Ancestors of



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Alfred John Jukes-Browne and Emma Jessie Smith




Husband Alfred John Jukes-Browne

         Born: 16 Apr 1851 - Penn Fields, Nr. Wolverhampton
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Aug 1914
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred Hall Browne
       Mother: Caroline Amelia Jukes


     Marriage: 30 Sep 1881




Wife Emma Jessie Smith

         Born: 1858 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Dec 1892
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Charles Herbert Jukes-Browne

         Born: 9 Dec 1884
   Christened: 
         Died: 1912 ?
       Buried: 



2 F Amelia Jessie Jukes-Browne

         Born: 6 Dec 1892
   Christened: 
         Died: Jan 1991
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Alfred adopted the surname of Jukes Browne on 2 November 1872.

1891 Census:

Alfred J Jukes-Browne was living with his parents at Elinbank, Newton Abbot, Devon - he was described as an assistant geologist (aged 39) "geological survey SC--Department

In 1911, Alfred lived at Bridge Road, Torquay

JUKES-BROWNE, Alfred John, BA; FRS, FGS

Born Penn Fields, near Wolverhampton, April 1851; s of A. H. Browne and C. A. Jukes; took name of Jukes-Browne on attaining age of 21; m 1881, Emma Jessie Smith; one d ; died 16 Aug. 1914.

Education: Cholmondeley School, Highgate; St John’s College, Cambridge.

Career: Appointed to staff of Geological Survey, 1874; was chiefly occupied in mapping parts of Suffolk, Cambridge, Rutland, and Lincoln up to 1883; was then entrusted with the preparation of a monograph on the British Upper Cretaceous rocks, and for this purpose examined and partly resurveyed the Cretaceous districts in Herts, Bedford, Bucks, Oxford, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Dorset, and Devon; spent the winter of 1888–89 in Barbados, afterwards collaborating with Prof. J. B. Harrison in papers on the geology of that island; awarded Murchison medal, 1901; retired from the Geological Survey in 1902 on account of ill-health.

Publications: Student’s Handbook of Physical Geology (2 editions), of Historical Geology (1886), of Stratigraphical Geology (2nd edn 1912); The Building of the British Isles (3rd edn 1911); The Cretaceous Rocks of Britain, in 3 vols (Memoirs Geol Survey); and many other smaller memoirs for same Survey; many papers contributed to the Geological Society, Geologists’ Association, Geological Magazine, and the Malacological Society.

Recreations: Conchology, garden.

Address: Westleigh, Torquay


General Notes (Wife)

Emma died after giving birth to Amelia Jessie in 1892.


General Notes for Child Charles Herbert Jukes-Browne

Charles H. assumed to be a son of Alfred and Emma, although Alfred’s entry in Who was Who mentions only a daughter.
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Joseph Kay and Sarah Henrietta Porden




Husband Joseph Kay

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Henrietta Porden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Captain Joseph Henry Kay R.N. F.R.S.

         Born: 1815 - London, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 17 Jul 1875 - South Yarra, Melbourne, Victoria
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Maria Meredith
         Marr: 6 Nov 1845 - Great Swanport, Glamorgan District, Tasmania




General Notes for Child Captain Joseph Henry Kay R.N. F.R.S.

Joseph Henry Kay was a naval officer and scientist. He entered the Navy in 1827 and on his return from an expedition to the Antarctic in 1840 he was appointed director of the Magnetic Observatory in Hobart. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1846 for his work on geomagnetism. He was the son of Joseph Kay, architect, and Sarah Henrietta nee Porden, and brother of William Porden Kay, the Tasmanian architect.

Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S., who entered the Navy, 18th December, 1827; obtained his commission, 6th April, 1839: from the 15th of the following May until his return to England in 1843 was engaged in an exploring expedition to the Antarctic regions in the "Terror," and subsequently became director of H.M. Magnetic Observatory at Hobart Town.

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Clarence Kay Meredith-Kaye and Rosina Maria Kay




Husband Clarence Kay Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 28 Nov 1858 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers


     Marriage: 26 Feb 1884 - New Zealand




Wife Rosina Maria Kay

         Born: 1860
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Captain Joseph Henry Kay R.N. F.R.S.
       Mother: Maria Meredith





Children
1 M Edwin Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 27 Feb 1888 - Timaru, 280 Cashel St., New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 Feb 1888
       Buried: 



2 F Fanny Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 29 Feb 1888 - Timaru, 280 Cashel St., New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Feb 1888
       Buried: 



3 F Gladys Maria Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Clarence Leslie Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 8 May 1893
   Christened: 
         Died: 9 Jul 1979 - Ages 86
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Blanche Louise Rees




General Notes (Husband)

Clarence Kay Meredith adopted the surname Meredith-Kaye in 1884.

Clarence Kay, b. 28th November, 1858; assumed the surname of Kaye in addition to and after that of Meredith; m., 26th February, 1884, his cousin, Rosina Maria, only child of Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S. (who d. at South Yarra, Victoria), by Maria, his wife, eldest daughter of George Meredith, Esq. of Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania, by Mary Evans, his second wife.


General Notes for Child Clarence Leslie Meredith-Kaye

Clarence L. Meredith-Kaye was a 2nd Lieutenant in 1917.
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Captain Joseph Henry Kay R.N. F.R.S. and Maria Meredith




Husband Captain Joseph Henry Kay R.N. F.R.S.

         Born: 1815 - London, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 17 Jul 1875 - South Yarra, Melbourne, Victoria
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Kay
       Mother: Sarah Henrietta Porden


     Marriage: 6 Nov 1845 - Great Swanport, Glamorgan District, Tasmania




Wife Maria Meredith

         Born: 1824
   Christened: 31 Dec 1829 - Tasmania
         Died: 1882
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Mary Anne Evans





Children
1 F Rosina Maria Kay

         Born: 1860
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Clarence Kay Meredith-Kaye
         Marr: 26 Feb 1884 - New Zealand




General Notes (Husband)

Joseph Henry Kay was a naval officer and scientist. He entered the Navy in 1827 and on his return from an expedition to the Antarctic in 1840 he was appointed director of the Magnetic Observatory in Hobart. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1846 for his work on geomagnetism. He was the son of Joseph Kay, architect, and Sarah Henrietta nee Porden, and brother of William Porden Kay, the Tasmanian architect.

Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S., who entered the Navy, 18th December, 1827; obtained his commission, 6th April, 1839: from the 15th of the following May until his return to England in 1843 was engaged in an exploring expedition to the Antarctic regions in the "Terror," and subsequently became director of H.M. Magnetic Observatory at Hobart Town.

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Edward William Meredith and Edith M. Keiller




Husband Edward William Meredith

         Born: 1857 - Circa - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Bult Meredith
       Mother: Eliza Rouse


     Marriage: 1885




Wife Edith M. Keiller

         Born: 1866 - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Oswald Meredith

         Born: 1888 - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Cecil William Meredith

         Born: 1893 - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 Apr 1971 - Sorbie, Coldharbour Road, Pyrford, Woking
       Buried: 26 Apr 1971 - Church of the Good Shepherd, Pyrford.



3 F Phyllis Meredith

         Born: 1896 - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Oswald Meredith

The Times, Saturday, Jul 01, 1939; pg. 8; Issue 48346; col D

Lieutenant Commander to Commander (A.)
Oswald L. Meredith-------President (Air Personnel Department).


General Notes for Child Cecil William Meredith

The Times, Friday, Apr 23, 1971; pg. 32; Issue 58154; col A

Meredith. - On 21st April, 1971, peacefully at his home, Sorbie, Coldharbour Road, Pyrford, Woking, Cecil William Meredith, aged 78 years. Service at 10.30 a.m. on Monday, 26th April, at the Church of the Good Shepherd, Pyrford, Cremation private. Family flowers only.
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Richard Reibey Meredith and Theodora Alice Lane




Husband Richard Reibey Meredith

         Born: 4 Feb 1857
   Christened: 
         Died: 1896 - Zeehan, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers


     Marriage: 27 Mar 1879 - St. Philip & St. James, Cheltenham, Essex




Wife Theodora Alice Lane

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Owen Glendower Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Gwylfa Glendower Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Edward T. Meredith

         Born: 1889 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Apr 1908 - Late Evening - Upper Plain
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Evening Post, Vol 51, Issue 40, 17 February 1896, Page 2

A Cable message was received this morning from Zeehan, Tasmania, announcing the death of Mr. Richard Meredith, son of Mr. Edwin Meredith, of this district. Deceased was well known and highly respected here.


General Notes for Child Edward T. Meredith

Evening Post, Vol. 75, Issue 94, 21 April 1908, Page 7

Tragic Occurence in the Wairarapa

Masterton, This day.

Late last evening Edward T. Meredith, son of the Late Mr. Richard Meredith, formerly of Lansdowne, and grandson of the late Mr. Edwin Meredith, of Upper Plain, met his death in a tragic manner at the residence of Mrs. Edwin Meredith, Upper Plain. Deceased was nineteen years of age, and had spent the evening with Dr. and Mrs. Dawson and Miss Meredith. He was apparently in perfect health and high spirits. After supper young Meredith proposed to have a bath, and went to the bathroom, from which shortly afterwards the report of a firearm was heard. On the body being examined by Dr. Dawson, he found that death must have been instantaneous. No cause for the occurence can be assigned. Dr. and Mrs. Dawson and Miss Meredith--the two latter being aunts of the deceased--were to have sailed for England today.
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William Monington and Sarah Langford




Husband William Monington

         Born: 10 Jun 1805 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Feb 1855 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Langford

         Born: 1813 - Walford, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1886 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Elizabeth Monington

         Born: 4 Oct 1830 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Jan 1889 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 



2 M William Monington

         Born: 1833 - Adforton, Leintwardine, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1889 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 



3 F Sarah Monington

         Born: 1834 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Samuel Meredith
         Marr: June Quarter 1857 - Ludlow, Herefordshire



4 F Charlotte Monington

         Born: 22 Jan 1836 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 Apr 1836 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 



5 M Thomas Monington

         Born: 6 Jan 1837 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Margaret Monington

         Born: 20 Oct 1838 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Mary Ann Monington

         Born: 26 Jun 1840 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Dec 1844 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 



8 F Caroline Monington

         Born: 6 Sep 1842 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 M Richard Monington

         Born: 1844 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1844 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 



10 F Ann Monington

         Born: 1845 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1911
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Bemand



11 M John Monington

         Born: 1847 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1917 - Ashford Carmonel, Shropshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Laura Ellen Barnes



12 M George Monington

         Born: 27 Jan 1849 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Feb 1887 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Helen Louisa Walle




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John Meredith and Lucy Lawrence




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1770 - Circa
   Christened: 26 May 1770 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 30 May 1850 - Leamington
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Sally Turner


     Marriage: 13 Mar 1800 - Saint Anne Soho, Westminster, London

 Other Spouse: Jane Aston - 3 Oct 1814 - Rowington, Warwickshire




Wife Lucy Lawrence




         Born: 1763 - Circa
   Christened: 2 Nov 1763 - Bristol, Gloucestershire
         Died: 18 Feb 1813
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Lawrence
       Mother: Lucy





Children
1 F Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith




         Born: 1804 - Circa - Birmingham
   Christened: 11 Jan 1804
         Died: 1890 - September Quarter
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Aston
         Marr: 8 Jun 1824 - Saint Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick, England




General Notes (Husband)

John was President of the Birmingham Law Society 1825-32, Chairman of the Leamington Board of Commissioners, and one of the Executors of Sir Thomas Lawrence - Gentleman's Magazine 1850 p.106

1841 Census:

John (aged 65) living with Jane (aged 50) at Eastnor Villa, Radford Road, Kenilworth, Leamington, Warwickshire with four servants.

The Gentleman's Magazine - 1850

May 30. At Leamington, aged 80, John Meredith esq. The deceased was for several years Chairman of the Leamington Board of Commissioners. He was one of the executors of Sir Thomas Lawrence, his first wife being a daughter of that celebrated man. He was subsequently united to Miss Aston, of Rowington Hall, who survives him.


General Notes (Wife)

Lucy was the sister of the portrait painter Sir Thomas Lawrence, President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

Oxford Journal - August 25, 1934

At No. 31 we come across the Lucy Lawrence whom Fanny Burney found at the Bear at Devizes as a girl of sixteen, with her brother Thomas, then ten years old-he destined to be the well known painter and she to live in Birmingham as wife of John Meredith, an attorney, President from 1825 to 1832 of the Birmingham Law Society.

Portrait of a lady, probably Lucy Meredith, the artist's sister, seated half-length, in a white dress with paisley sash, in a feigned stone cartouche.
oil on canvas
30 1/8 x 25 1/2 in. (76.5 x 64.8 cm.)

Extract from The Gentleman's Magazine -

Sir Thomas Lawrence had two brothers and two sisters....His elder sister Lucy was married in March 1800 to Mr. Meredith, solicitor of Birmingham. She died in Febnruary 1813 leaving one daughter married to Mr. John Aston of St. Paul's-Square in Birmingham.


General Notes for Child Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith

The sitter has traditionally been identified as Miss Lucy Meredith, Lawrence's niece, daughter of his sister Lucy and her husband John Meredith, attorney of Temple Row, Birmingham. Born in 1803, she married in 1824 John Aston of Rowington Hall, Warwick. Lawrence made a drawing of the younger Lucy in 1813, in the year of her mother's death, which was engraved by F.C. Lewis. Garlick highlights, however, the likeness of the sitter to the drawing that Lawrence made of his sister, Mrs Lucy Meredith on her death bed. In addition, he points out that, not born until 1803, Miss Lucy Meredith would have been younger than the subject appears on Lawrences' death in 1830 (op.cit).
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Thomas George Johnstone Phillips and Charlotte Maria Lewis




Husband Thomas George Johnstone Phillips

         Born: 1834
   Christened: 
         Died: 3 Apr 1898
       Buried: 


       Father: Michael Phillips
       Mother: Mary Anne Tench


     Marriage: 1860




Wife Charlotte Maria Lewis

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Thomas George Johnston Phillips was Rector of Fenagh, Co. Carlow. He died childless.


General Notes (Wife)

Charlotte Maria was the daughter of Edward Lewis of Violetstown, Co. Meath.
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Rev. John Liptrott




Husband Rev. John Liptrott

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Frances Liptrott

         Born: 1737
   Christened: 
         Died: 1811
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Rev. Thos. Greaves




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Lt.-Col. Peter Milner Wiggin and Margaret Frances Livingstone-Learmonth




Husband Lt.-Col. Peter Milner Wiggin

         Born: 1907 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin D.S.O., D.L., J.P
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 1933




Wife Margaret Frances Livingstone-Learmonth

         Born: 1914 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


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Henry James Vicary and Emily Eliza Lord




Husband Henry James Vicary

         Born: 23 Nov 1815 - Ar sea near Barbados
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 May 1868 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: Captain Michael Vicary
       Mother: Eliza Murray


     Marriage: 19 Jan 1839 - Spring Bay, Tasmania

 Other Spouse: Frances Charlotte Maclaine - 8 Jun 1854 - Prosser Plains, Tasmania




Wife Emily Eliza Lord

         Born: 14 May 1823 - St. Peter, Cornhill, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Sep 1853 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
       Buried:  - "Rostrevor", Spring Bay, Tasmania


General Notes (Husband)

Occupation: Constable Tasmanian Police.

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Howard Douglas Meredith and Eleanor Melina (Norah) Lorden




Husband Howard Douglas Meredith

         Born: 28 Aug 1887 - Merstone, Springfield-road, Wimbledon, S.W.
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Jan 1951 - London, England
       Buried: 


       Father: Howard Walter Meredith
       Mother: Blanche Dunfee


     Marriage: 




Wife Eleanor Melina (Norah) Lorden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 3 Jun 1960 - Richmond
       Buried: 13 Jun 1960 - Putney Vale Crematorium


       Father: Sir John W. Lorden J.P.
       Mother: Ellen Mary (Mim)




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Tuesday, Jan 16, 1951; pg. 1; Issue 51900; col A

Meredith. - On Jan. 13, 1951, passed peacefully away, after an operation, in London, Howard Douglas Meredith, of Kewhurst Manor, Bexhill-on-Sea, devoted and deeply loved husband of Norah and dear son of the late Howard W. Meredith and Mrs. Meredith. Funeral strictly private. No flowers. Memorial service later.

The Times, Monday, Jan 29, 1951; pg. 1; Issue 51911; col A

Meredith. - A memorial service for Howard Douglas Meredith, of Kewhurst Manor, Bexhill-on-Sea, will be held at St. Mark's Church, North Audley St. W.1 on Thursday, Feb. 1, at 2 p.m.


General Notes (Wife)

The Times, Tuesday, Apr 25, 1944; pg. 1; Issue 49839; col A

Lorden. - On April 21, 1944, at Little Ratton, Willingdon, Sir John W. Lorden, J.P., husband of Mim, and father of Nora Meredith, Doris Keiller, and Henry. No flowers or mourning. Funeral, Putney Vale Cemetery, tomorrow (Wednesday) at 12.30 pm.

The Times, Thursday, Jun 09, 1960; pg. 1; Issue 54793; col A

Meredith. - On June 3rd 1960, suddenly, at Richmond, Eleanor Melina (Nora), widow of Howard Douglas Meredith and daughter of the late Sir John W, Lorden. Funeral service at Putney Vale Crematorium on Monday, June 13th., at 12 noon. Flowers to Saunders & Co., 28 Kew Road, Richmond.
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Josiah Meredith and Mary Low




Husband Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1688 - circa
   Christened: 19 Aug 1688 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Josiah Meredith
       Mother: Margaret Wetmore


     Marriage: 11 May 1718 - Lingen, Hereford

 Other Spouse: Ann Owens - 10 Aug 1725 - Lingen, Hereford




Wife Mary Low

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1722-1725
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Margaret Meredith

         Born: 1719 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Dec 1719 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1722 - Circa
   Christened: 12 Aug 1722 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary




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George Albert Mace and Mary Rose Meredith




Husband George Albert Mace

         Born: 1846
   Christened: 
         Died: 1884
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1878 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania




Wife Mary Rose Meredith

         Born: 1852
   Christened: 
         Died: 1884 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Maria Hammond





Children
1 F Mary Rose (Molly) Mace

         Born: 1879
   Christened: 
         Died: 1918
       Buried: 



2 F Fanny Rosina Mace




         Born: 1880
   Christened: 
         Died: 1950
       Buried: 



3 M Trevor Ellis Mace




         Born: 1881
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Violet Ethel Mace

         Born: 1883 - Swansea, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1968 - Hobart, Tasmania
       Buried: 



5 F Molly Mace




         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Violet Ethel Mace

Violet Mace (1890–1968), potter, was born at Swansea. In 1920 she joined her cousin Maude Poynter at Ratho, Bothwell, where she learned pottery and was based until 1940. They exhibited together for many years. Mace also exhibited with the Society of Arts and Crafts of New South Wales (1927–42). She studied at the Cumberland School of Art and Crafts, London and with Bernard Leach in the 1930s.

Mace produced mainly small-scale domestic wares. Earlier wares featured strong colours and painted and incised decoration. Her later work became simpler in form with subdued colours and underglaze decoration that was more stylised. This included geometric designs influenced by Aboriginal art. Mace had a strong interest in Tasmanian history and used aspects of this for her decorative motifs.

Violet Mace. A potter, was born in Swansea, Tasmania. Taught pottery by her cousin Maude Poynter, Violet assisted Poynter in her Ratho studio at Bothwell in the 1920s. Both women exhibited pottery with the Arts and Crafts Society of Tasmania and in a joint exhibition at the Hobart Town Hall in 1924. Violet was also one of the few interstate members of the Arts and Crafts Society of NSW. From these exhibitions her work found its way into the collections of the Technological Museum (now Powerhouse Museum) and Art Gallery of NSW, institutions that regularly purchased works from the Society's exhibitions in the 1920s and '30s.

Mace's early work was influenced by that of her cousin, teacher and, for twenty years or so, working partner Maude Poynter, although she seems always to have had a stronger grasp of form than Poynter and to have relied less on painted pictorial decoration. Nevertheless, Poynter's high reputation in Tasmania, especially as a teacher, has tended to overshadow Mace's achievements.

Mace left to study at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London at some time in the late 1920s. It is said that she also visited Bernard Leach in his pottery at St Ives, but Leach appears to have had little influence on her work. On the other hand, a fine, simple and strongly formed squat vase, which was probably made soon after her return to Tasmania, demonstrates that she learned a great deal at the Camberwell School of Arts. It is one of several similar small vases she made at this time which rely for their impact purely on form and colour. The colours are unusually strong for the period and the technical sophistication of the glazes belies the primitive nature of the equipment Mace was using at Ratho, Maude Poynter's pottery at Bothwell, Tasmania, where she was again working.

It has to be remembered that potters in these early days had to rely entirely on their own resources. They had to teach themselves by a process of trial and error, dig their own clays, make their own glazes and build their own kilns. The technical difficulties involved in making work such as this were daunting. So the technical control evident in this vase is remarkable indeed. Although she appears not to have been especially prolific Violet Mace was certainly one of the most interesting Arts and Crafts exhibitors in the years before World War II. She made small domestic earthenware pots fired in the Ratho wood-burning kiln. Until about 1937 most had painted and incised underglaze decoration reminiscent of Poynter's work, but her late work using plain and mottled glazes is simpler in form and includes stylised plant and insect motifs and geometric designs drawn from Aboriginal art.

When Poynter left to live in Hobart in 1935, Mace took over the studio and worked there until it burnt down in the early 1940s. Then she gave up pottery and moved to Hobart. Later she lived in Victoria and worked as a housekeeper, afterwards moving to Western Australia to care for her sister. Finally she retired to Hobart, where she died.

Mace exhibited annually with the Arts and Crafts Society of NSW from 1927 to 1942. The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences purchased her work from the exhibitions in 1928 and 1929 and the Art Gallery of NSW acquired examples in 1927 and 1929. At the Society's 1931 exhibition she showed 20 bowls with Australian themes:

Aboriginal, lyrebird, kangaroo, berries, lizard, mantis. In 1934 she visited Central Australia and collected Aboriginal drawings and artefacts, later presented to the South Australian Museum, which included a 1934 sketchbook by Albert Namatjira and children's pencil drawings done in 1934, e.g. camels by Malarana, aged 13, a house and date palms at Hermannsburg by Ferdinand and men riding horses (one being thrown) by Gordon Abbott, aged 11. Her collection also includes a small carving of a human-headed dog by Kalboori Youngi, possibly acquired from a Queensland aunt.

In the NSW Society of Arts & Crafts section at the 1941 'Australian Aboriginal Art and Its Application' exhibition at David Jones's Castlereagh Street Auditorium, organised by the Australian Museum, Mace showed brown bowls and trays on which were painted black natives hunting, dancing and carrying out their domestic duties. She and Grace Seccombe seem to have provided a large number of the Society's 55 exhibits. Other exhibitors included Anne Weinholt, who won second prize in the special student competition for fabric design; another competitor was Frances Burke of Melbourne.

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James John Mackersey and Edith Dry Meredith




Husband James John Mackersey

         Born: 7 Mar 1856 - Kenilworth, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Jun 1902 - Wellington, New Zealand
       Buried: 


       Father: John Mackersey
       Mother: Ann Harriet Headlam


     Marriage: 29 Apr 1890 - Masterton, St. Matthews, New Zealand




Wife Edith Dry Meredith

         Born: 1868 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers





Children
1 M Errol Meredith Mackersey

         Born: 24 Feb 1891 - Wellington, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Edwin John Mackersey

         Born: 20 Jul 1893 - Wellington, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Janie Beatrice Mackersey

         Born: 10 Apr 1898 - Wellington, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

James John was the son of John Mackersey and Ann Harriet Headlam.

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Henry James Vicary and Frances Charlotte Maclaine




Husband Henry James Vicary

         Born: 23 Nov 1815 - Ar sea near Barbados
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 May 1868 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: Captain Michael Vicary
       Mother: Eliza Murray


     Marriage: 8 Jun 1854 - Prosser Plains, Tasmania

 Other Spouse: Emily Eliza Lord - 19 Jan 1839 - Spring Bay, Tasmania




Wife Frances Charlotte Maclaine

         Born: 11 Jun 1828 - Waterford, Co. Waterford, Ireland
   Christened: 
         Died: 2 Sep 1884 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Alice Katherine Vicary

         Born: 16 May 1859 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 Oct 1951 - Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Crispe Cottrell




General Notes (Husband)

Occupation: Constable Tasmanian Police.

picture

George Llewellyn Meredith and Alicia Louisa Maclean




Husband George Llewellyn Meredith

         Born: 28 Sep 1855 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Oct 1937
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Maria Hammond


     Marriage: 24 Jul 1886 - Sydney, Australia

 Other Spouse: Eleanor Bond Ward - 30 Nov 1899 - Sydney, Australia




Wife Alicia Louisa Maclean

         Born: 1858
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Aug 1892
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Male ?? Meredith




         Born: 19 Apr 1887 - Manse, Swansea, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Wynne Aubrey Meredith

         Born: 6 Jun 1892
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Argus - Monday 14 December 1931

Launceston - Saturday - George Llewellyn Meredith and Reginald Askew Farmilo Sutton were charged on three counts in the police court with having conspired with Walter John Howard Eastland and Richard William Musson to cheat and defraud members of the public by False pretences and crafty devices to become members of Tasmanian Credits Ltd. A remand until December 19 was granted.

The Argus - Friday 29 April, 1932

DEALINGS IN SHARES.
Tasmanian Conspiracy Case, LAUNCESTON (T. ), Thursday - The charge of conspiracy against George Llewellyn Meredith, Reginald Asken Farmilo Sutton and Richard William Musson in connection with a company known as Tasmanian Credits Ltd was continued in the Criminal Court today before Mr. Justice Crisp and a special jury.

C.E.H. Ferguson, the liquidator, gave a statement of the disposal ot the funds of the company and the various bank accounts
operated by Tasmanian Brokers and Underwriters, a subsidiary company. He stated that one account out of four was used as a clearing account for the adjusting and splitting of commission and it drew nearly £2 000 more from the other accounts than they drew from it.

Referring to Rapson shares, Ferguson said that the shares purchased totalled 16,520 of which 14,500 were vendors' shares and cost £8,700. The shares were not bought in the name of the subsidiary company. He considered that the whole transaction was irregular, as trust and borrowed money was used to traffic in shares, and the transactions were not put through in the company's name, while Sutton appeared to have received 6d a share as an overriding commission.


General Notes for Child Male ?? Meredith

This is most likely to be the young son of Mrs G.L. Meredith, of Launceston, who exhibited a painting on china and a pencil drawing called "Flowers" at the Launceston Exhibition in 1891-92. Born at the Manse, Swansea, Tasmania, he was the elder of two sons of George Llewellyn Meredith (1855-1937) and his first wife Alicia Louisa Maclean (1858-1892) who were married in Sydney on 24 Jul 1886. His brother Wynne Aubrey was born on 6 Jun 1892 and his mother died just two months later on 5 Aug aged 35. George married again in Sydney on 30 Nov 1899 to Eleanor Bond Ward (1863-1954). He died on 10 Oct 1937. G L Meredith & Co were stock and sharebrokers and mining agents at 38 St John Street, Launceston. George was also a member of the Launceston Stock Exchange.

Place of residence: 'Wynnstay' Invermay Launceston Tasmania Australia.


picture

David Malins




Husband David Malins

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Elizabeth Malins

         Born: 1833 - circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1911
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin 1st Bart.
         Marr: 1851




General Notes for Child Mary Elizabeth Malins

Mary Elizabeth was the second daughter of David Malins of Edgbaston, Birmingham, J.P.
picture

Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin 1st Bart. and Mary Elizabeth Malins




Husband Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin 1st Bart.

         Born: 14 Feb 1824 - Cheadle, North Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 12 Nov 1905 - Metchley Grange, Harborne, Birmingham
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1851




Wife Mary Elizabeth Malins

         Born: 1833 - circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1911
       Buried: 


       Father: David Malins
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin 2nd Bart.

         Born: 3 May 1852 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
   Christened: 11 Jun 1852 - St. Mark's, Birmingham
         Died: 2 May 1917
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Annie Sarah Cope
         Marr: 1878 - Kings Norton, Staffordshire



2 M Colonel Walter William Wiggin

         Born: 1856 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Nov 1936 - King's Norton, Birmingham
       Buried: 9 Nov 1936 - aged 81 - Alvechurch
       Spouse: Edith Atkins



3 F Mary Elizabeth Wiggin

         Born: 1860 - circa
   Christened: 24 Dec 1860 - St. Peter's, Harborne, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Ethel Malins Wiggin

         Born: 1862 - circa
   Christened: 28 Jan 1862 - St. Peter's, Harborne, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Alfred Harold Wiggin

         Born: 1864 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 January 1933 - aged 69 - Bordesley Hall, Alvechurch
       Buried: 1 Feb 1933 - Alvechurch



6 M Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin D.S.O., D.L., J.P

         Born: 1867
   Christened: 
         Died: 11 Nov 1939 Aged 71
       Buried: 15 Nov 1939 - St. Nicholas Church, Newbold Pacey, near Warwick



7 M Edgar Bertram Wiggin

         Born: 1868 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Henry Samuel Wiggin owned a nickel and cobalt refining manufacturing business. He took over the business of Evans and Hoskin in 1870, which became Henry Wiggin & Co. He was the Liberal MP for Staffordshire East 1880-1885 and Handsworth 1885-1892. He was created a baronet on 17 Jun 1892 on his retirement. He had four sons and two daughters.

Wiggin Baronets
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The Wiggin Baronetcy, of Metchley Grange in Harborne in the County of Stafford, is a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 17 June 1892 for Henry Wiggin. He was the founder of Henry Wiggin and Co Ltd, manufacturers of specialty metal products, and also represented Staffordshire East (as a Liberal) and Handsworth (as a Liberal Unionist) in the House of Commons. The second Baronet was High Sheriff of Staffordshire in 1896. The third Baronet was a Colonel in the Army and served as High Sheriff of Warwickshire in 1942. The fourth Baronet was High Sheriff of Warwickshire from 1975 to 1976 and a Deputy Lieutenant of the county in 1985.

The family seat is Honington Hall, near Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire.

Wiggin Baronets, of Metchley Grange (1892)

* Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin, 1st Baronet (1824-1905)
* Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin, 2nd Baronet (1852-1917)
* Sir Charles Richard Henry Wiggin, 3rd Baronet (1885-1972)
* Sir John Henry Wiggin, 4th Baronet (1921-1992)
* Sir Charles Rupert John Wiggin, 5th Baronet (b. 1949)

[edit] Other members of the Wiggin family

The Conservative politician Sir Jerry Wiggin is the son of Colonel Sir William Henry Wiggin (1888-1951), son of Alfred Harold Wiggin, fourth son of the first Baronet. His son is the Conservative politician Bill Wiggin. Edgar Askin Wiggin (1867-1939), fifth son of the first Baronet, was a Brigadier-General in the Army.

The Times, Monday, Nov 13, 1905; pg. 7; Issue 37863; col A

Sir Henry Wiggin.

Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin, first baronet, of Metchley Grange, died suddenly yesterday at his residence, Metchley Grange, Harborne, Birmingham. He was out in the garden when he was suddenly taken ill, and died to soon afterwards. Sir Henry was born at Cheadle, in North Staffs, in 1824, and went to Birmingham in 1838, where he studied the scientific side of nickel and cobalt refining and chemistry. He became connected with the of firm of Evans and Hoskin, refiners and manufacturers, and subsequently joined them in partnership. In 1870 he took over the business, which became Henry Wiggin & and Co., and in 1892 was converted into a private limited company. Sir Henry entered the town council in 1861, and remained a member for ten years. In 1864 be filled the office of chief magistrate. In 1880 he was elected in the Liberal interest for East Staffordshire. On the redistribution of seats in 1885 he was returned for Handsworth Division, and after the Home Rule split continued to represent the division as a Liberal Unionist until 1892, when he retired and was created a baronet. Sir Henry was until recently a director of the Midland Railway Company, and was on the board of a number of local industrial concerns. He took a keen interest in agriculture, and had been for some time a supporter of the Birmingham Agricultural Exhibition Society, as well as of all the local charitable an and philanthropic institutions. He married in 1851 Mary Elizabeth, second daughter. of Mr. David Malins, of Edgbaston, Birmingham, J.P. He is succeeded in the title by his elder son, Mr. Henry Arthur Wiggin, justice of the peace and deputy lieutenant for Staffordshire, who was born in 1852 and married in 1878 Annie Sarah, daughter of Mr. Charles Rogers Cope, of Kinnerton Court, Radnor, by whom he has a son, Charles Richard Henry, born in 1885. Three other sons and two daughters also survive him.

1871 Census:

Staffordshire
Harborne
Metchley Grange
Henry Wiggin - 47 - Alderman, land owner, manufacturer
???? Wiggin - 14 - scholar

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Milverton
Mary Elizabeth - wife - 37 - Alderman's wife
Mary Elizabeth - daughter - 10
Ethel ???? - daughter - 9
Alfred Harold - son - 7
Edgar Bertram - son - 3


General Notes (Wife)

Mary Elizabeth was the second daughter of David Malins of Edgbaston, Birmingham, J.P.


General Notes for Child Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin 2nd Bart.

Henry's father had built up a nickel and cobalt refining business and became an MP and then was made a Baronet on retiring from politics. Henry Arthur succeeded to the baronetcy on his father's death. Annie Sarah and Henry's descendants then predictably married into the same circles of baronets and senior military folk. Two of the Wiggin descendants from a brother of Henry are currently Conservative MPs in the current parliament.

1881 Census:

Staffordshire
Harborne
The Park House & The Lea
Henry - 28 - Nickel Refiner & J.P.
Annie S. - 22 - Wife
Margaret - 1

1901 Census:

Staffordshire
Eccleshall
Walton Hall
Henry A. Wiggin - Head - 48
Annie S. - wife - 42
Margaret - daughter - 21
Eleanor M. - daughter - 19


Wiggin, Sir Henry Arthur

2nd Baronet - created 1892
Born 3 May 1852; son of Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin, 1st Baronet and Mary, daughter of David Malins, Edgbaston, Birmingham; married 1878, Annie Sarah, Daughter of C.R. Cope of Kinnerton Court, Radnors: one son and two daughters; died 2 May 1917 JP, DL
Succession: S father, 1905
Career: High Sheriff, Co, Stafford, 1896
Heir: Son Charles Richard Henry Wiggin, Captain Staffordshire Yeomanry (born 21 March 1885; Married 1916, Mabel Violet Mary, daughter of late Sir William Jaffray, 2nd baronet. Eton; Trinity College, Cambridge; BA 1906)
Clubs: Reform, Union
Address: Walton Hall, Eccleshall
Wiggin, Sir Henry Arthur, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920-2007 - Oxford University Press


General Notes for Child Colonel Walter William Wiggin

The chief houses are Bordesley Hall with Bordesley Park belonging to Lieut.-Colonel H. C. Geast Dugdale, but now the residence of Mr. Alfred Harold Wiggin, J.P., and the Forhill House, the residence of Mr. Walter William Wiggin, J.P.

The Times, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1936; pg. 19; Issue 47528; col E

Colonel W.W. Wiggin

The funeral took place at Alvechurch yesterday of Colonel Walter William Wiggin. The Rev. G.J. Hodgins officiated, assisted by the Rev. W.E. Catlow. Among those present were:

Brigadier-General E.A. Wiggin (brother), Colonel Sir Charles Wiggin (nephew) and Lady Wiggin. Colonel W.H. Wiggin (nephew) and Mrs. Wiggin. Mr. R.A. Wiggin (nephew), Captain Peter Wiggin (nephew) and Mrs. Wiggin, Major and Mrs. Noel Wilson, Colonel and Mrs. A Lawrence, Captain and Mrs. G.P. Lawrence, Mr. John Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Nettlefold (niece), Lady Salt (niece), Mrs. D.W. Turner (niece).

Earl Fortescue, Sir William Jaffray, Major H. Cartland, Lieutenant-Colonel C.F. Milward (Chairman, Worcestershire County Council), representitives of the Bromsgrove and Redditch Benches, the Devon and Somerset Staghounds, the North Warwickshire Hunt, the Worcestershire Hunt, and the Birmingham Agricultural Exhibition Society.

The Times, Thursday, Feb 04, 1937; pg. 10; Issue 47600; col F

Wills and Bequests

Gifts to Charity

Lieutenant-Colonel Walter William Wiggin, late Queen's Own Worcestershire Yeomanry, of King's Norton, Birmingham, who died on November 4, aged 81, left £180,568, with net personalty £151,031. He left:-

£500 to the Wiggin Cottage Homes at Harborne; and £100 to Clifton College, Bristol.


General Notes for Child Alfred Harold Wiggin

Death Notice in The Times, Wednesday, February 1, 1933; Page 1

1891 Census:

Worcestershire
Northfield
Griffin Hill
Alfred - 27
Margaret (Wife) - 27
William - 3
Hilda - 1

1901 Census:

Worcestershire
Northfield
Griffin Hill
Alfred - 37
Margaret - 37
Hilda - 11
Mary


General Notes for Child Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin D.S.O., D.L., J.P

The Times, Thursday, Nov 16, 1939; pg. 11; Issue 48464; col D

Funeral Services

Brigadier-General E.A. Wiggin

The funeral service of Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin, D.S.O, was held at St. Nicholas Church, Warwick, yesterday. The Bishop of Coventry officiated.

The family mourners and others present included:-

Mrs. Wiggin (widow), Captain and Mrs. Peter Wiggin (son and daughter-in-law). Sir Charled Wiggin (nephew), Lady Wiggin, Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs W.H. Wiggin, Major R.A. Wiggin (nephew), Lieutenant-Colonel A.E. Lawrence (nephew), Mrs. R.C.B. Lawrence (sister), Mrs. J. Nettlefold (niece), Miss M. Wiggin (niece)Mr. V.W. Huntinton, Major H.S. Allbrey, Captain C.A.C. Hazlehurst, Captain Weston Stevens, Miss Weston Stevens, the Hon. Mrs. Bingham.

Mrs. Anthony Eden (also representing Mr. Anthony Eden), Lieutenant-General Sit Arthur Phayre, Sir Henry Fairfax-Lucy, Sir Wathen Waller, Lord and Ladt Ilkeston, Mr. W.S. Buckmaster, Sir William Jaffray, the Hon. A.E. Parker, Colonel and Mrs. J.R.C. Dent, Colonel G. Osborne, Colonel J.H. Alexander, Colonel and Lady Victoria de Trafford, Colonel and Mrs. J.H. Starkey, Sir Lionel Darell, Lady Dormer, Brigadier J. van der Byl (Cavalry Club), Colonel A.J. Palmer (Gloucestershire Hussars), Major Gregory Hood, Colonel C.J.H. Wheatley, Brigadier-General H.O.D. Hickman, Brigadier-General G.A.F. Sanders (County Boy Scouts' Association), Commander E.R.B. Kenble (Chief Constable of Warwickshire).

The Mayor of Warwick, the Warwickshire County Council, and the Warwick Corporation were also represented. The coffin was draped with the Union Jack, and was covered with wreaths of white roses. The interment took place at Newbold Pacey, near Warwick.

The Times, Thursday, Feb 29, 1940; pg. 11; Issue 48552; col F

Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin, D.S.O., D.L., J.P., late 13th Hussars, of Greys, Mallory, Warwick, who died on November 11, aged 71, left estate of the value of £38,872, with net personalty £34,388. He left:-

£100 to the executors for charities in the twon and County of Warwick; £100 to the 13th Hussars Association; £100 to Warneford Hospital, Leamington; £100 to the Royal Midland Home for Incurables; and £50 to the Hunt Servants' Benefit Society.

The Times, Tuesday, May 21, 1940; pg. 12; Issue 48621; col A

Legal Notices

Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin deceased. Pursuant to the Trustee Acr 1925, Section 27. Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claims or demands upon or against the estate of Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin D.S.O., late of Greys Mallory Warwick in the County of Warwick deceased (who died on the eleventh day of November One thousand nine hundred and thirty nine and whose will was proved by Emilie Margaret Wiggin Sir Charles Richard Henry Wiggin and Colonel William Henry Wiggin the Executots therein named on the first day of February One thousand nine hundred and forty in the Birmingham District Registry of the Probate Dicision of His Majesty's High Court of Justice) are hereby required to send in the particulars of their debts or claims to the said Executors at the offices of the undersigned their solicitors on or before the 28th day of July One thousand nine hundred and forty; and notice is hereby also given that aftyer that day the said Executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the said Brigadier-General Edgar Askin Wiggin deceased among the parties entitled thereto having regard only to the claims of which they shall then have had notice and that they will not be responsible for the assets or any part thereof so distributed to any person of whose debt or claim they shall not then have had notice.

Dated this 15th day of May One thousand nine hundred and forty.

Hyland Martineau & Co. 41 Church Street, Birmingham 3. Solicitors for the said Executors.



picture

Rev. Isaac Gregory Smith and Augusta Marray




Husband Rev. Isaac Gregory Smith

         Born: 21 Nov 1826 - Manchester
   Christened: 3 Jul 1827 - Mosely, St. Mary's
         Died: 17 Jan 1920 - Woking, Surrey
       Buried: 


       Father: Rev. Jeremiah Smith
       Mother: Felicia Anderton


     Marriage: 1859




Wife Augusta Marray

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Isaac Gregory was a Church of England clergyman and scholar. He married Augusta Marray in 1859. He was rector of Tedstone Delamere (1854-1872), vicar of Great Malvern (1872-1896) and rector of Great Shefford (1896-1904).
picture

Thomas Meredith and Esther (Hester) Marston




Husband Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1770 - Circa
   Christened: 8 Jun 1770 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Martha Dyke


     Marriage: 17 Aug 1801 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Esther (Hester) Marston

         Born: 1766?? - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1842 ?
       Buried: 25 Apr 1842 ? - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



Children
1 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1802 - Circa
   Christened: 15 Aug 1802 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1859-1861
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Caroline Cooper
         Marr: 4 Jun 1844 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



2 M James Meredith

         Born: 1804 - Circa
   Christened: 10 Jun 1804 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1861 - Before
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Phoebe Wylde
         Marr: 4 Nov 1841 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



3 M John Meredith

         Born: 1807 - Circa
   Christened: 17 May 1807 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Jul 1810 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1861-1871
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Caroline




General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Thomas & Hester with sons James, John and Joseph. They have 4 servants, including Phoebe Wylde who married James 7 months later. The farm was in Boresford.

1851 Census:

Radnorshire - Boresford and Pedwardine
Thomas (aged 80) farmer of 635 acres living with is son John (aged 42), his other son Joseph (aged 40), Joseph's wife, Caroline (aged 26) and their children Joseph (aged 4) and James (aged 1) They have 4 servants and have a substantial farm of 635 acres in Boresford.


General Notes (Wife)

Hester is a name varient of Esther.


General Notes for Child Thomas Meredith

1851 Wales Census - Radnorshire - Boresford and Pedwardine

Thomas (aged 49), farmer of 12 acres, his wife Caroline (nee Cooper - aged 30), their son John (aged 6), Benjamin (aged 3) and Ricard (aged 2 months). They have 1 servant and a small farm of 12 acres in Boresford.

Marriage Certificate:

4 June 1844 - Parish Church at Brampton Bryan - Thomas Meredith and Caroline Cooper, both of Full Age. James - Farmer, Caroline - Servant - both resident at Keven at the time of the marriage - Thomas's father, Thomas Meredith - Caroline is clearly illegitimate and has no father named. Caroline is also illiterate and signed with an 'X'. The witnesses were John Meredith, his brother and Ann Cooper (also illiterate) presumably Caroline's sister.


General Notes for Child James Meredith

Marriage Certificate:

Parish Church of Brampton Bryan - 4 November 1841 - both parties of full age.

James - a farmer and Phoebe, a servant in the household of Thomas Meredith (snr) his father - they both of Beresford at the time of the marriage, Phoebe's father was a John Wylde, a tailor. The marriage was witnessed by Mary Ann Turner and Thomas Edwards - no family members!! This may have been a sign of disapproval by the family as Phoebe would have been 7 months pregnant at the time of the marriage.


General Notes for Child John Meredith

1861 Census:

John Meredith [unmarried son of Thomas and Esther nee Marston] with nephews Herbert and Henry [sons of Phoebe widow of his brother James]. He is a farmer of 250 acres at Boresford.


General Notes for Child Joseph Meredith

Joseph was a farmer at Sutton St. Nicholas in 1861 - Household: Joseph Meredith [son of Thomas and Esther] with sons Joseph and James, and daughter Esther.


picture

James Meredith and Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather




Husband James Meredith




         Born: 20 Feb 1753 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 2 Mar 1753 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 9 Mar 1848 - 17 Colmore Row, Birmingham
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens


     Marriage: 25 Apr 1797 - St. Peter's, Wolverhampton




Wife Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather

         Born: 16 Jun 1766 - Leicester, Leicestershire
   Christened: 2 Jul 1766 - Saint Martin, Leicester, England
         Died: 4 Jul 1824
       Buried: 


       Father: John Mather
       Mother: Lydia Crookes





Children
1 M James Meredith

         Born: 1 Mar 1798
   Christened: 30 May 1798 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 20 Sep 1861
       Buried: 



2 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 7 Apr 1799
   Christened: 28 Apr 1799 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 14 Nov 1884 - Willesden, London
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alfred Jukes
         Marr: 7 Apr 1825 - St. Martin, Birmingham



3 M John Meredith

         Born: 15 Apr 1800
   Christened: 24 Apr 1800 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 17 Jul 1851
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Jane Walker Jones
         Marr: 9 Aug 1825 - Saint Martin's, Birmingham, Warwickshire



4 M David Meredith

         Born: 5 Apr 1802
   Christened: 10 May 1802 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 3 Mar 1822
       Buried: 



5 M Samuel Meredith

         Born: 25 Dec 1803
   Christened: 25 Dec 1803 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 30 Jul 1885
       Buried: 



6 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 31 Jul 1805
   Christened: 6 Oct 1805 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 1895
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ellen Williams



7 M Benjamin Meredith

         Born: 17 Oct 1806
   Christened: 23 Feb 1807 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 1843
       Buried: 



8 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 26 Mar 1809
   Christened: 2 Jul 1809 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 1813
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Ameredith name arose when Gruffydd ap Maredudd, who emigrated from Radnorshire and settled in Devon, anglicised his name to Griffith Ameredith - he married well, into the Devonshire aristocracy and his descendants continued the trend, although they were caught out by supporting the wrong side in the Civil War and lost much of their wealth as a result. By the mid-1600s the name was contracted again to Meredith, and the last of the line was Sir William Meredith Bart, a Member of Parliament who was a passionate opponent of slavery and supporter of the US - the town of Meredith, New Hampshire was named after him.

The Meredith name was reasonably common in Radnorshire as the Welsh patronymic ap Maredudd was anglicised to the surname Meredith.

James Meredith was the youngest of 12 children according to his obituary and was born at Brampton Bryan, Hereford.

James moved to Birmingham when he was 21 years of age.

James is described as a cousin of John Meredith with 6 sons and 1 daughter. One son John travelled to Van Diemen's Land with George but returned.

He was of the founders of the New Church in Birmingham and leader of its Swedenborg Society.

In 1841 census at 17 Colmore Row aged 88 with son James.

The evidence so far supports the view that James' income came from varnish manufacturing.

There are three references that claim that a varnish manufacturing business registered as Meredith & Co. was established in 1780 by John Meredith. The same business was listed in Holden's Directory of Birmingham for 1803 as Meredith & Co. - varnish makers (Royal Institute of Chemistry - 1940). In The Morning Chronicle of Saturday 17 January 1829, the following partnership dissolution:

"...............James Meredith, senior, James Meredith, junior, John Meredith, Samuel Clinton and Samuel Lawrence. opf Birmingham, varnish makers, (so far as regards James Meredith, senior)" - the latter appears to be a reconstitution of the partnership with James Meredith senior retiring.

In the UK National Archives is document MS 11936/528/1119677 datyed 8 February 1831. The contents refer to:

Insured: James Meredith, John Meredith and Samuel Meredith, 29 Great Queen Street Lincolns Inn Fields, dealers in varnish.

In the 1841 Census, a John Meredith is the correct age (allowing for the census rounding) to be the son of James Meredith, senior.

In the 1871 Census, a Samuel Meredith of the correct age to the son of James, senior is described as a varnish manufacturer and in an earlier Census (1851) he is living as a visitor at 107-108 Lionel St, Birmingham, the premises of Meredith et al & Co. (although his occupation at that time was described as a proprietor of houses).

In the Birmingham Directory of 1839, both John and Samuel Meredith were described as varnish makers of 107 Lionel St.

The only unsupported issue was the various references to a John Meredith who started the business in 1780. The most likely person would be James' elder brother John, who was born in 1739 who would have been aged 41 in 1780 (James would have been about 27). One conclusion might be that John had no issue and that either for reasons of death or ill health, James took over the varnish manufacturing business, which then passed to his sons.



General Notes (Wife)

James' Obituary in The Intellectual Repository and New Jerusalem Magazine of 1848:

..............It was in compamy with Mr. Clowes, his highly valued minister, Mr. Proud, and Mr. Salmon, in the year 1796, then on a visit to Dr. Mather of Wolverhampton, that he was introduced to an acquaintance with Miss Mather, his future wife. He had lived to the age of forty-four a bachelor, not, as he has often said, that he was at all indifferent to the holy and honourable state of matrimony..............The nuptials were soon after celebrated.....Mrs. Meredith's bodily frame sank under one of the most excruciating diseases to which in this mortal state we are liable......and on the 4th July, 1824, she bade her farewell for a time.

Witnesses at the wedding were John Mather and Joseph Meready. They were married by special licence as they did not call the banns.


General Notes for Child James Meredith

James remained unmarried.

Contents:

Insured: James Meredith, John Meredith and Samuel Meredith, 29 Great Queen Street Lincolns Inn Fields, dealers in varnish.

This looks to me as though James Meredith’s three sons, James, John and Samuel are the varnish manufacturers – it would make the three of them in the region of 30 years of age.

James Meredith matric. 31 May 1813 aged 15 d. unm. - was at St. Alban Hall, Oxford University (Alumni Oxoniensis)

1841 Census

Piece: HO107/1144/2 Place: Birmingham -Warwickshire Enumeration District: 4
Civil Parish: B'ham (St Paul) Ecclesiastical Parish: -
Folio: 32 Page: 22
Address: 17 Colemore Row

Surname First name(s) Sex Age Occupation Where Born Remarks MEREDITH James M 88 Independent Outside Census County (1841) MEREDITH James M 43 Independent Warwickshire FODEN Hanh F 47 Servant Outside Census County (1841) SHAW Mary F 20 Female Servant Warwickshire


General Notes for Child Sarah Meredith

Sarah Meredith d/o James Meredith m. Alfred Jukes on 7 Apr 1825 at St. Martin, Birmingham and left 2 sons and 1 daughter. Sarah Elizabeth Jukes aged 25 (and her mother) were living with her uncle Joseph Meredith in the 1851 census. The family was indexed in the UK 1841 census as Tukes.


General Notes for Child John Meredith

Insured: James Meredith, John Meredith and Samuel Meredith, 29 Great Queen Street Lincolns Inn Fields, dealers in varnish.

This looks to me as though James Meredith’s three sons, James, John and Samuel are the varnish manufacturers – it would make the three of them in the region of 30 years of age.

James, John's father, is described in Vivienne Rae-Ellis Louis Anne Meredith - A Tigress in Exile (Blubber Head Press, Tasmania: 1979), as a cousin of John Meredith with 6 sons and 1 daughter. John travelled to Van Diemen's Land with John Meredith's son, George Meredith but returned.

A John Meredith was established as a varnish maker in 1780. The firm became Meredith & Clinton, Meredith, Clinton & Lawrence (1830) and Meredith & Co - this was probably John's uncle, also John Meredith.

Meredith John, varnish manufacturer, 108, Lionel street; house, Harborne Park in an 1850 Directory.

22 Sep 1849 At Harborne, J. Beete Jukes, esq. of the Geological Survey of Great Britain, to Augusta-Georgina, eldest dau. of John Meredith, esq. of Harborne Park, Staffordshire.

1841 Census at Belle Vue, Hill, Hales Owen, Shropshire: John Meredith (age 40) varnish manufacturer, Jane (age 35), Georgina (aged 30) – ages rounded and Conway b.ca. 1835, Alban b. 1838, Ernest b. 1841.

IGI: children of John Meredith and Jane Walker:
Georgina Augusta Meredith b. 21 Aug 1826 bapt. 08 Nov 1826 at St. Phillips.
John Meredith b. 13 Mar 1828 and bapt. 10 Jun 1828 at St. Phillips.


General Notes for Child Samuel Meredith

Samuel was unmarried.

Contents:

Insured: James Meredith, John Meredith and Samuel Meredith, 29 Great Queen Street Lincolns Inn Fields, dealers in varnish.

This looks as though James Meredith’s three sons, James, John and Samuel are the varnish manufacturers – it would make the three of them in the region of 30 years of age.

Samuel Meredith matric. 26 May 1843 aged 39 d. unm. - was at St. Alban Hall, Oxford University (Alumni Oxoniensis).


General Notes for Child Joseph Meredith

Joseph Meredith in the 1851 England census was a Surgeon Dentist (age 45) at 5 Lee Cresc. Edgbaston with wife Ellen (44), children all b. Canada Winifred (10), Sarah (8), James, (6), Emily (4), Alfred (2), sister Sarah Jukes widow (51), Sarah Elizabeth Jukes (25) [Another son Joseph was b. ca. 1852]. In the 1901 Census son Alfred is a Bedding Manufacturer m. Annie with children Alfred (26), Annie M. (23) and Edith (19)

1861 Census:
Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Joseph Meredith - 55 - Dentist
Ellen - 54
Winifred - daughter - 20
Sarah - daughter - 18
James - son - 16
Alfred - son - 12
Joseph - son - 9

1871 Census:

London
Stoke Newington St. Mary
Joseph Meredith - 65 - retired dentist
Ellen - wife - 64
Emily - daughter - 24
Alfred - son - 22
Joseph - son - 19


1881 Census:

Middlesex
Willesden
21 Church Road
Joseph Meredith - Head - Widower - 75 - Late of Canada - Civil Servant
Sarah - daughter - 38
Emily - daughter - 34
Joseph - son - 29 - Bankers Clerk

1891 Census collection:

Joseph (aged 85) was living at 21 Church Rd, Willesden with his daughter Emily (aged 44) - it was stated that he was born in Birmingham and his daughter, Emily, was born in Canada.

He was the recipient of the following letter from Beatrice Allen:

I will answer your questions about the Meredith family to the best of my ability. Charles Meredith and his father before him had settled in Tasmania and must have been another and perhaps somewhat distant branch. Charles M. came over to England and married Miss Twamley, a friend of Aunt Jane, and also a cousin of his own. After an absence of 50 years Mrs. C. M. came to stay with us in the early 90's. She was a very clever and accomplished woman more so than any other woman in Tasmania, so the government House set made much of her and she was much féted (?) by successive governors and their wives. I should have said that Charles M. and his father were no doubt amongst the landed gentry though not wealthy. Charles M. I believe devoted himself a good deal to politics. He and his wife had 3 sons but I never heard they did anything much. The eldest was the father of Louisa who came over with her grandmother. She was then only 17 and has never been in England since. She is fond of letter writing and still corresponds with me. Her son came over in (?) in the war - Flying Corps - was shot down over the German lines and taken prisoner - lost the use of his right arm. Died eight years after his return home. Louisa has many sisters but only one brother and he has only a daughter so name is not going on there. That is all about them that needs to be said. Now for mother's branch. You are perhaps not aware that 'Grandma Jukes' was the eldest of the whole twelve. Uncle Joseph must I think have been one of the younger ones. Samuel and James were old bachelors and there were some who died as young men. I have often heard another ???? of her cousin John - a very handsome young man - I seem to remember that he enlisted for a time in the Austrian army where I suppose he met his wife. He afterwards went to Australia but neither he nor his son were very satisfactory and were soon lost news of. Of his brothers you will probably remember George Meredith, a most charming man who at one time lived next door to the Garnetts at Kensington. He had a very bigoted R. C. wife and one daughter who married but of course could not carry on the name. With the exceptions of George and his brother John (aforesaid) who went to Australia I believe all the other sons of John Meredith's son were unmarried. His eldest daughter who was mother's contemporary married Professor Beete Jukes. 'Grandma' used to say it was funny her niece should marry her husband's nephew. They were of course not related to each other. They had no children. I hope I have made all this clear. Mother talked most about the Joseph Merediths as they were the ones she had most to do with though so much younger than herself. L. Norvill doesn't live in Tasmania now but in Victoria.

picture

Charles Philips and Phoebe Maxwell




Husband Charles Philips

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Phoebe Maxwell

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Harriette Pawsey Philips

         Born: 9 Nov 1813 - Newnham, Gloucestershire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1889
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Joseph Broadbent Holmes
         Marr: 31 November 1841 - Westbury-on-Severn, Gloucestershire




picture
Thomas Mayo and Mary Meredith




Husband Thomas Mayo

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 7 Feb 1769 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Mary Meredith

         Born: 1748 - Circa
   Christened: 8 Apr 1748 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens




picture
Owen Montague Meredith and Irene M. McBride




Husband Owen Montague Meredith

         Born: 1888 - Greta, New South Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Henry Montague Meredith
       Mother: Minnie (Minna) Holmes


     Marriage: 1921 - Wellington, New South Wales




Wife Irene M. McBride

         Born: 1897 - Petersham, Sydney, N.S.W
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Wynne Aubrey Meredith

         Born: 1892
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
McLean and Pat Meredith




Husband McLean

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Pat Meredith

         Born: 1920 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Alan Alfred Meredith
       Mother: May





Children
1 F Gillian McLean

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

They had three children, one of whom is Gillian McLean.
picture

Claude Lodwyck McMillen and Lizzie Ella Meredith




Husband Claude Lodwyck McMillen

         Born: 1895
   Christened: 
         Died: 1985
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Lizzie Ella Meredith

         Born: 1900
   Christened: 
         Died: 1985
       Buried: 


       Father: Twamley Owen Meredith
       Mother: Jessica Farquhar




picture
John McWilliams and Amelia Thompson




Husband John McWilliams

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Amelia Thompson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Margaret McWilliams

         Born: 1833 - Circa - Glasgow, Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 June 1915 - 29 June - 'The Argus'
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alfred Meredith Jukes
         Marr: 29 Dec 1853 - Melbourne, Victoria




picture
Alan Geoffrey (Geoff) Meredith and Mavis Isobel Sisely




Husband Alan Geoffrey (Geoff) Meredith

         Born: 1918 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1989 - circa
       Buried: 


       Father: Alan Alfred Meredith
       Mother: May


     Marriage: 




Wife Mavis Isobel Sisely

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Ann Meredith

         Born: 23 Feb 1943 - Wayside Cottage, Richmond, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Josephine Meredith

         Born: 28 Dec 1946 - "Sangers", West Chiltington, Sussex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Martin Meredith

         Born: 13 Nov 1940 - Cadgwith, Caterham, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Thursday, Nov 14, 1940; pg. 1; Issue 48773; col A

Meredith. - On Nov. 13, 1940, at Cadgwith, Caterham, Surrey, to Mavis Isobel (née Sisely), wife of Alan Geoffrey Meredith - a son.

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 24, 1943; pg. 1; Issue 49478; col A

Meredith. - On Feb. 23, 1943, at Wayside Cottage, Richmond, Surrey, to Mavis (nêe Sisely) wife of A.G. Meredith, a daughter.

The Times, Wednesday, Jan 01, 1947; pg. 1; Issue 50647; col A

Meredith. - On Dec. 28, 1946, at "Sangers", West Chiltington, Sussex, to Mavis (née Sisely), wife of A.G. Meredith - a daughter (Josephine)

picture

Charles Meredith and Louisa Anne Twamley




Husband Charles Meredith




         Born: 29 May 1811 - Poyston, Pembroke, Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 2 Mar 1880 - Launceston, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Westall Hicks


     Marriage: 18 Apr 1839 - Edgbaston Old Church, Warwickshire




Wife Louisa Anne Twamley




         Born: 20 Jul 1812 - Birmingham
   Christened: 27 May 1824
         Died: 21 Oct 1895 - Collingwood, Victoria
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Twamley
       Mother: Louisa Anne Meredith





Children
1 M George Campbell Meredith




         Born: 1 Jul 1840 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 Jul 1917 - Lansdowne Cres. (Son's Residence)
       Buried: 26 Jul 1917 - Cornelian Bay Cemetery - 5.45 pm
       Spouse: Elizabeth Jillett
         Marr: 13 Jan 1868 - Oatland, Tasmania



2 M Charles Henry Meredith

         Born: 1 Nov 1841 - Waterloo, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 2 Mar 1842
       Buried: 



3 M Charles Twamley Meredith

         Born: 5 Apr 1844 - Great Swanport, Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 Sep 1888
       Buried: 



4 M Owen Meredith




         Born: 6 Apr 1847 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1927
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Eliza Jane Windsor
         Marr: 1 Nov 1871 - Chalmers Free Presbyterian, Hobart, Tasmania
       Spouse: Eady
         Marr: 1908 - after



5 F Louisa Meredith

         Born: 1849 - about
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Sabina Meredith

         Born: 1857
   Christened: 
         Died: 1924
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Charles Meredith was an Australian grazier and politician. He was Tasmanian colonial treasurer for several years and was also minister for lands and works.

Visited England in 1838 and married his cousin Louise in 1839. He returned to Tasmania in 1840.

Meredith was born at Poyston Lodge, Pembroke, Wales, the youngest son of George Meredith and his wife, Sarah Westall Hicks. His father saw service in the royal marines during the Napoleonic wars, and later decided to emigrate to Van Diemen's Land (later called Tasmania. He arrived at Hobart with his wife and family on 13 March 1821 and became one of the best known of the early pioneers. Charles assisted his father in farming in Tasmania for some time.

In 1834 Meredith went to New South Wales and took up land on the Murrumbidgee River after being denied a grant of land by Lieutenant-Governor George Arthur. He visited England in 1838 and on 18 April 1839 married his cousin, Louisa Anne Twamley. On his return to Australia he spent two years in New South Wales, but it was a depressed period and he made heavy losses. He then went to Tasmania, and in 1843 was appointed a police magistrate at Sorell in the north-east.

Political career

Meredith became a member of the original Tasmanian Legislative Council and was elected for Glamorgan in the first house of assembly in 1856. He was colonial treasurer in the Thomas Gregson ministry for two months in 1857, and held the same position in the James Whyte ministry from January 1863 to November 1866. He was opposition leader 1862–63 and November 1866–72. He held the lands and works portfolios in the Frederick Innes cabinet from November 1872 to August 1873, and was again colonial treasurer in the Thomas Reibey ministry from July 1876 to August 1877. In total, he was in parliament almost 24 years and was a member of the executive council for 17 years.

Late life and legacy

Meredith resigned his seat on account of ill-health in 1879, and died at Launceston, Tasmania , on 2 March 1880. His wife and children survived him.

Meredith was one of the few Tasmanians whose name has been publicly commemorated; a mountain range in nort-east Tasmania is named for him and a fountain in his memory was erected in the Queen's domain, Hobart, in 1885.

Tigress in Exile

Page 178-179

….and were called upon to keep the farming interests going to provide for the family's needs. George and Owen seemed to inherit the good qualities of both parents and were popular and well-liked men in the mining communities in which they moved when they left home.

So it was that in 1856 Louisa found herself in a predominantly male household. The interests of the male members of the family were essentially practical and a good deal of their time was spent in general farming duties, as Charles was still running sheep and cattle in the Swan Port area until 1858.

Louisa turned her attention to her husband. It was obvious to Louisa that from this point onwards it would be necessary for her to direct the family's fortunes. She was very fond of her handsome, charming husband and delighted in his company, but she could not ignore the sad fact that Charles was incompetent and completely incapable of providing for the family and steering it through the troubles lying ahead. Louisa faced the problem of her husband's weakness squarely and unflinchingly. Louisa became the governing force in the Meredith family.

At this time Charles was in an unenviable position in society. At an age when most of his contemporaries had consolidated their positions in one of the professions or on the land and had established themselves in pleasant houses and comfortable surroundings, affording their families good educations and every opportunity of enjoying the society of the island, Charles, at forty-four, had neither position nor prospects. He lived in a relatively humble house and could not afford to educate his children to any high degree.

With precious little capital to draw upon and no prospects of further inheritance, it was clear to Louisa that something must be found for Charles to do, preferably something which would employ his talents and give him back some of the status that he had enjoyed as heir to the 'Cambria' estates. Charles was a good-tempered spend-thrift whose chief asset was his silver tongue and a ready wit. It was the latter two attributes that Louisa felt could be most usefully employed.

To Louisa's despair, all his life money seemed to slip through Charles's fingers without any gain whatever. In the 1860s or 1870s both Louisa and Charles, at the death of their Uncle Charles Meredith, the lawyer in Leamington Priors in England, inherited £2,000 each. The estate was valued at about £40,000 and, according to Louisa,

ought to have been divided at once among his nephews and nieces, but Mr. Aston, cousin Lucy's husband, and the only surviving executor, made delays and played tricks which considerably reduced our shares. My Uncle would not have allowed Molly's brood to share his carefully-guarded wealth had he known what she and they were!

The inheritance once again sparked Louisa's bitterness against George's second family, and was a great disappointment to her. 'With my share,' she wrote, 'I paid off the mortgage on "Birch Grove" and hoped my husband would relieve "Twamley" with his, but he could not, and what became of his share I never knew.'

With Charles obviously incapable of succeeding in any commercial enterprise, Louisa came up with a clever solution: Charles would become a politician. His popularity on a personal level would help to elect him without too much trouble. Most important, his election would gain him recognition and status, which were lacking at this time of his life. The idea appealed to Charles. He had not, it is true, shown much interest in politics up to this time but, with the support of his wife and remembering her experience in active political work in Birmingham in the 'thirties, Charles felt confident that Louisa was right; politics were for him.

There was one drawback: politicians at this time were unpaid. The state of Victoria passed a bill in 1870 to provide payment for members of its parliament, but from 1856 when the first representative parliament was instituted, to 1890, Tasmania paid only the members of the Executive Council: the premier and his ministers. In 1890 a bill was passed to allow all members of the Tasmanian Legislative Council and the House of Assembly expenses of £100 per annum, payable only after each member had attended twenty sittings.

Charles's project would therefore be interesting, rewarding, demanding but non-productive financially and, unless he became a member of the Executive Council, it would be necessary to maintain a farm to provide for the family. This Louisa felt, was a small price to pay in return for Charles gaining a significant place in life.

In 1851 Charles had made his first, hesitant political move. 'Mr. Charles .Meredith declared elected amongst great celebrations around a cyder cask', wrote James Amos in his diary. 'A great many had too much to drink.' A rowdy meeting took place in the old Swan Inn. Charles had reluctantly agreed to accept endorsement for the Oatlands seat on the first Elective Legislative Council, but this move was made simply to demonstrate that Glamorgan, an important portion of the district to its settlers, was practically disfranchised by being overwhelmed by the voting power of Oatlands proper. Charles's feelings about his first essay into politics can be judged by his own words to John: 'You will have heard that I have been lucky enough…………..

Pages 218-219

……..underlined in her letter to Parkes for, ten years later, nothing had come of the Royal promise.

She asked Sir Henry to write a few lines to Gladstone. 'Add all your styles and titles of importance to your letter', she directed, and Sir Henry must have done so, as his recommendation was effective. To her intense satisfaction, on 20 October 1884, a bill was enacted in Tasmania authorising payment of a pension of £100 per annum to Louisa Anne Meredith, widow of the Honourable Charles Meredith who 'has by her writings and paintings rendered considerable services to the cause of Science, Literature and Art in Tasmania'.

An English newspaper reported:

The small colony of Tasmania has just done a generous and noble deed. For the first time in its history it has voted a pension as a reward for distinguished literary and artistic merit . . . Mrs. Meredith is well-known, not only as an authoress, but as an artist of singular grace and power. She has done more to illustrate the beautiful flora and singular fauna of Tasmania than any other person.

The pension was granted at a most opportune moment for its recipient, for after Charles's death financial problems became even more distressing.

Charles's will, dated 20 April 1868, was rather an eccentric one. It clearly reflected a distrust of the legal profession, possibly caused by the drastic reduction of an expected legacy from their Uncle Charles for which he and Louisa blamed the lawyers and the executor, Aston. The will is quoted here in full:

By this Will I revoke all other wills made by me and declare the Will in possession of Allport Roberts and Allport null and void. By this my last will and testament I give and bequeath all my goods, chattels, lands, houses and estates to my wife to be held and enjoyed by her during her life and in trust for my three sons, George Campbell Meredith, Charles Twamley Meredith and Owen Meredith whom I constitute and appoint my sole executors and who are, at their mother's death to divide my estate real and personal amongst themselves as may seem to them the best taking share and share alike and I entreat them to act together as loving brothers and to take care of their mother and not to quarrel with each other the real meaning of this my last will cannot be mistaken my object in making it so short and clear and leaving the disposal of my said estate to act with my wife and three sons is to prevent the lawyers from having anything to receive out of the hard earnings of my life.

His whole estate was valued at no more than £690 at the time of his death.

At sixty-eight years of age, Louisa was left to cope as well as she could on this pitifully small amount of capital. It is possible that she had their son Charles to provide for as well, until he died in September 1888 and was buried at St Anne's Church, 'Triabunna, at the age of forty-four. The day after his funeral Louisa donated to this church

the sweet sonorous bell which has been to me and mine as a familiar home-voice-at "Riversdale", at "Twamley" and at "Malunnah" for the past forty years. I shall not listen for it again but I pray you when you hear it, think kindly of my dear lamented dead, and let it toll for an hour at noon on the day of my own burial, whenever that may be.

After Charles's death in Launceston, Louisa returned to live at 'Malunnah', but when her son died she moved to a flat in a house in Davey Street, Hobart, owned by Captain W.S. Vernon. During these years of widowhood Louisa remained as busy as ever. Her grandchildren visited her frequently at 'Malunnah' and George Glendower, George's eldest son, had vivid memories all his life of his grandmother gathering a new botanical specimen from the bush or coming in with a freshly-caught fish still glistening from the sea and sitting down with paint and brush to record its colours immediately, before they faded. His grandmother gave him a beautiful painting which is one of the best examples of her work extant.

As Louisa grew older, it was left to another Louisa Anne, the eldest daughter of Owen Meredith, to comfort and take care of her in her final years. This Louisa Anne was a high-spirited girl, capable of coping with her grandmother's domineering and demanding manner. Louisa Anne vent to live permanently with her grandmother in about 1888.

Louisa had lost the sight of her right eye some time in the 1880s and she suffered much pain from chronic sciatica, which caused her to limp badly and required her to use a stick. But Sir Henry Parkes, knowing the incredible spirit and determination of his old friend, was not really surprised when he opened his mail one morning in 1889 to find yet another request from Louisa Meredith. This time, she said, she wanted his help in getting her to England to launch her next book in person!

She was an old lady, she acknowledged, but her grand-daughter Louisa Anne had promised to go with her-she was just seventeen. She described the voyage as 'doubtless an exploit of less wisdom than valour but asked Sir Henry to obtain a passage for her at reduced………


General Notes (Wife)

Louisa Anne Meredith (20 July 1812 – 21 October 1895 was an English and Australian writer and illustrator.

Louisa Anne Meredith, the daughter of Thomas Twamley and Louisa Ann Meredith, was born near Birmingham, England on 20 July 1812. She was educated chiefly by her mother, and in 1835 published a volume, Poems, which was favourably reviewed. This was followed in 1836 by The Romance of Nature, mostly in verse, of which a third edition was issued in 1839. Another volume was published in the same year, The Annual of British Landscape Scenery, an account of a tour on the River Wye from Chepstow to near its source at Plynlimon.

Shortly afterwards Miss Twamley was married to her cousin, Charles Meredith. Charles had emigrated to Van Dieman's Land in 1821 with his father George and family. They had been pioneers of grazing, whaling and other activities around Swansea on Tasmania's East Coast. Charles had become a squatter in the Canberra district of New South Wales.

They sailed for New South Wales in June 1839, and arrived at Sydney on 27 September 1839. After travelling into the interior as far as Bathurst, Mrs Meredith returned to the coast and lived at Homebush for about a year. By the time of his return to New South Wales, severe economic depression caused by excessive land speculation had destroyed the value of Charles' property, and towards the end of 1840 they relocated to Tasmania. An interesting account of her first 11 years in Australia is given in her two books, Notes and Sketches of New South Wales (1844), reprinted at least twice, and My Home in Tasmania (1852), which was soon republished in the United States of America under the title Nine Years in Australia.

For much of her life Mrs Meredith lived on properties around Swansea. In 1860 she published Some of My Bush Friends in Tasmania which contained elaborate full-colour plates printed by the new chromolithography process. The illustrations were drawn by herself, and simple descriptions of characteristic native flowers were given. In the following year an account of a visit to Victoria in 1856, Over the Straits, was published, and in 1880 Tasmanian Friends and Foes, Feathered, Furred and Finned. This went into a second edition in 1881. In 1891, in her eightieth year, Mrs Meredith went to London to supervise the publication of Last Series, Bush Friends in Tasmania. Published at the outset of a severe financial depression in the Australian colonies, this project and the collapse of the bank where most of her savings were held ruined her financially. She died at Melbourne on 21 October 1895 and was survived by sons Owen and George.

Mrs Meredith was the author of two novels, Phoebe's Mother (1869), which had appeared in the Melbourne weekly The Australasian in 1866 under the title of Ebba, and Nellie, or Seeking Goodly Pearls (1882).

Mrs Meredith took great interest in politics, her husband Charles being a Member of the Tasmanian Legislative Council for several terms between the mid 1850s until just before his death in 1881. She was an early member of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and influenced her husband to legislate for preservation of native wildlife and scenery.
Mrs Meredith frequently wrote unsigned articles for the Tasmanian press. This was no new thing for her as in her youth she had written articles in support of the Chartists. When she visited Sydney in 1882, Sir Henry Parkes told her that he had read and appreciated her articles when a youth. After her husband's death she was granted a pension of £100 a year by the Tasmanian government.

Mrs Meredith was tall and of commanding presence. Her poetry is no more than pleasant verse, but she had a true feeling for natural history and was a capable artist. Many of her books were illustrated by herself. Her volumes on New South Wales, Tasmania, and Victoria in the 1840s and 1850s, will always retain their value as first hand records.

LOUISA MEREDITH

Louisa Meredith was born in Birmingham in 1812. She was educated mainly by her mother and, in the agitation leading up to the 1832 Reform Act learnt to ‘think independently and express herself fearlessly on religious and social issues', and is likely
to have written for the Chartist press. She published several books of poems and in 1839 published Our Wild Flowers Familiarly Described and Illustrated, written in story form. Louisa married her cousin, Charles Meredith, in April 1839 in Birmingham. They sailed for Sydney in the Letitia soon afterwards. Louisa stayed in Bathurst while Charles inspected sheep stations on the Murrumbidgee. They returned to Sydney and lived at Homebush. In 1840, Louisa and Charles went to Oyster Bay in Tasmania, where Charles’ father owned ‘Cambria’. Charles and Louisa built a house on a neighbouring property. Their
second son was born there in 1841, but died soon afterwards. In Tasmania, the Meredith family was among those whose fortunes suffered; yet Louisa continued the writing she had commenced before leaving England for New South Wales in 1839.

Her perceptive observations in Notes and Sketches of New South Wales, published in 1844 was angrily reviewed in the Sydney press. Louisa's literary work continued through the years her children were born. The companion account, My Home in Tasmania during a residence of nine years published in 1952. Over the straits: a Visit to Melbourne appeared in 1861. Louisa became as well known for her sensitive writing on Australia's wildlife, and her artistic representations of plants and flowers as for her pungent social observations. Tasmanian Friends and Foes: Feathered Furred and Finned: A Family Chronicle of Country Life appeared in 1880 and included colour plates from here own drawings. She also illustrated several books of poems and Bush Friends in Tasmania: Last Series in 1981. Her wildflower drawings won medals in exhibitions in Australia and overseas. In 1884, the Tasmania government granted her pension for ‘distinguished literary and artistic services’ to the colony.

Louisa enjoyed the travel to research for her books. She became an honorary member of the Tasmanian Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. She also enjoyed acting. A man in one of her admiring audiences described her as ‘rivalling Fanny Kemble on the stage and as an interpreter of Shakespeare on the platform’.

Very few professional women earned reasonable incomes. Writers, botanists, painters and artists used skills in part-time, occasional manner. Few women motivated by money, or allowed to earn it this way. Louisa Meredith was the only one to be a commercial success. 20 books, some ran to several editions and many pamphlets, journal and newspaper articles.

Louisa's writing helped her family through many economic ups and downs. She died at Collingwood Victoria on 21 October 1895.


General Notes for Child George Campbell Meredith

Their eldest son, George Campbell, was born in 1840 in NSW, but the other four surviving children were born in Tasmania. George married Elizabeth Jillett, grand-daughter of Robert Jillett and Elizabeth Bradshaw, in 1868.


General Notes for Child Owen Meredith

Owen was a mining engineer.
picture

Robert Heaton Rhodes and Clara Meredith




Husband Robert Heaton Rhodes

         Born: 22 Apr 1855 - Clive Grange Estate, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Rhodes
       Mother: Fanny Reed


     Marriage: 21 Dec 1887




Wife Clara Meredith

         Born: 1864 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers




General Notes (Husband)

Robert Heaton Rhodes was the son of Joseph Rhodes and Fanny Reed. His father Joseph was one of the four Rhodes brothers who came to New Zealand in the days before organised settlement.

picture

David Meredith and Sarah Owens




Husband David Meredith

         Born: 1702 - Circa
   Christened: 3 May 1702 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 8 February 1781 - aged 79
       Buried: 11 Feb 1781 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford


       Father: Josiah Meredith
       Mother: Anne Whitcott


     Marriage: 30 Nov 1727 - Lingen, Hereford




Wife Sarah Owens

         Born: 1706 Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 14 April 1794 - aged 88
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1728 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Feb 1728 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 16 June 1810 - aged 82
       Buried: 1810
       Spouse: Edward Whitcott
         Marr: 25 May 1748 - More, Shropshire



2 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1730 - Circa
   Christened: 20 Sep 1730 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 1741 - circa
       Buried: 2 May 1741 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



3 M David Meredith

         Born: 1732 - Circa
   Christened: 11 Jun 1732 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 19 April 1803 - aged 70
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Pritchard
         Marr: 23 Jan 1753 - Ludlow, Shropshire



4 F Margaret Meredith

         Born: 1733 - Circa
   Christened: 9 Mar 1733 - Lingen, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Joseph Carter
         Marr: 18 Apr 1760 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



5 M Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1735 - Circa
   Christened: 6 Mar 1735 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 29 October 1807 - Aged 71
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Martha Carter
         Marr: 15 Feb 1763



6 M John Meredith

         Born: 1739 - Circa
   Christened: 13 Jan 1739 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Martha Dyke
         Marr: 24 May 1768 - Hopton Castle, Shropshire



7 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1741 - Circa
   Christened: 31 Jan 1741 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: May 1741
       Buried: 8 May 1741 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



8 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1742 - Circa
   Christened: 8 May 1742 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: Feb 1743
       Buried: 24 Feb 1743 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



9 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1744 - Circa
   Christened: 4 Aug 1744 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 14 April 1814 - aged 69
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Prosser
         Marr: 25 Apr 1773 - Bucknell, Shropshire



10 F Hannah Meredith

         Born: 1746 - Circa
   Christened: 28 Jun 1746 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Lawrence Stephens
         Marr: 11 Jun 1767 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



11 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1748 - Circa
   Christened: 8 Apr 1748 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Thomas Mayo
         Marr: 7 Feb 1769 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



12 M James Meredith




         Born: 20 Feb 1753 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 2 Mar 1753 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 9 Mar 1848 - 17 Colmore Row, Birmingham
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather
         Marr: 25 Apr 1797 - St. Peter's, Wolverhampton



13 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1754 - about
   Christened: 13 Jan 1754 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

According to family tradition, David Meredith and his brothers were left orphans. The eldest inherited property, but the youngest (David) had nothing and the uncle who had charge of them neglected their education. However, David educated himself and read remarkably well. He was an intelligent clever man and much liked by his neighbour Lord Oxford who frequently asked him to dine with him.

"A few reminiscences of the Meredith family, stated by ???? Carter of Maulden granddaughter of Mr Meredith of Brampton Bryan, Herefordshire, August 11 1855.

???? Carter had frequently heard that her grandfather's family were descended in a direct line ????? the Prince of Wales. Her grandfather and his brother were left orphans. ???? Carter thinks the eldest inherited property, but the youngest (her grandfather) had nothing and the uncle who had charge of them neglected their education but ???? Carter's grandfather educated himself and ???? remarkably well. He was an intelligent clever man and much liked by his neighbour Lord Oxford who frequently asked him to dine with him. Upon one occasion Lord Oxford met him and invited him to the Hall, but her grandfather said he must decline the invitation and asked to be excused as he was not dressed for dinner, but his Lordship replied “I look at the man and not at his coat and you must come home with me.” He lived at Pedwardine Herefordshire and had twelve children. Our father James Meredith who afterwards came to Birmingham was the seventh son."

This anecdote seems to be about David Meredith, father of James. The challenge is to work out the writer and the person reminiscing??

The reference in the Carter-Meredith document to a friendship between David Meredith Sr. and Lord Oxford (whose surname was Harley and who was Lord of the Manor at Brampton Bryan) prompted me to look for a possible in the National Archives catalogue. I have appended what I found, which concerns a Ralph Meredith ca. 1710-1720. I think this is the Ralph who the IGI shows was the father of 5 children, Anne (1684), Thomas (1687), Jane (1690), Elanor [sic] (1693), and Ralph (1695) by his wife Ellinor. I would guess that this is the Ralph Sr. who is referred to in the records, and that he was the Uncle who had charge of David and his brother and who the note mentions as neglecting their education. This would make Ralph Sr. the brother of Josiah Meredith who married Anne Whitcott and who I think is the father of David Meredith.


General Notes for Child Samuel Meredith

Described as Samuel Meredith of Wigmore.


General Notes for Child James Meredith

The Ameredith name arose when Gruffydd ap Maredudd, who emigrated from Radnorshire and settled in Devon, anglicised his name to Griffith Ameredith - he married well, into the Devonshire aristocracy and his descendants continued the trend, although they were caught out by supporting the wrong side in the Civil War and lost much of their wealth as a result. By the mid-1600s the name was contracted again to Meredith, and the last of the line was Sir William Meredith Bart, a Member of Parliament who was a passionate opponent of slavery and supporter of the US - the town of Meredith, New Hampshire was named after him.

The Meredith name was reasonably common in Radnorshire as the Welsh patronymic ap Maredudd was anglicised to the surname Meredith.

James Meredith was the youngest of 12 children according to his obituary and was born at Brampton Bryan, Hereford.

James moved to Birmingham when he was 21 years of age.

James is described as a cousin of John Meredith with 6 sons and 1 daughter. One son John travelled to Van Diemen's Land with George but returned.

He was of the founders of the New Church in Birmingham and leader of its Swedenborg Society.

In 1841 census at 17 Colmore Row aged 88 with son James.

The evidence so far supports the view that James' income came from varnish manufacturing.

There are three references that claim that a varnish manufacturing business registered as Meredith & Co. was established in 1780 by John Meredith. The same business was listed in Holden's Directory of Birmingham for 1803 as Meredith & Co. - varnish makers (Royal Institute of Chemistry - 1940). In The Morning Chronicle of Saturday 17 January 1829, the following partnership dissolution:

"...............James Meredith, senior, James Meredith, junior, John Meredith, Samuel Clinton and Samuel Lawrence. opf Birmingham, varnish makers, (so far as regards James Meredith, senior)" - the latter appears to be a reconstitution of the partnership with James Meredith senior retiring.

In the UK National Archives is document MS 11936/528/1119677 datyed 8 February 1831. The contents refer to:

Insured: James Meredith, John Meredith and Samuel Meredith, 29 Great Queen Street Lincolns Inn Fields, dealers in varnish.

In the 1841 Census, a John Meredith is the correct age (allowing for the census rounding) to be the son of James Meredith, senior.

In the 1871 Census, a Samuel Meredith of the correct age to the son of James, senior is described as a varnish manufacturer and in an earlier Census (1851) he is living as a visitor at 107-108 Lionel St, Birmingham, the premises of Meredith et al & Co. (although his occupation at that time was described as a proprietor of houses).

In the Birmingham Directory of 1839, both John and Samuel Meredith were described as varnish makers of 107 Lionel St.

The only unsupported issue was the various references to a John Meredith who started the business in 1780. The most likely person would be James' elder brother John, who was born in 1739 who would have been aged 41 in 1780 (James would have been about 27). One conclusion might be that John had no issue and that either for reasons of death or ill health, James took over the varnish manufacturing business, which then passed to his sons.



picture

David Meredith and Catherine Whitcott




Husband David Meredith

         Born: 1759 - Circa
   Christened: Mar 1759 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 14 February 1836 - aged 77
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Pritchard


     Marriage: 6 Feb 1800




Wife Catherine Whitcott

         Born: 21 Nov 1774
   Christened: 12 Feb 1775 - St. Chad, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
         Died: 7 November 1827 aged 53
       Buried: 


       Father: Benjamin Whitcott
       Mother: Catherine Gough





Children
1 F Eliza Meredith

         Born: 1811 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 9 Aug 1827 - Pedwardine - Died aged 16 years
       Buried: 



2 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1801 - Circa
   Christened: 25 Dec 1801 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Catherine Meredith

         Born: 1806 - Circa
   Christened: 9 Dec 1806 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1808 - Circa
   Christened: 29 Nov 1808 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M David Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Circa
   Christened: 24 Jul 1810 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died:  - Died in infancy
       Buried: 



6 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1813 - Circa
   Christened: 13 Jun 1813 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
David Meredith and Frances Stanley




Husband David Meredith

         Born: 1841 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Dec 1841 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Meredith
       Mother: Mary


     Marriage: 1865




Wife Frances Stanley

         Born: 1841 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Henry J. Stanley
       Mother: Martha Spender





Children
1 M Joseph Edward Meredith

         Born: 1865 - December Q - Clun, Shropshire, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M David Stanley Meredith

         Born: 1867 - September Q. - Abergavenny, Monmouthshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Mabel Martha Meredith

         Born: 1868 - December Q - Abergavenny, Monmouthshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Henry Stanley Meredith

         Born: 1870 - September Q - Uttoxeter, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M John Meredith

         Born: 1872 - June Q - Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Mary Elizabeth Meredith

         Born: 1874 - June Q - Abergavenny, Monmouthshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Maria Matthews Meredith

         Born: 1879 - March Q. - Abergavenny, Monmouthshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1861 Census - Herefordshire - Yazor

Davis was described as a pupil farmer

1871 Census Collection - Bagots Bromley, Staffordshire

David Meredith of Brampton Bryan (aged 29) farmer of 384 acres employing 6 labourers and 2 boys living with his wife Fanny (aged 30) of Newport, Shropshire, his son Joseph E. (aged 5) born in Salop, David S. (aged 3) born in Monmouth, Mabel M. (aged 2) born in Monmouth, Henry S. (7 months) born in Staffordshire, David's father-in-law Henry J. Stanley, a retired grocer born in Little Wood, Staffordshire and a sister-in-law Elizabeth A. Stanley (aged 24) born in Wysley, Staffordshire

1881 Census Collection - Abergavenny, Monmouthshire - 39 Chapel Rd.

Davis Meredith of Brampton Bryan (aged 39) unemployed farmer living with his wife Fanny (aged 39) and Martha Stanley (aged 65), his mother-in-law, an annuitant, his son Joseph E (aged 15) a railway clerk, his son David S. (aged 13) a scholar, mabel M. (aged 12), John (aged 9) born in Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire, Mary E. (aged 6) born in Monmouthshire and Maria M. (aged 2) born in Monmouthshire.
picture

David Meredith and Sarah Pritchard




Husband David Meredith

         Born: 1732 - Circa
   Christened: 11 Jun 1732 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 19 April 1803 - aged 70
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens


     Marriage: 23 Jan 1753 - Ludlow, Shropshire




Wife Sarah Pritchard

         Born: 1728 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 April 1813 - aged 85
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1754 - Circa
   Christened: 13 Jan 1754 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Richard Roberts
         Marr: 20 Jan 1777 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



2 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1756 - Circa
   Christened: 3 Jan 1756 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 15 Dec 1842 - aged 87
       Buried: 



3 M David Meredith

         Born: 1759 - Circa
   Christened: Mar 1759 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 14 February 1836 - aged 77
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Catherine Whitcott
         Marr: 6 Feb 1800



4 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1762 - Circa
   Christened: 19 Mar 1762 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: Apr 1762
       Buried: 14 Apr 1762 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



5 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1764 - Circa
   Christened: 1 Apr 1764 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Hannah Meredith

         Born: 1766 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Nov 1766 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: Feb 1768
       Buried: 29 Feb 1768 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



7 F Hannah Meredith

         Born: 1769 - Circa
   Christened: 22 Jan 1769 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 17 November 1834 - aged 65
       Buried: 



8 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1773 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Feb 1773 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 26 April 1842 - aged 69
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Sarah Meredith

Sarah was unmarried.


General Notes for Child Hannah Meredith

Hannah was unmarried.


General Notes for Child Anne Meredith

Anne was unmarried.
picture

Highgate Henry Phillips-Conn and Fanny Meredith




Husband Highgate Henry Phillips-Conn

         Born: 1841 - circa - Cavan, Ireland
   Christened: 
         Died: 1917 - March Q - Aged 75 - St. Marylebone, London
       Buried: 


       Father: Michael Phillips
       Mother: Mary Anne Tench


     Marriage: 1870 - June Quarter - Kings Norton, Staffordshire




Wife Fanny Meredith

         Born: 1842 - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 28 Aug 1932 - York
       Buried: 


       Father: Henry Meredith
       Mother: Julia Sheppard





Children
1 F Mabel Constance Phillips-Conn

         Born: 1879 - circa - Reading, Berks.
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Thomas Harry Meredith Phillips-Conn

         Born: 1881 - Reading, Berks.
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 May 1962 - 56 Bedford Gardens, W.8
       Buried: 31 May 1962 - Golders Green Crematorium
       Spouse: Edith M. Withers
         Marr: Sep 1913 - Ormskirk, Lancashire



3 F Violet Frances Phillips-Conn

         Born: 1895 - circa - Reading, Berks.
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Highgate Henry Phillips was an M.A., and M.D. of Dublin University, and a J.P. He served as Surgeon-Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps and the 44th (East Essex) Regt. He succeeded to the Mount Ida estates, Co. Kilkenny/Waterford, in 1893, on the death of his uncle by marriage, the late John Lambly Conn, and by Royal Licence 4 July, 1894 he assumed the additional surname and arms of CONN, in accordance with his uncle’s will. He also succeeded to the Glenview estates on the death of his elder brother Rev. Thomas George Johnson Phillips.

The Times, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 1932, pg. 1; Issue 46226; Col. A

Phillips-Conn. - On Aug. 28, 1932, at York, Fanny Phillips-Conn, wife of the late Dr. Phillips-Conn of Reading and Mount Ida, Waterford, in her 90th year

1871 Census:

Berkshire
St. Giles
Southampton Street
Heygate Phillips - Head - 29 - General Practitioner, Dublin University, Ireland
Fanny - wife - 27

1881 Census:

Berkshire
St. Giles
London Road
Heygate H. Phillips - Head - 39General Practitioner, M.D. Dublin
Fanny - wife - 37
Mabel C. - daughter - 1

1891 Census:

Berkshire
St. Giles
45 London Road
Heygate H. Phillips - Head - 49 - Registered Medical Practitioner Practicing as a Physician and surgeon.
Fanny - wife - 46
Mabel C. - daughter - 11
Thomas H.M. - son - 9
Violet F. - daughter - 6

A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Ireland (1912) pp. 127-128
Author: Burke, Bernard, Sir, 1814-1892; Fox-Davies, Arthur Charles, 1871-1928
Subject: Gentry -- Ireland; Heraldry -- Ireland
Publisher: London : Harrison

Phillips-Conn of Belturbet and Mount Ida.

Heygate Henry Phillips-Conn, of Belturbet, co, Cavan and Mount Ida, co, Kilkenny, J.P., M.A. and M.D. Dublin University, formerly Surgeon-Captain, R.A.M.C. and 44th (East Essex) Regt, b. 1841; m. 1870, Fanny, only dau. of the late Henry Meredith, of Edgbaston, and has issue.

1. Thomas Harry Meredith, b. 1881.
1. Mabel Constance.
2. Violet Frances.

Mr. H.H. Phillips-Conn s. to the Mount Ida estates in 1893, on the death of his uncle by marriage, the late John Lambly Conn, and, in accordance with his will, assumed by Royal Licence 4 July, 1894, the additional surname and arms of Conn. He also succeeded to the Glenview estates on the death s.p. of his elder brother Rev, T.G.J. Phillips, 3 April, 1898.

Lineage, - (of Phillips) - Thomas Phillips, Provost of Belturbet 1662, m. 1661, Jane, dau. of Thomas Richardson, of Dublin. He d. 1700 (will dated 5 Feb. 1699), leaving three sons,

1. James, his heir.
2. William, who left a dau., m. Valentine Swords.
3. Thomas, of Belturbet, co. Cavan, d. intestate (administration granted to his brother James, 14 July, 1692).

The elder son,

James Phillips, m. 1702, Margaret Haynes, of Lislin, co. Cavan, and with her acquired estates in that co.. He was s. by his only son,

Thomas Phillips, m. Mary Anne, dau. of John Wade, of Clonebrany, co. Meath, and d. intestate (administration granted 24 Dec. 1730), leaving an only son and heir,

Michael Phillips, of Edergole, b. 1730, who obtained under the will of his maternal uncle, John Wade, the lands of Coolcor or Ashgreen, co. Meath. He m. 1771, Mabel, dau. of Stearne Tighe, of Dublin (2nd son of Robert Tighe, of co. Westmeath), and by her was father of,

Thomas Phillips, of Ashgreen, co. Meath, m. 1st, Anne, dau. of John Tandy, of Johnsbrook, co. Meath, and by her had issue,

1. Michael, his heir.
2. Thomas, M.D., who settled in Canada, and left issue
1. Mabel, d. unm. 2. Marion, m. Robert Miller.
Mr. Phillips m. 2ndly, Helen, dau. of Joshua Nunn, of St. Margaret's, co. Wexford, and by her had issue,

3. Joshua, m. his cousin Anne Phillips, and had an only son, Frederick William, of Dublin.
3. Frances, m. B.A. Leonard.
4. Jane, m. Stearne Phillips.
5. Marianne, m. Dr. J. Taylor.
6. Elfrida, m. William Miller.

His eldest son,

Michael Phillips, of Glenview, Major in the Cavan Militia, J.P. co. Cavan, b. 1796; m. 1832, Mary Anne, dau. of Highgate Tench, of Ballyhealy, co. Wexford, by Frances his wide, eldest dau. of Joshua Nunn, of St. Margaret's, and d. 23 Dec. 1876, leaving two sons,

1. Thomas George Johnston, late of Glenview.
2. Highgate Henry, now of Belturbet and Mount Ida.

The elder son,

Rev. Thomas George Johnston Phillips, of Glenview, co. Cavan, M.A., Rector of Fenagh, co. Carlow, b. 1834; s. 1876; m. 1860, Charlotte Maria, dau. of Edward Lewis, of Violetstown, co. Westmeath, and d.s.p. 3 April, 1898, when he was s. by his only brother.

Lineage. - (of Conn).

John Conn, m. Mary, dau. of John Underwood, C.E., and niece of the Rev. William Lambly, Rector of Rower, co. Kilkenny, and by her had issue,

1. Benjamin
2. Joseph, who m. Mary Gleeson, and by her had a dau., Sarah, m. Saunders Rogers, of Tramore.

The elder son,

Benjamin Conn, of Mount Ida, m. 1811, Elizabeth, dau. of Capt. Peter Dalton, of Glenfield, co. Tipperary, and d. 1862, having by her (who d. 1858) had issue,

1. John Lambly, of Mount Ida.
1. Kate Elizabeth, d. unm.
2. Marianne, m. 26 April, 1853, Martin Costelloe, and had issue.

The only son,

John Lambly Conn, of Mount Ida, co. Kilkenny, b. 8 Aug. 1812; m. 16 July, 1844, Frances, eldest dau. of the late Highgate Tench, of Ballyhealy House, co. Wexford, and grand-dau. of the late Col. Joshua Nunn, of St. Margaret's, in the same co., and d. 1893, having had issue,

1. Benjamin Higatt, b. 1846; d. unm. 7 Aug. 1861.
2. John Nunn, b. 1847; d. 1849.

Mr. Conn devised his estates to his wife's nephew, Highgate Henry Phillips, who had assumed by Royal Licence the additional name and arms of Conn.

Arms - Quarterly: 1st and 4th, vert, a bend engrailed plain cotised arg. for Conn; 2nd and 3rd, az., a chevron engrailed between three falcons arg. belled or, for Phillips. Crest - A falcon's head, erased ppr. armed or holding in its beak a lure gu. Motto - Vincit qui patitur.

Seat - Mount Ida, Ferrybank, near Waterford.








General Notes (Wife)

Possibly the Fanny Meredith who m. Heygate Henry Phillips in Q2 1870 Kings Norton District. They are in the England 1871 census in Reading. He is a General Practitioner from Dublin University, Ireland, and she is aged 27 b. Birmingham. No trace of them in UK records after that.


General Notes for Child Thomas Harry Meredith Phillips-Conn

The Times, Tuesday, May 29, 1962; pg. 1; Issue 55403; col. A

Phillips-Conn. - On May 27th, 1962, at 56, Bedford Gardens, W.8, Thomas Harry Meredith Phillips-Conn, formerly solicitor and Overseas Manager of Leyland Motors Ltd., and retired member of the Irish Bar, Dublin, only son of Dr. H.H. Phillips (later Phillips-Conn), of Reading, Berkshire, and of Mount Ida, co, Kilkenny, Ireland. Cremation (private) Goldered Green, Thursday 2.50 p.m.. No letters or mourning, please, by his special request.
picture

Rev. Henry Griffin Williams and Frances Meredith




Husband Rev. Henry Griffin Williams

         Born: 1815 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1870
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 3 Apr 1855




Wife Frances Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1868
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Meredith
       Mother: Mary Greaves




General Notes (Husband)

Henry Griffin was rector of Preston, Suffolk and Professor of Arabic at Cambridge University.

The Gentleman's Magazine 1855, p. 410 (accessed through Google Books)

Henry and Frances had no children.
picture

George Frederick Meredith and Eliza Scholefield




Husband George Frederick Meredith

         Born: 1830 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 Aug 1896 - West Retford, Nottinghamshire
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Jane Walker Jones


     Marriage: 1857 - March Quarter - St. James, Westminster




Wife Eliza Scholefield

         Born: 31 May 1832
   Christened: 23 Oct 1832 - Saint Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Scholefield
       Mother: Jane





Children
1 F Gwendoleen Mary Meredith

         Born: 1862 - December Quarter - Wandsworth
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alfred Ingram Sharpe
         Marr: 1883 - September Quarter - Kensington




General Notes (Husband)

George Frederick was a Varnish Manufacturer - reported in the 1861 England Census.

In the Great Western Railway Shareholder listing his death was recorded as 15 August 1896 - address given as West Retford. Nottinghamshire and also a London address - Kensington, Middlesex.

Extract of a letter by Beatrice Allen:

"Of his brothers you will probably remember George Meredith, a most charming man who at one time lived next door to the Garnetts at Kensington. He had a very bigoted R. C. wife and one daughter who married but of course could not carry on the name."


General Notes (Wife)

Eliza was the daughter of William Scholefield, MP for Birmingham.

Eliza's brother was Clement Scholefield who was born: June 22, 1839, Edgbaston, West Midlands, Eng­land.

Died: Sep­tem­ber 10, 1904, Frith Hall, Godalming, Sur­rey, Eng­land.

Youngest son of William Scholefield, Member of Parliament from Birmingham, Clement at­tend­ed St. John’s Coll­ege, Cam­bridge (BA 1864, MA 1867). He was or­dained a deacon in 1867, and priest in 1869. He served churches at Hove, Brighton (1867); St. Peter’s, South Ken­sing­ton (1869); and St. Luke’s, Chelsea (1879). He was chaplain at Eton (1880-1890); vicar of Ho­ly Trin­i­ty, Knightsbridge (1890-1895); and retired in 1895. He con­trib­ut­ed hymns to Church Hymns with Tunes, by Arthur Sullivan (1874).

picture

George Glendower Meredith and Nora Gytha Michelmore




Husband George Glendower Meredith




         Born: 20 Dec 1868
   Christened: 
         Died: 1957
       Buried: 


       Father: George Campbell Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth Jillett


     Marriage: 1937




Wife Nora Gytha Michelmore

         Born: 1 Sep 1890 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Jul 1973
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

George Glendower was of the firm Oldham, Beddome and Meredith, Booksellers, Hobart.

George and Nora had no children.
picture

George Llewellyn Meredith and Eleanor Bond Ward




Husband George Llewellyn Meredith

         Born: 28 Sep 1855 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Oct 1937
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Maria Hammond


     Marriage: 30 Nov 1899 - Sydney, Australia

 Other Spouse: Alicia Louisa Maclean - 24 Jul 1886 - Sydney, Australia




Wife Eleanor Bond Ward

         Born: 1863
   Christened: 
         Died: 1954
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

The Argus - Monday 14 December 1931

Launceston - Saturday - George Llewellyn Meredith and Reginald Askew Farmilo Sutton were charged on three counts in the police court with having conspired with Walter John Howard Eastland and Richard William Musson to cheat and defraud members of the public by False pretences and crafty devices to become members of Tasmanian Credits Ltd. A remand until December 19 was granted.

The Argus - Friday 29 April, 1932

DEALINGS IN SHARES.
Tasmanian Conspiracy Case, LAUNCESTON (T. ), Thursday - The charge of conspiracy against George Llewellyn Meredith, Reginald Asken Farmilo Sutton and Richard William Musson in connection with a company known as Tasmanian Credits Ltd was continued in the Criminal Court today before Mr. Justice Crisp and a special jury.

C.E.H. Ferguson, the liquidator, gave a statement of the disposal ot the funds of the company and the various bank accounts
operated by Tasmanian Brokers and Underwriters, a subsidiary company. He stated that one account out of four was used as a clearing account for the adjusting and splitting of commission and it drew nearly £2 000 more from the other accounts than they drew from it.

Referring to Rapson shares, Ferguson said that the shares purchased totalled 16,520 of which 14,500 were vendors' shares and cost £8,700. The shares were not bought in the name of the subsidiary company. He considered that the whole transaction was irregular, as trust and borrowed money was used to traffic in shares, and the transactions were not put through in the company's name, while Sutton appeared to have received 6d a share as an overriding commission.

picture

George Steuart Meredith and Ethel Nancy Roxburgh




Husband George Steuart Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Ada Steuart Johnstone


     Marriage: 21 Oct 1913 - Launceston, Tasmania




Wife Ethel Nancy Roxburgh

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: J. W. Roxburgh
       Mother: 




General Notes (Husband)

Evening Post, Issue 60, 7 September 1912, Page 7:

The Australasian announces the engagement of George Stewart, youngest son of Mrs. Meredith, Orui, Elphin-road, Launceston, and of the late Mr. Edwin Meredith, Riversdale, Whareama, New Zealand, to Ethel Nancy, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Roxburgh, Bank of Australasia, Launceston.

Evening Post, Volume 86, Issue 121, 18 November 1913

On the 21st October, at Launceston, Tasmania, the marriage took place of Mr. George Stewart Meredith, third son of the late Mr. Edward Meredith, jun., of Waironga, East Coast, New Zealand, to Ethel Nancy, only daughter of J.W. Roxburgh, of the bank of Australasia, Launceston.
picture

Alfred Ingram Sharpe and Gwendoleen Mary Meredith




Husband Alfred Ingram Sharpe

         Born: 1861
   Christened: 
         Died: 1909
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1883 - September Quarter - Kensington




Wife Gwendoleen Mary Meredith

         Born: 1862 - December Quarter - Wandsworth
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Frederick Meredith
       Mother: Eliza Scholefield





Children
1 M Colonel, DSO OBE Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe




         Born: 1884 - September Quarter - Kensington
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Kathleen Beatrice Alice Ricketts
         Marr: 6 Dec 1910 - St. Georges, Hanover Square



2 F Gladys Sharpe

         Born: 1887
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Doris Sharpe

         Born: 1888
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Colonel, DSO OBE Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe

Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe, DSO, OBE, retired as a Colonel in 1944.

Royal Berkshire Regiment

Alfred Meredith Sharpe was born to Alfred Ingram Sharpe, being commissioned 2nd Lieut. in to the Royal Berkshire Regiment on the 18th November 1903, after passing out of the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

He was promoted to Lt on 20th May 1906 and Captain on 10th April 1912, whilst in between marrying Kathleen Beatrice Alice Ricketts in 1910.

In 1913, 16th February he was seconded for duty as Adjutant in the terratorial battalion of the regiment. He was in this command when war broke out yet he still maintained links to his old battalion attending the funerals of Lieutenant C W Green and Lieutenant E K Colbourne at the Military Cemetery Chocques on the 27th of June 1915. He also was a guest at the Mess at Bethune on the 6th July of the same year.

Leave from 26th August to the 4th September 1915 was followed by a mention in despatches on the 15th of October and then on the 27th of the same month the battalion records show this entry.

Capt Sharpe left the Bn to rejoin the 1st Bn. It was with great regret we parted after being so long together. He was very popular with all ranks and will be greatly missed.

This effectively restored him to the establishment as he returned to the 1st battalion and a temporary rank of Major, which held until 2nd July 1916. Whilst with the 1st battalion he was court martialed on the 29th June 1916 - but acquitted. It apparently l relates to an incident in Zouaves Valley when it is alleged the battalion faltered in an attack whilst under his command. The real truth appears to be that he did not get on with the Brigade commander Kellett.

On the 29th of march 1917 he replaced Captain H. R. Gallatly, M.C. as the Brigade major of the 62nd, part of 21st division. He would hold this position until leaving for a position as a GSO2 on the 6th of August 1918, seeing action at Arras in April 1917 and later during the actions at 3rd Ypres the same year. He was involved to in the German attacks of march 1918 and ably assisted his brigade commander in those desperate days. He had been established a brevet major on the 1st January 1918.

He had whilst still part of 62nd brigade been commended for his valour and apptitude at a critical time, gazetted DSO in the papers as,

16.9.18 LG:

"Sharpe, Alfred Gerald Meredith, Capt and Brevet Major, R Berkshire regt. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a week's operations. When the enemy had launched a heavy attack, and driven back the brigade on the right, laying open the right flank, this officer went forward under heavy fire to clear up the situation, selected positions, and led up reserve companies to form a defensive flank. He also rallied leaderless men of other units and led them forward into the line. He gave
a clear and accurate report of the situation on his return to brigade headquarters

On the 6th November he was awarded the Croix de Guerre (French),

He held the temporary rank of Major whilst GSO 2nd Grade, until 20th August 1919. When he was appointed GSO1 and temp. Lt. Col. from 21st August 1919 to 26-1-1920. On the 24th October 1919 he was awarded, Ordre de la Gouronne avec Croix de Guerre, Officier and an OBE on the 12th December of the same year.

With the winding down of the war and the shrinking of the army came reductions in standings and ranks. As such he became GSO2 on the 26th January 1920. He was awarded the Order of the Crown of Italy, Officer on the 24th of March 1921. He was still a brevet Major. Full majority was granted on the 22nd January 1923.

Away from army matters Sharpe was a keen spotsman and played in the army squash championship in 1925.

He was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel on the 19th August 1928 and held the command of the 1st Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment from 1928 to 1932. Brevet Colonel from 6th May 1932 and full Colonelcy on the 19th August 1932 with seniority from 6th May was followed by command of 164th (North Lancashire) Infantry Brigade from April 1932 to May 1936.

He attended an annual dinner, 99th (Buckinghamshire and Berkshire Yeomanry) Field Brigade, R.A., 1934 and one for his old 4th battalion in 1935.

On 6th may 1936 he was retired on retired pay, seemingly taking some role in WW2 as he was once again retired to retired pay on 12th February 1944.

Divorce Court File: 7078. Appellant: Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe. Respondent: Jean Sharpe. Co-respondent: Guy Gregson. Type: Husband's petition for divorce [HD].

Divorce Court File: 5825. Appellant: Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe. Respondent: Beatrice Kathleen Alice Sharpe. Co-respondent: Claud Edmond Clayton Penny. Type: Husband's petition for divorce [hd].





picture

Hammond Meredith and Ethel M. Weckes




Husband Hammond Meredith

         Born: 1886 - West Maitland, New South Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 1945 - Canterbury, N.S.W.
       Buried: 


       Father: Henry Montague Meredith
       Mother: Minnie (Minna) Holmes


     Marriage: 1914 - St. Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales




Wife Ethel M. Weckes

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1931 - Grenfell, N.S.W
       Buried: 


picture
Lawrence Stephens and Hannah Meredith




Husband Lawrence Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 11 Jun 1767 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Hannah Meredith

         Born: 1746 - Circa
   Christened: 28 Jun 1746 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens





Children
1 M John Stephens

         Born: 1770 - circa
   Christened: 22 Dec 1770 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Harris
         Marr: 31 Oct 1803 - Eardisley, Herefordshire



2 M Joseph Stephens

         Born: 1778 - circa
   Christened: 27 Apr 1778 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Susannah Beaumont



3 M James Stephens

         Born: 1775 - circa
   Christened: 3 Dec 1775 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Sarah Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Peter Stephens
         Marr: 9 Nov 1809 - Knill, Herefordshire



5 F Anna Maria Stephens

         Born: 1780 - circa
   Christened: 22 Feb 1780 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mr. Dore



6 F Anne Stephens

         Born: 1782 - circa
   Christened: 29 Mar 1782 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mr. Johnson



7 M William Stephens

         Born: 1773 - circa
   Christened: 5 Jul 1773 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 F Hannah Stephens

         Born: 1774 - circa
   Christened: 23 Oct 1774
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Of Moorcourt, farmer.


General Notes for Child John Stephens

John of Eardisley Castle,farmer. (extracted from the private letters of the Jukes family)


General Notes for Child Joseph Stephens

Joseph of Dinedor, then Dilwyn, farmer - they had ten children, nine daughters and one son.


General Notes for Child James Stephens

James of Harpton, a farmer. (extracted from the private letters of the Jukes family)
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Henry Rogers and Hannah Bult Meredith




Husband Henry Rogers

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1866 - June Quarter - Wandsworth




Wife Hannah Bult Meredith

         Born: 3 May 1817 - St. Mary's, Kent
   Christened: 4 Sep 1827 - London, England
         Died: 1907 - December Q - Wandsworth
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Hannah Bult




General Notes (Wife)

1881 census - Back St (Private House), Petworth, Sussex, England
Henry Rogers, Head, M, 76, Tewksbury, Gloucester, England, Retired Congregational Minister
Hannah B. Rogers, Wife, M, 63, Westwick, Kent, England
Alice Austin, Serv, U, 22, Petworth, Sussex, England, Domestic Servant
(Reference: RG11, Piece / Folio 1112 / 48, Page 31)

Hannah died aged 90.

picture

Harry Rouse Meredith and Margaret Edith Underhill




Husband Harry Rouse Meredith

         Born: 27 Apr 1885 - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 Sep 1958 - Tunbridge Wells, Kent
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred John Rouse Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Florence Evered


     Marriage: 17 Mar 1917 - Romford Essex




Wife Margaret Edith Underhill

         Born: 23 Nov 1896 - Croydon, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Dec 1991 - Hythe, Kent
       Buried: 


       Father: Liet. J. Underhill
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Edward John Rouse Meredith

         Born: 25 Dec 1917 - Cambridge
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Nov 1975 - London, England
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Bridget Mary Fife English
         Marr: 6 Jul 1957 - St. John the Baptist Church, Wateringbury, Kent



2 F Peggy Margaret Meredith

         Born: 26 Dec 1920
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ronald Beeching
         Marr: 1949 - circa



3 F Barbara Joyce Meredith

         Born: 27 Apr 1923
   Christened: 
         Died: Sep 1997 - Kent, England
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Leslie Stuart Arter
         Marr: 21 Jan 1951 - Folkstone, Kent




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Tuesday, March 20, 1917; Page 1

Meredith: Underhill.--On the 17th March, 1917, at Romford, Essex. Pte. Harry Rouse Meredith, 2nd Artists Rifles O.T.C., elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred John Rouse Meredith, of Warlingham, Surrey, to Margaret Edith, elder daughter of Lieut. J. Underhill, A.S.C., and Mrs. Underhill, of Warlingham, Surrey.


General Notes for Child Edward John Rouse Meredith

They had two children who are both living.
picture

Henry Meredith and Ann Woofe




Husband Henry Meredith

         Born: 1776 - Circa
   Christened: 7 Oct 1776 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 21 May 1841
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Sally Turner


     Marriage: 




Wife Ann Woofe

         Born: 1781
   Christened: 
         Died: 1841 - After August
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Circa
   Christened: 19 Jun 1810
         Died: Dec 1819
       Buried: 



2 M Henry Meredith

         Born: 1813 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1878 - circa
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Julia Sheppard
         Marr: 5 Jul 1838




General Notes (Husband)

Henry was a Gun manufacturer.

Will dated 13 Jan 1841
Proved 24 Aug 1841
Executor was his cousin William Rogers Cope, the s/o Charles & Harriet b. 18 Oct 1815 - Will of Henry Meredith, Gun Manufacturer of Birmingham , Warwickshire 24 August 1841.

PROB 11-1950 Image 229-198 (UK National Archives)


General Notes for Child Henry Meredith

Henry was a gun manufacturer in partnership with his father as Henry Meredith & Son before 1841.

1841 Census Henry (aged 25) was living at Harpers Hill, Birmingham with his wife Julia (aged 30) and his mother Ann (aged 60) and two servants. Henry was described as a gun maker.

In 1851 census Henry a coal dealer at 5 Hagley Terrace in the household of Ann Meredith.

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
53 Hagly Road
Henry Meredith - 47 - Coal Merchant
Julia - 48 - wife
Fanny - 17 - daughter

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
53 Hagly Road
Henry Meredith - 58 - Commission Agent
Julia - 60 - "keeps a ladies school"
picture

Henry Meredith and Julia Sheppard




Husband Henry Meredith

         Born: 1813 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1878 - circa
       Buried: 


       Father: Henry Meredith
       Mother: Ann Woofe


     Marriage: 5 Jul 1838




Wife Julia Sheppard

         Born: 1811 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1889
       Buried: 


       Father: Francis Sheppard
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Fanny Meredith

         Born: 1842 - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 28 Aug 1932 - York
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Highgate Henry Phillips-Conn
         Marr: 1870 - June Quarter - Kings Norton, Staffordshire




General Notes (Husband)

Henry was a gun manufacturer in partnership with his father as Henry Meredith & Son before 1841.

1841 Census Henry (aged 25) was living at Harpers Hill, Birmingham with his wife Julia (aged 30) and his mother Ann (aged 60) and two servants. Henry was described as a gun maker.

In 1851 census Henry a coal dealer at 5 Hagley Terrace in the household of Ann Meredith.

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
53 Hagly Road
Henry Meredith - 47 - Coal Merchant
Julia - 48 - wife
Fanny - 17 - daughter

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
53 Hagly Road
Henry Meredith - 58 - Commission Agent
Julia - 60 - "keeps a ladies school"


General Notes (Wife)

In the 1871 Census collection, Julia was reported as keeping a ladies school.


General Notes for Child Fanny Meredith

Possibly the Fanny Meredith who m. Heygate Henry Phillips in Q2 1870 Kings Norton District. They are in the England 1871 census in Reading. He is a General Practitioner from Dublin University, Ireland, and she is aged 27 b. Birmingham. No trace of them in UK records after that.
picture

Henry Meredith and Sarah Wright




Husband Henry Meredith

         Born: 1800 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1865 - Circa
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1837 - Before




Wife Sarah Wright

         Born: 9 Sep 1810 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Wright
       Mother: Sarah Downes





Children
1 M Henry Frederick Meredith

         Born: 1837 - Circa - Kington, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1905 - Circa
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Lucy Anne Meteyard
         Marr: 1877 - March Q - Clun




General Notes for Child Henry Frederick Meredith

Visiting with him and his wife at the time of the 1881 census was a Martha J Downes from Titley, Hereford. They also had two servants Elizabeth M Davies and Anne Thomas, 18 and 20 from Almley and Llanleonfel.
Occupation: 1881, Ironfounder/Ironmonger etc.
Residence: 1881, 31 Duke St, Gravel Hill, Kington, Herefordshire, England.

Marriage Notes for Henry Frederick Meredith and Lucy Ann Meteyard:
Clun reg district includes Clunbury so wedding may have been there. It also includes the following:- Bishop's Castle, Clun, Clungunford, Dinmore, Edgton, Hill End, Hopesay, Hopton Castle, Horderley Hall, Lydbury North, Lydham, Mainstone, More, Mucklewick, Myndtown, Norbury, Old Church Moor, Ratlinghope, Shelve, Snead (1837-84), Wentnor.






picture

Henry Frederick Meredith and Lucy Anne Meteyard




Husband Henry Frederick Meredith

         Born: 1837 - Circa - Kington, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1905 - Circa
       Buried: 


       Father: Henry Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Wright


     Marriage: 1877 - March Q - Clun




Wife Lucy Anne Meteyard

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Joseph Meteyard
       Mother: Anne Maria Beddoes





Children
1 F Florence L. Meredith

         Born: 1878 - Circa - Kington, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Mary M. Meredith

         Born: 1879 - Circa - Kington, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Visiting with him and his wife at the time of the 1881 census was a Martha J Downes from Titley, Hereford. They also had two servants Elizabeth M Davies and Anne Thomas, 18 and 20 from Almley and Llanleonfel.
Occupation: 1881, Ironfounder/Ironmonger etc.
Residence: 1881, 31 Duke St, Gravel Hill, Kington, Herefordshire, England.

Marriage Notes for Henry Frederick Meredith and Lucy Ann Meteyard:
Clun reg district includes Clunbury so wedding may have been there. It also includes the following:- Bishop's Castle, Clun, Clungunford, Dinmore, Edgton, Hill End, Hopesay, Hopton Castle, Horderley Hall, Lydbury North, Lydham, Mainstone, More, Mucklewick, Myndtown, Norbury, Old Church Moor, Ratlinghope, Shelve, Snead (1837-84), Wentnor.






General Notes for Child Florence L. Meredith

Residence: 1881, 31 Duke St, Gravel Hill, Kington, Herefordshire, England.


General Notes for Child Mary M. Meredith

Residence: 1881, 31 Duke St, Gravel Hill, Kington, Herefordshire, England.


picture

James Meredith and Elizabeth Morris




Husband James Meredith

         Born: 1750 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 27 Apr 1789 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Elizabeth Morris

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1789 - about
   Christened: 19 May 1789 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Elizabeth Meredith

         Born: 1791 - circa
   Christened: 11 Mar 1791 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Susannah Meredith

         Born: 1794 - about
   Christened: 6 Jun 1794 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
James Meredith and Phoebe Wylde




Husband James Meredith

         Born: 1804 - Circa
   Christened: 10 Jun 1804 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1861 - Before
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Meredith
       Mother: Esther (Hester) Marston


     Marriage: 4 Nov 1841 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Phoebe Wylde

         Born: 29 Aug 1813 - Lingen, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 1865 - December Q - Presteigne, Hefeordshire
       Buried: 


       Father: John Wylde (Wild)
       Mother: Sarah





Children
1 M Herbert Meredith

         Born: 1842 - circa
   Christened: 27 Jan 1842 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Henry James Meredith

         Born: 1843 - circa
   Christened: 26 May 1843 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Frances Meredith

         Born: 1846 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Alfred Meredith

         Born: 1847 - circa
   Christened: 31 Oct 1847 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1849 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Phoebe Meredith

         Born: 1851 - December Q
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Decima Frances Meredith

         Born: 1854 - March Q - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1885 - September Quarter - Shifnal, Shropshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Samuel Jones
         Marr: 1876 - December Q - Leominster, Herefordshire




General Notes (Husband)

Marriage Certificate:

Parish Church of Brampton Bryan - 4 November 1841 - both parties of full age.

James - a farmer and Phoebe, a servant in the household of Thomas Meredith (snr) his father - they both of Beresford at the time of the marriage, Phoebe's father was a John Wylde, a tailor. The marriage was witnessed by Mary Ann Turner and Thomas Edwards - no family members!! This may have been a sign of disapproval by the family as Phoebe would have been 7 months pregnant at the time of the marriage.


General Notes (Wife)

1861 Census: England- Herefordshire - Beresford and Pedwardine - District 8
Household: Phoebe Meredith [widow of James] with daughters Frances, Phoebe and Decima, and a son [sic] Mary. Phoebe is a pauper living in Oakhill Cottage.

1871 Census:

Household: Phoebe Meredith [widow of Thomas], with son Henry James and daughter Decima.


General Notes for Child Herbert Meredith

1861 Census: Herbert was living with his uncle John.


General Notes for Child Henry James Meredith

1861 Census: Henry was living with his uncle John.
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James Watkins and Jane Meredith




Husband James Watkins

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 26 Apr 1723 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Jane Meredith

         Born: 1690 - Circa
   Christened: 26 Dec 1690 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Ralph Meredith
       Mother: Ellinor




picture
James Brown Moodie and Janie Chalmers Meredith




Husband James Brown Moodie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 Jun 1958
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Moodie
       Mother: Helen Inglis Brown


     Marriage: 21 Sep 1909 - New Zealand




Wife Janie Chalmers Meredith

         Born: 1870 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers





Children
1 F Helen Moodie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Sheila Moodie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Joyce Moodie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

James Brown was the son of Thomas Moodie and Helen Inglis Brown. He was Masterton manager for Dalgety & Co.

New Zealand Free Lance, Volume 10, Issue 482, 25 September 1909, Page 14

Mr James B. Moodie, Masterton manager for Dalgety and Co., was married on Tuesday last to Miss Janie Chambers Meredith of Masterton. The bride was given away by her brother (Mr. J.M. Meredith), and was attended by two bridesmaids, Miss Eileen Moodie and Miss Doris Gawith. Mr. H.W. Rishworth was best man, and Mr. A.R. Schlanders was groomsman. Mr. and Mrs. Moodie motored away on their honeymoon, not feeling the least bit moody. The presents included a solid silver tea service from the Masterton staff of Dalgety and Co.

picture

John Meredith and Sally Turner




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1742 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Jan 1743 - St. Philip's, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 30 Apr 1790
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth


     Marriage: 20th or 28th August 1767 - St. Philip's, Birmingham




Wife Sally Turner

         Born: 1750
   Christened: 
         Died: 1819
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Louisa Anne Meredith

         Born: 1768 - Circa
   Christened: 22 Dec 1768 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: Feb 1839
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Thomas Twamley
         Marr: 1 Aug 1790 - St. Phillip, Birmingham



2 M John Meredith

         Born: 1770 - Circa
   Christened: 26 May 1770 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 30 May 1850 - Leamington
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Lucy Lawrence
         Marr: 13 Mar 1800 - Saint Anne Soho, Westminster, London
       Spouse: Jane Aston
         Marr: 3 Oct 1814 - Rowington, Warwickshire



3 M Charles Meredith

         Born: 1771 - Circa
   Christened: 28 Aug 1771 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 14 Jun 1843
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Greaves



4 F Sally Meredith

         Born: 1774 - Circa
   Christened: 23 Feb 1774
         Died: 6 Jun 1774
       Buried: 



5 F Ann Meredith

         Born: 1775 - Circa
   Christened: 10 Jan 1775
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Henry Meredith

         Born: 1776 - Circa
   Christened: 7 Oct 1776 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 21 May 1841
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ann Woofe



7 M George H. Meredith




         Born: 13 Feb 1778 - Castlebromwich, Birmingham, Warwick, England
   Christened: 23 Apr 1791 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwick
         Died: 21 Jun 1856 - Swanport, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Westall Hicks
         Marr: 16 Sep 1805 - Abingdon, Berkshire
       Spouse: Mary Anne Evans
         Marr: 30 Oct 1820 - Wales




General Notes (Husband)

In a short Will dated 7 April 1790 and proved 23 Dec 1790 John appointed his brother-in-law John Cope as his Executor.

Will of John Meredith, Gentleman of Castle Bromwich 23 December 1790 PROB 11-1199 Image 86-379 (UK National Archives) - Birmingham Barrister and Solicitor.
John Meredith is described as a clerk to:
- the Street Commisioners and the Birmingham Boat Company in 1770
- the builders of the Birmingham to Worcester Canal and the trustees for building the new church of St. Paul and St. Mary in 1772
- the builders of the Coventry and Oxford Canal in 1774.
He is listed In a Birmingham Directory of 1777 as an Attorney at Law at 17 Temple Street.
He secured a lease on Castle Bromwich Hall and the family lived there between 1785 and 1791.

He was referred to as deceased in his mother Elizabeth's Will of 16 Sep 1790.


General Notes (Wife)

Sally’s sister Hannah married Matthew Linwood. Their daughter Mary was a renowned artist in needlework.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography – entry for Mary Linwood.


General Notes for Child John Meredith

John was President of the Birmingham Law Society 1825-32, Chairman of the Leamington Board of Commissioners, and one of the Executors of Sir Thomas Lawrence - Gentleman's Magazine 1850 p.106

1841 Census:

John (aged 65) living with Jane (aged 50) at Eastnor Villa, Radford Road, Kenilworth, Leamington, Warwickshire with four servants.

The Gentleman's Magazine - 1850

May 30. At Leamington, aged 80, John Meredith esq. The deceased was for several years Chairman of the Leamington Board of Commissioners. He was one of the executors of Sir Thomas Lawrence, his first wife being a daughter of that celebrated man. He was subsequently united to Miss Aston, of Rowington Hall, who survives him.


General Notes for Child Charles Meredith

Charles was a partner in the firm of Meredith & Brown, solicitors of Leicester. John Liptrott Greaves was a brother-in-law. John Liptrott Greaves may be the son of Rev. Thomas Greaves (1734-1806) and Frances Liptrott (1737-1811) d/o Rev. John Liptrott. The reverends were rectors of Broughton Astley

ASTON v. MEREDITH.

1871 Feb. 25.

Practice-Partition-Sale-31 & 32 Vict. c. 40, s. 4.

A sale may be decreed under the Partition Act, 1868, although the bill contains no prayer for partition.

CHARLES MEREDITH, by his will, dated the 7th of June, 1841, devised real estate to the use of John Liptrott Greaves and Joseph Brown, upon trust, after decease and failure of children of his daughter Frances .Meredith, for all and every his nephews and nieces, children of his sister Louisa Ann Twamley, and his brothers John, Henry, and George, who should be living at the decease of his daughter, and who should attain twenty-one or marry, as tenants in common; and also the issue then living, who should attain twenty-one or marry, of any of his said nephews or nieces who might have died in the lifetime of his daughter, such issue to take per stirpes as tenants in common. He appointed the above-named trustees his executors.

The testator died on the 14th of June, 1843. The executors renounced probate, and never accepted or acted in the trusts; and the testator's brother and heir-at-law, John Meredith, conveyed the freeholds to the use of himself and the Plaintiff John Aston.

Testator's daughter Frances died in 1868, without having had issue.

Louisa Ann Twamley died in 1840, having had one child, Louisa Ann, wife of Charles Meredith.

John Meredith died in 1850, having had one child, the Plaintiff, Lucy Louisa Ann, wife of the Plaintiff John Aston.

Henry Meredith died on the 21st of May, 1841, having had two children, one of whom died in December, 1819, an infant. The other was the Defendant Henry Meredith.

George Meredith died in 1856, having had eleven children, namely, George, who died in the year 1836, never having been married ;Sarah Poynter, widow; Louisa Bell, widow; Sabina Boyes, widow; Charles; John; Maria, wife of Joseph Henry Kay; Edwin; Clara Dry, widow; Fanny, wife of Francis Seymour Gaynor ;and Rosina Despard, who died before 1868, leaving one child, Frederica Mary, now an infant.

The bill was filed in April, 1869, stating the above facts, and that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Meredith, Mrs. Boyes, Charles and John Meredith, Mrs. Kay, Edwin Meredith, Mrs. Dry and Miss Despard were out of the jurisdiction ; and alleging as follows:-

'' Having regard to the nature of the property, and the number of the parties interested therein, and to the absence abroad or disability of some of the parties, it will be much more beneficial to the parties interested that each property should be sold, and the proceeds of such sale distributed amongst such parties according to their rights and interests, than that such property should be partitioned amongst them."

The bill then prayed for a sale, without any prayer for a partition.

On the 11th of June, 1869, a decree was made, upon motion for decree, directing inquiries as to the interested.

On the 1st of October, 1869, Mrs. Poynter died, having devised her interest in the real estate unto and to the use of James Goodall Francis, Elizabeth Sabina Poynter, Charles Meredith Poynter, and George Farbrace Poynter, and their heirs, upon trusts for sale, for the benefit of the three last-named persons. She appointed the same four persons executors. They also were out of the jurisdiction.

Notice of the motion for decree had been served on all of the above persons who were adults, except J. G. Francis, and on the guardian of the infant.
The cause now came on upon further consideration.

Mr. L. Field, for the Plaintiffs:-

We ask for a sale: Silver v. Udall (1). All the parties have been served, in accordance with Hurry v. Hurry (2), except J. G. Francis, who is a bare trustee of a power.

It should be stated, however, that Lord Romilly, in a case of Teall v. Watts (3), seems to have thought it right that a bill seeking a sale under the Partition Act should contain a prayer for partition.

Mr. Dunn for the Defendants, supported the application, which was not opposed.

SIR JAMES BACON, V.C., decreed a sale of the property in the usual form; the money to be paid into Court, subject to further order.

Solicitors : Messrs. Field, Roscoe, Field & Francis, agents for Messrs. Stone, Paget, & Billson, Leicester.

ASTON v. MEREDITH.

1872, March 16.

Practice-Partition Act, 1868-Payment out of proceeds of Sale.

The Court will not make an order for payment out to trustees of money produced by a sale under the Partition Act, 1868, where it had been paid into Court, and some of the persons interested were married women, and resident in Australia.

THIS was a suit instituted under the Partition Act, 1858 (31& 32 Vict. c. 40), for a sale in lieu of partition. At the original hearing of the cause inquiries were directed as to who were the parties interested, and in what shares. At the hearing on first further consideration a sale was directed. The case is reported (1), where the facts are fully stated. The property having been sold, and the purchase-money paid into Court, the cause now came on for hearing on second further consideration.

The property was divisible into thirteenths. One of the persons interested was an infant. Four of the persons interested, two of whom mere married women, were resident in England; and the persons entitled to the other shares, two of whom mere married women, were resident in Australia. The purchase-money had been invested, and was now represented by £12,500 2s. 5d. consols.

Mr. Kay, Q.C. (Mr. L. Field with him), for the Plaintiffs (the surviving trustee of the settlement, and his wife, who was entitled to one share), asked that the fund in Court, with the exception of the infant's share, which was to be carried to her separate account, might, under sect. 23 of the Leases and Sales of Settled Estates Act (19 & 20 Vict. c. 120), which is incorporated in the Partition Act, 1868 (31 6-32 Vict. c. 40, s. s), be paid over to the Plaintiff, the surviving trustee, or to have a new trustee to be approved by the Court, in order that it might be paid by them to the persons entitled. In consequence of many of the persons interested being in Australia, great delay and expense would be incurred if these shares were ordered to be paid out to them in the usual manner, and powers of attorney had consequently to be obtained. He referred to cases under the Lands Clauses Consolidation Act, 1845,and other cognate Acts, in which similar orders had been made: Re Roberts (1) ; Grant v. Grant (2) ;and distinguished the present case from Higgs v. Dorkis (3), in which Vice-Chancellor Wickens had declined-- married woman and an infant being the only persons interested--o order the money produced by a sale under the Act to be paid to trustees.

Mr. E. C. Dunn, for the Defendant and persons served with notice of the decree (the other persons interested), supported the application.

SIR JAMES BACON, V.C., said that, although he was always anxious, where it was possible, with due regard to the protection of the persons interested, to save as much as possible delay and expense, he did not think he should, under :the, circumstances of the case, be justified in making the order applied for. The fund must accordingly be paid out to the persons interested in the usual manner.

Solicitors for all parties: Messrs. Field, Roscoe, Field, & Francis.

1841 Census:

Warwickshire
Leamington Priors
Newbold Road
Charles Meredith - 65 - Independent


General Notes for Child Ann Meredith

Died Unmarried


General Notes for Child Henry Meredith

Henry was a Gun manufacturer.

Will dated 13 Jan 1841
Proved 24 Aug 1841
Executor was his cousin William Rogers Cope, the s/o Charles & Harriet b. 18 Oct 1815 - Will of Henry Meredith, Gun Manufacturer of Birmingham , Warwickshire 24 August 1841.

PROB 11-1950 Image 229-198 (UK National Archives)


General Notes for Child George H. Meredith

George Meredith was at one time known as "the king of the east coast of Van Diemen's Land"!

George served in the navy.

George entered the Navy in 1794. He was a Lieutenant in the Marines and served in America, the West Indies and Egypt.14 It was reported that at Alexandria, in 1803, he scaled the 180-foot high Pompey's Pillar, to remove the French cap-of-liberty placed there by Napoleon's forces and replace it with the Union Jack. Subsequently, the cap was suspended from the ceiling of the grand hall of the British Museum.

George retired in 1806 on half pay and farmed first near Newbury (a conveyance of 1809 records the location)16 and then at Rhyndaston in Pembrokeshire before emigrating to Australia in 1820, shortly after his 2nd marriage.

MEREDITH, GEORGE (1777-1856), settler, was born on 13 February 1777 near Birmingham, England, the fourth son of John Meredith and his wife Sally, née Turner; his father was a prominent barrister and solicitor and descended from the ancient Amerydeth family of Devon and Wales. In 1796 Meredith was commissioned second lieutenant in the marines and later served in the West Indies, at the blockade of Ferrol in Spain and on the Mediterranean Station. At Alexandria in 1803 he made a daring ascent of Pompey's Pillar, a granite column 180 feet (55 m) high, to fasten the Union Jack in place of a French cap-of-liberty placed there by Napoleon's forces. In 1805 when recruiting in Berkshire he met and married Sarah, the daughter of H. W. Hicks. Next year he retired on half-pay and commenced farming at Newbury; later the family move to Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, and farmed there until 1819 when the post-war rural depression stimulated his interest in emigration. He then had two boys and three girls, the eldest being...

Meredith resolved to settle in Van Diemen's Land and applied to the Colonial Office for letters of introduction. In company with several partners he chartered a ship, but early in 1820 his wife died suddenly, thus jeopardizing the whole venture. By good fortune their former governess and companion, Mary Evans, consented to take care of the young family on the voyage. In July official permission was granted and in October the ship was loaded with personal possessions, extensive farm equipment and a small flock of merino sheep. An agreement had already been made to obtain additional stock from Edward Lord's flocks already on the island. The original partners, Meredith, Joseph Archer and Thomas Gregson, were joined by a number of passengers, including the Amos family, John Kerr, Francis Desailly and John Meredith, a cousin of the family. Before embarkation George Meredith and Mary Evans were quietly married and on 8 November the expedition sailed in the Emerald and reached Hobart Town on 13 March 1821.

After settling the family in temporary lodgings Meredith presented his letters of introduction to Lieutenant-Governor William Sorell and began to look for suitable land. He had already experienced the limited market outlets for inland farms in England and Wales, and was determined to secure coastal grants if possible. According to government surveys the most promising land lay at Oyster Bay, about 140 miles (225 km) distant on the eastern coast, and a small party set out in a whale-boat to visit the district. Close examination proved the land to be greatly inferior to the official descriptions, but certain parts capable of development were selected and the party returned to Hobart on 24 April to lodge the formal applications.

Official permission was duly given to the whole scheme, which included the individual grants, and late in September, after the first livestock were dispatched overland, a small schooner was chartered to take the settlers to Oyster Bay. There they found part of the granted land occupied by William Talbot, an emigrant Irishman who had already unsuccessfully sought inclusion in the group and now claimed that the land had been granted to him. Vigorously protesting he withdrew from the district but the dispute was finally decided in Meredith's favour in 1826.

Meanwhile the grants were developed and improved, both for seasonal crops and grazing stock; a tannery and flour-mill were established at the Meredith River, and bay whaling stations set up on near-by islands to try out whale oil for export. In a shipyard at Waterloo Point were built several trading vessels and also small craft for the use of sealing gangs on their visits to the Bass Strait islands. These enterprises required both skilled labour and special equipment and necessitated repeated visits to Hobart, so Meredith was able to maintain a close interest and participation in the public affairs of the free colonists. In 1824, after the declaration of a new Charter of Justice for Van Diemen's Land, Meredith and many other colonists met publicly to express their appreciation and to seek more benefits from the British government. In March 1827, after news that property owners in New South Wales were petitioning for an elective legislature, Meredith and other landowners arranged a public meeting to encourage similar efforts in Van Diemen's Land. A petition and addresses were prepared for submission to London by Lieutenant-Governor (Sir) George Arthur. Through misunderstanding the documents were delayed; copies were later sent privately to England but the whole matter lapsed because the Colonial Office disapproved the colonists' attitude toward Arthur. Later that year Meredith and others again came into conflict with the lieutenant-governor over legislation to license the press, with which Meredith had strong connexions. Bitter official opposition toward Meredith continued throughout Arthur's term and constituted a severe restriction to his personal life and public spirit.

In the early 1820s many isolated settlements were under repeated attack from escaped convicts. In October 1825 the homestead at Oyster Bay was raided in Meredith's absence by the bushranger Matthew Brady. None of the family was injured but the house was ransacked and a servant taken hostage was later killed; fortunately the plate and other valuables were found buried near Hobart and returned. The family had first lived at Redbanks, a turf hut strengthened with timber, on the south bank of the Meredith River. About 1827 they moved into Belmont, a more spacious home lying about one mile (1.6 km) further inland. About 1836 they moved into Cambria, a large dwelling designed by Meredith near the original home and surrounded by gardens which had been steadily developed since their arrival. From that time the management of the property devolved more upon the eldest sons, and they took the entire care of the estate when his wife Mary died unexpectedly in 1842. By his second marriage he had three sons and four daughters, of whom the second son John remained in charge at Oyster Bay until George Meredith died in 1856.

Several of Meredith's children became prominent in later years; his second son, Charles, was appointed colonial treasurer of Van Diemen's Land in 1857 and continued in high public offices for twenty years; the fourth son, John, was appointed a magistrate at Swansea in 1855 and contributed greatly to the welfare of the district; the fifth son, Edwin, migrated to New Zealand as a pioneer colonist in 1851, and the fifth, daughter Clara, married Richard Dry.

George Meredith possessed qualities of endurance and strength which, coupled with his early experience at sea in command of men and subsequent farming life in England, resulted in a character eminently suitable for pioneer colonial life. The enthusiasm and encouragement of his wife Mary also contributed greatly to his successful career in public and private life.

When George and his family immigrated, the ages of his children increased somewhat quickly - possibly due to the fact that they became eligible for land grants sooner? It appears that George overstated their ages.

Sarah died in about 1820 (in childbirth from memory), after which George married Mary Anne Evans who had been the children's nanny.

his wife Sarah had died in 1820 and in 1818 George got their 18 years old "handsome and voluptuous" servant Mary Evans (later to become his 2nd wife) pregnant. By changing the ages this would cloud the fact?

Pioneers of the East Coast from 1642

Swansea, Bicheno

by Karl von Steiglitz

Extracts

LIEUT. GEORGE MEREDITH (LATE OF THE ROYAL MARINES) ARRIVES IN HOBART TOWN AND PREPARES TO VISIT THE COAST WITH THE BROTHERS AMOS

Some of our most important settlers arrived in Tasmania aboard the ship "Emerald"' (about 400 tons), under Capt. Elliott, on the 17th March, 1821. George Meredith, snr,, and, it is supposed, Joseph Archer, had chartered her privately, to bring them and their families to this country, making history from the fact that she was the first vessel to be privately, chartered for Van Diemen's Land. The "Emerald" had left privately, four months earlier and called in at Teneriffe and the Cape on the way out.

Other pioneering families on board included Adam Amos, his wife and three sons; John Amos, his wife and one son-, the Gregson family; and J. C. Tolman, who was found to be suffering from scurvy on arrival.

Only a fortnight passed before the quick actin Meredith was able to write home and give an interesting account of his impressions and intentions. The letter is dated 2nd April 1821, from Hobart Town. George Meredith to his brother John Meredith, Old Square, Birmingham.

“Dear John. Our safe arrival at our destined port and the land of promise safely over, we are living in a cottage Mr. Lord provided for us, about three miles distant from Hobart Town, which, although small and unfurnished, is definitely preferable to residing with the Place itself, and, indeed, offers comforts superior to any our passengers have met with; for I must needs confess no station I ever yet visited boasted so little accommodation or convenience for strangers. However, it is as yet in its infancy and many circumstances combine to account for the present state of things.

“I have been well received by His Honour the Lieut.-Governor (Sorell) partly owing to my private letter from Mr. Goulburn and perhaps the more so from my acquaintance with Mr. Lord, who appears to be on the best footing with him. I have dines once with him and had several private interviews; the last this day previous to my setting off for the Eastern Coast, where I think it highly probable from the concurring information I have received, that I and my party shall settle. It was always my view from the first to branch out to some coast situation calculated for the site of a new township, with a back country fit for intended locations and I have some confidence that the result of my projected excusion (sic) and survey will make me amends for the disappointment I suffered in not finding a desirable opening on the Western Coast, as I had expected, at one of the newly discovered harbours of Port Davey and McQuarrie in the vicinity of neither of which is there any desirable open country - and, if there was, the prevailing winds would be unfavourable to water communication, and a chain of mountains which run from a little to the westward or Port Dalrymple nearly to this plain, interpose and effectual ban to inland intercourse.

The country between this and Port Dalrymple still affords many desirable situations for a settlement except as to distance from either port or market, nothing to any extent being VACANT within less than 20 to 30 miles from water carriage which is a great objection, independently of a settlement in that line of country bringing me in contact with residents of an inferior and perhaps not very moral class.

Now, if I do fix on the Eastern Coast which the Lieut. Governor is desirous to have respectably settled, I do not doubt being followed by succeeding emigrants from England and I have already come to a satisfactory understanding with the Lieut.-Governor on the subject. There are many of the natives at present along that coast but they will necessarily give way as we establish and extend ourselves. They are the most wretched of all aborigines I have yet seen or heard of. Cowardly but treacherous, I understand, and several persons have been violently speared by them for want of due precaution. I shall, however, have four free persons with me and, though an excursion of from nine days to a fortnight among them and their wiles may not be altogether a pleasurable one, I look to it as safe and advantageous. When I return I will speak of the country of which at present I know nothing but by report.

“The borders of the Derwent are high land and almost one entire forest. The sheep here are large but rather leggy - and wool still coarse. The pigs very good; cattle but middling and horses small and exceptionally dear; one worth £20 in England being here of the value of £50 at least. The climate is indeed fine and vegetation of all kinds rapid and vigorous. The sweet briar is a common hedge and the most beautiful green-house plants grow wild.

“Money was never scarcer than at present, that is Government Bills, which almost exclusively form the medium of remittance to England. The market for nearly everything I have brought out is overstocked and my only chance to convert my goods is to have them retailed but I will write Henry on this subject. If the two stills I ordered are not sent out the smaller one of 30 gallons must be exchanged for one of not less that 40. Nothing under that will be allowed to work here and distillation commences August 1822. I have written but a disjointed letter and must be more connected and explanatory when my mind is less occupied and when I can give my observations instead of the report of others. Thank God we all enjoy good health and spirits and WE ALL send our united good wishes to YOU ALL and with every kind sentiment towards you all believe me Ever Your Affectionate Brother Geo. H. Meredith.”

THE FIRST SETTLERS AND THE LAND THEY FOUND

Diary of Lieut. George Meredith R.N., written in 1821 when he sailed up the east coast with the brothers Amos in search of land for settlement.

April 5th. Left Newtown, Thursday morning, 5th April, 9 o'clock in a whaleboat. Self and six people. Pulled down to Iron Pot Island, partly calm, partly against sea-breeze, by 2 o'clock. Ran down thence to about 6 miles short of East Bay Neck with a fine sea breeze by ½ past 5. The wind failing and near sunset, beach on the larboard side. N.B. - Slopen Island a good place to form a raft near and erect boilers for whale fishing. Abundance of large crabs off Hog Island as well as Dough Boy Island.

April 6th. Broke camp at half past seven. Arrived at East Bay Neck at half past nine but made for the wrong side. Rowed round and landed at ten at low water. Waited for flood to get the boat up. Meantime carried over things. I examined the land to the westward. When the boat was got over, strong breeze set right ahead and again encamped for the night. N.B.-East Bay divided in two by a point and a reef of rocks near the centre. Land to the W. is left of point. Good rich marly loam, nearly all the breadth but does not reach all the way to the other bay. Another considerable breadth of similar land lies on the ….or E. end of the bay, but does not run so far inland. The middle part, through which the boat carriage road runs, is light sandy earth, but might be brought under the plough and made turnip and barley land, but the whole is thickly timbered and would occasion much labour and expense. It certainly would be desirable to have a settlement at the Neck, conditioning for a team to be always ready to haul over a boat upon wheels fitted on purpose at a fixed rate. And if Oyster Bay on the Eastern Coast is settled, small grants may be properly reserved along the boat road for the settler to erect granaries or depots on. The beach on the East Bay side is bare sand for a great distance, and the creek on the other side mud down to low water mark. A pier might be run out on the inside and a landing place made on the other side by laying some fallen trees with a little jetty at the end.

ARRIVAL AT OYSTER BAY

10th April. Saw the tracks of dogs and men on the sand and waited till about two o'clock and Mr. Amos not arrived. Concluded therefore they might have gone on to Inlet Bay (Little Swan Port?) to meet us there and launched the boat to proceed there.

There is no river at Grindstone Bay and had three miles to go for water-stagnant and tasting of gum leaf.

The land behind Grindstone Bay is partly good light soil with a marly substratum and partly of the character of the flats around Skate Bay (Spring Bay) which, in fact, come down to Grindstone Bay, and the valley flats land appears to run along the coast behind the highland bluffs to a considerable distance with almost a level inland communication the whole way.

Arrived off Inland Bay about three o'clock, but for the chance of Mr. Amos seeing the boat, remained on the Sandy Bay beyond it where I landed at four o'clock and walked back in order to examine the country between the bays. Did not reach the tent for fear of having ranged rather far for the time of day. Still no tidings of Mr. Amos. This land will come under the general description tomorrow. Flat land….all the way.

April 11th. After breakfast, Mr. Amos not having arrived, sent two men by land to the herdsmen's hut for intelligence and set off with one man to examine the land round to the south of the inlet leaving two persons in charge of the tent with directions not to fire except something of moment occurred, as I should consider it an alarm.

At ten o'clock heard a musket fired at the tent, hastened towards it, but hearing a second, concluded there could be nothing serious and Mr. Amos had returned, therefore answered it and continued our walk.

On returning to the tent, found Mr. Amos and the guide who had gone on as far as the Great Salt Water River round the N. point of Grindstone Bay.

Went out after a scanty meal with the hut guide and four dogs to get a kangaroo for supper. Put up two, and each taking a different course, killed both. While half skinning the last, the two men who had been to the hut joined us with the other two stockmen and six does and two kangaroos they had killed. N.B.-Good entertainment for man and beast.

April 12th. Immediately after breakfast departed with the intention of being governed by the wind as to proceeding on to Great Swan Port and taking the intermediate places back or not.

The wind being ahead with a dense fog just as we rounded the point into a kind of bay at the south end of which is a salt water river, with a narrow channel to enter on the N. side of the mouth, close to the shore which is rocky and a surf runs all the way from this side to the other across the sandy beach.

It was nearly low water as we proceeded up, the channels for the boat were narrow and intricate. Through one which reached right across from N. to S. over a pebbly bottom with weedy mud on both sides it was difficult to get the boat ahead against the tide current. With both sails and oars, following the sinuosities of the river, I suppose we proceeded up about three miles when we stuck fast and with difficulty got the boat clear again. This was just above a small green-margined low island with a channel each side. We took the S. side but it afterwards appeared the other side was the most direct. The mud and weeds coming as far into the river on each side, we had to fall down considerably before we could land, which we effected at the upper or western point of the creek, the first principal one on the S. side, about two miles up, at the head of which a mountain stream runs in winter. Indeed, about a mile or one half inland there was a weak spring still running for a short distance, but it had no apparent source or termination. It seemed to rise through and lose itself again in the loose sandy soil. This spring Mr. Amos had crossed on his way to this river and he confirmed my conviction that there was a vale and level communication at the back of the coast all the way from Prossers Bay.

The day being far spent, had only time to cross one of these easy ascents of forest land which constitute the chief of all this coast country, and found it tally precisely with that already noted. The low valleys vary in width, sometimes not more than a hundred yards, sometimes even a mile, but the great extent of arable land offers itself on the banks of this spreading river, and the accumulation of mud and vegetable matter, from the mouth upwards would be a never ceasing supply of manure for it. There was every appearance of summer streams emptying themselves in many places on both sides and at its head. I have no doubt water may be obtained all the year by sinking wells in the lower land or even by damming up the mountain rivers and clearing out pools for it to lodge in a body. Killed one black swan.

April 13th, Came down the river, which now, being high water, with mud banks covered, presented a beautiful and grand appearance, but I would advise it to be first entered with the young flow immediately after low water that the proper channels may be known - otherwise a boat would be continually grounding.

On opening the Bay in clear weather, found the level ground to extend about two miles to the N. with a considerable depth inland all round by the river.

GREAT SWAN PORT IS REACHED

Stood over direct for Great Swan Port with a fine breeze across a wide and deep bay to the west I n which Little Swan Port is stated to lay. Entered the river at one o'clock over the bar or sand spit instead of the proper channel which lies close to shore. Sailed up the river as far as the fourth reach where the channel circles round to southward. Landed about two to dine and examine the neck between the river and bay which is about ½ mile wide and a mere deposit of sand by the ocean, though timber of considerable size grows on it.

At three o'clock proceeded up as far as the depth of water would admit, but not finding a sufficient channel by sunset returned for the night down to the point of land on the N. side above the circle. Unfortunately had no water remaining and could not meet any, although a swan fold was on the spot - a circumstance to us indicative of there being water to hand. Sought again in the morning without success, and were obliged to leave without having taken tea, supper or breakfast.

April 14th. Again proceeded up to the same place we met the obstruction last night but without better success, and after trying several hours were again obliged to relinquish the task and return and seek for water as the first object.

Instead of going down to the mouth where water was stated to be, proceeded up what had the appearance of a creek or inlet round to the E. of the point where we had slept the night before to try both for water and to examine if it led to any inland communication, and after about half a mile were agreeably surprised to find it turn to the N. and continue a fine open deep river channel. Landed and found water round the first point on the E. side where we made a hearty meal of steamed kangaroo, and leaving two men in charge of the tent and things, proceeded up the river to see if it really did continue to any extent.

Proceeded as far as the sand bank at the head of the third reach and seeing a large breadth of water both round to the N.E. over on the other side of the sand bank, and also round to the S.W., returned to the tent for the night in full confidence that the latter would lead us into the fresh water river communicating with the Plains, and that the former would lead up to some other river and desirable land. N.B. - the land all along the east side where we slept is a deep pure sand without any substratum within a foot or eighteen inches in the places we tried - Yet the timber grows well.

April 15th. Proceeded after breakfast up the river, but on rounding the mud and sand banks on the western hand began to lose hoped of the S.W. water leading inland to the Great Swan River as it seemed to be completely landlocked and a mere bay. When we got within about 150 yards of the termination round at the southern end, the boat grounded and I sent two men on shore to end all doubts. In an hour they returned with a full conviction of having found an entrance a little to the east, but on questioning them I found that they had merely seen the passages we had already tried from a new position. Pulled all round the west shore without finding either river, spring, or run of fresh water, nor could we discover an entrance into a sheet of water seen over the sand bank to the N.E.. Landed over on the western and northern shores and found a considerable breadth of flat land of a better quality than any yet seen, with more low ground. Deep water and a bold shore for a boat to land on the further N. side. Returned after sunset to last night's camp.

April 16th. Proceeded after breakfast to make one more effort to pass up the main course into the fresh water river at high tide. At half past eleven o'clock again gave up the attempt and made for the place where we dined on the 13th for the purpose of walking up the south side to examine the channel at low water from the shore and determine if it were possible to effect a passage. On arriving opposite the place where we were obstructed in the boat, sent a man across the water, the tide being nearly ebb and found there was no channel whatever. Therefore, if there should be so great a body of fresh water coming down the river from the Plains as is stated, it must spread itself over the great expanse of tide water and be lost in it.

Crossed over the Isthmus to the ocean to ascertain how far it would be expedient to send a boat round to meet me on my return from the Plains to which I determined to walk the next day, although lame and suffering from a bowel complaint. Found this part of the neck of the Isthmus like the lower, an entire bed of sand. Bathed in the sea and walked along the fine sand till opposite our tent.

April 17th. Set off with Mr. Amos and the two guides for the Plains leaving four men at the tent. Found all the south side one entire bed of flags, rushes and swamp (after passing the tide way) which continued extending to the southward far above the real mouth of the river. Crossed through the top part at the expense of a wetting, it having rained hard the preceding night.

These rushes, etc., extend from the river's mouth for a mile then abrupt stony hills for about two more, when you enter upon the plains. after walking a mile or better, settled for the night with merely a few boughs placed as a screen against the wind, but unluckily it rained nearly the whole night and having come in wet the middle, and my bowel complaint becoming more severe, passed a very unpleasant night, the ground very wet. We had two kangaroo dogs and a man killed us a kangaroo for supper.

April 18th. After taking some kangaroo soup, proceeded along the riverside to the N.W. about two miles when I sent Watson (the guide?) back to the tent to take the boat round the isthmus to meet us at the bottom of the bay as it would save half a day in time besides giving us an opportunity of taking a much greater sweep of country to the westward and southward on our way back.

About two miles further up, the river contracts, and there is a fall of, say about two feet in twenty yards and the water a few inches deep only. It then opens and deepens again and afterwards again contracts and becomes shallow so as to be a mere brook.

At this place we made a fire and some kangaroo soup, when at the moment of sitting down to it, a most violent thunderstorm came on with hail and rain and completely drenching us through, and it rained more or less nearly the remainder of the day.

From this point we made first S. and then S.E. for the head of the Bay where we arrived about half past seven, having travelled through the bush an hour after dark. Those parts of the Plains seen certainly do not answer to the high character given by Watson, but it is fair to state that he considers the best land to be more to the southward and westward than we reached. The low lands are mostly flooded in winter and have a rather peaty surface with a good marly substratum. The Higher levels are of light sandy earth and no substratum within a foot wherever we tried, with one exception, though I incline to think clay might be found at a lower depth.

As we returned we crossed a large tract of higher and poor forest land commencing with a point near where we struck off to return, and which Watson could not have seen, as it formed part of what he described as all plains.

Upon the whole I could not but feel disappointed, although the country about the Plains is very pleasing to the eye and if anything, rather too lightly timbered.

About half past eight the boat arrived, the people as well as ourselves wet through. However a good fire, moonlight night, and the tent, formed a pleasing contrast with last night's accommodation.

April 19th. My bowel complaint still affecting me, for I had thoughtlessly come away without any of those medicines proper to carry on such occasions. I could not venture in the boat, and resolved to devote the day to examine the country around this little bay, and if there were any vale communication with the Plains above G.S.P., which, from many circumstances, I inclined to believe I should find.

About noon, for we had gone to rest late the night before and had little sleep the previous one, set off along the south side of an inlet or creek of salt water situate just at the point of this bay where it rounds off from the sandy beach at the back of the isthmus, but the mouth was now choked up by the beach for want of rains to force its way into the ocean.

For about half a mile it continues westerly and meanders to the south. Salt and brackish, and is navigable for boats when full, and partly so now. To that distance, the land on either side, low and level - timbered land at least of average quality with the chief of that already seen - a light brown earth with a substratum of good gravel for six feet. At this distance the fresh water pools commenced with dry shoals between, and beyond this I should not rely on boats going up.

There we crossed, having ascertained the width of low level land to the southward and which is bounded by stoney (sic) rises and poor forest land with narrow vale patches occasionally. All round to the westward these flats are bounded by stoney hills and poor forest land and which appear to join the many Tiers which bound the Plains to the S. and W..

Took a circle over this miserable land to the N. still hoping to find the vale communication I sought and after two hours walking came upon a large lagoon of 100 acres and upwards. Sent two persons round the south side and kept the north myself without either finding any outlet for the water to run off in winter. It must be a receiver for the winter rains which it appears to retain all through the dry season.

LAND IS CHOSEN

Going on the N.E. crossed a considerable breadth of low forest and vale land, chiefly inclined to the above lagoon but partly apparently to the inlet near our tent. Crossed right over this level to the eastward till we came to the sough end of the isthmus or neck of land between the Bay and G.S.P.. I did this to have a comprend (sic) of the country to the N.W. to ascertain if there were any hills or interruptions to what I now felt confident was a land of communication from the Bay to the Plains. This brought us to the beach about a mile north of the tent by dark, and resolved to go, or send Mr. Amos, in the morning from the inlet to the point where we crossed the flat to make certain as I INTEND TO FIX OUR GRANTS HERE and across to the G.S.P. river if it prove so on examination.

April 20th. While the people were gone for water and to kill kangaroos, Mr. Amos traced the valley from the Inlet to the place mentioned and confirmed my expectation, the distance being about two miles with a lagoon of 30 to 40 acres at half a mile distance from the Inlet. The lagoon had water standing in it but there was a visible outlet where the water ran out in winter.

Wishing, if possible, to make out a complete vale communication between the coast bluffs and points, I sent the boat with five hands to attend my motions and walked by land with two others as far as a fresh water summer river in which were still occasional pools, but the mouth was locked by sand. This is situated on the N. side the second point of land from where we slept, the Tier appearing to come down to a point very near the coast about a mile or better N.W. of this river.

All the way we came we had vale and flat forest land with hills towards the coast and rises over others inland, but towards where we started from and where we slept at the mouth of the river, the low lands are of great breadth.

As the wind was contrary and no desirable place to stop the night at the point, continued trace communications. At the back and S.W. of the mouth of this river is some good forest and flat land bound by the mountains to the N.. The fresh water run still having pools of good water….as in…..but at the distance of about two miles S.W. the main Tiers curved round and came down to the coast at the next point of land, so that any inland road or connection must be to the westward of them. There is a narrow strip of flat land across this point to the next point where the Tiers came down to the coast - but it is of very little depth under the Tiers.

April 21st. Started on our return home doubting more than ever the reality of any other L.S.P. or of the large, fine river and boat harbour mentioned by Watson. For two hours it was nearly calm when, a northerly breeze springing up, reached Skate Bay (Spring Bay) soon after sunset and pitched the tent on the old spot occupied 8th and 9th. Having on our return hugged the coast…..found my fears confirmed that there was neither other L.S.P. or river emptying itself into Oyster Bay. Indeed the whole coast from where the Tiers come down to the point of land south of where we slept last night, to within about four miles of the Salt Water River, or real L.S.P. and where they again recede back to the…..head of L.S.P. and come down again at Prosser's river show at once there can be no sheet of water or breadth of land such as is described by Watson.

SECOND VISIT OF AMOS AND MEREDITH FIVE MONTHS LATER

Sept. 29th. At daylight, we found we were in the bay off Little Swan Port. Pulled for three hours and, a favourable breeze springing up, made Meredith's creek about ten o'clock where we found Mr. Amos had built a small hut on the south side of the creek. (On the site of present Redbanks House). Planted the fruit trees.

Sept. 30th. Looked around for a convenient place to build a store to receive and lodge our goods, implements, etc., etc., and live in till the surveyor measures off the Grants and we can each fix a final residence, and farm buildings, stockyards, etc.. Caught fish.

Oct. 1st. Dug the foundation of the store house on the north side of the creek about half a mile from the mouth. Commenced falling timber, etc..

Oct. 2nd. Wind westerly. Sent off boat to East Bay Neck for another load.

Oct. 3rd. Proceeded with the store house, cutting timber, etc.. Had the cattle down from the Great River to the north side of the creek to fold land for garden and corn.

Oct. 4th. Going on with building and made fold yards for cattle.

Oct. 6th. Sixty head of cattle besides calves arrived with five of the people leaving the sheep and four people on the other side of Little Swan Port. Also arrived the boat from East Bay Neck with all the things, both what were left and what the boat brought the second time.

Oct. 6th. Sent off the boat to East Bay Neck and to leave tea, sugar, meat, etc. with the people along with the sheep.

Oct. 7th. Set off to the Plains to examine the country more particularly, from the Creek along the west side of sandy peninsula and between the sand bank and the lagoon and marsh which extend to the Great River (Swan River?). On the banks of the Great River is some marsh land and dry ground fir for anything - say fifty acres. Then to the west are rocky hills on the side of the river, fit for sheep - but inland all the ground though low and level is poor, sandy, and wet till about a mile or a mile and a half up the river from the west side of the marshes running north and south - that is from the Creek to the Great River when you come upon a tract of land similar to that on each side of the creek, viz., dry red earth. This extends to the inland rivulet running from the mountain to the Great River, say north and south, and may comprise 200 acres, not more. On the other side of this rivulet is some good marshy land, from 100 to 200 acres, running a good way back towards the hills. Beyond this, the land lays in strips of dry poor land and low marsh towards the river, but the poor land predominates, and more inland, it is chiefly poor with little or no interruption. Went over the river and had a most charming prospect from a small hill - up the plain and over the whole country to the south west. Walked up the north side of the river a mile or two, and found it chiefly of the same character as the side we had left. Returned under the mountains or hills and over poor sandy land until we fell in with the great lagoon towards our Creek after nightfall, and reached the hut at ten o'clock, greatly disappointed at the result of our day's inspection, having expected to find all the plain good rich land as described by Rice and Watson on whose report to the Governor I had relied.

Oct. 6th to 12th. Employed felling timber, making enclosures for folding cattle over land intended for corn and potatoes. Building a hut. etc..

Oct. 13th. Mr Amos, James Amos (son of Adam) and Stansfield set off to meet the sheep coming down overland.

Oct. 14th. Walked up the river above the creek, following its turns until the mountains became entire timber and rocks. Crossed about half a mile below where it bands to the north and followed this branch about three miles round, then came over the hills a little below where we crossed it and examined the hills on the south side, which, though frequently rocky and abrupt, are very fine sheep pasture and apparently much better than the other side, which, indeed, where we walked was barrenness itself, though lower down towards the creek, by the side of the river they look much better and tolerably fair sheep pasture. On the south side occasional green valleys and slopes of land fir for cattle or sheep, and the whole will prove a very desirable run for the farm on this side of the creek which appears to show quite as much good land as that on the other side. There is a low marshy flat of land of loamy clay and sand mixed likely to prove good wheat land, lying under the hills and directly between them and the creek, flat red land, but it is thickly wooded though the timber is not large.

STOCK YARDS AND A BRIDGE

Oct. 15th. Yoked the bullock Young with the Jericho white bullock and began to haul timber and logs for the yoking yard, this to prepare them for ploughing, they being very wild. The men together with Mr. A. Amos who had gone to meet them arrived with about 830 sheep from the New Plains, having killed ten, eight lost, eight left on the road down. Many of the sheep lame, but all in good condition.

Oct. 21st. Mr. Amos set off to explore the upper part of the Great River and Plains, etc., and returned the 22nd at night.

Oct. 24th. Recovered two bullocks, Young and Peter, who had been astray a week or more. Yoked Young and Pretty instead of Peter who would not go steady as leader, and put the two young steers, Strawberry and George, behind, and began to plough for spring wheat and barley, etc., clearing the land of timber and roots in the most open spots. Killed a bullock of Jericho herd. No scales to weigh, suppose about four hundredweight.

Oct. 25th. Rained all day more or less. Bullocks again astray. Got in the old ones at night but not the young ones. Planted one bed of potatoes in the lower folded ground in the lazy bed way - about ¾ bushel.

Oct. 27th. Sent the boat to the Neck for the remaining things and Master George and man left in charge.

Oct. 28th. Made an excursion up the Great River with Mr. A. and J. Amos and Dickons. Crossed the two more western branches and at upper part of the middle one, adjoining the N. one, found a breadth of good land similar to that at the Creek but not so stoney or in such rises - say about two to three hundred acres, laying along the river side - and another breadth, Mr. Amos states to lay along the middle branch on the north side of it, about 200 acres of similar quality.

Oct. 30th. Sowed about one acre of spring wheat.

Oct. 31st. Mr. Amos returned having been to the head of the eastern branch of Great Swan Port (along the sand bar of which I formerly passed in boat). He describes a fine wet marsh of very great extent to be at the head of this tide water, about six miles above the sand bar, and which can be easily drained and through which he conceives there is a constant stream of fresh water, and he also believes he saw a continued valley from the head of this marsh to the eastern coast and ocean to the north of Schouten Tier. Boat arrived from E.B. Neck.

Nov. 1st. Set off in boat to explore the country about the eastern branch of Great Swan Port, but the wind setting in strong ahead with very heavy rains, returned.

Nov. 2nd. Started again and made the north end of Great Swan Port as the wind and sea were too high to discover the channel into the eastern branch. Took dinner and set off about 3 p.m. over the hills with my son, Mr. Amos and a man to carry rug and tea kettle, etc.. Came upon the middle of the marsh at about four miles distance (having fallen with two separate mobs of natives who ran from their fires on out approach). The marsh is now a lagoon being covered entirely with water, although in summer, evidently, many parts will be nearly dry. A considerable river empties itself into it at the head and after running as a river about a mile it spread itself wholly over it. Slept at night near the lower end of the river on the west side.

Nov. 3rd. Walked up the west side to find a fording place to cross the river and found a narrow rocky part with a strong current about three feet deep three miles higher up. Crossed and came down along the eastern side where all the land is mountainous and barren down to the very beach where we attempted to cross, first through high tea tree bush and scrub growing in water and scarcely passable, then along the beach about a leg deep, on rushy bottom. Then came to a small dry circular rise with some timber growing on it. Proceeding about 200 yards further and were then stopped by deep channels running from the lagoon to the Bay. It being late, returned to the dry hill for the night without bread, meat or grog - having only a little sugar and a few grains of tea left.

Nov. 4th. Pulled down a pole and also carried a dead tree to make a bridge which being launched across the deep channel we passed on it and then hauled it after us and carried it to a second, after which we walked up into the lagoon round a broad deep stream through which the lagoon chiefly empties itself into the Bay, and where the tide water flows up about half a mile and the fresh water stands all round about a foot deep, but deeper higher up the lagoon. In fact, it could not be drained without making a new channel along one of the banks for the river at its head to run in so as to lead it off the lagoon, and also forming a bank to keep back the tide water from overflowing it. Could this be done, it would make a large breadth of valuable land and has a narrow range of very capital grazing along the west bank about three or four miles up from the Bay.

Reached the boat at 2 p.m., took dinner and returned down Swan Port to the sandy peninsula on its larboard entrance and walked home over the sand about ten o'clock.

END OF DIARY

Cambria

(Dr. E. Brettingham-Moore)

This is the key property of the Swansea district and caused a good deal of bickering when it was founded. This was caused by the fact that when Lieut. Thomas Buxton came through to the East Coast as manager for William Talbot in 1821, he and Talbot selected land which had already been marked out for George Meredith. Bitter quarrels followed between Meredith and Talbot. Appeals were made to Governor Sorell, rude remarks were made and general unpleasantness prevailed for years. The land in question is now known as Belmont. (Buxton lived for a time at Old Belmont, a mile up the Wye River from the present Belmont House.)

Creek Hut, Oyster Bay
4th March, 1822.

Geo. Meredith to William Talbot. “I have chosen and am authorised by His Honour, the Lieut. Governor, to occupy 2000 acres of land, extending north from the creek and river near my hut, and situate between the sandbank on the East and the Hills to the West and including the lands on which you have caused huts to be built and which you have otherwise taken forcible possession. And I hereby give you further notice that you and your servants immediately remove from the said land and I shall hold you accountable to me for all loss, damage or expenses I have sustained or may sustain by you or your servants occupying or trespassing on the same.”

There is no room here to enlarge on a controversy that caused endless talk in the old days and made family feuds that dragged on for years, but many letters on the subject expressing all angles of feeling, may be read in the Historical Records (Vol. 4, series 3). Deputy Surveyor General G. W. Evans and Thomas Scott, another fine surveyor, were called in to settle the dispute and Surveyor General Oxley, under orders from Governor-in-chief Sir Thomas Brisbane, made recommendations, but the affair dragged on interminably. Talbot was only partially appeased in the end when he was given a large grant of land at Fingal, which he named Malahide, after his family estate in Ireland.

George Meredith then added considerably to his property at Swan Port, and in the end, before final adjustment by the Caveat Board, his estate must have covered about 50,000 acres. This included John Amos” land at Riversdale which Meredith claimed as his own.

Talbot in his rage had accused everyone but Buxton of being in league against him, including John Amos, but Governor Sorell knew that Amos had nothing to do with Meredith's grant. “I know Mr. Amos, whom I have appointed Chief District Constable and Keeper of the Pound, as a settler on his own land,” Sorell told Talbot when replying to this accusation. “He is not an overseer or in any way dependent on Mr. Meredith, a fact which Mr. Meredith has officially certified……With respect to your statement that your stock and Mr. Meredith's are the only stock likely to trespass at Swan Port, this would in no way effect Mr. Amos's appointment. But in fact I see marked on the map of Swan Port several other names as being located there, amongst which are Major Honner, Mr. Compton and Mr. Hart of Little Swan Port and may reasonably suppose that the settlement will increase.”

In reply Talbot said he was being cheated out of the land, hinting very plainly that Sorell was biased - which, as a matter of fact, he was not.

The first cottage built on Cambria by George Meredith, and referred to by him in correspondence as Creek Hut, was the usual sort of split log cabin built by most of the early settlers. Daubed with clay and mud, with shutter windows and thatched roof made of sags and rushes, it served very well as a temporary home while a strong house was being built. The greatest worry of the pioneers in the meantime being the ever-present fear of fire, either from flying sparks or deliberate malice. When materials were ready for building the present Cambria homestead, Charles Meredith (George senior's second son by his first wife, who is best known now from the fact that he was the husband of his delightful wife, Louise Anne Meredith, authoress and painter) tells that the builder and architect was close at hand. “Old Bull built the house,” says Meredith, “also Riversdale, Spring Vale, and, in fact, the greater part of the houses at Swan Port. His weight did not exceed nine stone. Originally this faithful, honest man had been transported from the Old Country. Twice he escaped, and claimed to be the only escaped convict to reach Sydney without being recaptured. While escaping through the bush his companions were all murdered by the blacks and he had to hide for three days under a log before it was safe for him to come out. Reaching Sydney he was flogged and sent back to Van Diemen's Land, where he became my father's servant.”

Whatever else old Bull may have done, there is no doubt that he left a worthwhile monument to himself in Cambria House, which is a delightful place, well made and strong, even if it lacks some of the continuity a trained architect would have given it. Single storey in front, with a long wide stone-flagged verandah, onto which French windows open, it goes up to three storeys at the back. The bottom storey at the rear of the house actually consists of the cellars, only one side of which is visible, as both ends and back are let into the side of a little hill on which the house was built. A low wall closing in the back yard, gives the impression that it is a sunken garden when viewed from the side of the house, for there are beds of bright flowers in it. There the warm coloured bricks and three rows of windows glow in the afternoon sunshine over the gardens and grass, giving an intensely English effect.

Down in the orchard and vegetable garden there are the remains of a round old brick rabbit hutch, where the precious little animals were closely guarded as delicacies for the table - such a delightful change from the everlasting pickled port (sic), beef and mutton of those early days. Fortunately the little creatures multiplied so rapidly that Mrs. Meredith was able to give some to her friends and the day even came when they were able to liberate a few as an experiment. (How charming; how very much like home it would be; to see real rabbits frisking about and even perhaps, making a burrow in a sandy bank by a briar hedge. Almost certainly the defenceless little things, deprived of the lettuce and cabbage leaves that was their usual diet, would be eaten by the hyenas - Tasmanian Tigers, as they were beginning to call them, or by those nasty smelly wild cats that were always prowling about. Still, it was worth trying.)

Hawthorn hedges protect the garden and orchard, and looking down from the old hot house where fabulous grapes used to ripen, you may see at the foot of a steep bank towards the river, the grandfather of all the oaks, whose branches reach for 34 paces over the green grass, and all is shady and pleasant. It is a beautiful spot and what Louisa Anne Meredith would have called a “dell”. She would have had every reason for doing so, for there is not a tree to be seen in any direction that did not originate in the Old Country.

George Meredith, the eldest son, quarrelled with his father over their sealing and bay whaling activities and started to work on his own account. George, Snr., built a top-sail schooner on the banks of the Meredith River and called her the “Independent”, and George, Jnr., also built himself a ship which he named the “Defence”. The “Independent” was known for years along the coast, under Capt. Thos. Furlong, until at last she was wrecked on Bruny Island.

Young George met his death at St. Vincent's Gulf near what is now Glenelg (South Australia). One Sunday morning with his whaleboat hauled up on the beach nearby, while he was reading his bible, some natives crept out from the scrub and clubbed him to death. He had sold his share of Cambria to Edward Carr Shaw in 1829.

When they arrived in Van Diemen's Land the Meredith family consisted of George, Snr., his second wife, and six children: George, jnr., who was nineteen years old; Sarah, Louisa, Sabina, Charles, Henry and Edwin. John was native born. Of these, Louisa married Capt. Bell and Edwin went over to New Zealand where he settled near Christchurch. Charles was appointed M.H.A. for Glamorgan in 1856 and held other positions as mentioned elsewhere. He died 2nd March, 1880, and was buried in Hobart. George, Snr., died in June, 1856, leaving an estate of 11,000 acres. His wife had died in November, 1842. The Cambria stud of six Saxon Merino rams and ten ewes, the first in the district, if not in Tasmania, was brought out on the “Emerald” by the Merediths.

BUSHRANGER BRADY AT CAMBRIA

Not long after their escape from Macquarie Harbour in 1824, Matthew Brady and his mate, McCabe, attacked Cambria with the intention of robbing Mr. Meredith.

It is said that Mrs. Meredith had the presence of mind to hide her husband in a cider barrel and, trusting to Brady's reputation for unfailing gallantry to women, with pounding heart went out alone to face the bushrangers. She told them that Mr. Meredith had gone away and would not be back before nightfall.

Brady robbed the place of a quantity of food and most of the family silver. Then he drank a glass of wine to the lady's health and took his leave in one of Meredith's whaleboats, lifting his cap and bowing courteously as he went.

Most of the silver was recovered months afterwards, from under some rocks where it had been hidden on the bank of the Derwent by the bushrangers.

It seems likely that the story of Meredith hiding in the barrel was added to the otherwise true story by his enemies. Whatever his weaknesses may have been, Meredith was no coward, and would have been sure to give a good account of himself.

Edwin Meredith in his journal informs us that his father built old Belmont house and lived there while preparing the site of Cambria, about a mile distant. The trees, hedges and orchard of Cambria were being planted while Edwin and his mother, with a gardener, marked out the flower and vegetable gardens.

His half-brother, George, meanwhile helped with ship building and the dealing and whaling. The first vessel built by Meredith on his own property was a small schooner, the “Cygnet”, which proved to be too small for the sealing work it was intended for and was sold in Hobart. “The Black Swan”, also a schooner, was then built to take her place, but she was wrecked while sealing in Bass Strait. Meredith then built his third schooner, the “Independent”. Edwin's half-brother, Charles, at this time was in charge of the whaling station at Maria Island. When Edwin started off to settle in New Zealand his father gave him £2,000 with which he bought a property he named Riversdale in the North Island. His three half-sisters were: Sarah, who married James Poynter, manager of the Bank of Australasia in Hobart; Louisa, married Capt. John Bell, of Bellevue, New Town; and Sabina married John Boyes, merchant, of Hobart Town and London.

George Meredith's family by his second wife consisted of Harry, who was killed when thrown from his horse; Edwin, married Jane Chalmers, of Hobart, and became a pioneer settler in New Zealand on an estate near Otago, which he named Riversdale; John moved over to Mt. Gambier in South Australia and owned a property named Mingbool; Maria was married from Cambria by Bishop Nixon to Lieut. Kay, R.N., of the astronomical station in Hobart; Clara, married Sir Richard Dry of Quamby. Two other sisters, Fanny (who lived in England with Lady Dry and died in London during May of the present year at the age of 94), and Rosina, did not marry. Charles Meredith and his wife Louisa Anne (referred to elsewhere) had a family of three sons, George, Owen and Charles (who never married). Owen married Eliza Jane Windsor; their children were five daughters and one son, the present Mr. David Owen Meredith (mining and metallurgical engineer) of Hobart, whose daughter, Mrs. Alice Hodgson, has two sons, Michael Meredith and David Neil. Mr Michael M. Hodgson married Miss Rosemary Grueber and has an infant son (Lucian Guy).

LIEUT. GEORGE MEREDITH CLIMBS POMPEY'S PILLAR

Pompey's Pillar, a celebrated column of red granite, stands on an eminence south of the walls of Alexandria, in Egypt. Including a ten foot high pedestal, it reaches 98 ft. 9 in. from the ground and is 29 ft. 8 in. in circumference; being, it is said, the largest block of hewn granite in the world. By Napoleon's orders a French “Cap of Liberty” - made of boiler plate, about 7 ft. long, 4 ft. wide, and 3 ft. high, was placed on top of the pillar and firmly fixed there, as an act of defiance during the French occupation.

In 1801, soon after the surrender of Alexandria to Col. Hutchinson, George Meredith, then a young lieutenant on H.M.S. Hinde, was on service in the port and made up his mind to bring down the Cap by hook or by crook. The Governor gave his permission for the attempt to be made provided no harm came to Pompey's Pillar, at the same time pointing out that Meredith was unlikely to succeed where so many others had failed already.

But Meredith vowed he would neither eat nor drink until the accursed Cap was brought down. By means of a kite (the method Napoleon had used) he at last succeeded in getting a rope over the top of the column and dislodging the Cap, which was then lowered to the ground, and the Union Jack left proudly blowing in its place.

The Governor of Alexandria delightedly offered to exchange the trophy for as much coined silver as it would hold, but Meredith took it home with him to Birmingham. Later on it was presented to the Museum there, through the medium of the Earl of Dartmouth, who commemorated the event by presenting George Meredith with a gold ring studded with stones.

The ring is now owned by Mr. David Meredith's grandson, Mr. Michael Meredith Hodgson, in Hobart.

The Charles Merediths

“The Life of a Pioneer Boy”

No history of the East Coast would be complete without some mention of the delightful Mrs. Charles Meredith (1912-1895) whose books (“My Home in Tasmania”, and others) and drawings, made known the life and beauties of the coast all over the Empire.

They struck hard times, for he was no money maker, and that added incentive to her busy pen, although she had published a book of poems, and another of nature studies, before her marriage. Observant, capable and generous, her simple books will always be among the classics of Tasmania.

Charles Meredith, second son of George Meredith, was born at Poyston, Pembrokeshire, on the 29th May, 1811, and came out here with his father. “I well remember that it was a bitter cold night when my brother George, our three sisters and myself were called in from our school to join the 'Emerald'”, he wrote afterwards. “On the way out we fought off a pirate ship near St. Helena, where napoleon Bonaparte was then confined, and reported the action to H.M. frigate 'Mona', then cruising on guard off St. Helena.”

At Cambria Charles and his brother George led a harsh but adventurous life sometimes experienced by young pioneers. “I used to be sent out on frosty mornings with no breakfast, from the tent in which I lived, to take 300 Merino sheep to their feeding ground. When it happened to be convenient a pannikin of tea and a piece of damper were brought to me by anyone who thought of it or had time - perhaps one of my sisters, but I did not go home at night till there was barely enough light for me to put my sheep into the yard. Then I had my supper and went to my tent. This routine went on wed or dry for many months, when my 300 sheep were eventually joined to the large flock and that occupation was gone. I used to sit under a tree and read, for the poor lonely little shepherd had some glorious companions in his solitude. Shakespeare and his myriad creatures lived beside me and Don Quixote and Sancho performed their feats of arms beneath the gum tree boughs. Many a time whilst in this company I have laughed aloud and then, terrified at my imprudence, have sprung to my feet and gazed in fear around, lest some hideous black shape, spear in hand, should have heard it too and come to murder me.

“When I was only eleven years old, it was my duty to take the dogs out to catch kangaroo for meat, as my father's sheep were all of the valuable Merino breed, and far too precious in those early days to be killed for that purpose. If I got brush kangaroo I carried them home myself; if foresters, which were often very large and heavy, I had to go again and take a man to help me bring them in.

“My father was kind, brave and generous and as children we honoured and yielded him implicit obedience but the hand he ruled with wore an iron glove. Any one or two of the scores of half-occupied men on my father's establishment could have done my allotted duties but it was his pleasure and command that the duty should be mine, no matter what the difficulty, toil or danger, and I would not have dared to utter, or look, any remonstrance.

“Horses were scarce in those days, and even had they been plentiful I don't suppose I should have had the use of one. Starting off at dawn into the bush….hunting on one occasion…I struck up towards the hills and after heading the stony creek the dogs caught two brush kangaroo, which were as much as I could carry, so I turned again seawards, having made a half-circle of five or six miles, intending to return along the beach. As I neared the sea I listened repeatedly, in case any of the blacks should be about, and on quitting the forest for the more open sandbank, I crept along on my hands and knees from the shelter of one boobialla bush to another, until I could look down on the broad sands. I then saw that there were fresh tracks of bare feet. The black tribe had evidently just passed by; men, women and children, going north, the same direction in which I was bound. Had I been a few minutes earlier I should have been in advance of them and been plainly seen on the long stretch of sand and, as a certain consequence, pursued and speared. I could not even now be sure that all the tribe had passed, some might be still behind, and should I venture on the beach, I might be hemmed in between the two parties. I was very tired with my long walk, heavily laden as I was, but there was only one thing to do - to make my way back by the same circuitous route I had come, following up the creek….and striking across the rough hills and forest for home.

“As I plodded wearily along I came upon another set of tracks of the aborigines…..but keeping the dogs silent and close beside me; creeping along noiselessly and steadily, and keenly listening for every sound that might warn me of the enemy's neighbourhood, I got safely home. There I was sharply taken to task for having dawdled so long on the way and straightway ordered off on some other task.”

Perhaps George Meredith, Senior, Treated his boys a little more harshly than most; he was certainly a severe man, but it may be gathered by the notes left by Charles that his hostility had been aroused by the manner adopted by his family to their new step-mother. Mrs. Charles Meredith gives some indication of this in her book, “Tasmanian Friends and Foes”, in which her husband appears under the name of Merton and tells tales of his youth in almost the exact paraphrase of some of the notes he left. Some of these are in the library of the Royal Society in Hobart, and some are in the possession of his descendents.

Charles Meredith started life for himself as a squatter in New South Wales at the age of twenty-three and after two years returned to England where he married his cousin, Louisa Anne Twamley, at Edybaston (sic) Church, Birmingham, in 1838. They lived in New South Wales for a time, where he suffered severely from bad seasons. Then he brought her to Oyster Bay and lived on his father's property, Riversdale, while Spring Vale was being built fore them to live in. For thirty-eight years after that he was in politics, being a member of the House of Assembly for Glamorgan and holding various important positions - Colonial Treasurer and Minister for Lands and Works. Governor Eardley Wilmot then appointed him Police Magistrate at Port Sorell.

Among the measures he introduced was an Act for the protection of black swans, which were then in danger of extermination, although once they had been counted in millions. He died in Launceston, 2nd March, 1880, and five years later a fountain was raised to his memory on the Queen's Domain, in Hobart. His wife died in Melbourne on the 21st October, 1895.

“My grandfather was a solicitor in Birmingham.” Charles Meredith tells us, “and lived at Castle Bromwick (sic) where he died at the age of 48, leaving six children, of which my father was the youngest, born 13th February, 1778. My mother had been Miss Sarah Westall Hicks, whom he married in 1805 while he was recruiting for the Royal Marines. My father sold my mother's property in Berkshire and with the proceeds purchased our estate in Wales, Rhyndaston, about eight miles from Hertford, but, almost immediately after her death, my father sold Rhyndaston (which had been rented to the two brothers, Amos) and with the proceeds of the sale obtained orders for grants of land in Tasmania. These first grants were Cambria and Riversdale.

“My father then married miss Mary Evans, my mother's companion, and taking us with them, left for Hobart Town.”

The Naval Chronicle
Publiushed by J. Gold, 1805
Item Notes: v. 14

Marriages

September 13.............

16............

Lieutenant Meredith, of the Royal Marines, to Miss Hicks of Enbourne.

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, October 12, 1805; Issue 2737

At Abingdon, Lieut. G. Meredith, of the Royal Marines, to Miss Hicks of Enhorne. Berks.

There was a dispute in 1809 over some property - the case cited was Meredith v. King. The Plaintiffs were George Meredith and his wife and the defendants were John King and Thomas Hicks.

Meredith - Hicks
Certified copy of a conveyance D/EX 104111 1809

Contents:

1. Thomas Hicks and Mary his wife late of Newbury now of Enborne, gent. and others to

2. John Meredith of Brumagham co. Warwick, gent, (a trustee of George Meredith, late a Lieutenant in His Majesty's Corps of marines, now of Speen, esq.)

Messuage, barn, outhouses, orchards, stables near the wash in Newbury, and about 100 acres (with abuttals) dispersed in the common fields (known as Northcroft, Eastfield and Westfield), in Newbury

Included in the property is a messuage outhouses and barns and just over 10 acres of land (specified) in Enborne near the Newbury property above. The deed contains topographical detail in the abuttals of the Enborne property, such as 'King's Ditch' and 'Nightingale Lane' etc.. The Enborne property includes several coppices

Consideration: £4765





picture

John Bult Meredith and Eliza Rouse




Husband John Bult Meredith




         Born: 5 Feb 1821 - St. Swithins, Middlesex
   Christened: 
         Died: 1915 - December Quarter - Croydon
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Hannah Bult


     Marriage: 4 May 1852 - Kensington, London




Wife Eliza Rouse

         Born: 13 Jul 1827 - Marylebone, Middlesex
   Christened: 21 Nov 1827 - Westminster, Craven Chapel, Marshall Street, London
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Rouse
       Mother: Elizabeth Bardwell Browne





Children
1 F Eliza Marian Meredith

         Born: 1853 - circa - Southwark, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Alfred John Rouse Meredith

         Born: 1855 - Circa - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Dec 1936 - Warlingham, Surrey
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Florence Evered
         Marr: 1884 - Wandsworth, London



3 M Edward William Meredith

         Born: 1857 - Circa - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edith M. Keiller
         Marr: 1885



4 M Howard Walter Meredith

         Born: 1858 - Circa - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 May 1944
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Blanche Dunfee
         Marr: 1886 - June Quarter - Wandsworth, London




General Notes (Husband)

John Bult Meredith was brought up in Woolwich until 1829, then Bessels Green, Kent, until 1833, and finally in Lambeth where he was sent to a grammar school in Pimlico. He was baptised at Regent Baptist Chapel, Ethelred Street, Lambeth in 1835, and signed the total abstinence pledge the following year. He was an Engineer by profession, having been articled by indenture to John Hague in 1936 for 5 years. He worked on various engineering projects in different parts of the country after his indenture expired. Then in 1851 he bought a sawmill at Bankside, Southwark and settled down to live in Lambeth. In 1854 he moved to 6 Durham Place, Lambeth to be near his parents, and in 1864, after their death, he moved with his young family to Durham Villa, Wandsworth Common.

1871 Census Collection

John, a saw mill proprietor employing 90 men, (aged 50) was living at the family house, Durham Villa with his wife Eliza (aged 43) and their children Eliza Marian (aged 18), Alfred John Rouse (aged 16), Edward William (aged 14), and Howard Walter (aged 12)

1881 Census Collection:

John, a saw mill proprietor employing 90 men (aged 60) was living in Upper Richmond Rd, Wandsworth with his wife Eliza (aged 53), his daughter Eliza Marian (aged 28) and his three sons, Alfred (aged 26), Edward (aged 24) and Howard (aged 22) the latter described as a builder's ironmonger

1891 Census Collection:

John (aged 70) described as a timber merchant, was living at the Wandworth house with his wife Eliza (aged 65) and their daughter Eliza Marian.

1901 Census Collection:

John (aged 80) was living at 9 Sydenham Rd., Croydon with his wife Eliza (aged 73) and his daughter Eliza Marian (aged 48)

See Fragmentary Records of a Long Life including narratives of Seven Voyages by John B. Meredith:

"According to a certificate of birth in my possession I was born in Cannon Street, London, on February 5, 1821. This registration was effected at Dr. Williams' Library, Redcross Street, near Cripplegate, in the City of London. The new Registration Act was not passed till August 17, 1836.

I was one of a family of eight - four sons and four daughters - being the eldest son; one sister was older than myself.

Our parents afterwards lived at Woolwich during some eight or nine years. The land on the opposite shore of the Thames, that is, on the Essex side of the river, was then fields and marshes. At times we were ferried over the river, and wandered about there for an afternoon ramble, to our great delight......."


General Notes (Wife)

Eliza was the elder daughter of William Rouse and Elizabeth Bardwell Browne, who lived at 16 Canterbury Villas, Maida Vale, at the time of Eliza’s marriage. They were old friends of the Merediths.


General Notes for Child Alfred John Rouse Meredith

1901 Census Collection:

Alfred, a timber merchant, (aged 46) was living in Warlingham, Surrey with his wife Sarah F. (aged 37), their son Harry R. (aged 15), their son Alan A. (aged 12) and their daughter Kathleen (aged 7)

The Times - Monday 10 February 1936, Page 15

Mr. Alfred John Rouse Meredith, of Warlingham, Surrey, a director of Meredith and Wise and Aston Grant & Co., timber importers, died on December 5, leaving estate of the gross value of £43,815, with net personalty £41,796 (duty paid £5,651) He gives: £250 to the Caterham and District Hospital.


General Notes for Child Howard Walter Meredith

1891 Census Collection:

Howard (aged 32) was living at 11 Springfield Rd, Wimbledon, was described as an iron merchant, living with his wife Blanche (aged 24), their son Howard D (aged 3) and their daughter Marian D (1 month)

1901 Census Collection:

Howard (aged 42) was described as a builders hardware merchant (employer) living with his wife Blanche (aged 34), their son Howard (aged 13), their daughter Marian (aged 10) and their son Erc D. (aged 5), and Blanche's mother Ann H. Dunfee who was living on an annuity.

The Times Saturday, May 05, 1945; pg. 1; Issue 50135; col A

Meredith. - In very loving memory of Howard Walter Meredith (May 5, 1944). - Blanche, Douglas and Dorothy.

The Times, Tuesday, Aug 30, 1887; pg. 1; Issue 32164; col A

On the 28th August, at Merstone, Springfield-Road, Wimbledon, S.W., the wife of Howard Walter Meredith, of a son
picture

John Charles Meredith and Louisa May Stephenson




Husband John Charles Meredith

         Born: 1871
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Campbell Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth Jillett


     Marriage: 7 May 1895 - Zeehan, Tasmania




Wife Louisa May Stephenson

         Born: 1877 - About - Zeehan, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Twin of Twamley Owen.
picture

John Percival O. Meredith




Husband John Percival O. Meredith

         Born: 20 Nov 1865 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1916
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Maria Hammond


     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Percival Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Joseph Meredith and Ellen Williams




Husband Joseph Meredith

         Born: 31 Jul 1805
   Christened: 6 Oct 1805 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 1895
       Buried: 


       Father: James Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather


     Marriage: 




Wife Ellen Williams

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Winifred Meredith

         Born: 1841 - Circa - Canada
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1843 - Circa - Canada
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M James Meredith

         Born: 1845 - Circa - Canada
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Emily Meredith

         Born: 1847 - Circa - Canada
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Alfred Meredith

         Born: 1849 - Circa - Canada
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Annie



6 F Ellen Meredith

         Born: 1850 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1852 - Circa - England
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Joseph Meredith in the 1851 England census was a Surgeon Dentist (age 45) at 5 Lee Cresc. Edgbaston with wife Ellen (44), children all b. Canada Winifred (10), Sarah (8), James, (6), Emily (4), Alfred (2), sister Sarah Jukes widow (51), Sarah Elizabeth Jukes (25) [Another son Joseph was b. ca. 1852]. In the 1901 Census son Alfred is a Bedding Manufacturer m. Annie with children Alfred (26), Annie M. (23) and Edith (19)

1861 Census:
Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Joseph Meredith - 55 - Dentist
Ellen - 54
Winifred - daughter - 20
Sarah - daughter - 18
James - son - 16
Alfred - son - 12
Joseph - son - 9

1871 Census:

London
Stoke Newington St. Mary
Joseph Meredith - 65 - retired dentist
Ellen - wife - 64
Emily - daughter - 24
Alfred - son - 22
Joseph - son - 19


1881 Census:

Middlesex
Willesden
21 Church Road
Joseph Meredith - Head - Widower - 75 - Late of Canada - Civil Servant
Sarah - daughter - 38
Emily - daughter - 34
Joseph - son - 29 - Bankers Clerk

1891 Census collection:

Joseph (aged 85) was living at 21 Church Rd, Willesden with his daughter Emily (aged 44) - it was stated that he was born in Birmingham and his daughter, Emily, was born in Canada.

He was the recipient of the following letter from Beatrice Allen:

I will answer your questions about the Meredith family to the best of my ability. Charles Meredith and his father before him had settled in Tasmania and must have been another and perhaps somewhat distant branch. Charles M. came over to England and married Miss Twamley, a friend of Aunt Jane, and also a cousin of his own. After an absence of 50 years Mrs. C. M. came to stay with us in the early 90's. She was a very clever and accomplished woman more so than any other woman in Tasmania, so the government House set made much of her and she was much féted (?) by successive governors and their wives. I should have said that Charles M. and his father were no doubt amongst the landed gentry though not wealthy. Charles M. I believe devoted himself a good deal to politics. He and his wife had 3 sons but I never heard they did anything much. The eldest was the father of Louisa who came over with her grandmother. She was then only 17 and has never been in England since. She is fond of letter writing and still corresponds with me. Her son came over in (?) in the war - Flying Corps - was shot down over the German lines and taken prisoner - lost the use of his right arm. Died eight years after his return home. Louisa has many sisters but only one brother and he has only a daughter so name is not going on there. That is all about them that needs to be said. Now for mother's branch. You are perhaps not aware that 'Grandma Jukes' was the eldest of the whole twelve. Uncle Joseph must I think have been one of the younger ones. Samuel and James were old bachelors and there were some who died as young men. I have often heard another ???? of her cousin John - a very handsome young man - I seem to remember that he enlisted for a time in the Austrian army where I suppose he met his wife. He afterwards went to Australia but neither he nor his son were very satisfactory and were soon lost news of. Of his brothers you will probably remember George Meredith, a most charming man who at one time lived next door to the Garnetts at Kensington. He had a very bigoted R. C. wife and one daughter who married but of course could not carry on the name. With the exceptions of George and his brother John (aforesaid) who went to Australia I believe all the other sons of John Meredith's son were unmarried. His eldest daughter who was mother's contemporary married Professor Beete Jukes. 'Grandma' used to say it was funny her niece should marry her husband's nephew. They were of course not related to each other. They had no children. I hope I have made all this clear. Mother talked most about the Joseph Merediths as they were the ones she had most to do with though so much younger than herself. L. Norvill doesn't live in Tasmania now but in Victoria.


General Notes for Child Sarah Meredith

1881 Census:

Living at 21 Church Rd, Willesden, Middlesex - age 38.


General Notes for Child James Meredith

James died in West Africa - he was unmarried.


General Notes for Child Alfred Meredith

In the 1901 England Census Alfred Meredith is a Bedding Manufacturer m. Annie with children Alfred (26), Annie M. (23) and Edith (19).


General Notes for Child Joseph Meredith

In the 1881 Census, Joseph is described as a Bankers Clerk.
picture

Joseph Meredith and Mary Prosser




Husband Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1744 - Circa
   Christened: 4 Aug 1744 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 14 April 1814 - aged 69
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens


     Marriage: 25 Apr 1773 - Bucknell, Shropshire




Wife Mary Prosser

         Born: 1747 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Sep 1747 - Bucknell, Shropshire
         Died: 16 March 1799 - aged 51
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Prosser
       Mother: Jane





Children
1 M John Meredith

         Born: 1774 - Circa
   Christened: 8 Feb 1774 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 15 May 1834 - aged 60 - Pedwardine
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Downes
         Marr: 27 Apr 1802 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire



2 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1781 - Circa
   Christened: 11 Sep 1781 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child John Meredith

John Meredith died 1834 in of Pedwardine. He married Mary Downes on 27 April 1802 in Leintwardine, Herefordshire, England, daughter of Jeremiah Downes and Anne Hudson.

More About John Meredith:
Christening: 1774

Children of John Meredith and Mary Downes are:
Elizabeth Meredith, b. 1803, d. date unknown.
John Meredith, b. 1805, Shropshire, England, d. date unknown.
Joseph Meredith, b. 1808, d. 1872.
Mary Meredith, b. 1815, d. date unknown.

Mary Downes (daughter of Jeremiah Downes and Anne Hudson) was born Abt. 1782, and died Bet. 1815 - May 1849.

More About Mary Downes:
Christening: 2 March 1782, Shipton, Shropshire, England.

Elizabeth Meredith (daughter of John Meredith and Mary Downes was born 1803, and died date unknown.
Notes for Elizabeth Meredith & John:
Both received Fifty pounds from their grandmother Anne Downes in her Will. [Rita Taylor]

Sarah Downes. sister of Mary married John Wright. Their daughter Sarah Wright married Henry Meredith who was born about 1800 and died in 1865 - they were married before 1837 and had one child (at least) Henry Frederick Meredith born about 1837 in Kington, Herefordshire and died in 1905

picture

Josiah Meredith and Margaret Wetmore




Husband Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1640 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 29 Dec 1684 - Caynam, Shropshire




Wife Margaret Wetmore

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Hannah Meredith

         Born: 1690 - Circa
   Christened: 28 Nov 1690 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Esther Meredith

         Born: 1693 - Circa
   Christened: 8 Oct 1693 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1688 - circa
   Christened: 19 Aug 1688 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ann Owens
         Marr: 10 Aug 1725 - Lingen, Hereford
       Spouse: Mary Low
         Marr: 11 May 1718 - Lingen, Hereford




picture
Josiah Meredith and Anne Whitcott




Husband Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1655 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1707
       Buried: 19 Mar 1707 - Lingen, Hereford
     Marriage: 21 Dec 1699 - Lingen, Hereford

Noted events in his life were:
• Burial Date

Julian calendar - this is the father of David - it fits with story of David being orphaned. A momentary panic when I saw Thomas bapt. 18 May 1706 but of course this is before 1706 Mar 19 in the old system.




Wife Anne Whitcott

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1700 - Circa
   Christened: 11 Jun 1700 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M David Meredith

         Born: 1702 - Circa
   Christened: 3 May 1702 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 8 February 1781 - aged 79
       Buried: 11 Feb 1781 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
       Spouse: Sarah Owens
         Marr: 30 Nov 1727 - Lingen, Hereford



3 M John Meredith

         Born: 1704 - Circa
   Christened: 18 Apr 1704 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: Bef Sep 1790
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Elizabeth
         Marr: 1731 - Circa - St. Phillip, Birmingham



4 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1706 - Circa
   Christened: 18 May 1706 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child David Meredith

According to family tradition, David Meredith and his brothers were left orphans. The eldest inherited property, but the youngest (David) had nothing and the uncle who had charge of them neglected their education. However, David educated himself and read remarkably well. He was an intelligent clever man and much liked by his neighbour Lord Oxford who frequently asked him to dine with him.

"A few reminiscences of the Meredith family, stated by ???? Carter of Maulden granddaughter of Mr Meredith of Brampton Bryan, Herefordshire, August 11 1855.

???? Carter had frequently heard that her grandfather's family were descended in a direct line ????? the Prince of Wales. Her grandfather and his brother were left orphans. ???? Carter thinks the eldest inherited property, but the youngest (her grandfather) had nothing and the uncle who had charge of them neglected their education but ???? Carter's grandfather educated himself and ???? remarkably well. He was an intelligent clever man and much liked by his neighbour Lord Oxford who frequently asked him to dine with him. Upon one occasion Lord Oxford met him and invited him to the Hall, but her grandfather said he must decline the invitation and asked to be excused as he was not dressed for dinner, but his Lordship replied “I look at the man and not at his coat and you must come home with me.” He lived at Pedwardine Herefordshire and had twelve children. Our father James Meredith who afterwards came to Birmingham was the seventh son."

This anecdote seems to be about David Meredith, father of James. The challenge is to work out the writer and the person reminiscing??

The reference in the Carter-Meredith document to a friendship between David Meredith Sr. and Lord Oxford (whose surname was Harley and who was Lord of the Manor at Brampton Bryan) prompted me to look for a possible in the National Archives catalogue. I have appended what I found, which concerns a Ralph Meredith ca. 1710-1720. I think this is the Ralph who the IGI shows was the father of 5 children, Anne (1684), Thomas (1687), Jane (1690), Elanor [sic] (1693), and Ralph (1695) by his wife Ellinor. I would guess that this is the Ralph Sr. who is referred to in the records, and that he was the Uncle who had charge of David and his brother and who the note mentions as neglecting their education. This would make Ralph Sr. the brother of Josiah Meredith who married Anne Whitcott and who I think is the father of David Meredith.


General Notes for Child John Meredith

Birth and death events (children) registered at St. Phillip, Birmingham.

Birmingham Barrister and solicitor - will dated 7 April 1790 - proved 23 December 1790.
picture

Josiah Meredith and Ann Owens




Husband Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1688 - circa
   Christened: 19 Aug 1688 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Josiah Meredith
       Mother: Margaret Wetmore


     Marriage: 10 Aug 1725 - Lingen, Hereford

 Other Spouse: Mary Low - 11 May 1718 - Lingen, Hereford




Wife Ann Owens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1726 - circa
   Christened: 13 Mar 1726 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1731 - circa
   Christened: 15 May 1731 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1732 - About
   Christened: 10 Sep 1732 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M John Meredith

         Born: 1735 - about
   Christened: 14 May 1735 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
F.-Lt. Edmund G. Pole R.A.F.V.R. and Kathleen Meredith




Husband F.-Lt. Edmund G. Pole R.A.F.V.R.

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Kathleen Meredith

         Born: 1894 - circa - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred John Rouse Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Florence Evered





Children
1 M Bill Pole

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Reginald Edmund Meredith Pole R.N.

         Born: 1923 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 May 1941 - Missing in Action - Navy
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Reginald Edmund Meredith Pole R.N.

The Times, Thursday, Jul 24, 1941; pg. 1; Issue 48986; col A

Pole. - Missing since May 22, 1941, (in proud and loving thought on this his 18th birthday), Midshipman Reginald Edmund Meredith Pole, R.N., H.M.S. Gloucester, elder son of F.-Lt. E.G. Pole R.A.F.V.R. and Mrs. Pole, Ranworth, Green Lane, Oxhey, Watford.
picture

Laird A. William Meredith and Ivy Tatham




Husband Laird A. William Meredith

         Born: 1881 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Ada Steuart Johnstone


     Marriage: 12 May 1909 - Masterton, St. Matthews, New Zealand




Wife Ivy Tatham

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

New Zealand Free Lance, Volume 9, Issue 463, 15 May 1909, Page 14

A wedding in which considerable interest was manifested was celebrated at St. Matthew's Church, Masterton, last Wednesday afternoon. The contracting parties were Miss Ivy Tatham, of "Homewood" East Coast, and Mr. Laird A.W. Meredith, of "Waioronga" East Coast, second son of the late Mr. Edwin Meredith, of Riversdale, and grandson of the late Mr. Edwin Meredith of "Llandaff" Masterton. The Rev. J.H. Sykes of Upper Hutt, performed ther marriage ceremony, and he was assisted by the Rev. H. Watson.
picture

Leonard Bult Meredith




Husband Leonard Bult Meredith

         Born: Sep 1869 - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Bult Meredith
       Mother: Penelope


     Marriage: Sep 1901 - Southwark, London




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


picture
Norvill and Louisa Ann Meredith




Husband Norvill

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Louisa Ann Meredith

         Born: 10 Sep 1873 - Tasmania
   Christened: 16 Oct 1873 - Chalmers Free Presbyterian, Hobart, Tasmania
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Owen Meredith
       Mother: Eliza Jane Windsor





Children
1 M Unknown Norvill

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Wife)

Letter written by SAE:

"From a letter of condolence after our sad loss in the spring, from our Australian friend Mrs. Norvill who visited us whilst in England with her grandmother Mrs. Charles Meredith of Hobart Tasmania in 1890 & 1891.

'The picture of Alfred has laways stayed in my memory. I went to church with Mr. Allen on Sunday & it was a dull day. Alfred was in the choir in his chorister's gown, & all of a sudden a ray of light lit up his hair, & I remember thinking it looks like a halo.'

17 Well Walk
Hampstead
1916

Extract of a letter from Beatrice Allen:

"L. Norvill doesn't live in Tasmania now but in Victoria."


General Notes for Child Unknown Norvill

Mention of this son in a letter by Beatrice Allen:

"Her son came over in (?) in the war - Flying Corps - was shot down over the German lines and taken prisoner - lost the use of his right arm. Died eight years after his return home."
picture

Thomas Twamley and Louisa Anne Meredith




Husband Thomas Twamley

         Born: 1766 - St. Phillip, Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Jun 1834
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1 Aug 1790 - St. Phillip, Birmingham




Wife Louisa Anne Meredith

         Born: 1768 - Circa
   Christened: 22 Dec 1768 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: Feb 1839
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Sally Turner





Children
1 F Louisa Anne Twamley




         Born: 20 Jul 1812 - Birmingham
   Christened: 27 May 1824
         Died: 21 Oct 1895 - Collingwood, Victoria
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Charles Meredith
         Marr: 18 Apr 1839 - Edgbaston Old Church, Warwickshire




General Notes (Husband)

Thomas was a corn dealer.

Louisa was their only child.

Louisa Ann Meredith (1812-1895), author and artist, was born on 20 July 1812 at Birmingham, daughter of Louisa Ann (born Meredith) and Thomas Twamley, farmer and miller. Louisa was educated mainly by her mother. She grew up in Birmingham and in the agitation leading to the 1832 Reform Act she learnt 'to think independently and express herself fearlessly on religious and social issues'.


General Notes for Child Louisa Anne Twamley

Louisa Anne Meredith (20 July 1812 – 21 October 1895 was an English and Australian writer and illustrator.

Louisa Anne Meredith, the daughter of Thomas Twamley and Louisa Ann Meredith, was born near Birmingham, England on 20 July 1812. She was educated chiefly by her mother, and in 1835 published a volume, Poems, which was favourably reviewed. This was followed in 1836 by The Romance of Nature, mostly in verse, of which a third edition was issued in 1839. Another volume was published in the same year, The Annual of British Landscape Scenery, an account of a tour on the River Wye from Chepstow to near its source at Plynlimon.

Shortly afterwards Miss Twamley was married to her cousin, Charles Meredith. Charles had emigrated to Van Dieman's Land in 1821 with his father George and family. They had been pioneers of grazing, whaling and other activities around Swansea on Tasmania's East Coast. Charles had become a squatter in the Canberra district of New South Wales.

They sailed for New South Wales in June 1839, and arrived at Sydney on 27 September 1839. After travelling into the interior as far as Bathurst, Mrs Meredith returned to the coast and lived at Homebush for about a year. By the time of his return to New South Wales, severe economic depression caused by excessive land speculation had destroyed the value of Charles' property, and towards the end of 1840 they relocated to Tasmania. An interesting account of her first 11 years in Australia is given in her two books, Notes and Sketches of New South Wales (1844), reprinted at least twice, and My Home in Tasmania (1852), which was soon republished in the United States of America under the title Nine Years in Australia.

For much of her life Mrs Meredith lived on properties around Swansea. In 1860 she published Some of My Bush Friends in Tasmania which contained elaborate full-colour plates printed by the new chromolithography process. The illustrations were drawn by herself, and simple descriptions of characteristic native flowers were given. In the following year an account of a visit to Victoria in 1856, Over the Straits, was published, and in 1880 Tasmanian Friends and Foes, Feathered, Furred and Finned. This went into a second edition in 1881. In 1891, in her eightieth year, Mrs Meredith went to London to supervise the publication of Last Series, Bush Friends in Tasmania. Published at the outset of a severe financial depression in the Australian colonies, this project and the collapse of the bank where most of her savings were held ruined her financially. She died at Melbourne on 21 October 1895 and was survived by sons Owen and George.

Mrs Meredith was the author of two novels, Phoebe's Mother (1869), which had appeared in the Melbourne weekly The Australasian in 1866 under the title of Ebba, and Nellie, or Seeking Goodly Pearls (1882).

Mrs Meredith took great interest in politics, her husband Charles being a Member of the Tasmanian Legislative Council for several terms between the mid 1850s until just before his death in 1881. She was an early member of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and influenced her husband to legislate for preservation of native wildlife and scenery.
Mrs Meredith frequently wrote unsigned articles for the Tasmanian press. This was no new thing for her as in her youth she had written articles in support of the Chartists. When she visited Sydney in 1882, Sir Henry Parkes told her that he had read and appreciated her articles when a youth. After her husband's death she was granted a pension of £100 a year by the Tasmanian government.

Mrs Meredith was tall and of commanding presence. Her poetry is no more than pleasant verse, but she had a true feeling for natural history and was a capable artist. Many of her books were illustrated by herself. Her volumes on New South Wales, Tasmania, and Victoria in the 1840s and 1850s, will always retain their value as first hand records.

LOUISA MEREDITH

Louisa Meredith was born in Birmingham in 1812. She was educated mainly by her mother and, in the agitation leading up to the 1832 Reform Act learnt to ‘think independently and express herself fearlessly on religious and social issues', and is likely
to have written for the Chartist press. She published several books of poems and in 1839 published Our Wild Flowers Familiarly Described and Illustrated, written in story form. Louisa married her cousin, Charles Meredith, in April 1839 in Birmingham. They sailed for Sydney in the Letitia soon afterwards. Louisa stayed in Bathurst while Charles inspected sheep stations on the Murrumbidgee. They returned to Sydney and lived at Homebush. In 1840, Louisa and Charles went to Oyster Bay in Tasmania, where Charles’ father owned ‘Cambria’. Charles and Louisa built a house on a neighbouring property. Their
second son was born there in 1841, but died soon afterwards. In Tasmania, the Meredith family was among those whose fortunes suffered; yet Louisa continued the writing she had commenced before leaving England for New South Wales in 1839.

Her perceptive observations in Notes and Sketches of New South Wales, published in 1844 was angrily reviewed in the Sydney press. Louisa's literary work continued through the years her children were born. The companion account, My Home in Tasmania during a residence of nine years published in 1952. Over the straits: a Visit to Melbourne appeared in 1861. Louisa became as well known for her sensitive writing on Australia's wildlife, and her artistic representations of plants and flowers as for her pungent social observations. Tasmanian Friends and Foes: Feathered Furred and Finned: A Family Chronicle of Country Life appeared in 1880 and included colour plates from here own drawings. She also illustrated several books of poems and Bush Friends in Tasmania: Last Series in 1981. Her wildflower drawings won medals in exhibitions in Australia and overseas. In 1884, the Tasmania government granted her pension for ‘distinguished literary and artistic services’ to the colony.

Louisa enjoyed the travel to research for her books. She became an honorary member of the Tasmanian Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. She also enjoyed acting. A man in one of her admiring audiences described her as ‘rivalling Fanny Kemble on the stage and as an interpreter of Shakespeare on the platform’.

Very few professional women earned reasonable incomes. Writers, botanists, painters and artists used skills in part-time, occasional manner. Few women motivated by money, or allowed to earn it this way. Louisa Meredith was the only one to be a commercial success. 20 books, some ran to several editions and many pamphlets, journal and newspaper articles.

Louisa's writing helped her family through many economic ups and downs. She died at Collingwood Victoria on 21 October 1895.
picture

Frederick David Waldock and Maria Carter Meredith




Husband Frederick David Waldock




         Born: 22 Sep 1831 - Braughing, Hertfordshire
   Christened: 7 Mar 1832 - Independent Church, Buntingford, Hertfordshire
         Died: 6 Oct 1908 - Worthing
       Buried: 


       Father: William Marshall Waldock
       Mother: Hannah Plyer


     Marriage: 9 Aug 1862 - Esher St. Congregational Chapel, Lambeth




Wife Maria Carter Meredith




         Born: 21 Dec 1834
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 Sep 1909 - Maradana Warwick Gardens, Worthing, Sussex
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Hannah Bult





Children
1 F Winifred Waldock

         Born: 12 May 1863 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Apr 1948 - Croydon, Surrey
       Buried: 



2 F Millicent Waldock

         Born: 11 Jun 1864 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Frederick William M. Waldock

         Born: 18 Mar 1866 - Kandy, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 24 Oct 1924 - Newara Eliya, Sri Lanka
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Lizzie Kyd Souter



4 M Bertram Meredith Waldock

         Born: 4 Nov 1868 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 24 Aug 1948 - Brighton, Sussex
       Buried: 



5 M Arthur Plyer Waldock

         Born: 28 Feb 1870 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 2 Aug 1941 - Putney, London
       Buried: 



6 M Harold Meredith Waldock

         Born: 12 Sep 1871 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Feb 1951 - Hove, Sussex
       Buried: 



7 M Edgar Roger Waldock

         Born: 11 Mar 1873 - Sussex, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 9 Jul 1944 - Seaton, Devon
       Buried: 



8 F Ethel Maria Waldock

         Born: 8 May 1876 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 Nov 1960 - Vancouver, Canada
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

William Marshall was an architect who with his wife settled in Ceylon in 1862 as a Baptist missionary, where all eight of their children were born.


General Notes (Wife)

Maria Carter taught at and administered the Colombo Native Christian Girls' Boaring School.

Frederick David Waldock- Born 22 Sept 1831, Braughing, Hertford, England. Christened 7 Mar 1832, Independent Church, Buntingford, Hertford. School, where ? Married Maria Carter Meredith 9 Aug 1862, at Esher St. Congregational Chapel, District of Lambeth, London, England. Frederick Waldock was a young architect whose bride purportedly persuaded him to "don the cloth" as a Baptist missionary. Became a Baptist minister 23 Jul 1862. "11 Aug 1862, a farewell party was held for F.D. Waldock who was bound for Kandy, Ceylon." He then took his wife from England to Colombo, Ceylon by sailing ship (the "Percy Douglas") around the Cape of Good Hope in 1862. Designed and had house built in Colombo. All eight children born here. It is now (1984) the headquarters building for the Baptist Church ("Mission House", 46 Kynesy Road, Colombo) in Sri Lanka. He designed and built many buildings in Ceylon for the Baptist Church- churches and schools. "Waldock House", one of four houses of Carey Baptist College, Kynsey Road, Colombo: 8, Sri Lanka, was named after him. Retired 1898. Died 6 Oct 1908, Worthing, England.

Maria Carter (Meredith) Waldock- Born where ? when ? Parents: ?

Meredith, Hannah Bult. Strong minded. Brought up children in a strict Baptist way. They were not allowed to go to theatres or concerts and all they did on Sundays was to read the Bible. Maria taught and administered the Colombo Native Christian Girls' Boarding School. Died 30 Sep 1909, Mardana Warwick-Gardens, Worthing, England.

Transcription of a letter to Maria Carter Waldock, Née Meredith, wife of Frederick David Waldock from her brother John Meredith. Eliza must be John's wife; who Hannah was is not clear. (Courtesy of H.E. Waldock)

Durham Villa,
Wandsworth Common,
London, S.W.
June 9, 1866

My Dear Maria,

We were very sorry to hear of Mr. Allen's death, it did seem sudden. Indeed, I would have written next to Frederick in reply to his letter but am not sure where he is, and mine is a letter of business.

You are aware that by mother's will, on sister's marriage the surplus she had over the rest was to be redivided; it has been done, and Mr. Wollacott will explain in his letter what he wishes you and Frederick to sign, and you both must be particular, as by not doing so on a former occasion, it caused some little extra charge, you will see that the firm is now Woollacott & Leonard, Mr. Larson having retired on account of his health, so we live in a world of change.

Little did we suppose sister was going so suddenly to make such a change as she has done, but I hope it will be for her happiness. I have seen her new home, having been there at the welcome the people gave them on their marriage, it is a pleasant country place, where one would be free from the wear and tear of London life, it is a daily race here, and the world seems going on at a rapid pace.

Eliza has been engaged for some weeks last in getting your order, for things without end, ready for shipment and she has at last succeeded in getting off the case to the dock. The vessel “Jane Maria” sails on Tuesday next June 12. What a case it is, more than 3 or 4 men can lift. Your order came when we were full of business every way and especially in preparing for Hannah's marriage & the business connected with it. By the way there are some few pounds legal expenses connected with the alteration of the property which you have to bear in conjunction with the rest, however, has you will see by Mr. Woollacott's statement that you will get a small additional sum to receive interest upon.

Eliza will write to you by the next mail with bill of lading which we have not yet received from the ship broker.
We have received at college wharf two curious sort of trays or half boxes, but no particulars, what they are for. Will you send word when you write next. We are all well and all send their love to you, Frederick, & yours.

Believe me, your affectionate brother,

John B. Meredith


General Notes for Child Frederick William M. Waldock

Frederick William and Lizzir Kyd had four sons and one daughter.

Their 4th son Claud Humphrey Meredith Waldock (1904-1981) was a jurist and international lawyer. In 1934 he married Ethel Beatrice Williams, daughter of James Herbert Williams, shipopwner of the Black Diamond Line, of Wellington, New Zealand. They had a son and a daughter.
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Richard Roberts and Mary Meredith




Husband Richard Roberts

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 20 Jan 1777 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Mary Meredith

         Born: 1754 - Circa
   Christened: 13 Jan 1754 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Pritchard




General Notes (Husband)

Of Hopton Castle in Shropshire - scene of a massacre during the Civil War.
picture

Hubert Sladden and Melita Meredyth Meredith




Husband Hubert Sladden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1952
       Buried: 


       Father: Dilnot Sladden
       Mother: Elizabeth Letitia Coster


     Marriage: Apr 1906 - Wairarapa, New Zealand




Wife Melita Meredyth Meredith

         Born: 1874 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers




General Notes (Husband)

Hubert had a park (Sladden Park) in Hutt City named after him, and was the son of Dilnot Sladden and Elizabeth Letitia Coster. He was a civil engineer.

Melita and Hubert had two sons and two daughters.

A Wairarapa wedding of great interest, and an unusually pretty one, was that of Miss Melita Meredith, daughter of Mr. Meredith, Llandaff, Masterton, to Mr. Hubert Sladden, of Pentone. St. Matthew's was prettily decorated for the ceremony, and the day-Wednesday last-was gloriously bright and sunny. Wedding music was played by the organist. The Rev. A. M. Johnston officiated, and many guests were present.

The bride entered the church with her father, and looked very graceful and sweet in her bridal robe of white mousseline satin, veiled with flounces of lovely lace. A small wreath of orange blossoms and white heather was worn under the long tulle veil, and a shower bouquet carried.

The attendant maids were Miss Kathleen Meredith and Miss Dolly Sladden, who wore charming gowns of rose pink radium silk, with pink hats, relieved with long black ostrich plumes, and, their bouquets were of shaded pink roses. Little Miss B. Mackersy and Master Smith (a niece and nephew of the bride) completed the picturesque bridal group. Mr. C. Sladden was best man, and Mr. L. Meredith groomsman.

After the ceremony, a great many friends were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Meredith at Llandaff. The pretty rooms were decorated with a profusion of beautiful flowers, and the tables were laid in the large hall. Several very bright little speeches were made. The toast of the bride and bridegroom was drunk with enthusiasm. Later, Mr. and Mrs. Sladden left for the North, the bride, travelling in a gown of dark blue serge with white corded silk collar, pretty front of crepe-de-chine and lace, blue hat with wings, and silver fox furs.

Mrs. Meredith wore a black silk gown; Mrs. Sladden, black taffetas gown and lace. Some of the guests were: Mr. and Mrs. H Smith, Mr. and Mrs Meredith Kaye, Mrs James, Mr. and Mrs Sladden and the Misses Sladden, Mrs. Mackersy, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Perry, Mr. and Mrs. Gawith, Dr. and Mrs. Dawson, Mr. and Mi,. E. Vallance, Dr. and Mrs, Hocking, Mr. and Mrs. Cox, Miss Board, Miss Hamlin (Napier), Miss Holmes, Mrs. Hayward and Miss Sladden (England), Messrs. Gawith, Moodie, Sumerell, and
Dr. A. Hosking.

The bridesmaids' gifts were quaint gold brooches, set with pearls, and the bride's gift was an opal and diamond ring. Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Sladden will reside at the Lower Hutt on their return from the North.


picture

Owen Meredith and Eliza Jane Windsor




Husband Owen Meredith




         Born: 6 Apr 1847 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1927
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Meredith
       Mother: Louisa Anne Twamley


     Marriage: 1 Nov 1871 - Chalmers Free Presbyterian, Hobart, Tasmania

 Other Spouse: Eady - 1908 - after




Wife Eliza Jane Windsor

         Born: 1844
   Christened: 
         Died: 1908
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Louisa Ann Meredith

         Born: 10 Sep 1873 - Tasmania
   Christened: 16 Oct 1873 - Chalmers Free Presbyterian, Hobart, Tasmania
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Norvill



2 F Winifred Eliza Meredith

         Born: 9 Jan 1874
   Christened: 22 Oct 1874 - Chalmers Free Presbyterian, Hobart, Tasmania
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M David Owen Meredith

         Born: 31 May 1875 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Feb 1964 - Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alice Vicary Cottrell



4 F Sabina Ida Meredith

         Born: 1877
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Violet Isabel Meredith

         Born: 1879
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Corina Ruby Meredith

         Born: 1880
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Owen was a mining engineer.


General Notes for Child Louisa Ann Meredith

Letter written by SAE:

"From a letter of condolence after our sad loss in the spring, from our Australian friend Mrs. Norvill who visited us whilst in England with her grandmother Mrs. Charles Meredith of Hobart Tasmania in 1890 & 1891.

'The picture of Alfred has laways stayed in my memory. I went to church with Mr. Allen on Sunday & it was a dull day. Alfred was in the choir in his chorister's gown, & all of a sudden a ray of light lit up his hair, & I remember thinking it looks like a halo.'

17 Well Walk
Hampstead
1916

Extract of a letter from Beatrice Allen:

"L. Norvill doesn't live in Tasmania now but in Victoria."


General Notes for Child David Owen Meredith

David Owen was manager of the Electrolytic Zinc Company, Risdon, Hobart
picture

Paul Meredith




Husband Paul Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Percival Meredith
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Living ?? Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Percival Meredith




Husband Percival Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Percival O. Meredith
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Paul Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
J. Paton and Phoebe Evangeline Meredith




Husband J. Paton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Phoebe Evangeline Meredith

         Born: 5 Mar 1878
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Campbell Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth Jillett




picture
Richard Meredith and Mary Wasnam




Husband Richard Meredith

         Born: 1763 - about
   Christened: 30 May 1763 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth


     Marriage: 25 Apr 1811 - Lingen, Hereford




Wife Mary Wasnam

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


picture
Samuel Meredith and Sarah Monington




Husband Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1834 - Circa
   Christened: 16 Mar 1834 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Meredith
       Mother: Mary Prince


     Marriage: June Quarter 1857 - Ludlow, Herefordshire




Wife Sarah Monington

         Born: 1834 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Monington
       Mother: Sarah Langford





Children
1 M Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1859 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M William H. Meredith

         Born: 1860 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M George Richard Meredith

         Born: 1866 - circa
   Christened: 17 Apr 1866 - Aymestrey, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Margaret Ann Meredith

         Born: 1867 - circa
   Christened: 26 May 1867 - Aymestrey, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M John Meredith

         Born: 1869 - circa
   Christened: 10 Oct 1869 - Aymestrey, Herefordshire
         Died: 1869 - circa
       Buried: 



6 M James Meredith

         Born: 1871 - circa
   Christened: 28 Jan 1871 - Aymestrey, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Sarah Elizabeth Meredith

         Born: 1876 - circa
   Christened: 25 Jan 1876 - Aymestrey, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1861 Census:

Samuel Meredith of Buckton in Herefordshire (aged 27) farmer employing 3 men with his wife Sarah, (also aged 27) and William H.D. their son (aged 2) and three servants

1871 Census:

Samuel of Wigmore (aged 37), living at Kingsland, Herefordshire, farmer of 466 acres employing 5 men and one boy - with his wife Sarah of Leintwardine (aged 37), son George (aged 5), daughter Margaret A. (aged 3) and son James (aged 3 months) & 3 servants.

1881 Census:

Samuel of Wigmore (aged 46) farmer of 24 acres at Coom Farm, Cradley, Herefordshire, his wife Sarah (aged 46), their son George R (aged 15), agricultural labourer, their daughter Margret N. (aged 13), their son James (aged 10) and their daughter Sarah, aged 6 - there are no servants!!

1891 Census:

Samuel (now at Walford, Herefordshire) (aged 57) with his wife Sarah (aged 57) and their son James (aged 21) - Samuel was described as a farm servant.

1901 Census:

Samuel was living at Kings Caple, Herefordshire (aged 67) and was described as a grocer - with his wife Sarah (aged 24)
picture

Samuel Meredith and Mary Prince




Husband Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1807 - Circa
   Christened: 11 Feb 1807 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1889 - First Quarter - Leominster, Herefordshire
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Meredith - of Wigmore
       Mother: Esther (Hester) Radnor


     Marriage: 15 May 1833 - Wigmore, Herefordshire

 Other Spouse: Elizabeth Price - 16 Dec 1873 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire




Wife Mary Prince

         Born: 1809 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Aug 1809 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Richard Prince
       Mother: Mary





Children
1 M Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1834 - Circa
   Christened: 16 Mar 1834 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Monington
         Marr: June Quarter 1857 - Ludlow, Herefordshire



2 F Ann Meredith

         Born: 1838 - Circa - Adforton, Leintwardine, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Samuel was living with his wife Mary at Brampton Bryan with son Samuel and daughter Ann - He was described as a farmer - also with them, John Prince, Mary's brother, and servants.

1851 Census - Radnorshire - Adforton Stanway and Paytoe and Grange

Samuel and Mary with son Samuel (aged 17), daughter Ann (aged 15), Mary's brother John Prince and a servant, Samuel senior described as a farmer employing two men.

1861 Census - Radnorshire - Adforton Stanway and Paytoe and Grange.

Samuel (aged 54) and Mary, his wife (aged 60) living with Anne, their daughter from Hereford, Samuel their grandson, aged 2?? & Martha Meredith, Samuel's sister from Hereford aged 53.

1871 Census - Adforton, Herefordshire.

Samuel (aged 60) farmer of 162 acres was living with his sister Martha (aged 66), both of Brampton Bryan, and servants.

1881 Census - Leintwardine - Herefordshire.

Samuel Meredith (aged 75) described as a retired farmer living with his wife Elizabeth of Lotten?? and a servant.

Married Elizabeth Price of Leintwardine in 1873 when he was aged 66.


General Notes for Child Samuel Meredith

1861 Census:

Samuel Meredith of Buckton in Herefordshire (aged 27) farmer employing 3 men with his wife Sarah, (also aged 27) and William H.D. their son (aged 2) and three servants

1871 Census:

Samuel of Wigmore (aged 37), living at Kingsland, Herefordshire, farmer of 466 acres employing 5 men and one boy - with his wife Sarah of Leintwardine (aged 37), son George (aged 5), daughter Margaret A. (aged 3) and son James (aged 3 months) & 3 servants.

1881 Census:

Samuel of Wigmore (aged 46) farmer of 24 acres at Coom Farm, Cradley, Herefordshire, his wife Sarah (aged 46), their son George R (aged 15), agricultural labourer, their daughter Margret N. (aged 13), their son James (aged 10) and their daughter Sarah, aged 6 - there are no servants!!

1891 Census:

Samuel (now at Walford, Herefordshire) (aged 57) with his wife Sarah (aged 57) and their son James (aged 21) - Samuel was described as a farm servant.

1901 Census:

Samuel was living at Kings Caple, Herefordshire (aged 67) and was described as a grocer - with his wife Sarah (aged 24)
picture

Samuel Meredith and Elizabeth Price




Husband Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1807 - Circa
   Christened: 11 Feb 1807 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1889 - First Quarter - Leominster, Herefordshire
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Meredith - of Wigmore
       Mother: Esther (Hester) Radnor


     Marriage: 16 Dec 1873 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire

 Other Spouse: Mary Prince - 15 May 1833 - Wigmore, Herefordshire




Wife Elizabeth Price

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Samuel was living with his wife Mary at Brampton Bryan with son Samuel and daughter Ann - He was described as a farmer - also with them, John Prince, Mary's brother, and servants.

1851 Census - Radnorshire - Adforton Stanway and Paytoe and Grange

Samuel and Mary with son Samuel (aged 17), daughter Ann (aged 15), Mary's brother John Prince and a servant, Samuel senior described as a farmer employing two men.

1861 Census - Radnorshire - Adforton Stanway and Paytoe and Grange.

Samuel (aged 54) and Mary, his wife (aged 60) living with Anne, their daughter from Hereford, Samuel their grandson, aged 2?? & Martha Meredith, Samuel's sister from Hereford aged 53.

1871 Census - Adforton, Herefordshire.

Samuel (aged 60) farmer of 162 acres was living with his sister Martha (aged 66), both of Brampton Bryan, and servants.

1881 Census - Leintwardine - Herefordshire.

Samuel Meredith (aged 75) described as a retired farmer living with his wife Elizabeth of Lotten?? and a servant.

Married Elizabeth Price of Leintwardine in 1873 when he was aged 66.
picture

Isaac Whitehouse and Sarah Meredith




Husband Isaac Whitehouse

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 3 Jan 1760 - St. Philip's, Birmingham, Warwickshire




Wife Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1737 - Birmingham
   Christened: 
         Died: September 1790 - After
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth





Children
1 M Isaac Whitehouse

         Born: 1771 - circa
   Christened: 6 Nov 1771 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M James Whitehouse

         Born: 1767 - circa
   Christened: 27 Feb 1767 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M John Whitehouse

         Born: 1764 - circa
   Christened: 21 Mar 1764
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Phebe Whitehouse

         Born: 1761 - circa
   Christened: 25 Mar 1761
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Isaac was described as an Enameller of Birmingham in the Will of his mother-in-law Elizabeth Meredith.

picture

Edward Whitcott and Sarah Meredith




Husband Edward Whitcott

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 25 May 1748 - More, Shropshire




Wife Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1728 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Feb 1728 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 16 June 1810 - aged 82
       Buried: 1810


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens





Children
1 M Edward Whitcott

         Born: 8 Jun 1750 - Lingen, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
James Peck Poynter and Sarah Westall Meredith




Husband James Peck Poynter




         Born: 1781 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 June 1847 - aged 56
       Buried:  - St. David's Cemetery, Hobart


       Father: James Methurst Poynter
       Mother: Elizabeth Peck


     Marriage: 30 Apr 1836 - St. David's Church




Wife Sarah Westall Meredith

         Born: 19 Dec 1808
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 Oct 1869
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Westall Hicks





Children
1 M Charles Meredith Poynter

         Born: 24 Mar 1839 - Bathurst, N.S.W.
   Christened: 
         Died: 1910
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Emily Nodder Shaw
         Marr: 3 Jul 1865 - Melbourne, Victoria



2 M George Farbrace Boyes Poynter

         Born: 25 Dec 1840 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Aug 1920
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Clara Alexandrina Singer
         Marr: 1870



3 M James Benjamin Poynter

         Born: 12 Nov 1842 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Kate Simpson
         Marr: 10 Jul 1875 - Gisborne, Aukland, New Zealand



4 F Elizabeth Selina (Lily) Poynter

         Born: 29 Aug 1846 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1934
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

James and Sarah had three sons and one daughter.

James Poynter was manager of the Australasia Bank in Hobart.

The Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser - Tuesday 24th May 1836

On the 30th April, at St. David's Church by the Rev. William Bedford, James P. Poynter, Esq., Manager of the Bank of Australasia, to Sarah, the eldest daughter of George Meredith, Esq., of Great Swan Port, in this Colony.

The Courier (Hobart) - Wednesday 23rd June 1847

At New Norfolk, James Peck Poynter, Esq., late of Hobart Town, Merchant, in the 57th year of his age. The funeral will take place on Friday next, the 25th instant, at 2 o'clock, from his late residence, Macquarie-street.


General Notes (Wife)

Sarah Westall Poynter

Painter and sketcher, was the eldest daughter of George Meredith, pioneer settler of the Great Swanport district in Van Diemen's Land, and his first wife, Sarah Westall Hicks. Sarah was probably born in Wales but she lived mainly in England. She came to Van Diemen's Land with her father, step-mother and other members of the family, leaving from London in the Emerald on 8 November 1820. Her view of The Old Cottage at Red Banks (the original wattle-and-daub cottage built by her father at Cambria in 1821) was copied in 1846 by her half-sister Fanny Meredith. It is now known only from the copy.

After her marriage to James Peck Poynter in the 1830s Sarah lived at Bathurst, New South Wales, where James managed the local bank. Her brother Charles and his wife Louisa Anne Meredith, a cousin whom she had known all her life, visited in October 1839 and met the Poynters' first surviving son, Charles, born in March. The Poynters finally had a family of three boys and a girl. James died in 1847 and Sarah returned to England. She apparently paid a visit to her Tasmanian relatives in the late 1850s and seems to have been staying with her father's family at the grander Cambria, Great Swanport, in 1858 when she exhibited her oil painting, Lake St. Clair, Tasmania, in the Hobart Town Art-Treasures Exhibition (unless this was copied from a Prout drawing or engraving in England). She died in England in 1869.

Sarah Poynter's original sketches are in the Crowther Library. In 1936 Violet Mace, the last of the George Meredith descendants to live at Cambria, made four crude pencil copies after Poynter drawings for the Royal Society of Tasmania. These depict Bothwell Church, two general views of Port Arthur and Sketch of Commandant's House, Port Arthur Showing Point Puer in Distance (TMAG). The originals have not been located.


General Notes for Child James Benjamin Poynter

From the Hobarton Paper of February 15th 1865

The murder of Mr. Llewellyn Meredith by the blacks in Queensland.

The report lately received of the murder of Mr. Llewellyn Meredith by the natives in Northern Queensland is unhappily but too well founded.

Accounts confirming the terrible fate have been brought by Mr. J. B. Poynter, who had been for two years residing on Mr. Hervey's station with Mr. Meredith and who has fearlessly and perseveringly exerted himself to discover the remains of his lost relative, and of the servant who shared his fate.

It appears that Mr. Meredith had accompanied a dray which was bringing up supplies from ???? for the station and when within three days ride of home, he proceeded alone, and found a large mob of blacks camped close to the road. They followed him in a threatening manner and on his arrival at the station he heard that they had tried to surround some drays a short time before. Having to return to the dray, in order to see it safe home, he took a man with him, both being well armed; but in the night of November 20th when they were camped on the creek where the blacks were, they were both murdered.

A week afterwards, when anxiety began to be felt at the station concerning the non-appearance of either Mr. Meredith or the dray, a person passing informed Mr. Poynter that the draymen were waiting for someone to fetch them on, neither Mr. Meredith nor his companion having reached them. Mr. Poynter then at once set forth in search, taking two men and a black native boy with him, and on arriving at the “creek” he found the missing horses hobbled in the bush. Continuing the search next day, the saddles, bridles, rifle etc. were found broken up, in a deserted blacks camp, the late dwellers of which were next pursued, and found about twenty miles down the creek, and in their camp were the ?????, quart-pots, blankets and everything belonging to the lost white men, even to their clothes. Mr. Poynter then endeavoured to find out from the blacks what had been done with the bodies, and the black boy tried to communicate with them, but the dialects of different tribes are often so dissimilar and it was impossible to elicit any distinct information. The searching party occupied more than a week in following up the blacks and trying to discover the remains of the murdered White men, but without learning any further particulars as to the circumstances under which the poor fellows met their awful fate. Mr. Meredith was well known and universally esteemed and respected in Northern Queensland where his cruel murder has created a deep sensation of sorrow and horror. His brave genial disposition and keen intelligence, his noble handsome person and winning courtesy will be long and affectionately remembered and his tragic and early death sincerely mourned by many friends and a wide circle of relatives both in this and in the old country.

This seems to be a letter to Sarah Jukes (nee Meredith) Alfred Jukes” wife.

Extract from Mrs. Meredith's letter dated February 20th 1865

“It is sad new I have to tell you dear friend. We have received the melancholy tidings of our poor Llewellyn's untimely death in Queensland. He said when he left us for Queensland that he should either return in a carriage or not at all. for the ???? of the enterprise was well known and his foreboding has been terribly fulfilled. He was murdered by natives on the night of the 20th November last, but the length and difficulty of the journey over land (our ????? occupies 8 days in crossing) and the double or treble voyage have prevented our hearing until this month.

James Poynter our nephew, who had been at Tower Hill with poor Llewellyn the past two years made every effort regardless of danger to discover the remains of his lost friend and of the servant who shared his awful fate, but though the horses, ???? blankets, arms, and even the clothes of the victims were found, no clue could be obtained as to the hiding place of the bodies. I sent you a newspaper with an account I made out from James' narration and that is all we know now - of course further investigation will be carried on - and you shall know the result.

I cannot tell you the shock and grief this has been to me and to us all - for his dear father's sake, as well as his own. He was dear to me and my sons loved him and lament him as a brother - he was liked and respected by all who knew him, and James says his sad and early fate has created a deep and bitter sensation in Queensland.

I have written to Georgina Jones who seemed to have especially selected Llewellyn for her own. I know how much attached to her he was and I have written to Beete that he might tell Augusta - I send ???? to them and to your brother Samuel. I would have written to Joseph but ?? if I could have done so in the time - what little remains for me to do, I have sadly and faithfully performed and shall forward whatever ???? or property our lost one has left - I will send a ???? and write to your Alfred at Warrnambool.

February 19th 1865

I have just written to Beete that he may break to Augusta the terrible news of poor Llewellyn's murder in Queensland by the blacks. The paper containing the account he can send to you.

Our nephew James Poynter (married to Sarah Westall Meredith) was with Llewellyn for two years, and did all he could in endeavouring to find his remains and that of the man who shared his terrible fate, but in vain.

He was murdered on the night of the 20th November last, but owing to the long time occupied by the journey, James only arrived in Melbourne the end of January.

He sent a telegram from Brisbane with the first facts - but we tried not to believe them - - now I have his own account and there is no longer a doubt.

Everything belonging to Llewellyn and his servant was found in or near the Black's camps - but no enquiry or search served to show where the bodies were ????.

It is a melancholy business. We were much attached to poor Llewellyn and mourn his fearful death most sincerely. Charles' eldest brother was murdered years ago by natives at Kangaroo Island.

picture

William Meredith and Ann Rollings




Husband William Meredith

         Born: 1787 - Circa
   Christened: 27 Jan 1787 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Meredith
       Mother: Martha Carter


     Marriage: 10 Feb 1817 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Ann Rollings

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


picture
William Meredith and Martha Evans Monington




Husband William Meredith

         Born: 1808 - Circa
   Christened: 28 Nov 1808 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Meredith - of Wigmore
       Mother: Esther (Hester) Radnor


     Marriage: 1840 - circa




Wife Martha Evans Monington

         Born: 1821 - circa - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


picture
Samuel Meredith - of Wigmore and Esther (Hester) Radnor




Husband Samuel Meredith - of Wigmore

         Born: 1764 - Circa
   Christened: 2 Jan 1764 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 13 January 1819 (aged 56)
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Meredith
       Mother: Martha Carter


     Marriage: 12 Feb 1804 - Byton, Herefordshire




Wife Esther (Hester) Radnor

         Born: 1773 - Circa
   Christened: 12 Apr 1773 - Brilley, Herefordshire
         Died: 11 June 1841 (aged 68)
       Buried: 


       Father: John Radnor
       Mother: Hannah





Children
1 F Martha Meredith

         Born: 1805 - circa
   Christened: 11 Nov 1805 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1807 - Circa
   Christened: 11 Feb 1807 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1889 - First Quarter - Leominster, Herefordshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Prince
         Marr: 15 May 1833 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Spouse: Elizabeth Price
         Marr: 16 Dec 1873 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire



3 M John Meredith

         Born: 1808 - Circa - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 25 Apr 1808 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M William Meredith

         Born: 1808 - Circa
   Christened: 28 Nov 1808 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Martha Evans Monington
         Marr: 1840 - circa



5 F Esther (Hester) Meredith

         Born: 1813 - Circa
   Christened: 16 May 1813 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M James Meredith

         Born: 1816 - circa
   Christened: 26 May 1816 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Samuel Meredith

1841 Census:

Samuel was living with his wife Mary at Brampton Bryan with son Samuel and daughter Ann - He was described as a farmer - also with them, John Prince, Mary's brother, and servants.

1851 Census - Radnorshire - Adforton Stanway and Paytoe and Grange

Samuel and Mary with son Samuel (aged 17), daughter Ann (aged 15), Mary's brother John Prince and a servant, Samuel senior described as a farmer employing two men.

1861 Census - Radnorshire - Adforton Stanway and Paytoe and Grange.

Samuel (aged 54) and Mary, his wife (aged 60) living with Anne, their daughter from Hereford, Samuel their grandson, aged 2?? & Martha Meredith, Samuel's sister from Hereford aged 53.

1871 Census - Adforton, Herefordshire.

Samuel (aged 60) farmer of 162 acres was living with his sister Martha (aged 66), both of Brampton Bryan, and servants.

1881 Census - Leintwardine - Herefordshire.

Samuel Meredith (aged 75) described as a retired farmer living with his wife Elizabeth of Lotten?? and a servant.

Married Elizabeth Price of Leintwardine in 1873 when he was aged 66.
picture

Clarence Leslie Meredith-Kaye and Blanche Louise Rees




Husband Clarence Leslie Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 8 May 1893
   Christened: 
         Died: 9 Jul 1979 - Ages 86
       Buried: 


       Father: Clarence Kay Meredith-Kaye
       Mother: Rosina Maria Kay


     Marriage: 




Wife Blanche Louise Rees

         Born: 23 Jan 1892
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 June 1969 - Ages 77
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles William Rees
       Mother: Catherine Bradley





Children
1 M Charles Kenrick Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Clarence L. Meredith-Kaye was a 2nd Lieutenant in 1917.


General Notes (Wife)

Blanche Louise was the daughter of Charles William Rees and Catherine Bradley.


General Notes for Child Charles Kenrick Meredith-Kaye

Charles Kenrick Meredith-Kaye was a day boy at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian College, 1930-32.
picture

James Mitchell-Baker and Lilia Theta Dean Poynter




Husband James Mitchell-Baker

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 31 Jul 1915 - South Africa




Wife Lilia Theta Dean Poynter

         Born: 30 May 1883 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Oct 1983
       Buried: 


       Father: James Benjamin Poynter
       Mother: Kate Simpson




picture
George Monington and Helen Louisa Walle




Husband George Monington

         Born: 27 Jan 1849 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Feb 1887 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
       Buried: 


       Father: William Monington
       Mother: Sarah Langford


     Marriage: 




Wife Helen Louisa Walle

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


picture
Edward Mooyart and Mary Jane Stephens




Husband Edward Mooyart

         Born: 5 Apr 1817 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 15 Jun 1817
         Died: Bef 1891
       Buried: 


       Father: Jacobus Nicolaas Mooyart
       Mother: Johanna Catherine Jahn


     Marriage: 1860 - December Q - Notting Hill, London




Wife Mary Jane Stephens

         Born: 1822 - circa
   Christened: 18 Jul 1822 - Dinedor, Herefordshire
         Died: 1891 - December Quarter - Marylebone, London
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Stephens
       Mother: Susannah Beaumont




General Notes (Husband)

The Venerable Archdeacon Mooyart of Ceylon.

1861 Census:

Berkshire
Winkfield
Edward Mooyaart - 44 - Chaplain at Galle, Sri Lanka
Mary J. - wife - 38

1871 Census:

London
St Marylebone
Rectory
Edward Mooyaart - Head - 53 - Archdeacon of Colombo Ceylon
Mary Jane - wife - 45
Henry Mooyaart - brother - unmarried - 42 - Late of the Ceylon Civil Service - retired




General Notes (Wife)

Living with her sister Louisa Coxe in London in 1851.

1891 Census:

St. Marylebone
Christchurch
2 Harewood Square
Mary J. Mooyaart - Head - Widow - Living on Own Means


picture

Captain Michael Vicary and Eliza Murray




Husband Captain Michael Vicary

         Born: Jan 1794 - Co. Wexford, Ireland
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Jul 1867 - Triabunna, Tasmania
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 7 Jan 1815 - Ipswich, Suffolk




Wife Eliza Murray

         Born: 1791
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Jan 1865 - Triabunna, Tasmania
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Henry James Vicary

         Born: 23 Nov 1815 - Ar sea near Barbados
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 May 1868 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Frances Charlotte Maclaine
         Marr: 8 Jun 1854 - Prosser Plains, Tasmania
       Spouse: Emily Eliza Lord
         Marr: 19 Jan 1839 - Spring Bay, Tasmania




General Notes (Husband)

Army records: 18 Nov 1809 London, England
Emigration: 23 Nov 1828 Hobart, Tasmania,
Australia Army records: 23 Feb 1829 London, England
Land Purchase: Jul 1838 Spring Bay, Tasmania, Australia
Land Purchase: 1839 Spring Bay, Tasmania, Australia

Personal Information
Occupation: 1828 Oatlands, Tasmania, Australia Inspector of Roads
Occupation: 1829/30 Bothwell, Tasmania, Australia Assistant Police Magistrate
Occupation: 1833 Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Storkeeper, Colonial Branch of Ordinance Department


General Notes for Child Henry James Vicary

Occupation: Constable Tasmanian Police.

picture

Lord North




Husband Lord North

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Lieut.-Colonel Oliver Henry North

         Born: 28 Apr 1874
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 July 1954 - aged 80
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edith Monica Smith-Masters
         Marr: 1908




General Notes for Child Lieut.-Colonel Oliver Henry North

Oliver Henry North’s obituary appeared in The Times on Saturday, Jul 24, 1954 as follows:

“Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver Henry North, D.S.O., died on Wednesday, at the age of 80. He was bom on April 28, 1874, the fifth son of the late North North, of Newton Hall, Lancashire. He was gazetted to the Lancashire Fusiliers in 1900, and served in the South African War with Bethune's Mounted Infantry, being present at the relief of Ladysmith, at the action of Spion Kop, at the operations of February 5 to February 7, at the action at Vaal Kranz, and at the operations on Tugela Heights during 1900. He was actively engaged throughout the rest of the war until the final operations in Cape Colony in 1902. Promoted captain in 1910, major in 1915, he was three times mentioned in dispatches and created D.S.O. for his services in the 1914-18 War. North retired in 1925. From 1933 until 1937 he was district remount officer of Westem Command. In 1908, he married Edith Monica, only child of William Allan Smith Masters, of Meopham, Kent. They had four sons, one of whom was killed in action in 1940.”
picture

Lieut.-Colonel Oliver Henry North and Edith Monica Smith-Masters




Husband Lieut.-Colonel Oliver Henry North

         Born: 28 Apr 1874
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 July 1954 - aged 80
       Buried: 


       Father: Lord  North
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 1908




Wife Edith Monica Smith-Masters

         Born: 1879 - circa - Meopham, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Allan Smith-Masters
       Mother: Mary Coxe




General Notes (Husband)

Oliver Henry North’s obituary appeared in The Times on Saturday, Jul 24, 1954 as follows:

“Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver Henry North, D.S.O., died on Wednesday, at the age of 80. He was bom on April 28, 1874, the fifth son of the late North North, of Newton Hall, Lancashire. He was gazetted to the Lancashire Fusiliers in 1900, and served in the South African War with Bethune's Mounted Infantry, being present at the relief of Ladysmith, at the action of Spion Kop, at the operations of February 5 to February 7, at the action at Vaal Kranz, and at the operations on Tugela Heights during 1900. He was actively engaged throughout the rest of the war until the final operations in Cape Colony in 1902. Promoted captain in 1910, major in 1915, he was three times mentioned in dispatches and created D.S.O. for his services in the 1914-18 War. North retired in 1925. From 1933 until 1937 he was district remount officer of Westem Command. In 1908, he married Edith Monica, only child of William Allan Smith Masters, of Meopham, Kent. They had four sons, one of whom was killed in action in 1940.”


General Notes (Wife)

Edith Monica and Oliver Henry North had 4 sons, one of whom was
killed in action in 1940.
picture

Edward Reynolds and Maria Louisa Parker




Husband Edward Reynolds

         Born: 1825 - circa - Christchurch, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 1895
       Buried: 


       Father: William Reynolds
       Mother: Jane Stephens


     Marriage: 1860 - December Quarter - Sheffield, Yorkshire




Wife Maria Louisa Parker

         Born: 1834 - circa - London, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 1902
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Edward Parker Reynolds

         Born: 1862 - June Quarter - St. George, Hanover Square, London, Middlesex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Helen Maud Armstrong
         Marr: 16 Nov 1889 - St. Mark's, Sheffield, Yorkshire



2 M Frederick Reynolds

         Born: 1864 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Alleyne Reynolds

         Born: 1866 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: Dec 1918 - Monmouthshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alice Elizabeth Greaves
         Marr: 1892 September Quarter - Ecclesall Bierlow, Yorkshire




General Notes (Husband)

In the 1881 census Edward Reynolds was enumerated as a Civil Engineer and Steel Manufacturer.

Results of an Experimental Inquiry Into the Tensile Strength and Other ...

Reynolds, E. Engineer to Naylor, Vickers & Co., Don Steel Works, Sheffield

Report on Machinery and Processes of the Industrial Arts and Apparatus of ...

by Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard - Exposition universelle de 1867 à Paris - 1869 - 669 pages - Page 174

This is the ingenious water-jet elevator, invented by Mr. Edward Reynolds,
engineer of the River Don Steel Works, at Sheffield, England, owned by Messrs.

Proceedings - Institution of Mechanical Engineers - Page xxi
by Institution of Mechanical Engineers (Great Britain), Institution of Mechanical Engineers (Great Britain). - Mechanical engineering - 1866

List of Members
1862. Reynolds, Edward, Don Steel Works, Sheffield

1871 Census:

Yorkshire
Ecclesall Bierlow
7 Victoria Road

Edward Reynolds - head - 45 - Civil Engineer
Maria Louisa - wife - 37 - London
Edward P. - son - 8
Frederick - son - 7 - Sheffield
Alleyne - son - 4

1881 Census:

Yorkshire
Nether Hallam

Edward Reynolds - head - 55 - Civil Engineer and Steel Manufacturer - Southawk, Surrey
Maria L. - wife - 47 - London
Edward. P. - son - 18 - Scholar
Alleyne - son - 14 - Scholar

1891 Census:

Yorkshire
Nether Hallam
112 Westbourne Road

Edward Reynolds - head - 65 - Civil Engineer
Maria L. - wife - 57
Alleyne - son - 24 - Engineers' Draughtsman



General Notes (Wife)

1901 Census:

Yorkshire
Nether Hallam
Hallam
112 Westbourne Road
Maria L. Reynolds - head - widow - 67.


General Notes for Child Edward Parker Reynolds

The Times, Thursday, Nov 21, 1889; pg. 1; Issue 32862; col A

On the 16th, at St. Mark's, Sheffield, by the Rev. A.H. Favell, assisted by the Rev. T.C. Davies, Edward Parker, eldest son of Edward Reynolds, Sheffield, to Helen Maud, only daughter of the late David B. Armstrong, formerly of Manchester.

1901 Census:

Yorkshire
Ecclesall
60 Ashdell Grove, Westbourne Road

Edward P. Reynolds - head - 38 - Living on Own Means
Helen M. - wife - 38
Evelyn M. - daughter - 10
Violet M. - daughter - 7


General Notes for Child Alleyne Reynolds

The Times, Wednesday, May 07, 1913; pg. 27; Issue 40205; col A

Faults of Present-Day Furnaces.

A paper by Mr. Alleyne Reynolds was entitled "Some Fundamental Faults of Present-Day Furnaces and their Remedies."

After having discussed the principles of combustion the author gave details regarding some devices arranged by him for securing correct and complete combustion. Where coal or other solid fuel was employed the device embodied a chamber, connected to a source of high-pressure air, having two closed branches, one being provided with connexions to the air inlet of the gas producer, and the other with the air inlet or inlets of the firnace. The connexions betwen the chamber and the branches were provided with valves and seatings, the diameters of the latter being such that their areas were proportional to ratios of the primary and secondary air supplies required................

1901 Census

Yorkshire
Upper Hallam
Riverdale

Alleyne Reynolds - Head - 34 - Metallurgical Engineer - Employer - Sheffield
Alice E - wife - 40 - Sheffield
Edward A. - son - 7
Mabel - daughter - 2
James F. - son - 9 months
picture

James Methurst Poynter and Elizabeth Peck




Husband James Methurst Poynter

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Peck

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M James Peck Poynter




         Born: 1781 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 June 1847 - aged 56
       Buried:  - St. David's Cemetery, Hobart
       Spouse: Sarah Westall Meredith
         Marr: 30 Apr 1836 - St. David's Church




General Notes for Child James Peck Poynter

James and Sarah had three sons and one daughter.

James Poynter was manager of the Australasia Bank in Hobart.

The Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser - Tuesday 24th May 1836

On the 30th April, at St. David's Church by the Rev. William Bedford, James P. Poynter, Esq., Manager of the Bank of Australasia, to Sarah, the eldest daughter of George Meredith, Esq., of Great Swan Port, in this Colony.

The Courier (Hobart) - Wednesday 23rd June 1847

At New Norfolk, James Peck Poynter, Esq., late of Hobart Town, Merchant, in the 57th year of his age. The funeral will take place on Friday next, the 25th instant, at 2 o'clock, from his late residence, Macquarie-street.

picture

Michael Phillips and Mary Anne Tench




Husband Michael Phillips

         Born: 1796
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Dec 1876
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Mary Anne Tench

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Highgate Henry Phillips-Conn

         Born: 1841 - circa - Cavan, Ireland
   Christened: 
         Died: 1917 - March Q - Aged 75 - St. Marylebone, London
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Fanny Meredith
         Marr: 1870 - June Quarter - Kings Norton, Staffordshire



2 M Thomas George Johnstone Phillips

         Born: 1834
   Christened: 
         Died: 3 Apr 1898
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Charlotte Maria Lewis
         Marr: 1860




General Notes (Husband)

Michael Phillips was a Major in the Cavan Militia.


General Notes (Wife)

Mary Anne was the daughter of Highgate Tench, of Ballyhealy, Co. Wexford, and his wife Frances, daughter of Joshua Nunn, of St. Margaret’s.


General Notes for Child Highgate Henry Phillips-Conn

Highgate Henry Phillips was an M.A., and M.D. of Dublin University, and a J.P. He served as Surgeon-Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps and the 44th (East Essex) Regt. He succeeded to the Mount Ida estates, Co. Kilkenny/Waterford, in 1893, on the death of his uncle by marriage, the late John Lambly Conn, and by Royal Licence 4 July, 1894 he assumed the additional surname and arms of CONN, in accordance with his uncle’s will. He also succeeded to the Glenview estates on the death of his elder brother Rev. Thomas George Johnson Phillips.

The Times, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 1932, pg. 1; Issue 46226; Col. A

Phillips-Conn. - On Aug. 28, 1932, at York, Fanny Phillips-Conn, wife of the late Dr. Phillips-Conn of Reading and Mount Ida, Waterford, in her 90th year

1871 Census:

Berkshire
St. Giles
Southampton Street
Heygate Phillips - Head - 29 - General Practitioner, Dublin University, Ireland
Fanny - wife - 27

1881 Census:

Berkshire
St. Giles
London Road
Heygate H. Phillips - Head - 39General Practitioner, M.D. Dublin
Fanny - wife - 37
Mabel C. - daughter - 1

1891 Census:

Berkshire
St. Giles
45 London Road
Heygate H. Phillips - Head - 49 - Registered Medical Practitioner Practicing as a Physician and surgeon.
Fanny - wife - 46
Mabel C. - daughter - 11
Thomas H.M. - son - 9
Violet F. - daughter - 6

A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Ireland (1912) pp. 127-128
Author: Burke, Bernard, Sir, 1814-1892; Fox-Davies, Arthur Charles, 1871-1928
Subject: Gentry -- Ireland; Heraldry -- Ireland
Publisher: London : Harrison

Phillips-Conn of Belturbet and Mount Ida.

Heygate Henry Phillips-Conn, of Belturbet, co, Cavan and Mount Ida, co, Kilkenny, J.P., M.A. and M.D. Dublin University, formerly Surgeon-Captain, R.A.M.C. and 44th (East Essex) Regt, b. 1841; m. 1870, Fanny, only dau. of the late Henry Meredith, of Edgbaston, and has issue.

1. Thomas Harry Meredith, b. 1881.
1. Mabel Constance.
2. Violet Frances.

Mr. H.H. Phillips-Conn s. to the Mount Ida estates in 1893, on the death of his uncle by marriage, the late John Lambly Conn, and, in accordance with his will, assumed by Royal Licence 4 July, 1894, the additional surname and arms of Conn. He also succeeded to the Glenview estates on the death s.p. of his elder brother Rev, T.G.J. Phillips, 3 April, 1898.

Lineage, - (of Phillips) - Thomas Phillips, Provost of Belturbet 1662, m. 1661, Jane, dau. of Thomas Richardson, of Dublin. He d. 1700 (will dated 5 Feb. 1699), leaving three sons,

1. James, his heir.
2. William, who left a dau., m. Valentine Swords.
3. Thomas, of Belturbet, co. Cavan, d. intestate (administration granted to his brother James, 14 July, 1692).

The elder son,

James Phillips, m. 1702, Margaret Haynes, of Lislin, co. Cavan, and with her acquired estates in that co.. He was s. by his only son,

Thomas Phillips, m. Mary Anne, dau. of John Wade, of Clonebrany, co. Meath, and d. intestate (administration granted 24 Dec. 1730), leaving an only son and heir,

Michael Phillips, of Edergole, b. 1730, who obtained under the will of his maternal uncle, John Wade, the lands of Coolcor or Ashgreen, co. Meath. He m. 1771, Mabel, dau. of Stearne Tighe, of Dublin (2nd son of Robert Tighe, of co. Westmeath), and by her was father of,

Thomas Phillips, of Ashgreen, co. Meath, m. 1st, Anne, dau. of John Tandy, of Johnsbrook, co. Meath, and by her had issue,

1. Michael, his heir.
2. Thomas, M.D., who settled in Canada, and left issue
1. Mabel, d. unm. 2. Marion, m. Robert Miller.
Mr. Phillips m. 2ndly, Helen, dau. of Joshua Nunn, of St. Margaret's, co. Wexford, and by her had issue,

3. Joshua, m. his cousin Anne Phillips, and had an only son, Frederick William, of Dublin.
3. Frances, m. B.A. Leonard.
4. Jane, m. Stearne Phillips.
5. Marianne, m. Dr. J. Taylor.
6. Elfrida, m. William Miller.

His eldest son,

Michael Phillips, of Glenview, Major in the Cavan Militia, J.P. co. Cavan, b. 1796; m. 1832, Mary Anne, dau. of Highgate Tench, of Ballyhealy, co. Wexford, by Frances his wide, eldest dau. of Joshua Nunn, of St. Margaret's, and d. 23 Dec. 1876, leaving two sons,

1. Thomas George Johnston, late of Glenview.
2. Highgate Henry, now of Belturbet and Mount Ida.

The elder son,

Rev. Thomas George Johnston Phillips, of Glenview, co. Cavan, M.A., Rector of Fenagh, co. Carlow, b. 1834; s. 1876; m. 1860, Charlotte Maria, dau. of Edward Lewis, of Violetstown, co. Westmeath, and d.s.p. 3 April, 1898, when he was s. by his only brother.

Lineage. - (of Conn).

John Conn, m. Mary, dau. of John Underwood, C.E., and niece of the Rev. William Lambly, Rector of Rower, co. Kilkenny, and by her had issue,

1. Benjamin
2. Joseph, who m. Mary Gleeson, and by her had a dau., Sarah, m. Saunders Rogers, of Tramore.

The elder son,

Benjamin Conn, of Mount Ida, m. 1811, Elizabeth, dau. of Capt. Peter Dalton, of Glenfield, co. Tipperary, and d. 1862, having by her (who d. 1858) had issue,

1. John Lambly, of Mount Ida.
1. Kate Elizabeth, d. unm.
2. Marianne, m. 26 April, 1853, Martin Costelloe, and had issue.

The only son,

John Lambly Conn, of Mount Ida, co. Kilkenny, b. 8 Aug. 1812; m. 16 July, 1844, Frances, eldest dau. of the late Highgate Tench, of Ballyhealy House, co. Wexford, and grand-dau. of the late Col. Joshua Nunn, of St. Margaret's, in the same co., and d. 1893, having had issue,

1. Benjamin Higatt, b. 1846; d. unm. 7 Aug. 1861.
2. John Nunn, b. 1847; d. 1849.

Mr. Conn devised his estates to his wife's nephew, Highgate Henry Phillips, who had assumed by Royal Licence the additional name and arms of Conn.

Arms - Quarterly: 1st and 4th, vert, a bend engrailed plain cotised arg. for Conn; 2nd and 3rd, az., a chevron engrailed between three falcons arg. belled or, for Phillips. Crest - A falcon's head, erased ppr. armed or holding in its beak a lure gu. Motto - Vincit qui patitur.

Seat - Mount Ida, Ferrybank, near Waterford.








General Notes for Child Thomas George Johnstone Phillips

Thomas George Johnston Phillips was Rector of Fenagh, Co. Carlow. He died childless.
picture

Thomas Harry Meredith Phillips-Conn and Edith M. Withers




Husband Thomas Harry Meredith Phillips-Conn

         Born: 1881 - Reading, Berks.
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 May 1962 - 56 Bedford Gardens, W.8
       Buried: 31 May 1962 - Golders Green Crematorium


       Father: Highgate Henry Phillips-Conn
       Mother: Fanny Meredith


     Marriage: Sep 1913 - Ormskirk, Lancashire




Wife Edith M. Withers

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Tuesday, May 29, 1962; pg. 1; Issue 55403; col. A

Phillips-Conn. - On May 27th, 1962, at 56, Bedford Gardens, W.8, Thomas Harry Meredith Phillips-Conn, formerly solicitor and Overseas Manager of Leyland Motors Ltd., and retired member of the Irish Bar, Dublin, only son of Dr. H.H. Phillips (later Phillips-Conn), of Reading, Berkshire, and of Mount Ida, co, Kilkenny, Ireland. Cremation (private) Goldered Green, Thursday 2.50 p.m.. No letters or mourning, please, by his special request.
picture

William Marshall Waldock and Hannah Plyer




Husband William Marshall Waldock

         Born: 1787
   Christened: 
         Died: 1863
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Hannah Plyer

         Born: 1787
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Frederick David Waldock




         Born: 22 Sep 1831 - Braughing, Hertfordshire
   Christened: 7 Mar 1832 - Independent Church, Buntingford, Hertfordshire
         Died: 6 Oct 1908 - Worthing
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Maria Carter Meredith
         Marr: 9 Aug 1862 - Esher St. Congregational Chapel, Lambeth




General Notes for Child Frederick David Waldock

William Marshall was an architect who with his wife settled in Ceylon in 1862 as a Baptist missionary, where all eight of their children were born.


picture

Lawrence Johnstone Stephens and Eliza Jane Pooley




Husband Lawrence Johnstone Stephens

         Born: 1828 - circa
   Christened: 10 August 1828 - circa - Creden Hill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Stephens
       Mother: Susannah Beaumont


     Marriage: 1859 - March Quarter - Marylebone, Middlesex




Wife Eliza Jane Pooley

         Born: 1830 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Address in 1860 - Howick, Alnwick, Northumberland. — Caius Coll Camb. B.A. 1851, M A. 1855 ; Deacon 1852, Priest. 1853, both by Bp of Wore; Curate of Howick, 1859; late Curate of Lesbury, Northumberland; formerly Curate of Shawbury, Shropshire.

He married a widow.

1871 Census:

Hampshire
Owslebury

Lawrence J. Stephens - head - 42 - Vicar of Owslebury
Eliza Jane - wife - 41 - clergyman's wife.


picture

Charles Meredith Poynter and Emily Nodder Shaw




Husband Charles Meredith Poynter

         Born: 24 Mar 1839 - Bathurst, N.S.W.
   Christened: 
         Died: 1910
       Buried: 


       Father: James Peck Poynter
       Mother: Sarah Westall Meredith


     Marriage: 3 Jul 1865 - Melbourne, Victoria




Wife Emily Nodder Shaw

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Clara Elizabeth Poynter

         Born: 17 Jun 1866 - Talbot, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Harper Campbell
         Marr: 21 Jan 1891 - Geelong, Victoria



2 M Charles Farbrace Poynter

         Born: 2 Aug 1867 - Amherst, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 1893
       Buried: 



3 F Lily Maude Poynter

         Born: 25 Jun 1869 - Amherst, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Hugh Meredith Poynter

         Born: 8 Apr 1871 - Talbot, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 1871
       Buried: 



5 M James Cursham Poynter

         Born: 16 Dec 1873 - Amherst, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 1959 - circa
       Buried: 



6 F Mabel Cholmondely Poynter

         Born: 28 Jun 1874 - Geelong, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 28 Oct 1919
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Robert Henry Burnside Downes
         Marr: 4 Apr 1896 - Geelong, Victoria



7 F Emily Sarah Meredith Poynter

         Born: 5 Jun 1877 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 May 1878
       Buried: 



8 M Reginald Chomley Poynter

         Born: 18 Oct 1879 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1900
       Buried: 



9 F Gladys Bower Poynter

         Born: 3 Mar 1882 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Lily Maude Poynter

Maude Poynter

Maude was a potter and painter. She was born in Geelong, Victoria, where her father was a bank manager. The family could be described as having artistic connections: Sir Edward Poynter, President of the Royal Academy in 1897, was a cousin and through him the family was distantly related to Sir Edward Burne-Jones. Her father and one of her sisters also painted.
Poynter was brought up in Geelong. In about 1910 she went to London and studied painting at the Slade School, followed by pottery at the Kingston-on-Thames School of Art in 1913. During World War I she worked as a VAD, but became ill and returned to Australia in 1918 to live with her father. After his death, she moved to Tasmania to stay with her married sister, Mrs Reid of Ratho, outside Bothwell. The Reids let Maude have a small plot of land on the Ratho estate where, using some of her small private income and with the help of a local carpenter, she built a cottage and a large wood-fired kiln. After experimenting with local clays and finding that the results did not justify the effort, Poynter bought her clays from Campbell's Pottery in Launceston. Her glazes were imported from Wenzer's at Stoke-on-Trent, England. The kiln took about twelve hours to fire and the pots were usually fired in saggars.

As early as 1919 Poynter exhibited large quantities of her pottery with the Arts and Crafts Society of Tasmania and attracted favourable notice, particularly as she was the first person to do so. During the 1920s she exhibited her pottery regularly with the Society and sold it through Sargison's jewellery shop and Jean Spong's Art Salon. At the same time she consistently showed paintings, usually landscapes, with the Art Society of Tasmania. At Ratho Poynter taught pottery to her cousin Violet Mace and to local women. In 1924 she and Violet held a joint exhibition of pottery at the Hobart Town Hall, which included demonstrations of throwing by Maude.

In 1928 Maude returned overseas in order to visit the art centres of Europe. In 1935, not long after this photograph was taken, she moved to Hobart where she continued working with a small electric kiln, taught at New Norfolk and took a few private pupils. One of them, Mylie Peppin, opened a pottery at Port Arthur in the 1990s named in memory of her teacher.
Maude Poynter's pottery was distinguished by a sturdy utilitarian quality, relieved by a taste for the bizarre or a whimsical humour. Her interesting Bird Jug, dated 1932, is characteristic of her most imaginative work. It has been wheel-thrown from a buff earthenware body then modelled by hand. The large lip has been built out and curved downwards to resemble a bird's beak, balanced by the large handle. The zoomorphic effect is enhanced by the eyes painted on each side with a modelled pupil in relief. The jug is decorated with dark tan glaze in the interior, while the exterior has been divided into geometric fields painted in dark or light tan or the thick blue glaze Poynter favoured, or in some cases left in the natural buff body and covered with a clear glaze. Each field is delineated with a black line, which also defines the eyes and emphasises the continuity of the beak, rim and curve of the handle.

The scheme of decoration was bold for the time in terms of its abstraction. It is also of particular interest as it was almost certainly intended to represent Aboriginal motifs. A contemporary article on the use of Aboriginal art had featured feather-like designs similar to that employed around the rim of the jug, while the colours used were probably meant to evoke those used in Aboriginal art or, possibly, in the landscape itself. The same article had also remarked that `in one or two instances aboriginal subjects have been drawn on jugs with excellent results'.

Although the use of Australian motifs was commonplace in craftwork of the period, this is an early example of looking to the art of the indigenous Australians rather than to flora or fauna for inspiration. It is certainly one of the earliest Tasmanian specimens of studio pottery to employ such motifs.

Caroline Miley.
Details


Also known as: Poynter, Maud Note: Possibly also "Maud" Poynter.
Gender: Female
Birth: Date: 1869 Place: Geelong, Vic.
Period active: Dates: c. 1910 - 1935
Death: Date: 1945
Medium: OTHER Note: Pottery
Medium: Painting
Artwork: Title: Bird Jug Date: 1932 Note: 1932, glazed earthenware 9.3 x 24 x 14 cm; inscr. base `Maude Poynter/Ratho/1932'. QVMAG. Photograph Brian Allison.
Collection: Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston, Tas.
Published image: Maude Poynter in Her Studio at "Ratho", Bothwell, Tasmania. Note: Photograph from Tasmanian Mail 28 March 1935 (Archives Office of Tasmania, Hobart); courtesy Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania.
Published image: Section 11, plate 480 Note: Heritage biography
Published image: Bird Jug 1932, glazed earthenware 9.3 x 24 x 14 cm; inscr. base `Maude Poynter/Ratho/1932'. QVMAG. Photograph Brian Allison.
Training: Dates: c. 1910 - 1912 Place: Slade School, London, England, UK
Training: Dates: 1913 - 1913 Place: Kingston-on-Thames School of Art, Kingston, London, England, UK
Family member: Person: Poynter, Edward (Sir) Relation: cousin
Family member: Person: Burne-Jones, Edward Relation: OTHER Note: Sir Edward Burne-Jones was a distant relative.
Family member: Person: Reid (Mrs) Relation: sister
Family member: Person: Mace, Violet Relation: cousin
Biographer: Miley, Caroline
Source of info: Heritage: The National Women's Art Book
Date written: Date: 1995
Reference: Title: Beautiful & Useful: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Tasmania [catalogue] Year: 1987 Author: Miley, Caroline Published: Launceston, Tasmania : Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery
Reference: Title: Australian Studio Pottery and China Painting Year: 1986 Author: Timms, Peter Published: Melbourne, Vic.
Reference: Year: 1924-04-16 Published: Illustrated Tasmanian Mail
Reference: Year: 1932-07-28 Published: Illustrated Tasmanian Mail

Summary: From an artistic family, Maude Poynter eventually made her way to England to study painting and pottery, returning to Australia at the end of the First World War, when she had worked as a volunteer. An imaginative potter, she was among the first to reference Aboriginal motifs in her work.


picture

Frank Middleton Poynter and Ruby Maudine Welwood




Husband Frank Middleton Poynter

         Born: 18 May 1878 - Coromandel, Aukland, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: Jul 1945
       Buried: 


       Father: James Benjamin Poynter
       Mother: Kate Simpson


     Marriage: 1914 - New Zealand




Wife Ruby Maudine Welwood

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


picture
George Farbrace Boyes Poynter and Clara Alexandrina Singer




Husband George Farbrace Boyes Poynter

         Born: 25 Dec 1840 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Aug 1920
       Buried: 


       Father: James Peck Poynter
       Mother: Sarah Westall Meredith


     Marriage: 1870




Wife Clara Alexandrina Singer

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Clara Singer Poynter

         Born: 29 Oct 1871 - Dalvey, Tapanui, Otago, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Mary Harriet Poynter

         Born: 30 Mar 1873 - Caversham, Otago, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Annie Bower Poynter

         Born: 18 Aug 1874 - Dalvey, Tapanui, Otago, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 1945
       Buried: 



4 M George Alexander Poynter

         Born: 25 May 1876 - Dalvey, Tapanui, Otago, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Elizabeth Westall Poynter

         Born: 22 Dec 1878
   Christened: 
         Died: 1949
       Buried: 



6 M Stewart Meredith Poynter

         Born: 29 Mar 1882 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1945
       Buried: 



7 M William Duncan Poynter

         Born: 29 Mar 1882 - Spring Bay, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
James Benjamin Poynter and Kate Simpson




Husband James Benjamin Poynter

         Born: 12 Nov 1842 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: James Peck Poynter
       Mother: Sarah Westall Meredith


     Marriage: 10 Jul 1875 - Gisborne, Aukland, New Zealand




Wife Kate Simpson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Frank Middleton Poynter

         Born: 18 May 1878 - Coromandel, Aukland, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: Jul 1945
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ruby Maudine Welwood
         Marr: 1914 - New Zealand



2 M James Meredith Poynter

         Born: 31 May 1876 - Turanga, Auckland, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 28 Sep 1964
       Buried: 



3 F Zoe Esther Poynter

         Born: 3 Apr 1880 - Bushmere, Auckland, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 Apr 1963
       Buried: 



4 F Lilia Theta Dean Poynter

         Born: 30 May 1883 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Oct 1983
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James Mitchell-Baker
         Marr: 31 Jul 1915 - South Africa




General Notes (Husband)

From the Hobarton Paper of February 15th 1865

The murder of Mr. Llewellyn Meredith by the blacks in Queensland.

The report lately received of the murder of Mr. Llewellyn Meredith by the natives in Northern Queensland is unhappily but too well founded.

Accounts confirming the terrible fate have been brought by Mr. J. B. Poynter, who had been for two years residing on Mr. Hervey's station with Mr. Meredith and who has fearlessly and perseveringly exerted himself to discover the remains of his lost relative, and of the servant who shared his fate.

It appears that Mr. Meredith had accompanied a dray which was bringing up supplies from ???? for the station and when within three days ride of home, he proceeded alone, and found a large mob of blacks camped close to the road. They followed him in a threatening manner and on his arrival at the station he heard that they had tried to surround some drays a short time before. Having to return to the dray, in order to see it safe home, he took a man with him, both being well armed; but in the night of November 20th when they were camped on the creek where the blacks were, they were both murdered.

A week afterwards, when anxiety began to be felt at the station concerning the non-appearance of either Mr. Meredith or the dray, a person passing informed Mr. Poynter that the draymen were waiting for someone to fetch them on, neither Mr. Meredith nor his companion having reached them. Mr. Poynter then at once set forth in search, taking two men and a black native boy with him, and on arriving at the “creek” he found the missing horses hobbled in the bush. Continuing the search next day, the saddles, bridles, rifle etc. were found broken up, in a deserted blacks camp, the late dwellers of which were next pursued, and found about twenty miles down the creek, and in their camp were the ?????, quart-pots, blankets and everything belonging to the lost white men, even to their clothes. Mr. Poynter then endeavoured to find out from the blacks what had been done with the bodies, and the black boy tried to communicate with them, but the dialects of different tribes are often so dissimilar and it was impossible to elicit any distinct information. The searching party occupied more than a week in following up the blacks and trying to discover the remains of the murdered White men, but without learning any further particulars as to the circumstances under which the poor fellows met their awful fate. Mr. Meredith was well known and universally esteemed and respected in Northern Queensland where his cruel murder has created a deep sensation of sorrow and horror. His brave genial disposition and keen intelligence, his noble handsome person and winning courtesy will be long and affectionately remembered and his tragic and early death sincerely mourned by many friends and a wide circle of relatives both in this and in the old country.

This seems to be a letter to Sarah Jukes (nee Meredith) Alfred Jukes” wife.

Extract from Mrs. Meredith's letter dated February 20th 1865

“It is sad new I have to tell you dear friend. We have received the melancholy tidings of our poor Llewellyn's untimely death in Queensland. He said when he left us for Queensland that he should either return in a carriage or not at all. for the ???? of the enterprise was well known and his foreboding has been terribly fulfilled. He was murdered by natives on the night of the 20th November last, but the length and difficulty of the journey over land (our ????? occupies 8 days in crossing) and the double or treble voyage have prevented our hearing until this month.

James Poynter our nephew, who had been at Tower Hill with poor Llewellyn the past two years made every effort regardless of danger to discover the remains of his lost friend and of the servant who shared his awful fate, but though the horses, ???? blankets, arms, and even the clothes of the victims were found, no clue could be obtained as to the hiding place of the bodies. I sent you a newspaper with an account I made out from James' narration and that is all we know now - of course further investigation will be carried on - and you shall know the result.

I cannot tell you the shock and grief this has been to me and to us all - for his dear father's sake, as well as his own. He was dear to me and my sons loved him and lament him as a brother - he was liked and respected by all who knew him, and James says his sad and early fate has created a deep and bitter sensation in Queensland.

I have written to Georgina Jones who seemed to have especially selected Llewellyn for her own. I know how much attached to her he was and I have written to Beete that he might tell Augusta - I send ???? to them and to your brother Samuel. I would have written to Joseph but ?? if I could have done so in the time - what little remains for me to do, I have sadly and faithfully performed and shall forward whatever ???? or property our lost one has left - I will send a ???? and write to your Alfred at Warrnambool.

February 19th 1865

I have just written to Beete that he may break to Augusta the terrible news of poor Llewellyn's murder in Queensland by the blacks. The paper containing the account he can send to you.

Our nephew James Poynter (married to Sarah Westall Meredith) was with Llewellyn for two years, and did all he could in endeavouring to find his remains and that of the man who shared his terrible fate, but in vain.

He was murdered on the night of the 20th November last, but owing to the long time occupied by the journey, James only arrived in Melbourne the end of January.

He sent a telegram from Brisbane with the first facts - but we tried not to believe them - - now I have his own account and there is no longer a doubt.

Everything belonging to Llewellyn and his servant was found in or near the Black's camps - but no enquiry or search served to show where the bodies were ????.

It is a melancholy business. We were much attached to poor Llewellyn and mourn his fearful death most sincerely. Charles' eldest brother was murdered years ago by natives at Kangaroo Island.

picture

Joseph Rhodes and Fanny Reed




Husband Joseph Rhodes

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Fanny Reed

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Robert Heaton Rhodes

         Born: 22 Apr 1855 - Clive Grange Estate, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Clara Meredith
         Marr: 21 Dec 1887




General Notes for Child Robert Heaton Rhodes

Robert Heaton Rhodes was the son of Joseph Rhodes and Fanny Reed. His father Joseph was one of the four Rhodes brothers who came to New Zealand in the days before organised settlement.

picture

William Reynolds and Jane Stephens




Husband William Reynolds

         Born: 1795 - circa - London, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: Bef 1825




Wife Jane Stephens

         Born: 1804 - circa
   Christened: 31 Oct 1804 - Pembridge, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Stephens
       Mother: Mary Harris





Children
1 M Edward Reynolds

         Born: 1825 - circa - Christchurch, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 1895
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Maria Louisa Parker
         Marr: 1860 - December Quarter - Sheffield, Yorkshire



2 F Mary Reynolds

         Born: 1829 - Fownhope, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Herbert Reynolds

         Born: 1834 - circa - Wormsley, Hereforshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Frederick Reynolds

         Born: 1836 - circa - Wormsley, Hereforshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Arthur Reynolds

         Born: 1838 - circa - Stonham Pava, Suffolk
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Alice Jane Reynolds

         Born: 1843 - circa - Stratford, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Suffolk
Stonham Parva
Jane Reynolds - 35 - Farmer
Mary - 11
Herbert - 6
Frederick - 4
Arthur - 2
William, her husband must have been absent at the time of this census.

William was described as a retired farmer in the 1851 Census collection.


General Notes (Wife)

Jane died prematurely and her sister Mary brought up the family.


General Notes for Child Edward Reynolds

In the 1881 census Edward Reynolds was enumerated as a Civil Engineer and Steel Manufacturer.

Results of an Experimental Inquiry Into the Tensile Strength and Other ...

Reynolds, E. Engineer to Naylor, Vickers & Co., Don Steel Works, Sheffield

Report on Machinery and Processes of the Industrial Arts and Apparatus of ...

by Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard - Exposition universelle de 1867 à Paris - 1869 - 669 pages - Page 174

This is the ingenious water-jet elevator, invented by Mr. Edward Reynolds,
engineer of the River Don Steel Works, at Sheffield, England, owned by Messrs.

Proceedings - Institution of Mechanical Engineers - Page xxi
by Institution of Mechanical Engineers (Great Britain), Institution of Mechanical Engineers (Great Britain). - Mechanical engineering - 1866

List of Members
1862. Reynolds, Edward, Don Steel Works, Sheffield

1871 Census:

Yorkshire
Ecclesall Bierlow
7 Victoria Road

Edward Reynolds - head - 45 - Civil Engineer
Maria Louisa - wife - 37 - London
Edward P. - son - 8
Frederick - son - 7 - Sheffield
Alleyne - son - 4

1881 Census:

Yorkshire
Nether Hallam

Edward Reynolds - head - 55 - Civil Engineer and Steel Manufacturer - Southawk, Surrey
Maria L. - wife - 47 - London
Edward. P. - son - 18 - Scholar
Alleyne - son - 14 - Scholar

1891 Census:

Yorkshire
Nether Hallam
112 Westbourne Road

Edward Reynolds - head - 65 - Civil Engineer
Maria L. - wife - 57
Alleyne - son - 24 - Engineers' Draughtsman



picture

Edward Rickards




Husband Edward Rickards

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: Bef 1847
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah Ann Rickards

         Born: 1815 - circa - Sheerness, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Jan 1893 - Holly Cottage, Somerset Road, Edgbaston
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Charles Rogers Cope
         Marr: 16 Jun 1847




General Notes for Child Sarah Ann Rickards

Sarah was the eldest daughter of Edward Rickards.
picture

Sir Frederick William Rodney Ricketts Fifth Bt. and Alice Eve Grace Webster




Husband Sir Frederick William Rodney Ricketts Fifth Bt.

         Born: 27 Sep 1857
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Sep 1925
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 29 May 1879




Wife Alice Eve Grace Webster

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1931
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Kathleen Beatrice Alice Ricketts

         Born: 17 Jul 1882
   Christened: 
         Died: 1932
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Colonel, DSO OBE Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe
         Marr: 6 Dec 1910 - St. Georges, Hanover Square



2 M Sir Claude Albert Frederick - 6th Baronet Ricketts

         Born: 27 Apr 1880
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Godfrey Edward Cornwallis Ricketts

         Born: 1886
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Rodney Bernard Ricketts

         Born: 2 Nov 1894
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Ricketts Baronetcy, of The Elms in the County of Gloucester and Beaumont Leys in the County of Leicester, is a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 15 February 1828 for Vice-Admiral Robert Ricketts. The second Baronet was an Admiral in the Royal Navy. The third Baronet succeeded in 1884 to the estates of his maternal uncle Thomas Plumbe-Tempest and assumed by Royal license the same year the surname of Tempest in lieu of his patronymic. This surname was also borne by the fourth Baronet but not by any subsequent holders of the baronetcy.

[edit] Ricketts Baronets, of The Elms and Beaumont Leys (1828)

* Sir Robert Tristram Ricketts, 1st Baronet (1772-1842)
* Sir Cornwallis Ricketts, 2nd Baronet (1803-1885)
* Sir Robert Tempest Tempest, 3rd Baronet (1836-1901)
* Sir Tristram Tempest Tempest, 4th Baronet (1865-1909)
* Sir Frederick William Rodney Ricketts, 5th Baronet (1857-1925)
* Sir Claude Albert Frederick Ricketts, 6th Baronet (1880-1937)
* Sir Robert Cornwallis Gerald St Leger Ricketts, 7th Baronet (1917-2005)
* Sir Robert Tristram Ricketts, 8th Baronet (1946-2007) [1]
* Stephen Tristram Ricketts, 9th Baronet (born 1974)

Sir Frederick William Rodney Ricketts, 5th Bt. was born on 27 September 1857. He was the son of Sir Cornwallis Ricketts, 2nd Bt. and Lady Caroline Augusta Pelham-Clinton. He married Alice Eve Grace Webster, daughter of Charles Fox Webster, on 29 May 1879. He died on 18 September 1925 at age 67.


General Notes for Child Kathleen Beatrice Alice Ricketts

Kathleen Beatrice Alice was d/o Sir Frederick William Rodney Ricketts, 5th Bt.
picture

Colonel, DSO OBE Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe and Kathleen Beatrice Alice Ricketts




Husband Colonel, DSO OBE Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe




         Born: 1884 - September Quarter - Kensington
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred Ingram Sharpe
       Mother: Gwendoleen Mary Meredith


     Marriage: 6 Dec 1910 - St. Georges, Hanover Square




Wife Kathleen Beatrice Alice Ricketts

         Born: 17 Jul 1882
   Christened: 
         Died: 1932
       Buried: 


       Father: Sir Frederick William Rodney Ricketts Fifth Bt.
       Mother: Alice Eve Grace Webster





Children
1 M Arthur F. M. Sharpe

         Born: 1912 - September Quarter - Reading
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe, DSO, OBE, retired as a Colonel in 1944.

Royal Berkshire Regiment

Alfred Meredith Sharpe was born to Alfred Ingram Sharpe, being commissioned 2nd Lieut. in to the Royal Berkshire Regiment on the 18th November 1903, after passing out of the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

He was promoted to Lt on 20th May 1906 and Captain on 10th April 1912, whilst in between marrying Kathleen Beatrice Alice Ricketts in 1910.

In 1913, 16th February he was seconded for duty as Adjutant in the terratorial battalion of the regiment. He was in this command when war broke out yet he still maintained links to his old battalion attending the funerals of Lieutenant C W Green and Lieutenant E K Colbourne at the Military Cemetery Chocques on the 27th of June 1915. He also was a guest at the Mess at Bethune on the 6th July of the same year.

Leave from 26th August to the 4th September 1915 was followed by a mention in despatches on the 15th of October and then on the 27th of the same month the battalion records show this entry.

Capt Sharpe left the Bn to rejoin the 1st Bn. It was with great regret we parted after being so long together. He was very popular with all ranks and will be greatly missed.

This effectively restored him to the establishment as he returned to the 1st battalion and a temporary rank of Major, which held until 2nd July 1916. Whilst with the 1st battalion he was court martialed on the 29th June 1916 - but acquitted. It apparently l relates to an incident in Zouaves Valley when it is alleged the battalion faltered in an attack whilst under his command. The real truth appears to be that he did not get on with the Brigade commander Kellett.

On the 29th of march 1917 he replaced Captain H. R. Gallatly, M.C. as the Brigade major of the 62nd, part of 21st division. He would hold this position until leaving for a position as a GSO2 on the 6th of August 1918, seeing action at Arras in April 1917 and later during the actions at 3rd Ypres the same year. He was involved to in the German attacks of march 1918 and ably assisted his brigade commander in those desperate days. He had been established a brevet major on the 1st January 1918.

He had whilst still part of 62nd brigade been commended for his valour and apptitude at a critical time, gazetted DSO in the papers as,

16.9.18 LG:

"Sharpe, Alfred Gerald Meredith, Capt and Brevet Major, R Berkshire regt. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a week's operations. When the enemy had launched a heavy attack, and driven back the brigade on the right, laying open the right flank, this officer went forward under heavy fire to clear up the situation, selected positions, and led up reserve companies to form a defensive flank. He also rallied leaderless men of other units and led them forward into the line. He gave
a clear and accurate report of the situation on his return to brigade headquarters

On the 6th November he was awarded the Croix de Guerre (French),

He held the temporary rank of Major whilst GSO 2nd Grade, until 20th August 1919. When he was appointed GSO1 and temp. Lt. Col. from 21st August 1919 to 26-1-1920. On the 24th October 1919 he was awarded, Ordre de la Gouronne avec Croix de Guerre, Officier and an OBE on the 12th December of the same year.

With the winding down of the war and the shrinking of the army came reductions in standings and ranks. As such he became GSO2 on the 26th January 1920. He was awarded the Order of the Crown of Italy, Officer on the 24th of March 1921. He was still a brevet Major. Full majority was granted on the 22nd January 1923.

Away from army matters Sharpe was a keen spotsman and played in the army squash championship in 1925.

He was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel on the 19th August 1928 and held the command of the 1st Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment from 1928 to 1932. Brevet Colonel from 6th May 1932 and full Colonelcy on the 19th August 1932 with seniority from 6th May was followed by command of 164th (North Lancashire) Infantry Brigade from April 1932 to May 1936.

He attended an annual dinner, 99th (Buckinghamshire and Berkshire Yeomanry) Field Brigade, R.A., 1934 and one for his old 4th battalion in 1935.

On 6th may 1936 he was retired on retired pay, seemingly taking some role in WW2 as he was once again retired to retired pay on 12th February 1944.

Divorce Court File: 7078. Appellant: Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe. Respondent: Jean Sharpe. Co-respondent: Guy Gregson. Type: Husband's petition for divorce [HD].

Divorce Court File: 5825. Appellant: Alfred Gerald Meredith Sharpe. Respondent: Beatrice Kathleen Alice Sharpe. Co-respondent: Claud Edmond Clayton Penny. Type: Husband's petition for divorce [hd].





General Notes (Wife)

Kathleen Beatrice Alice was d/o Sir Frederick William Rodney Ricketts, 5th Bt.
picture

Colonel John Henry Ellis Ridley




Husband Colonel John Henry Ellis Ridley

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Louisa Elizabeth Ridley

         Born: 1850 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1923
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sir George Thomas Henry Boyes
         Marr: 1874




General Notes for Child Louisa Elizabeth Ridley

1881 Census:

Devon
Stoke Dameral
Stoke
LOuisa E. Boyes - wife - 32 - Wife of Captain Boyes
John R. - son - 6
Constance J. - daughter - 4
Hector - son - 1 month
picture

J. W. Roxburgh




Husband J. W. Roxburgh

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Ethel Nancy Roxburgh

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George Steuart Meredith
         Marr: 21 Oct 1913 - Launceston, Tasmania




picture
Sir Thomas Anderton Salt and Ellinor Mary Wiggin




Husband Sir Thomas Anderton Salt

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1940
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1905




Wife Ellinor Mary Wiggin

         Born: 1882 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: Jan 1974
       Buried: 


       Father: Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin 2nd Bart.
       Mother: Annie Sarah Cope




General Notes (Wife)

The Times, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1974; pg. 16; Issue 58988; col G

Obituary

Lady Salt, widow of Lieutenant Colonel Sir Thomas Anderon Salt, the second baronet, has died at the age of 91. She was Elinor Mary, younger daughter of Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin, the second baronet, and she was married in 1905. Her husband died in 1940.
picture

Francis Sheppard




Husband Francis Sheppard

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Julia Sheppard

         Born: 1811 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1889
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Henry Meredith
         Marr: 5 Jul 1838




General Notes (Husband)

Francis was a brass founder.


General Notes for Child Julia Sheppard

In the 1871 Census collection, Julia was reported as keeping a ladies school.
picture

Frederick William M. Waldock and Lizzie Kyd Souter




Husband Frederick William M. Waldock

         Born: 18 Mar 1866 - Kandy, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 
         Died: 24 Oct 1924 - Newara Eliya, Sri Lanka
       Buried: 


       Father: Frederick David Waldock
       Mother: Maria Carter Meredith


     Marriage: 




Wife Lizzie Kyd Souter

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Claud Humphrey Meredith Waldock

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ethel Beatrice Williams
         Marr: 12 Jul 1934 - Holy Trinity, Roehampton




General Notes (Husband)

Frederick William and Lizzir Kyd had four sons and one daughter.

Their 4th son Claud Humphrey Meredith Waldock (1904-1981) was a jurist and international lawyer. In 1934 he married Ethel Beatrice Williams, daughter of James Herbert Williams, shipopwner of the Black Diamond Line, of Wellington, New Zealand. They had a son and a daughter.


General Notes for Child Claud Humphrey Meredith Waldock

The Times, Friday, July 13, 1934; pg 19; Issue 46805; Col A

Mr. C.H.M. Waldock and Miss B. Williams

The marriage took place yesterday, at Holy Trinity, Roehampton, of Mr. Claude Humphrey Meredith Waldock, Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford, youngest son of the late Mr. F.W. Waldock and of Mrs. Waldock; of Colombo, Ceylon, and Miss Ethel Beatrice Williams, youngest daughter of the late Mr. J.H. Williams and of Mrs. Williams, of Wellington, New Zealand, and Carrick Lodge, Dover House Road, Roehamption, S.W. 15 The Rev. R.H. Owen and the Rev. Henry Elkerton officiated.
picture

Henry J. Stanley and Martha Spender




Husband Henry J. Stanley

         Born: 1815 - circa - Little Wood, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1838 - June Q. - Wellington, Shropshire




Wife Martha Spender

         Born: 1816 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Frances Stanley

         Born: 1841 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: David Meredith
         Marr: 1865




picture
Jon Howie Stallworthy and Gillian Meredith Waldock




Husband Jon Howie Stallworthy

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 25 Jun 1960 - Chapel of Magdelin College, Oxford




Wife Gillian Meredith Waldock

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Claud Humphrey Meredith Waldock
       Mother: Ethel Beatrice Williams




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Monday, June 27, 1960; pg. 14; Issue 54808; Col C

Mr. J.H. Stallworthy and Miss G.M. Waldock

The marriage took place on Saturday in the chapel of Magdalin College, Oxford, of Mr. Jon Howie Stallworthy, only son of Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Stallworthy, of Shotover Edge, Headington, and Miss Gillian Meredith Waldock, daughter of Professor and Mrs. C.H.M. Waldock, of 6 Lathbury Road, Oxford. The Rev. A.W. Adams officiated.

The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a silver-white peau-de-soie, princess-line gown with a train falling from the shoulders. Her long tulle veil was held in place by a headdress of white flowers and she carried a bouquet of whire roses and other white flowers. She was attended by three bridesmaids, Miss Caroline Lumley and Miss Sally and Miss Wendy Stallworthy, who wore short white façonné dresses. They carried bouquets of white and gold roses and had matching bows in their hair. Mr Humphrey Waldock, brother of the bride was best man.

A reception was held in the Codrington Library of All Souls College, and the honeymoon is being sepnt in the Balearic Islands.
picture

James Stephens




Husband James Stephens

         Born: 1775 - circa
   Christened: 3 Dec 1775 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Lawrence Stephens
       Mother: Hannah Meredith


     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Peter Stephens

         Born: 1819 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Esther Cooke
         Marr: 1854 - September Quarter - Knighton, Herefordshire



2 F Anne Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M James Laurence Stephens

         Born: 1822 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1888
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Helena Tristram
         Marr: 24 Nov 1853 - St. Martin's, Hereford



4 F Mary Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Bridgewater



5 F Elizabeth Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

James of Harpton, a farmer. (extracted from the private letters of the Jukes family)


General Notes for Child Peter Stephens

1841 Census:

Herefordshire
Presteign
Radnor
Lower Harpton
Peter Stephens - 20 - farmer
Ann Stephens - 25
Mary Stephens - 20
James Stephens - 18 - ironmonger's apprentice
Elizabeth Stephens - 15

1851 Census:

Herefordshire
Lower Harpton
Peter Stephens - head - 32 - farmer
Elizabeth Stephens - sister - 27 - farmer's daughter

In 1861 Peter Stephens was a Farmer of 350 acres at Lower Harpton, Herefordshire. He was living at 10 Bridge Street, Leominster in 1881, a retired farmer.

1861 Census:

Herefordshire
Lower Harpton
Peter Stephens - head - 43 - farmer
Esther - wife - 33
Peter C. - son - 5
John J. - son - 4
Sam S. - son - 2
William E. - son - 10 months
Ann - sister - 45

1871 Census:

Shropshire
Bucknell
Peter Stephens - head - 53 - Farmer
Esther - wife - 44
Peter C. - son - 15
John J. - son - 14
William E. - son - 10
Anna L. - daughter - 9
Esther M. - daughter - 7
Emma J. - daughter - 6
Frank L. - son - 4
Harry S. - son - 2
Joseph A. - son - 3 months
Anne S. - sister - 55 - housekeeper

1881 Census:

Herefordshire
Leominster
10 Bridge Street
Peter Stephens - head - 63 - retired farmer
Esther - wife - 54
Peter C. - son - 26 - Unemployed grocer
John J. - son - 25 - unemployed farmer
Anna L. - daughter - 19 - milliner's assistant
Esther M. - daughter - 17
Emma J. - daughter - 15
Frank L. - son - 14
Harry S. - son - 12
Joseph A. - son - 10


General Notes for Child Anne Stephens

Lived with sister Elizabeth in Hereford.


General Notes for Child James Laurence Stephens

On 24 Nov 1853 James Laurence married Helena TRISTRAM in Hereford, St. Martin’s.

1861 Census:

Herefordshire
High Town
St. Peter
James L. Stephens - 39 - Ironmonger employing 4 men
Helena - 39 - wife
James H. - 5 - son
William T. - 3 - Son
Helena L. - 1 - daughter
Elizabeth Tristram - 36 - sister in law

1871 Census:

Herefordshire
7 Bridge Street
St. Nicholas
James L. Stephens - 48 - Agent, wines and spirits
Helena - 48 - wife
James Henry - 15 - son
William T. - 13 - son
Helena Louisa - 11 - daughter

1881 Census:

Herefordshire
St. Nicholas
James L. Stephens - 58 - Agent, Spirit Merchant
Helena - 58 - wife
Helena L. - 21 - daughter



General Notes for Child Mary Stephens

Mary married a Mr.Bridgewater - a farmer.


picture

James Laurence Stephens and Helena Tristram




Husband James Laurence Stephens

         Born: 1822 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1888
       Buried: 


       Father: James Stephens
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 24 Nov 1853 - St. Martin's, Hereford




Wife Helena Tristram

         Born: 1822 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1909
       Buried: 



Children
1 M James Henry Stephens

         Born: 1856 - circa - Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M William Tristram Stephens

         Born: 1857 - circa - Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Helena Louisa Stephens

         Born: 1860 - circa - Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

On 24 Nov 1853 James Laurence married Helena TRISTRAM in Hereford, St. Martin’s.

1861 Census:

Herefordshire
High Town
St. Peter
James L. Stephens - 39 - Ironmonger employing 4 men
Helena - 39 - wife
James H. - 5 - son
William T. - 3 - Son
Helena L. - 1 - daughter
Elizabeth Tristram - 36 - sister in law

1871 Census:

Herefordshire
7 Bridge Street
St. Nicholas
James L. Stephens - 48 - Agent, wines and spirits
Helena - 48 - wife
James Henry - 15 - son
William T. - 13 - son
Helena Louisa - 11 - daughter

1881 Census:

Herefordshire
St. Nicholas
James L. Stephens - 58 - Agent, Spirit Merchant
Helena - 58 - wife
Helena L. - 21 - daughter



General Notes for Child Helena Louisa Stephens

Helena Louisa Stephens was a music teacher.
picture

Peter Stephens and Sarah Stephens




Husband Peter Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 9 Nov 1809 - Knill, Herefordshire




Wife Sarah Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Lawrence Stephens
       Mother: Hannah Meredith




General Notes (Husband)

Peter Stephens of Broadheath, Presteign.

Peter and Sarah had no children.
picture

W.B. Stevenson




Husband

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife W.B. Stevenson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Alexander James Stevenson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sylvia Florence Ingleby
         Marr: 10 Oct 1944 - St. Mary's, Sedgeford




General Notes for Child Alexander James Stevenson

Alexander James was the only son of Rev. Dr. W. B. Stevenson. He was a Wing Commander at the time of his marriage to Sylvia Florence.

The Times, Monday, Sep 25, 1944; pg. 6; Issue 49963/2; col B

Wing Commander A.J. Stevenson and Miss S.F. Ingleby

A marriage has been arranged, and will take place quietly at Sedgeford on October 10, between Wing Commander Alexander James Stevenson, R.A.F.V.R., son of Mrs. W.B. Stevenson, 28, Inverleith Place, Edinburgh, and of the late Dr. W.B. Stevenson, D.D., and Sylvia Florence, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clement Rolfe Ingleby, of Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk.

The Times, Thursday, Oct. 19, 1944; pg. 7; Issue 49977/2; col C

Wing Commander A.J. Stevenson and Miss S.F. Ingleby
The marriage took place quietly on October 10, at St. Mary's Sedgeford of Wing Commander Alexander James Stevenson, R.A.F.V.R., only son of Mrs. W.B. Stevenson, 28, Inverleith Place, Edinburgh, and of the late Rev. Dr. W.B. Stevenson, and Miss Sylvia Florence Ingleby, younger daughter of Major and Mrs. Clement Rolfe Ingleby, of Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk. The Rev. Frederick Ward officiated, assisted by the Rev. William Clark.

picture

Liet. J. Underhill




Husband Liet. J. Underhill

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
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Children
1 F Margaret Edith Underhill

         Born: 23 Nov 1896 - Croydon, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Dec 1991 - Hythe, Kent
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Harry Rouse Meredith
         Marr: 17 Mar 1917 - Romford Essex




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