Ancestors of



picture
William Rogers Cope and Matilda Walker




Husband William Rogers Cope

         Born: 1816 - circa
   Christened: 23 Apr 1818 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 1889 - London, England
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Cope
       Mother: Harriet Rogers


     Marriage: 16 Jun 1842 - Kington, Herefordshire




Wife Matilda Walker

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edward Walker
       Mother: 




General Notes (Husband)

At the time of his marriage William was described as a solicitor. In 1848 the Morning Chronicle announced the dissolution of the partnership of Clement Ingleby, George Paulson Wragge and William Rogers Cope, of Birmingham, attorneys. In the 1861 and 1871 censuses he was described as the Vicar of Hartshill.

The Morning Chronicle (London) Wednesday, January 5, 1848; Issue 24400

Parnership Dissolved

Clement Ingleby, George Paulson Wragge and William Rogers Cope, of Birmingham, Attorneys.

The Bristol Mercury, Saturday, June 25, 1842; Issue 2728

Wm. Rogers Cope, Esq., solicitor, of Birminham, to Matilda, 4th daughter of Edward Walker, Esq., Surgeon, Kington

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Mancetter
William Rogers Cope - 45 - Incumbant of Hartshill
Matilda - wife - 47

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Hartshill
Vicarage House
William Rogers Cope - 55 - Vicar of Hartshill
Matilda - wife - 57


General Notes (Wife)

Matilda was the 4th daughter of Edward Walker, a surgeon, of Kington.

picture

Stuart Corbett




Husband Stuart Corbett

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Susan Corbett

         Born: 28 May 1811
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Jan 1899 - Ryde, Isle of Wight
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Joshua Scholefield




General Notes for Child Susan Corbett

Susan was the daughter of the venerable Stuart Corbell, Archbishop of York.
picture

Joshua Scholefield and Susan Corbett




Husband Joshua Scholefield

         Born: 3 May 1811
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Jun 1864
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Susan Corbett

         Born: 28 May 1811
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Jan 1899 - Ryde, Isle of Wight
       Buried: 


       Father: Stuart Corbett
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Vincent Cotterill Scholefield

         Born: 9 Oct 1840 - Birmingham
   Christened: 2 Mar 1841 - Smethwick, Staffordshire
         Died: 4 Jan 1911
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Annie Sabina Aston
         Marr: 1866




General Notes (Wife)

Susan was the daughter of the venerable Stuart Corbell, Archbishop of York.


General Notes for Child Vincent Cotterill Scholefield

Vincent Cotterill was a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy.

1881 Census:

Monmouthshire
Cwmcarvan
Vincent C. Scholefield - Head - 40 - No Occupation
Annie S. - wife - 38
Ernest N.M. - son - 8 - born in Monmouthshire
Florence M. - Daughter - 4 - Monmouthshire
picture

Dilnot Sladden and Elizabeth Letitia Coster




Husband Dilnot Sladden

         Born: 23 Mar 1842 - Ash, Sandwich, Kemt
   Christened: 1 May 1842 - St. Nicholas, Ash, Kent
         Died: 1 Sep 1906 - New Zealand
       Buried: 


       Father: John Sladden
       Mother: Elizabeth Coleman


     Marriage: 8 Mar 1866 - St. Mark's, Opawa, New Zealand




Wife Elizabeth Letitia Coster

         Born: 1841
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Hubert Sladden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1952
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Melita Meredyth Meredith
         Marr: Apr 1906 - Wairarapa, New Zealand



2 M Francis Dilnot Sladden

         Born: 26 Jun 1870 - Christchurch, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Mabel Bessie Sladden

         Born: 10 May 1876 - Kaiapoi, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M George Edward Sladden

         Born: 7 Nov 1868 - Christchurch, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Violet Susannah Coleman Sladden

         Born: 7 May 1884 - Oxford East, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Hubert Sladden

Hubert had a park (Sladden Park) in Hutt City named after him, and was the son of Dilnot Sladden and Elizabeth Letitia Coster. He was a civil engineer.

Melita and Hubert had two sons and two daughters.

A Wairarapa wedding of great interest, and an unusually pretty one, was that of Miss Melita Meredith, daughter of Mr. Meredith, Llandaff, Masterton, to Mr. Hubert Sladden, of Pentone. St. Matthew's was prettily decorated for the ceremony, and the day-Wednesday last-was gloriously bright and sunny. Wedding music was played by the organist. The Rev. A. M. Johnston officiated, and many guests were present.

The bride entered the church with her father, and looked very graceful and sweet in her bridal robe of white mousseline satin, veiled with flounces of lovely lace. A small wreath of orange blossoms and white heather was worn under the long tulle veil, and a shower bouquet carried.

The attendant maids were Miss Kathleen Meredith and Miss Dolly Sladden, who wore charming gowns of rose pink radium silk, with pink hats, relieved with long black ostrich plumes, and, their bouquets were of shaded pink roses. Little Miss B. Mackersy and Master Smith (a niece and nephew of the bride) completed the picturesque bridal group. Mr. C. Sladden was best man, and Mr. L. Meredith groomsman.

After the ceremony, a great many friends were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Meredith at Llandaff. The pretty rooms were decorated with a profusion of beautiful flowers, and the tables were laid in the large hall. Several very bright little speeches were made. The toast of the bride and bridegroom was drunk with enthusiasm. Later, Mr. and Mrs. Sladden left for the North, the bride, travelling in a gown of dark blue serge with white corded silk collar, pretty front of crepe-de-chine and lace, blue hat with wings, and silver fox furs.

Mrs. Meredith wore a black silk gown; Mrs. Sladden, black taffetas gown and lace. Some of the guests were: Mr. and Mrs. H Smith, Mr. and Mrs Meredith Kaye, Mrs James, Mr. and Mrs Sladden and the Misses Sladden, Mrs. Mackersy, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Perry, Mr. and Mrs. Gawith, Dr. and Mrs. Dawson, Mr. and Mi,. E. Vallance, Dr. and Mrs, Hocking, Mr. and Mrs. Cox, Miss Board, Miss Hamlin (Napier), Miss Holmes, Mrs. Hayward and Miss Sladden (England), Messrs. Gawith, Moodie, Sumerell, and
Dr. A. Hosking.

The bridesmaids' gifts were quaint gold brooches, set with pearls, and the bride's gift was an opal and diamond ring. Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Sladden will reside at the Lower Hutt on their return from the North.


picture

David Owen Meredith and Alice Vicary Cottrell




Husband David Owen Meredith

         Born: 31 May 1875 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Feb 1964 - Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: Owen Meredith
       Mother: Eliza Jane Windsor


     Marriage: 




Wife Alice Vicary Cottrell

         Born: 27 Jan 1879 - Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 Dec 1939 - Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: John Crispe Cottrell
       Mother: Alice Katherine Vicary





Children
1 F Alice Meredith

         Born: 30 Jan 1902 - New South Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Nov 1986 - Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Frederick Charles Hodgson
         Marr: 24 Jun 1925




General Notes (Husband)

David Owen was manager of the Electrolytic Zinc Company, Risdon, Hobart
picture

John Crispe Cottrell and Alice Katherine Vicary




Husband John Crispe Cottrell

         Born:  - New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 1881 - New Zealand
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Alice Katherine Vicary

         Born: 16 May 1859 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 Oct 1951 - Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: Henry James Vicary
       Mother: Frances Charlotte Maclaine





Children
1 F Alice Vicary Cottrell

         Born: 27 Jan 1879 - Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 Dec 1939 - Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: David Owen Meredith




picture
Edwin Cox and Esther Meredith




Husband Edwin Cox

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1873 - March Q - Bedminster, Gloucestershire




Wife Esther Meredith

         Born: Sep 1852 - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Meredith
       Mother: Caroline





Children
1 F Minnie Cox

         Born: 1874 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Edwin Cox

         Born: 1875 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Clara Cox

         Born: 1879 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Florence Cox

         Born: 1881 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Canon Seymour Richard Coxe and Fanny Coxe




Husband Canon Seymour Richard Coxe

         Born: 23 Jan 1842 - Newcastle-Upon-Tyne
   Christened: 22 Jun 1842 - Newcastle-Upon-Tyne
         Died: 2 Aug 1922 - aged 80 - The Precincts, Canterbury
       Buried: 


       Father: Venerable Richard Charles Coxe
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 1872 - June Quarter - Kensington, Middlesex




Wife Fanny Coxe

         Born: 1850 - circa - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 Aug 1936 - The Precincts, Canterbury
       Buried: 


       Father: Philip Smith Coxe
       Mother: Louisa Stephens





Children
1 F Ethel Seymour Coxe

         Born: 1873 - circa - Hawthorn, Co. Durham
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Charles Richard Seymour Coxe

         Born: 26 Jan 1875 - Brompton, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Feb 1942 - aged 67
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Beatrice Brown or Gladys Harriet Singleton
         Marr: 1907 - March Quarter - Leeds, Yorkshire
       Spouse: Louisa A. T. Appleyard
         Marr: 1920-1941



3 F Fanny Maud Coxe

         Born: 1876 - circa - Brompton, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Seymour Richard Coxe was the son of the Venerable Richard Charles Coxe, Archdeacon of Lindisfarne. He was a canon of Newcastle. As Rector of Stoke Bruerne, he is described by British History Online as having been “a man of considerable private income. As well as further renovating the interior of the church, he introduced a surpliced choir and was the first rector of Stoke to retire on a pension.”

The Times, Thursday, Aug 03, 1922; pg. 5; Issue 43100; col E

Canon Seymour Richard Coxe, who died yesterday at The Precincts, Canterbury, aged 80, was the son of the Ven. R.C. Coxe, Archdeacon of Lindisfarne and was himself hon. canon of Newcastle. From Durham School he went up to Brasenose with a Hulmeian exhibition, and was the captain of the College boat when it was head of the river; he was also treasurer of the Oxford University Boat Club. He held benefices in Yorkshire, Norfolk and Northumberland, and was for some years examining chaplain to Bishop Wilberforce, of Newcastle, and proctor in Convocation.

1881 Census:

Hampshire
Ventnor
Tharle House

Seymour R. Coxe - head - 39 - M.A. Vicar of Brompton
Fanny - wife - 31
Ethel S. - daughter - 8
Charles R.S. - son - 6
Fanny M.S. - daughter - 4
?????W.H. Cox - cousin - 60 - Major General - Bengal Staff

Cox - Major-General W.H. - Royal Artillery - died 10th March 1903.
Grave at St. Peter's Church, Leckhampton, Cheltenham, Glos. - "Major General W.H. Cox, R.A. Died 10th March 1903."

St. Peter's Leckhampton Tombstone inscriptions

G. 139

White marble ridged and hipped ledger upon base stone formerly with railings, covered with lichen.

South: Charlotte Barbara,/Beloved wife of Major General W.H. Cox,/died 1st July 1892.

North: Also of/Major General W.H. Cox. R.A./Died 10th March 1903.

1901 Census:

Northamptonshire
Stoke Bruerne
Rectory Grounds

Seymour Riuchard Coxe - head - 59 - Priest - Church of England
Fanny Coxe - wife - 51
Ethel Seymour Coxe - daughter - 28
Fanny Maud Seymour Coxe - daughter - 24


General Notes (Wife)

The Times Tuesday, Sep 01, 1936; pg. 1; Issue 47468; col B

Coxe. - On Aug. 30, 1936, at The Precincts, Canterbury, Fanny, dearly loved wife of the late Canon Seymour Coxe, aged 86.


General Notes for Child Charles Richard Seymour Coxe

In the Marlborough College Register Charles' address was given as the Bank of England, Leeds.

Charles Richard Seymour Coxe married either Beatrice Brown or Gladys Harriet Singleton in 1907.

His second wife, Louisa Appleyard was first married in 1920.

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 25, 1942; pg. 1; Issue 49169; col A

Coxe.- On Feb. 23, 1942, Charles Richard Seymour Coxe, Hurst Road, Horsham, beloved husband of Louisa (nee Appleyard), and only son of the late Canon and Mrs. Seymour Coxe, aged 67.

The Times, Monday, Nov 29, 1909; pg. 1; Issue 39129; col A

Coxe. - on the 25th Nov., at 26, Alexandra-crescent, Ilkley, the wife of Chrales R. Seymour Coxe, of twins (boy and girl).
picture

William Allan Smith-Masters and Mary Coxe




Husband William Allan Smith-Masters

         Born: 1851 - circa - Humber, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 Aug 1937 - Camer, Meopham, Kent
       Buried: 31 Aug 1937 - Meopham Church
     Marriage: 19 Oct 1876 - London, St. Mary Magdalene's, Paddington

 Other Spouse: Kathleen Amy Gore - 22 Feb 1919 - Hertingfordbury, Hertfordshire




Wife Mary Coxe

         Born: 1851 - circa - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Feb 1915 - Camer, Meopham, Kent
       Buried: 23 Feb 1915 - Meopham, Kent


       Father: Philip Smith Coxe
       Mother: Louisa Stephens





Children
1 F Edith Monica Smith-Masters

         Born: 1879 - circa - Meopham, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Lieut.-Colonel Oliver Henry North
         Marr: 1908




General Notes (Husband)

In 1881 William Allan Smith-Masters was a farmer of 670 acres employing 20 men and 6 boys at Camer House, Meopham in Kent.13 After the death of his first wife Mary, he married secondly Kathleen Amy Gore on 22 Feb 1919.

The Times, Saturday, Oct 21, 1876; pg. 1; Issue 28766; col A

On the 19th Oct., at St. Mary Magdalene's, Paddington, by the Rev. Seymour R. Coxe, Vicar of Brompton, Yorks., brother-in-law of the bride, assisted by the Rev. R.W. Randall, Vicar of All Saints, Clifton, uncle of the bridegroom, and the Rev. Dr. West, Vicar of the parish, William Allan Smith-Masters, of Camer, Kent, Esq., to Mary, younger daughter of the late Phillip S. Coxe, Esq., of 34, Ladbroke-grove, Kensington-park-gardens.

The Times, Monday, Aug 30, 1937; pg. 1; Issue 47776; col A

Smith-Masters. - On Aug. 27, 1937, William Allen Smith-Masters, of Camer, Meopham, Kent, at the age of 87. Funeral at Meopham Church tomorrow (Tuesday), 2.30 pm.

1881 Census:

Kent
Meopham
Camer House
William A. Smith-Masters - head - 37
Mary - wife - 29
Edith Monica - daughter - 1

1901 Census:

Kent
Meopham
Camer House
William A. Smith-Masters - head - 57 - J.P. - living on own means
Mary - wife - 49
Edith M. - daughter - 21


General Notes (Wife)

The Times, Monday, Feb 22, 1915; pg. 1; Issue 40784; col A

Smith-Masters.- On the 18th inst., at Camer, Mary, wife of William Allan Smith-Masters, and dusghter of the late Phillip Smith Coxe, aged 63. Funeral at Meopham, at 3 o'clock. on February 23rd.


General Notes for Child Edith Monica Smith-Masters

Edith Monica and Oliver Henry North had 4 sons, one of whom was
killed in action in 1940.
picture

Philip Smith Coxe and Louisa Stephens




Husband Philip Smith Coxe

         Born: 1810 - circa - Bucklebury, Berkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1868
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1849 - June Quarter - Marylebone, London




Wife Louisa Stephens

         Born: 1818 - circa - Dinedor, Herefordshire
   Christened: 20 Jan 1818 - Dinedor, Herefordshire
         Died: Sep 1885 - Kensington, London
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Stephens
       Mother: Susannah Beaumont



 Other Spouse: Walter Rankin Johnson - 2 Dec 1840 - Weobley, Herefordshire



Children
1 F Fanny Coxe

         Born: 1850 - circa - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 Aug 1936 - The Precincts, Canterbury
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Canon Seymour Richard Coxe
         Marr: 1872 - June Quarter - Kensington, Middlesex



2 F Mary Coxe

         Born: 1851 - circa - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Feb 1915 - Camer, Meopham, Kent
       Buried: 23 Feb 1915 - Meopham, Kent
       Spouse: William Allan Smith-Masters
         Marr: 19 Oct 1876 - London, St. Mary Magdalene's, Paddington



3 M Philip Henry Coxe

         Born: 1854 - circa - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Philip was a solicitor of London.

1851 Census:

Middlesex
St. Marylebone
St. John
83 Hamilton Terrace
Philip - 41 - Solicitor
Louisa - 33 - wife
Mary E. Coxe - Half Sister
Fanny - 1
Isabella A. Johnson - from Louisa's previous marriage
Mary. I. Stephens - 28 - sister-in-law

1861 Census:

Middlesex
Kensington
St. Mary Abbott
Kensington Town
Philip - 51 - Solicitor
Louisa - 43 - wife
Isabella A Johnson - 17 - Louisa's previous marriage
Fanny - 11
Mary - 9
Philip - 6

1871 Census:

Gloucestershire
Clifton
Louisa - Head - 54
Isabella A Johnson - 27 - Louisa's previous marriage
Mary - daughter - 19
Philip Henry - son - 16

1881 Census:

Kensington
Kensington Town
34 Ladbroke Gardens
Louisa - 65 - Head
Isabella A Johnson - 38
Philip Henry - 26 - Solicitor
Louisa H. Coxe - 25 - Great Niece



General Notes for Child Fanny Coxe

The Times Tuesday, Sep 01, 1936; pg. 1; Issue 47468; col B

Coxe. - On Aug. 30, 1936, at The Precincts, Canterbury, Fanny, dearly loved wife of the late Canon Seymour Coxe, aged 86.


General Notes for Child Mary Coxe

The Times, Monday, Feb 22, 1915; pg. 1; Issue 40784; col A

Smith-Masters.- On the 18th inst., at Camer, Mary, wife of William Allan Smith-Masters, and dusghter of the late Phillip Smith Coxe, aged 63. Funeral at Meopham, at 3 o'clock. on February 23rd.


General Notes for Child Philip Henry Coxe

Philip was a solicitor.


picture

Venerable Richard Charles Coxe




Husband Venerable Richard Charles Coxe

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Canon Seymour Richard Coxe

         Born: 23 Jan 1842 - Newcastle-Upon-Tyne
   Christened: 22 Jun 1842 - Newcastle-Upon-Tyne
         Died: 2 Aug 1922 - aged 80 - The Precincts, Canterbury
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Fanny Coxe
         Marr: 1872 - June Quarter - Kensington, Middlesex




General Notes for Child Canon Seymour Richard Coxe

Seymour Richard Coxe was the son of the Venerable Richard Charles Coxe, Archdeacon of Lindisfarne. He was a canon of Newcastle. As Rector of Stoke Bruerne, he is described by British History Online as having been “a man of considerable private income. As well as further renovating the interior of the church, he introduced a surpliced choir and was the first rector of Stoke to retire on a pension.”

The Times, Thursday, Aug 03, 1922; pg. 5; Issue 43100; col E

Canon Seymour Richard Coxe, who died yesterday at The Precincts, Canterbury, aged 80, was the son of the Ven. R.C. Coxe, Archdeacon of Lindisfarne and was himself hon. canon of Newcastle. From Durham School he went up to Brasenose with a Hulmeian exhibition, and was the captain of the College boat when it was head of the river; he was also treasurer of the Oxford University Boat Club. He held benefices in Yorkshire, Norfolk and Northumberland, and was for some years examining chaplain to Bishop Wilberforce, of Newcastle, and proctor in Convocation.

1881 Census:

Hampshire
Ventnor
Tharle House

Seymour R. Coxe - head - 39 - M.A. Vicar of Brompton
Fanny - wife - 31
Ethel S. - daughter - 8
Charles R.S. - son - 6
Fanny M.S. - daughter - 4
?????W.H. Cox - cousin - 60 - Major General - Bengal Staff

Cox - Major-General W.H. - Royal Artillery - died 10th March 1903.
Grave at St. Peter's Church, Leckhampton, Cheltenham, Glos. - "Major General W.H. Cox, R.A. Died 10th March 1903."

St. Peter's Leckhampton Tombstone inscriptions

G. 139

White marble ridged and hipped ledger upon base stone formerly with railings, covered with lichen.

South: Charlotte Barbara,/Beloved wife of Major General W.H. Cox,/died 1st July 1892.

North: Also of/Major General W.H. Cox. R.A./Died 10th March 1903.

1901 Census:

Northamptonshire
Stoke Bruerne
Rectory Grounds

Seymour Riuchard Coxe - head - 59 - Priest - Church of England
Fanny Coxe - wife - 51
Ethel Seymour Coxe - daughter - 28
Fanny Maud Seymour Coxe - daughter - 24

picture

Crammond and Sarah Louisa Meredith




Husband Crammond

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Louisa Meredith

         Born: 22 Feb 1876 - Springbay, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1977
       Buried: 


       Father: George Campbell Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth Jillett




picture
John Cromie




Husband John Cromie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Samuel Macaulay Cromie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Blanche Jukes
         Marr: 17th Apil 1895 - Willesden, Victoria St. Warrnambool, Victoria




picture
Samuel Macaulay Cromie and Sarah Blanche Jukes




Husband Samuel Macaulay Cromie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Cromie
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 17th Apil 1895 - Willesden, Victoria St. Warrnambool, Victoria




Wife Sarah Blanche Jukes

         Born: 15 Mar 1870
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred Meredith Jukes
       Mother: Margaret McWilliams




General Notes (Wife)

The Argus - Saturday 17 April 1920 - silver wedding commemoration:

On 17th April 1895 at the residence of the bride's mother, Willesden, Victoria St., Warrnambool, by the Rev. Gray Dixon, M.A. Samuel Macaulay eldest son of John Cromie of Warrnambool, to Blanche Sarah only surviving daughter of the late Alfred Meredith Jukes of Warrnambool.
picture

John Mather and Lydia Crookes




Husband John Mather

         Born: Apr 1738 - Dronfield, Derbyshire
   Christened: 4 Apr 1738 - Dronfield, Derby, England
         Died: 2 Mar 1825 - Birmingham
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 4 Sep 1758 - Dronfield, Derby, England




Wife Lydia Crookes

         Born: Apr 1740 - Dronfield, Derby, England
   Christened: 6 Apr 1740 - Dronfield, Derby, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather

         Born: 16 Jun 1766 - Leicester, Leicestershire
   Christened: 2 Jul 1766 - Saint Martin, Leicester, England
         Died: 4 Jul 1824
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James Meredith
         Marr: 25 Apr 1797 - St. Peter's, Wolverhampton



2 F Lydia Mather

         Born: 21 Dec 1764 - Soho, Westminster, London
   Christened: 16 Jan 1765 - Saint Anns, Soho, Westminster, London
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Intellectual Repository for the New Church - Vol I No. VI April 1825

At Birmingham, on the morning of March 2nd, in the 90th year or his age, Dr. John Mather, who had been a most cordial receiver of the writings of Emmanuel Swedenborg, for more than fifty years. He was first introduced to those inestimable writings by seeing the treatise on Heaven and Hell advertised in the newspaper, about the time of its first publication, upon being translated into the English language. Curiosity led him to purchase it; and its perusal convinced him of the truth of its contents. This excited in him an ardant desire to be furnished with all the other theological works of the illuminated author; and he ever prized them above all others, except the Holy Word, the next rank to which they held in his esteem. He read them in the Latin, and studied them daily for a long course of years. He constantly referred to them as a rule of life, and manifested great zeal in recommending them to others. He was a correspondent of the venerable Hartley, and the ties of friendship were formed between them, though they never saw each other. During a considerable portion of his life he practiced as a physician in Bedfordshire, in which capacity he was peculiarly eminent and successful.

*We have taken the liberty greatly to abridge this notice which was forwarded to us of this respected character; it having already appeared in another publication.

Roll of the Royal College of Physicians of London - V. 2 - Page 226

John Mather was elected physician to the London Hospital 5th June 1765 and John Mather M.D. was admitted as an Extra Licentiate (not by examination) of the College of Physicians 10 September 1765.




General Notes for Child Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather

James' Obituary in The Intellectual Repository and New Jerusalem Magazine of 1848:

..............It was in compamy with Mr. Clowes, his highly valued minister, Mr. Proud, and Mr. Salmon, in the year 1796, then on a visit to Dr. Mather of Wolverhampton, that he was introduced to an acquaintance with Miss Mather, his future wife. He had lived to the age of forty-four a bachelor, not, as he has often said, that he was at all indifferent to the holy and honourable state of matrimony..............The nuptials were soon after celebrated.....Mrs. Meredith's bodily frame sank under one of the most excruciating diseases to which in this mortal state we are liable......and on the 4th July, 1824, she bade her farewell for a time.

Witnesses at the wedding were John Mather and Joseph Meready. They were married by special licence as they did not call the banns.
picture

Dr. Henry F. Dawson and Gwendoline Meredyth Meredith




Husband Dr. Henry F. Dawson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 12 Dec 1900 - St. Matthews, Masterton, New Zealand




Wife Gwendoline Meredyth Meredith

         Born: 1872 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers




General Notes (Husband)

Evening Post, Vol. 60, Issue 141, 12 December 1900, Page 5

Masterton, This Day.

A very pretty wedding was celebrated at St. Matthew's Church today, when Dr. H.F. Dawson, of Pahiatua, was married to Miss Gwendoline M. Meredith, daughter of Mr. Edwin Meredith, of Llandaff. Dr. C.M. Dawson, of Tenui, acted as best man, and the sisters of the bride as bridesmaids. Dr. and Mrs. Dawson will leave for Wellington this afternoon, en route for Sydney.
picture

Clement Lindley Wragge and Leonora Edith Florence d'Eresby




Husband Clement Lindley Wragge

         Born: 19 Sep 1852 - Stourbridge, Worcestershire
   Christened: 30 Oct 1852 - Old Swinford, Worcester
         Died: 10 Dec 1922
       Buried: 


       Father: Clement Ingleby Wragge
       Mother: Anna Maria Downing


     Marriage: 13 Sep 1877




Wife Leonora Edith Florence d'Eresby

         Born: 1856 - circa - Adelaide, South Australia
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Leonora Ingleby Wragge

         Born: 1878
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Emma J. Wragge

         Born: 1879
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Clement Lionel Egerton Wragge

         Born: 1880 - Farley, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Rupert Lindley Wragge

         Born: Aug 1882 - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Clement Lindley Wragge born in 18 Sep 1852 became a well-known meteorologist who founded the Meteorological Society of Australasia.

1871 Census:

Middlesex
Teddington
Frances A Wragge - Head - 62 - Annuitant
Ellen E - daughter - 31 - annuitant
Bertha M. - daughter - 25
Catherine E. - daughter - 24
Clement L. Wragge - nephew - 18

1881 Census:

Staffordshire
Farley
Clement - 28 - Independent means from dividends and interest - F.R.C.S, F.M.S & Scientific Pursuits, viz ????? Geography
Leonard E. - 25 - Wife - From Adelaide, South Australia
Emma - 2
Clement L. E. - 8 months

Clement Lindley Wragge (19 September 1852 - 10 December 1922) was a meteorologist born in Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. After training in law, Wragge became renowned in the field of meteorology, winning the Scottish Meteorological Society's Gold Medal and starting the trend of using people's names for cyclones. He travelled widely, and in his later years was a reliable authority on Australia, India and the Pacific Islands.

Wragge lost both of his parents at a young age: his mother at five months and his father at five years. He was raised for a number of years by his grandmother, Emma Wragge at Oakamoor, Staffordshire and educated at Uttoxeter Grammar School. Upon the death of his grandmother in 1865 he moved to London to live with relatives. There he followed in the footsteps of his father, studying law at Lincoln's Inn. He also studied navigation, and attended St Bartholomew's Hospital alongside medical students to watch operations. His uncle was Clement Mansfield Ingleby a partner in the law firm Ingleby Wragge and Ingleby, who became famous for his literary writings.

In 1874 Wragge worked his way to Sydney, Australia on a windjammer. He left the ship for a number of months to explore outback New South Wales and Queensland. In 1875 he worked his way from Sydney to San Francisco and Salt Lake City. There he held long discussions with Brigham Young. Claiming that polygamy appealed to him, he considered becoming a Mormon before returning to England. There he wrote a number of articles about Mormons and their religion.

Wragge returned to Australia in 1876, obtaining a position with the Surveyor-General's Department in South Australia. Wragge worked there for three years, participating in surveys of the Flinders Ranges and Murray scrubland. He married on 13 September 1877 Leonora Edith Florence d'Eresby and returned to Oakamoor, England in 1878 with his wife.

Wragge's first meteorological job was working at a weather station in North Staffordshire in 1881, living at Parkhouse Farm, Farley, Staffordshire. After the secretary of the Scottish Meteorological Society selected him to set up an observatory on the top of Ben Nevis Wragge climbed the peak daily to take readings, while his wife took comparable readings from sea level. For an unbroken series of observations from 1 June to 14 October 1881 he was awarded the Society's Gold Medal. After a second series of observations were undertaken in 1882 a Summit Observatory was opened in 1883. Wragge applied for the job of Superintendent, but was unsuccessful, possibly due to unpopularity.

Wragge's wife Leonora gave birth to a daughter, Leonora Ingleby in 1878; Emma.J. in 1879 and Clement Lionel Egerton in 1880 . His fourth child Rupert Lindley was born in August 1882 in Scotland. Wragge left for Australia soon after. His third child, Clement who was born in Farley, Staffordshire in 1880, would later enlist with the 2nd Light Horse Regiment of the First Australian Imperial Force and die from wounds at Gallipoli on 16 May 1915.

Wragge inherited a considerable fortune upon the death of a wealthy aunt in 1883, and the following year he moved with his wife to settle on the outskirts of Adelaide, South Australia. He established the Torrens Observatory at Walkerville, and another at Mount Lofty. In 1886 Wragge was the founding member of the Royal Meteorological Society of Australia.

Clement Wragge died on 10 December 1922 from a stroke. His son Kismet K Wragge stayed on as "First Officer" of the Wragge Institute.

Prophet of boom

January 11, 2008
Advertisement
It was soon after noon on September 26, 1902, that the first of the six big guns - giant Steiger Vortex guns, with long, funnel-shaped barrels, that reminded people of candle snuffers - were fired into the cloudy skies above Charleville. Boom! Boom! Boom!

Then, as now, the central Queensland town was deep in drought. In its desperation it had turned to firepower to shake the clouds, to produce rain.

According to contemporary reports, the cacophony from the cannons spooked a Chinaman's horse, upsetting his cart of fruit and rattled the heavens, but dislodged not a drop of rain. Subsequent volleys succeeded only in blowing apart two guns.
Townsfolk had been assured that similar guns had been used successfully to disperse damaging hailstorms over European vineyards, but present-day meteorologist Dick Whitaker of the Weather Channel says the plan had no scientific basis.
"It harked back to medieval days when people would set off cannons, fire volleys of arrows or ring church bells at advancing storms. Some great battles were fought in heavy rain, and people thought vibration from the gunfire had set it off.
"In fact, the amount of energy generated is relatively tiny," says Whitaker, who questions the efficacy even of modern "hail guns".

Despite the failure of the expensive experiment, Whitaker still admires its instigator, Clement Wragge, who subsequently left the town after an argument with the local council. "He was an eccentric, a real character, a loose cannon, a self-promoter," Whitaker says of a little-known man whose story will feature prominently when the Bureau Of Meteorology celebrates its centenary this year.

"He could communicate easily with the public, who generally liked him, but he did and said things that made the scientific community absolutely despair. In many ways he was, like the phenomena he studied, a 'natural disaster'."

Clement Lindley Wragge was born in Stourbridge in the English Midlands in 1852. With an erratically, endlessly inquiring mind, he studied law, navigation and, informally, medicine before working his way to Sydney on a windjammer in his 20s.

Thereafter, his life, like his interests, zig-zagged back and forth across not just Australia, but the world. From Adelaide he set off to survey the Flinders Ranges. In Salt Lake City in the US, he considered becoming a Mormon and embracing polygamy. Back home, he began working at a weather station first in Staffordshire, then in Scotland, on Ben Nevis, Britain's highest mountain. As Whitaker says: "You have to admire the determination of the man."

While his wife, who was to die on Ben Nevis in a blizzard, collected information from their home at sea level, Wragge would climb the mountain every day, four hours up, four hours down, to take readings.

By the time an observatory was established, Wragge had become so unpopular among his peers that he failed to win the job as superintendent. When, decades later, the first director of the bureau was sought, he was similarly shunned. Equipped with a new wife and enriched by a legacy from a wealthy aunt, he returned to Australia - to South Australia, where he established an observatory on Mount Lofty; then, four years later, to Queensland.

His arrival coincided with abnormal rainfall, for which he was nicknamed "Wet" and "Inclement" Wragge. Within years he gained another: "the Charleville Rainmaker".

As weather historian Tim Sherratt recorded, the fall-out from Wragge's failure was typical of the man. A pioneer of long-range forecasting and an energetic builder of weather stations, notably on Mount Kosciuszko and Mount Wellington, Tasmania, Wragge "had the unhelpful knack of alienating many of his colleagues. Styling himself as the 'boss weather prophet' and promulgating Australia-wide predictions from his 'chief weather bureau, Brisbane', he sought to claim the continent and the discipline his own".

He developed a convention of naming cyclones, first using Greek letters, then figures from Polynesian mythology and, more provocatively, politicians such as Edmund Barton and Alfred Deakin. Like cyclones, he argued, they were highly damaging.
Sherratt says Wragge increasingly found himself out of favour, "a weather prophet in the wilderness". After travelling through the Cook Islands, New Caledonia and Tahiti, he finally washed up, with a third wife, an Indian woman, in New Zealand.
His last home was in Birkenhead on Auckland's North Shore, which he described as the "sweetest nook in Maoridom … in God's own country". Here, he founded the Wragge Institute & Museum and the Waiata Observatory and Tropical Gardens.
In an essay for the Auckland historical society, Kim Adams recalled "a self-taught philosopher, meteorologist, geographer and showman who dressed in Indian-style apparel and … looked like a tall, turbaned scarecrow with a beard".

Wragge attracted many visitors to his home and garden, but as Adams noted, "his entire lack of feeling for social distinctions led to misunderstandings and jealousy … people expected behaviour that he could not conform to".

He died, praising "God, the master dynamo" and promoting suspicions that he had become a Muslim in 1922. Of his latter years in New Zealand almost nothing remains, but these days he is fondly remembered in Charleville, scene of his greatest disaster.

Two of the restored guns now stand in its Bicentennial Park, where signboards relate the story of how they were strapped to trees and fired into the heavens by the rainmaker.

The 68-year-old Charleville historian George Balsillie remembers one of the last times they were fired. "I was a youngster, apprenticed to this bloke Bob McWha, who had a blacksmith's workshop. When I started he pointed out this long, cone-shaped thing lying in the yard and said, 'Don't go throwing that out, it's a piece of history.' Apparently, some bloke turned up one day, probably 1947, very interested. Suggested they give it a bit of a test fire.

"They dug this thing up and strapped it to an electric light post next to the picture house. They got some gunpowder and made a bit of a fuse. Anyway, they didn't clear all the rubbish out of the barrel first. When it did go off, it went WHOMP, of course, but all these bloody feathers…and rubbish came flying out." But still no rain.


General Notes for Child Clement Lionel Egerton Wragge

Clement Lionel enlisted in the 2nd Light Horse Regiment of the First Australian Imperial Force and died from wounds 0n 16 May 1915.
picture

Captain Frederick William Despard and Rosina Meredith




Husband Captain Frederick William Despard

         Born: 1828 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 

 Other Spouse: Harriet Anne Nixon - 1862 - Hobart, Tasmania




Wife Rosina Meredith

         Born: 1833
   Christened: 
         Died: 1858
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Mary Anne Evans





Children
1 F Frederica Mary Despard

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Frederick and Rosina had one daughter.

Frederick and Harriet Ann Nixon had two children.

Frederick William Despard was a Captain in the army.

Frederick was also of the 99th Regiment as was Captain F. S. Gaynor, husband of Fanny.
picture

Captain Frederick William Despard and Harriet Anne Nixon




Husband Captain Frederick William Despard

         Born: 1828 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1862 - Hobart, Tasmania

 Other Spouse: Rosina Meredith




Wife Harriet Anne Nixon

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Rosina Clara Despard

         Born: 1863
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Edith Sophia Despard

         Born: 1864 - Morven, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Frederick and Rosina had one daughter.

Frederick and Harriet Ann Nixon had two children.

Frederick William Despard was a Captain in the army.

Frederick was also of the 99th Regiment as was Captain F. S. Gaynor, husband of Fanny.
picture

Charles Alfred Hebbert and Frances Helen Dilke




Husband Charles Alfred Hebbert

         Born: 24 Jun 1856
   Christened: 26 Aug 1856 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Benbow Hebbert
       Mother: Julia Lucy Aston


     Marriage: 27 Jan 1883 - St. John Baptist, Coventry




Wife Frances Helen Dilke

         Born: 1855 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Andrew Dilke
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Arthur Charles Benbow Hebbert

         Born: Nov-Dec 1856
   Christened: 5 Feb 1857 - Millbank St., Westminster
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

27.01.1883 - Hebbert, Charles Alfred 26, bac., surgeon 17 Great College Street, Westminster son of John Benbow Hebbert, solicitor, to Dilke, Frances Helen 28, spin. Holyhead Road, Coventry daughter of William Andrew Dilke, gentleman [deceased] C. Wentworth Dilke, Arthur H. Hebbert, Henry C. Hebbert, Dinah Hebbert, George Laston.

The Times, Friday 23 January 1880

Royal College of Surgeons - Charles Alfred Hebbert of Birmingham, of the Westminster Hospital, admitted with diploma as a member of the College on 21 January 1880.


General Notes (Wife)

Frances Helen was the daughter of William Andrew Dilke, gentleman (deceased at the time of her marriage). She was living at Holyhead Road, Coventry.


General Notes for Child Arthur Charles Benbow Hebbert

Daily News (London), Wednesday, February 9, 1887; Issue 12741

Hebbert. - February 5, at Millbank Street, Westminster, Arthur Charles Benbow, son of Charles A. and Frances H. Hebbert, aged 3 months.
picture

William Andrew Dilke




Husband William Andrew Dilke

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Frances Helen Dilke

         Born: 1855 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Charles Alfred Hebbert
         Marr: 27 Jan 1883 - St. John Baptist, Coventry




General Notes for Child Frances Helen Dilke

Frances Helen was the daughter of William Andrew Dilke, gentleman (deceased at the time of her marriage). She was living at Holyhead Road, Coventry.
picture

Frank Dudley Docker and Lucy Constance Hebbert




Husband Frank Dudley Docker

         Born: 26 Aug 1862 - Paxton House, Smethwick, South Street
   Christened: 
         Died: 8 Jul 1944 - Colesill House, Amersham, Buckinghamshire
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 17 Aug 1895 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire




Wife Lucy Constance Hebbert

         Born: 1852 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Benbow Hebbert
       Mother: Julia Lucy Aston





Children
1 M Sir Bernard Dudley Frank Docker

         Born: 9 Aug 1896 - Rotton Park Lodge, Edgbaston
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 May 1978 - Branksome Park, Dorset
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Jeanne Stuart Ivy Sweet
         Marr: Apr 1933
       Spouse: Norah Turner
         Marr: 1949




General Notes (Husband)

Dudly Docker was a successful industrialist and financier.

The Times, Monday, Jul. 10, 1944; Page 6

Mr. F. D. Docker

Mr. Frank Dudley Docker C.B., died at his home at Amersham on Saturday.

He was director of the Midland Bank, The Electric and Railway Finance Corporation and the Birmingham Small Arms Company. He was born in 1862, and in 1895 married Lucy Constance, daughter of J.B. Hebbert, of Edgbaston. Their only son is Sir Bernard Docker, chairman of Westminster Hospital and of the British Hospitals Assocaition.

Mr. Docker was one of the founders of the Federation of British Industries and was its first president. He was made C.B. in 1911.


General Notes (Wife)

Dudley Docker by R.P.T. Davenport-Hines - 2004

On 17 August 1895, a fortnight before his 33rd birthday, Dudley Docker married, at St. Augustines in Edgbaston, Lucy Constance Hebbert. She was the daughter of one of Ralph Docker's most distinguished contemporaries in the Birmingham legal fraternity, John Benbow Hebbert (1809-87), by his wife Lucy Julia, daughter of John Aston of Edgbaston and Rowington and sister of a prosperous Birmingham manufacturer, George Lyttelton Aston. Hebbert had enrolled as a solicitor in 1831, and as he remained active until his death, his professional longevity surpassed that of Ralph Docker by two or three years........


General Notes for Child Sir Bernard Dudley Frank Docker

Bernard Docker was born in Edgbaston, Birmingham, the only child of Frank Dudley Docker an industrialist.

Docker was the Managing Director of the Birmingham Small Arms Company group of companies (BSA) from the early 1940s until 1956 and he also chaired the Daimler Motor Company.

He became noted during the 1950s for producing show cars, such as the "Golden Daimler" (1952), "Blue Clover" (1953), the "Silver Flash" and "Stardust" in 1954. He was succeeded by Jack Sangster as Chairman of BSA, following a 1956 boardroom coup.

Docker's first wife was Jeanne Stuart (née Ivy Sweet), a British actress. They married in 1933 but the marriage was soon dissolved after pressure from Docker's parents. His second wife was Norah Collins (née Norah Royce Turner), a former showgirl he married in 1949 as her third husband; she was the widow of Sir William Collins, the president of Fortnum & Mason, and widow of Clement Callingham, the head of Henekeys wine and spirits merchants.
picture

Sir Bernard Dudley Frank Docker and Jeanne Stuart Ivy Sweet




Husband Sir Bernard Dudley Frank Docker

         Born: 9 Aug 1896 - Rotton Park Lodge, Edgbaston
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 May 1978 - Branksome Park, Dorset
       Buried: 


       Father: Frank Dudley Docker
       Mother: Lucy Constance Hebbert


     Marriage: Apr 1933

 Other Spouse: Norah Turner - 1949




Wife Jeanne Stuart Ivy Sweet

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Bernard Docker was born in Edgbaston, Birmingham, the only child of Frank Dudley Docker an industrialist.

Docker was the Managing Director of the Birmingham Small Arms Company group of companies (BSA) from the early 1940s until 1956 and he also chaired the Daimler Motor Company.

He became noted during the 1950s for producing show cars, such as the "Golden Daimler" (1952), "Blue Clover" (1953), the "Silver Flash" and "Stardust" in 1954. He was succeeded by Jack Sangster as Chairman of BSA, following a 1956 boardroom coup.

Docker's first wife was Jeanne Stuart (née Ivy Sweet), a British actress. They married in 1933 but the marriage was soon dissolved after pressure from Docker's parents. His second wife was Norah Collins (née Norah Royce Turner), a former showgirl he married in 1949 as her third husband; she was the widow of Sir William Collins, the president of Fortnum & Mason, and widow of Clement Callingham, the head of Henekeys wine and spirits merchants.
picture

Sir Bernard Dudley Frank Docker and Norah Turner




Husband Sir Bernard Dudley Frank Docker

         Born: 9 Aug 1896 - Rotton Park Lodge, Edgbaston
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 May 1978 - Branksome Park, Dorset
       Buried: 


       Father: Frank Dudley Docker
       Mother: Lucy Constance Hebbert


     Marriage: 1949

 Other Spouse: Jeanne Stuart Ivy Sweet - Apr 1933




Wife Norah Turner

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Bernard Docker was born in Edgbaston, Birmingham, the only child of Frank Dudley Docker an industrialist.

Docker was the Managing Director of the Birmingham Small Arms Company group of companies (BSA) from the early 1940s until 1956 and he also chaired the Daimler Motor Company.

He became noted during the 1950s for producing show cars, such as the "Golden Daimler" (1952), "Blue Clover" (1953), the "Silver Flash" and "Stardust" in 1954. He was succeeded by Jack Sangster as Chairman of BSA, following a 1956 boardroom coup.

Docker's first wife was Jeanne Stuart (née Ivy Sweet), a British actress. They married in 1933 but the marriage was soon dissolved after pressure from Docker's parents. His second wife was Norah Collins (née Norah Royce Turner), a former showgirl he married in 1949 as her third husband; she was the widow of Sir William Collins, the president of Fortnum & Mason, and widow of Clement Callingham, the head of Henekeys wine and spirits merchants.
picture

Mr. Dore and Anna Maria Stephens




Husband Mr. Dore

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Anna Maria Stephens

         Born: 1780 - circa
   Christened: 22 Feb 1780 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Lawrence Stephens
       Mother: Hannah Meredith





Children
1 F Anna Maria Dore

         Born: 1808 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1881
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Mr. Dore of London (reference in private correspondence of the Jukes family)
picture

Frederic Doulton and Sarah Saunders Meredith




Husband Frederic Doulton

         Born: 1823 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1872
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 5 May 1846 - Resent St. Baptist Chapel, Lambeth, Surrey




Wife Sarah Saunders Meredith

         Born: 8 Jan 1824 - St. Mary's, Kent
   Christened: 4 Sep 1827 - London, England
         Died: 1914
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Hannah Bult





Children
1 F Alice Duneau Doulton

         Born: 1854 - March Q. - Brixton, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Hubert Victor Doulton

         Born: 1864 - March Q. - Dulwich, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Amy Sarah Doulton

         Born: 1848 - Sept. Q. - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Alfred Percy Doulton

         Born: 1855 - March Q. - Brixton, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Isabel Hannah Doulton

         Born: 1858 - September Q. - Dulwich, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Frederick was an earthenware manufacturer.


General Notes (Wife)

1881 census - 147 Peckham Rye, Camberwell, Surrey, England.

Sarah S. Doulton, Head, W, 57, Woolwich, Kent, England, Dividends.
Amy Sarah Doulton, Daur, U, 33, Lambeth, Surrey, England, Dividends.
Alice Dunea. Doulton, Daur, U, 27, Brixton, Surrey, England, Dividends.
Alfred Percy Doulton, Son, U, 26, Brixton, Surrey, England, Solicitors Managing Clerk.
Isabel H. Doulton, Daur, U, 22, Dulwich, Surrey, England, Dividends.
Herbert V. Doulton, Son, U, 17, Dulwich, Surrey, England, Scholar.
Hannah F. Sleigh, Serv, U, 21, Stepney, Middlesex, England, Cook Domestic.
Mary Kate Blake, Serv, U, 21, Preston Condover, Hampshire, England, Housemaid Domestic.
Samuel B. Meredith, Brother, M, 58, Woolwich, Kent, England, Retired Farmer.

1891 Census:

Camberwell
257 Barry Road
Sarah S. Doulton - Head - 67 - Living on Own Means
Alice D. - daughter - 37 - Living on Own Means
Hubert V. - son - 27 - schoolmaster
Rosie - granddaughter - 10 - Scholar

1901 Census:

Camberwell
257 Barry Road
Sarah S. Doulton - 77 - Living on Own Means
Alice D. - daughter - 47
Hubert V. - son - Schoolmaster
Rosie - granddaughter - 20


picture

Hubert Victor Doulton




Husband Hubert Victor Doulton

         Born: 1864 - March Q. - Dulwich, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Frederic Doulton
       Mother: Sarah Saunders Meredith


     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Rosie Doulton

         Born: 1881 - circa - Staines, Middlesex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Dowding and Anne Stephens




Husband Dowding

         Born:  - Cheltenham
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Anne Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Stephens
       Mother: Susannah Beaumont




General Notes (Husband)

Of Cheltenham.
picture

Jeremiah Downes and Anne Hudson




Husband Jeremiah Downes

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Anne Hudson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Downes

         Born: 1782 - about
   Christened: 2 Mar 1782 - Shipton, Shropshire
         Died: 1848 - circa
       Buried: 22 Sep 1848 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
       Spouse: John Meredith
         Marr: 27 Apr 1802 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire



2 F Sarah Downes

         Born: 1784 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1854 - Circa
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Wright
         Marr: 14 Oct 1806 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire




General Notes for Child Mary Downes

1841 Census:

Mary, aged 59, living in Pedwardine with son John (aged 34), Joseph and his wife Mary - she was described as a farmer.
picture

John Meredith and Mary Downes




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1774 - Circa
   Christened: 8 Feb 1774 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 15 May 1834 - aged 60 - Pedwardine
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Meredith
       Mother: Mary Prosser


     Marriage: 27 Apr 1802 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire




Wife Mary Downes

         Born: 1782 - about
   Christened: 2 Mar 1782 - Shipton, Shropshire
         Died: 1848 - circa
       Buried: 22 Sep 1848 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford


       Father: Jeremiah Downes
       Mother: Anne Hudson





Children
1 F Elizabeth Meredith

         Born: 1803 - Circa
   Christened: 7 Jun 1803 - Bucknell, Shropshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M John Meredith

         Born: 1805 - Circa - Shropshire, England
   Christened: 1 Nov 1805 - Bucknell, Shropshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1806 - Circa - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 1853 - March Q - Ludlow, Herefordshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary
         Marr: 1841 - before



4 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1815 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John Meredith died 1834 in of Pedwardine. He married Mary Downes on 27 April 1802 in Leintwardine, Herefordshire, England, daughter of Jeremiah Downes and Anne Hudson.

More About John Meredith:
Christening: 1774

Children of John Meredith and Mary Downes are:
Elizabeth Meredith, b. 1803, d. date unknown.
John Meredith, b. 1805, Shropshire, England, d. date unknown.
Joseph Meredith, b. 1808, d. 1872.
Mary Meredith, b. 1815, d. date unknown.

Mary Downes (daughter of Jeremiah Downes and Anne Hudson) was born Abt. 1782, and died Bet. 1815 - May 1849.

More About Mary Downes:
Christening: 2 March 1782, Shipton, Shropshire, England.

Elizabeth Meredith (daughter of John Meredith and Mary Downes was born 1803, and died date unknown.
Notes for Elizabeth Meredith & John:
Both received Fifty pounds from their grandmother Anne Downes in her Will. [Rita Taylor]

Sarah Downes. sister of Mary married John Wright. Their daughter Sarah Wright married Henry Meredith who was born about 1800 and died in 1865 - they were married before 1837 and had one child (at least) Henry Frederick Meredith born about 1837 in Kington, Herefordshire and died in 1905


General Notes (Wife)

1841 Census:

Mary, aged 59, living in Pedwardine with son John (aged 34), Joseph and his wife Mary - she was described as a farmer.


General Notes for Child John Meredith

John died unmarried

John provided the information about the Merediths of Pedwardine contained in the 4 page letter

“The Merediths of Pedwardine (near Brampton Bryan Herefordshire)
From Mr. John Meredith of Pedwardine to my mother April 27th 1845 – (Signed SEA)

‘I have forwarded all the inscriptions to our family in Brampton Bryan Churchyard; at the same time observe there is one sister only of your revered father lies interred there viz. Mrs. Whitcott’

Then there are the details above re the Merediths – then the letter goes on with more details:

“Hannah Meredith (late of lower Pedwardine) died November 11th 1834 aged 65 years
Anne Meredith (also of Pedwardine) died April 26th 1842 aged 69
Sarah Meredith died December 15th 1842 aged 87
David Meredith (late of Pedwardine) died February 14th 1836 aged 77
Catherine (wife of the above) died November 7th 1827 aged 53 years
Also Eliza daughter of the above David and Catherine Meredith who died in her 16th year and David a son who died in infancy.”

The letter then goes on:

“Davis Meredith of Pedwardine born 1702 died 1781 aged 79 our great grandfather (Signed SEA)

I believe he had a family of twelve children and our grandfather James Meredith senior of Birmingham I have heard was 5 years younger than the rest – one of his nephews was older than himself. Mrs. Whitcott was his eldest sister and Mrs. Mayo was the name of another.

James Meredith (our grandfather) son of David Meredith of Pedwardine was born February 20th 1753 – died March 9th 1848. He married Sally Rhodes Mather, daughter of J Mather of Leicester. James their eldest son born March 1st 1798 died September 20th 1861.

Sarah married Alfred Jukes surgeon of Birmingham (she was) born April 7th 1799 died at Willesden November 14th 1884.
John born April 15th 1800 – married Jane daughter of George Jones of Birmingham – (she) died July 17th 1851
David born April 5th 1802 died March 3rd 1822
Samuel born December 25th 1803 died July 30th 1885”

The third page as follows:

“Memoranda relating to the Stephens Family

Mrs. Stephens daughter of Davis Meredith of Pedwardine and sister of James Meredith of Birmingham, wife of Mr. Stephens of Moorcourt farmer, had six children
John Stephens of Eardisley Castle, farmer
Joseph Stephens of Dinedor & afterwards Dilwyn, Farmer
James Stephens of Harpton (?), farmer
Sarah Stephens wife of Peter Stephens of Broadheath, Resteign (?)
Anna Stephens wife of Mr Dore of London
?? Stephens wife of Mr. Johnson, surgeon of Dowgate Hill London
John Stephens married Miss Harris of ???? and had two daughters
Jane afterwards Mrs Reynolds (Alice Reynolds is her daughter)
Mary of St Georges Square London who brought up her sisters family Mrs R (Jane) having died. Mary Stephens died December 16th 1880 aged 74
Joseph Stephens married Miss Beaumont of Brinsop (?) in Hereford and had ten children. 9 daughters and one son.
Hannah married Mr. Gough solicitor of Hereford
Susan (??)
Sarah married Mr Holdsworth of Huddersfield
Anne married Mr Dowding of Cheltenham
Louisa married (1) The Rev. M Johnson. (2) Mr. Philip Coke (?) solicitor of London
Mary Jane married the Ven. Archdeacon Mooyart of Ceylon
Joanna married M. Delaye of Geneva
Octavia
Harriet
Lawrence Johnstone married a widowlady. Vicar of Long Haughton, Tesbury (?) Northumberland
James Stephens married ???? and had 5 children:
Peter married Miss Cooke & lived in Harpton ???? Herefordshire
Anne lives with Elizabeth in Hereford
James L died 1888
Mary married Mr Bridgewater farmer
Elizabeth
Mrs Peter Stephens pf Broadheath had no children
Mrs Dore had one daughter Anna Maria who died in 1881 aged 73
Mrs Johnson had no children”

1841 Census: Herefordshire - Boresford and Pedwardine

John, aged 34?, living in Pedwardine with his mother Mary

1851 Census: Wales - Radnorshire - Boresford and Pedwardine

John was living with his sister Eliza

1861 Census - Herefordshire - Beresford and Pedwardine

John was living with his sister Eliza

1871 Census - Herefordshire - All Saints

John described as a retired farmer - living as a lodger


General Notes for Child Joseph Meredith

1851 Census: Radnorshire - Boresford and Pedwardine.

Joseph was living with his wife Mary and their sons John, Joseph and James.
picture

Robert Henry Burnside Downes and Mabel Cholmondely Poynter




Husband Robert Henry Burnside Downes

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 4 Apr 1896 - Geelong, Victoria




Wife Mabel Cholmondely Poynter

         Born: 28 Jun 1874 - Geelong, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 28 Oct 1919
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Meredith Poynter
       Mother: Emily Nodder Shaw




picture
John Wright and Sarah Downes




Husband John Wright

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 14 Oct 1806 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire




Wife Sarah Downes

         Born: 1784 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1854 - Circa
       Buried: 


       Father: Jeremiah Downes
       Mother: Anne Hudson





Children
1 F Sarah Wright

         Born: 9 Sep 1810 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Henry Meredith
         Marr: 1837 - Before




picture
Clement Ingleby Wragge and Anna Maria Downing




Husband Clement Ingleby Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 19 Sep 1814 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 1857
       Buried: 


       Father: George Wragge
       Mother: Emma Ingleby


     Marriage: 21 Oct 1851 - Clent, Worcester




Wife Anna Maria Downing

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1852
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Clement Lindley Wragge

         Born: 19 Sep 1852 - Stourbridge, Worcestershire
   Christened: 30 Oct 1852 - Old Swinford, Worcester
         Died: 10 Dec 1922
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Leonora Edith Florence d'Eresby
         Marr: 13 Sep 1877




General Notes (Husband)

George Wragge and Emma had a son Clement Ingleby Wragge who was christened on 19 Sep 1814 in Cheadle, and who also became a solicitor.

1841 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Frederick St
George Wragg - 30 - solicitor
Clement Wragge - 25 - solicitor


General Notes for Child Clement Lindley Wragge

Clement Lindley Wragge born in 18 Sep 1852 became a well-known meteorologist who founded the Meteorological Society of Australasia.

1871 Census:

Middlesex
Teddington
Frances A Wragge - Head - 62 - Annuitant
Ellen E - daughter - 31 - annuitant
Bertha M. - daughter - 25
Catherine E. - daughter - 24
Clement L. Wragge - nephew - 18

1881 Census:

Staffordshire
Farley
Clement - 28 - Independent means from dividends and interest - F.R.C.S, F.M.S & Scientific Pursuits, viz ????? Geography
Leonard E. - 25 - Wife - From Adelaide, South Australia
Emma - 2
Clement L. E. - 8 months

Clement Lindley Wragge (19 September 1852 - 10 December 1922) was a meteorologist born in Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. After training in law, Wragge became renowned in the field of meteorology, winning the Scottish Meteorological Society's Gold Medal and starting the trend of using people's names for cyclones. He travelled widely, and in his later years was a reliable authority on Australia, India and the Pacific Islands.

Wragge lost both of his parents at a young age: his mother at five months and his father at five years. He was raised for a number of years by his grandmother, Emma Wragge at Oakamoor, Staffordshire and educated at Uttoxeter Grammar School. Upon the death of his grandmother in 1865 he moved to London to live with relatives. There he followed in the footsteps of his father, studying law at Lincoln's Inn. He also studied navigation, and attended St Bartholomew's Hospital alongside medical students to watch operations. His uncle was Clement Mansfield Ingleby a partner in the law firm Ingleby Wragge and Ingleby, who became famous for his literary writings.

In 1874 Wragge worked his way to Sydney, Australia on a windjammer. He left the ship for a number of months to explore outback New South Wales and Queensland. In 1875 he worked his way from Sydney to San Francisco and Salt Lake City. There he held long discussions with Brigham Young. Claiming that polygamy appealed to him, he considered becoming a Mormon before returning to England. There he wrote a number of articles about Mormons and their religion.

Wragge returned to Australia in 1876, obtaining a position with the Surveyor-General's Department in South Australia. Wragge worked there for three years, participating in surveys of the Flinders Ranges and Murray scrubland. He married on 13 September 1877 Leonora Edith Florence d'Eresby and returned to Oakamoor, England in 1878 with his wife.

Wragge's first meteorological job was working at a weather station in North Staffordshire in 1881, living at Parkhouse Farm, Farley, Staffordshire. After the secretary of the Scottish Meteorological Society selected him to set up an observatory on the top of Ben Nevis Wragge climbed the peak daily to take readings, while his wife took comparable readings from sea level. For an unbroken series of observations from 1 June to 14 October 1881 he was awarded the Society's Gold Medal. After a second series of observations were undertaken in 1882 a Summit Observatory was opened in 1883. Wragge applied for the job of Superintendent, but was unsuccessful, possibly due to unpopularity.

Wragge's wife Leonora gave birth to a daughter, Leonora Ingleby in 1878; Emma.J. in 1879 and Clement Lionel Egerton in 1880 . His fourth child Rupert Lindley was born in August 1882 in Scotland. Wragge left for Australia soon after. His third child, Clement who was born in Farley, Staffordshire in 1880, would later enlist with the 2nd Light Horse Regiment of the First Australian Imperial Force and die from wounds at Gallipoli on 16 May 1915.

Wragge inherited a considerable fortune upon the death of a wealthy aunt in 1883, and the following year he moved with his wife to settle on the outskirts of Adelaide, South Australia. He established the Torrens Observatory at Walkerville, and another at Mount Lofty. In 1886 Wragge was the founding member of the Royal Meteorological Society of Australia.

Clement Wragge died on 10 December 1922 from a stroke. His son Kismet K Wragge stayed on as "First Officer" of the Wragge Institute.

Prophet of boom

January 11, 2008
Advertisement
It was soon after noon on September 26, 1902, that the first of the six big guns - giant Steiger Vortex guns, with long, funnel-shaped barrels, that reminded people of candle snuffers - were fired into the cloudy skies above Charleville. Boom! Boom! Boom!

Then, as now, the central Queensland town was deep in drought. In its desperation it had turned to firepower to shake the clouds, to produce rain.

According to contemporary reports, the cacophony from the cannons spooked a Chinaman's horse, upsetting his cart of fruit and rattled the heavens, but dislodged not a drop of rain. Subsequent volleys succeeded only in blowing apart two guns.
Townsfolk had been assured that similar guns had been used successfully to disperse damaging hailstorms over European vineyards, but present-day meteorologist Dick Whitaker of the Weather Channel says the plan had no scientific basis.
"It harked back to medieval days when people would set off cannons, fire volleys of arrows or ring church bells at advancing storms. Some great battles were fought in heavy rain, and people thought vibration from the gunfire had set it off.
"In fact, the amount of energy generated is relatively tiny," says Whitaker, who questions the efficacy even of modern "hail guns".

Despite the failure of the expensive experiment, Whitaker still admires its instigator, Clement Wragge, who subsequently left the town after an argument with the local council. "He was an eccentric, a real character, a loose cannon, a self-promoter," Whitaker says of a little-known man whose story will feature prominently when the Bureau Of Meteorology celebrates its centenary this year.

"He could communicate easily with the public, who generally liked him, but he did and said things that made the scientific community absolutely despair. In many ways he was, like the phenomena he studied, a 'natural disaster'."

Clement Lindley Wragge was born in Stourbridge in the English Midlands in 1852. With an erratically, endlessly inquiring mind, he studied law, navigation and, informally, medicine before working his way to Sydney on a windjammer in his 20s.

Thereafter, his life, like his interests, zig-zagged back and forth across not just Australia, but the world. From Adelaide he set off to survey the Flinders Ranges. In Salt Lake City in the US, he considered becoming a Mormon and embracing polygamy. Back home, he began working at a weather station first in Staffordshire, then in Scotland, on Ben Nevis, Britain's highest mountain. As Whitaker says: "You have to admire the determination of the man."

While his wife, who was to die on Ben Nevis in a blizzard, collected information from their home at sea level, Wragge would climb the mountain every day, four hours up, four hours down, to take readings.

By the time an observatory was established, Wragge had become so unpopular among his peers that he failed to win the job as superintendent. When, decades later, the first director of the bureau was sought, he was similarly shunned. Equipped with a new wife and enriched by a legacy from a wealthy aunt, he returned to Australia - to South Australia, where he established an observatory on Mount Lofty; then, four years later, to Queensland.

His arrival coincided with abnormal rainfall, for which he was nicknamed "Wet" and "Inclement" Wragge. Within years he gained another: "the Charleville Rainmaker".

As weather historian Tim Sherratt recorded, the fall-out from Wragge's failure was typical of the man. A pioneer of long-range forecasting and an energetic builder of weather stations, notably on Mount Kosciuszko and Mount Wellington, Tasmania, Wragge "had the unhelpful knack of alienating many of his colleagues. Styling himself as the 'boss weather prophet' and promulgating Australia-wide predictions from his 'chief weather bureau, Brisbane', he sought to claim the continent and the discipline his own".

He developed a convention of naming cyclones, first using Greek letters, then figures from Polynesian mythology and, more provocatively, politicians such as Edmund Barton and Alfred Deakin. Like cyclones, he argued, they were highly damaging.
Sherratt says Wragge increasingly found himself out of favour, "a weather prophet in the wilderness". After travelling through the Cook Islands, New Caledonia and Tahiti, he finally washed up, with a third wife, an Indian woman, in New Zealand.
His last home was in Birkenhead on Auckland's North Shore, which he described as the "sweetest nook in Maoridom … in God's own country". Here, he founded the Wragge Institute & Museum and the Waiata Observatory and Tropical Gardens.
In an essay for the Auckland historical society, Kim Adams recalled "a self-taught philosopher, meteorologist, geographer and showman who dressed in Indian-style apparel and … looked like a tall, turbaned scarecrow with a beard".

Wragge attracted many visitors to his home and garden, but as Adams noted, "his entire lack of feeling for social distinctions led to misunderstandings and jealousy … people expected behaviour that he could not conform to".

He died, praising "God, the master dynamo" and promoting suspicions that he had become a Muslim in 1922. Of his latter years in New Zealand almost nothing remains, but these days he is fondly remembered in Charleville, scene of his greatest disaster.

Two of the restored guns now stand in its Bicentennial Park, where signboards relate the story of how they were strapped to trees and fired into the heavens by the rainmaker.

The 68-year-old Charleville historian George Balsillie remembers one of the last times they were fired. "I was a youngster, apprenticed to this bloke Bob McWha, who had a blacksmith's workshop. When I started he pointed out this long, cone-shaped thing lying in the yard and said, 'Don't go throwing that out, it's a piece of history.' Apparently, some bloke turned up one day, probably 1947, very interested. Suggested they give it a bit of a test fire.

"They dug this thing up and strapped it to an electric light post next to the picture house. They got some gunpowder and made a bit of a fuse. Anyway, they didn't clear all the rubbish out of the barrel first. When it did go off, it went WHOMP, of course, but all these bloody feathers…and rubbish came flying out." But still no rain.


picture

Sir Richard Dry and Clara Meredith




Husband Sir Richard Dry




         Born: 20 Sep 1815 - Elphin Farm, Near Launceston, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 Aug 1869 - Holbrook House, Hobart, Tasmania
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 27 Apr 1853 - All Saint's Church, Swansea, Tasmania




Wife Clara Meredith

         Born: Sep 1828
   Christened: 31 Dec 1829 - Tasmania
         Died: 1904 - Circa
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Mary Anne Evans




General Notes (Husband)

Clara and Richard had no children

DRY, Sir RICHARD (1815-1869), landowner and politician, was born on 20 September 1815 at Elphin Farm near Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, the elder son of Richard Dry and his wife Anne, née Maughan. He was educated at Kirklands, the boys' school conducted by Rev. John Mackersey at Campbell Town. At 21 he made a voyage to Mauritius and British Indian ports, and on his return devoted himself to farming the fine Quamby property left him by his father in 1843. He had been placed on the Commission of the Peace in 1837 by Sir John Franklin, who was impressed with Dry's personality and steady character. On 8 February 1844, Lieutenant-Governor Sir John Eardley-Wilmot nominated him a non-official member of the Legislative Council.

Dry began his political career in the turmoil of an economic depression deepened by instructions to Wilmot to reduce expenditure and to make up deficiencies in funds from colonial revenue. On the introduction of the estimates in August 1845, Dry called for the appointment of a committee to inquire into expenses incurred by the colony through the maintenance of convicts. Wilmot employed his casting vote to defeat the motion but, pressed by the opposition, postponed further consideration of the estimates until October. When they were brought up again, Dry a second time demanded a committee to inquire into the Convict Department, intending to prove to the British government that the colony's decline was due to the expense of the convict system which caused free labour to leave the colony. Wilmot resented the attempt of the council to control the government and question Colonial Office instructions, and used his casting vote to defeat the motion. Opposition attempts at adjournment failed, the appropriation bill passed two readings and protests from Dry and Thomas Gregson were quashed. On the third reading of the bill on 31 October 1845, Dry and the five other unofficial members left the chamber and resigned. This action of the 'Patriotic Six', as they came to be known popularly, for the first time united the cause of representative government with the cry for cessation of transportation. Whilst Gregson and others received various evidences of public approbation, 'Dicky' Dry was given one of the greatest receptions ever organized for a citizen of Launceston, and maintained the popularity he achieved by his stand against Wilmot's administration for the rest of his life. In 1847 Sir William Denison, Wilmot's successor, persuaded Dry and his five colleagues to accept reappointment to the council. There were, however, few controversial issues before 1851 and Dry was often absent. At this time he took a leading part in the newly-formed Anti-transportation League, and it was with the support of this body that Dry was returned for Launceston at the elections to the new council in October 1851, easily defeating Adye Douglas. At the first meeting of the new council Dry was unanimously elected Speaker, and retained the position for four years.

On 27 April 1853 Dry married Clara, the daughter of George Meredith of Cambria, Swanport, at All Saints' Church, Swansea. They had no children, and lived until 1856 at Quamby where their hospitality made the colonial-period house a notable centre. Their Waterloo ball was an event in the colony's social calendar, attended by the lieutenant-governor and leading citizens. Dry, however, did not neglect his public responsibilities: as Speaker and chairman of the electoral committee he used his influence to speed up legislation for holding the first elections for the new parliament, although he did not become a candidate. A fall from a horse in 1854 seriously affected his health, and forced his retirement. After receiving an address from Launceston voters, who commissioned his portrait, and selling his library and about 6000 acres (2428 ha) of his land, he and his wife went for an extended visit to England and Europe. Whilst abroad he was knighted by Queen Victoria, the first Tasmanian-born citizen to be so honoured, and one of the first Australians.

His popularity lost nothing in his absence. In November 1859, some months before his return to the colony, admirers nominated him for the Devon seat in the House of Assembly, but he did not stand. In 1862 Dry was elected for Tamar to the Legislative Council. Whilst overseas he had interested himself in the railway developments in Great Britain and Europe. On his return he vigorously entered the campaign for a north-south railway, and one between Launceston and Deloraine. He became chairman of the Launceston and Deloraine Railway Association and president of the Northern Tasmanian Railway League, by his personal efforts helping to overcome opposition to the scheme and financial problems involved. When in 1866 the Whyte ministry was defeated on the question of direct taxation, Dry, although still in poor health and not a member of the House of Assembly, was persuaded to become premier. The ministry of three, smallest in the history of Tasmanian politics, was nevertheless strong. After the customary re-election Dry became colonial secretary and registrar of records of the territory of Tasmania, with Thomas Chapman, a skilful public financier, as colonial treasurer and William Lambert Dobson, an able young barrister, as attorney-general and government leader in the House of Assembly. Dry successfully steered through the upper house the government's bills for retrenchment and the appropriation of the land fund surplus, despite strong criticism of the latter expedient. More positive legislation established the finance of the railway company on a sound footing, arranged for the survey of the main line, the building of roads, and the creation of a Board of Education.

Towards the middle of 1869 Dry's health deteriorated and he died on 1 August 1869 at his Hobart house, Holbrook. His death brought unprecedented tributes of sorrow from all classes and his funeral cortège was followed by large processions through all the towns from Hobart to Launceston.

His place as the most popular and widely esteemed public man of his day rested on personal qualities as much as political achievements. One of the island's most colourful squires, he was yet an equalitarian in social relations and free of condescension. But his championship in the political causes of his day, his extravagant way of living and lack of ability as a business manager reduced his fortune to the point of embarrassment. He was a devout member of the Church of England and at his own request was buried at St Mary's, Hagley, which he had built and endowed.

A portrait in oils of Dry in the robes of Speaker of the Legislative Council, by Conway Hart, commissioned by public subscription in 1855, hangs in Parliament House, Hobart. Two later portraits by Robert Dowling are in the possession of the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston. Two exhibition prizes perpetuate his memory at the University of Tasmania, and there is a window to his memory in St David's Cathedral, Hobart.
picture

Howard Walter Meredith and Blanche Dunfee




Husband Howard Walter Meredith

         Born: 1858 - Circa - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 May 1944
       Buried: 


       Father: John Bult Meredith
       Mother: Eliza Rouse


     Marriage: 1886 - June Quarter - Wandsworth, London




Wife Blanche Dunfee

         Born: 1867 - circa - Pimlico, Westminster
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: 
       Mother: Ann H.





Children
1 M Howard Douglas Meredith

         Born: 28 Aug 1887 - Merstone, Springfield-road, Wimbledon, S.W.
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Jan 1951 - London, England
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Eleanor Melina (Norah) Lorden



2 F Marian Dorothy Meredith

         Born: 1891 - circa - Wimbledon, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Eric Dunfee Meredith

         Born: 1896 - circa - Wimbledon, Surrey
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 Oct 1916 - Battle of the Somme
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1891 Census Collection:

Howard (aged 32) was living at 11 Springfield Rd, Wimbledon, was described as an iron merchant, living with his wife Blanche (aged 24), their son Howard D (aged 3) and their daughter Marian D (1 month)

1901 Census Collection:

Howard (aged 42) was described as a builders hardware merchant (employer) living with his wife Blanche (aged 34), their son Howard (aged 13), their daughter Marian (aged 10) and their son Erc D. (aged 5), and Blanche's mother Ann H. Dunfee who was living on an annuity.

The Times Saturday, May 05, 1945; pg. 1; Issue 50135; col A

Meredith. - In very loving memory of Howard Walter Meredith (May 5, 1944). - Blanche, Douglas and Dorothy.

The Times, Tuesday, Aug 30, 1887; pg. 1; Issue 32164; col A

On the 28th August, at Merstone, Springfield-Road, Wimbledon, S.W., the wife of Howard Walter Meredith, of a son


General Notes for Child Howard Douglas Meredith

The Times, Tuesday, Jan 16, 1951; pg. 1; Issue 51900; col A

Meredith. - On Jan. 13, 1951, passed peacefully away, after an operation, in London, Howard Douglas Meredith, of Kewhurst Manor, Bexhill-on-Sea, devoted and deeply loved husband of Norah and dear son of the late Howard W. Meredith and Mrs. Meredith. Funeral strictly private. No flowers. Memorial service later.

The Times, Monday, Jan 29, 1951; pg. 1; Issue 51911; col A

Meredith. - A memorial service for Howard Douglas Meredith, of Kewhurst Manor, Bexhill-on-Sea, will be held at St. Mark's Church, North Audley St. W.1 on Thursday, Feb. 1, at 2 p.m.


General Notes for Child Eric Dunfee Meredith

The Times, Thursday, Oct 07, 1937; pg. 1; Issue 47809; col A

Meredith. - In most loving rememberance of Eric Dunfee Meredith, Sec. Lieut., 32nd Royal Fusiliers, who on Oct. 7., 1916, fell, while gallantly leading his platoon, in an attack near Ligny Thilloy (Battle of the Somme).

"Let those who come after see to it
that his name be not forgotton."
picture

John Meredith and Martha Dyke




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1739 - Circa
   Christened: 13 Jan 1739 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens


     Marriage: 24 May 1768 - Hopton Castle, Shropshire




Wife Martha Dyke

         Born: 1747 - Circa - Hopton Castle, Shropshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Meredith

         Born: 1769 - Circa
   Christened: 19 May 1769 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1777 - circa
       Buried: 2 Apr 1777 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



2 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1770 - Circa
   Christened: 8 Jun 1770 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Esther (Hester) Marston
         Marr: 17 Aug 1801 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



3 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1771 - Circa
   Christened: 16 Nov 1771 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1785
       Buried: 20 Mar 1785 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



4 F Martha Meredith

         Born: 1773 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Mar 1773 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1775 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Jan 1775 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M David Meredith

         Born: 1777 - Circa
   Christened: 6 Jan 1777 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 21 Jun 1787 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



7 M John Meredith

         Born: 1786 - Circa
   Christened: 29 Sep 1786 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Thomas Meredith

1841 Census:

Thomas & Hester with sons James, John and Joseph. They have 4 servants, including Phoebe Wylde who married James 7 months later. The farm was in Boresford.

1851 Census:

Radnorshire - Boresford and Pedwardine
Thomas (aged 80) farmer of 635 acres living with is son John (aged 42), his other son Joseph (aged 40), Joseph's wife, Caroline (aged 26) and their children Joseph (aged 4) and James (aged 1) They have 4 servants and have a substantial farm of 635 acres in Boresford.

picture

Owen Meredith and Eady




Husband Owen Meredith




         Born: 6 Apr 1847 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1927
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Meredith
       Mother: Louisa Anne Twamley


     Marriage: 1908 - after

 Other Spouse: Eliza Jane Windsor - 1 Nov 1871 - Chalmers Free Presbyterian, Hobart, Tasmania




Wife Eady

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Owen was a mining engineer.
picture

William Edwards and Hannah Meredith




Husband William Edwards

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 21 Mar 1815 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Hannah Meredith

         Born: 1782 - Circa
   Christened: 9 Jun 1782 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Meredith
       Mother: Martha Carter




picture
James Balleney Elkington and Margaret Meredith




Husband James Balleney Elkington

         Born: 27 Oct 1830 - Saint Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 1907, June Quarter - St. Georges, Hanover Square (Aged 77 - BMD)
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1854, March Quarter - Harbonne, Warwickshire

 Other Spouse: Emily Jane Hilbers - 1888 - June Quarter - Steyning, Sussex




Wife Margaret Meredith

         Born: 1832 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1886 - March Quarter - Llanelly, Wales
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Jane Walker Jones





Children
1 M George Meredith Elkington

         Born: 1863 Reg. March 1864 - Dell Cottage - Reg. Kings Norton
   Christened: 
         Died: 1913, March Quarter - Thanet, Kent
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Fanny Bigg
         Marr: 1886, September Quarter - Thanet, Kent



2 M James Llewellyn Elkington

         Born: 1875 - Brighton, Sussex
   Christened: 
         Died: 1925
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Rachel Kavanagh
         Marr: 1895 - June Quarter - Hereford




General Notes (Husband)

The Elkington family established the Pembrey copperworks company in Wales in 1849

1891 Census:

James was living at Bordesley Hall, Worcestershire, Alvechurch parish, and was described as a manufacturer/Magistrate, living with his wife, Emily, and their son James (aged 15).


General Notes (Wife)

Margaret Elkington is at Pembrey House in the 1871 Wales Census with sister Constance.


General Notes for Child James Llewellyn Elkington

James Llewellyn and family emigrated to Kenya in 1905.

1901 Census:

James (aged 28) was described as living on his own means, a retired gentleman, 4th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment, living with his wife Rachel at Oaklands, Derbyshire, in the Brailsford parish, with their daughter, Margaret (aged 5), a visitor, Jane G. Digby-Walsh and five servants.
picture

James Balleney Elkington and Emily Jane Hilbers




Husband James Balleney Elkington

         Born: 27 Oct 1830 - Saint Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 1907, June Quarter - St. Georges, Hanover Square (Aged 77 - BMD)
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1888 - June Quarter - Steyning, Sussex

 Other Spouse: Margaret Meredith - 1854, March Quarter - Harbonne, Warwickshire




Wife Emily Jane Hilbers

         Born: 1851, March Quarter - Liverpool, Lancashire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

The Elkington family established the Pembrey copperworks company in Wales in 1849

1891 Census:

James was living at Bordesley Hall, Worcestershire, Alvechurch parish, and was described as a manufacturer/Magistrate, living with his wife, Emily, and their son James (aged 15).
picture

James Llewellyn Elkington and Rachel Kavanagh




Husband James Llewellyn Elkington

         Born: 1875 - Brighton, Sussex
   Christened: 
         Died: 1925
       Buried: 


       Father: James Balleney Elkington
       Mother: Margaret Meredith


     Marriage: 1895 - June Quarter - Hereford




Wife Rachel Kavanagh

         Born: 1872 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1964
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Margaret Meredith K Elkington

         Born: 1895 - December Quarter - Kensington, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 1925
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

James Llewellyn and family emigrated to Kenya in 1905.

1901 Census:

James (aged 28) was described as living on his own means, a retired gentleman, 4th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment, living with his wife Rachel at Oaklands, Derbyshire, in the Brailsford parish, with their daughter, Margaret (aged 5), a visitor, Jane G. Digby-Walsh and five servants.
picture

E. S. Emerson and Elsie Dry Meredith




Husband E. S. Emerson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elsie Dry Meredith

         Born: 1869
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 May 1918 - Edmonton Private Hospital
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Maria Hammond




picture
Edward John Rouse Meredith and Bridget Mary Fife English




Husband Edward John Rouse Meredith

         Born: 25 Dec 1917 - Cambridge
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Nov 1975 - London, England
       Buried: 


       Father: Harry Rouse Meredith
       Mother: Margaret Edith Underhill


     Marriage: 6 Jul 1957 - St. John the Baptist Church, Wateringbury, Kent




Wife Bridget Mary Fife English

         Born: 5 Nov 1927 - Manor Farm, Wateringbury, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Feb 2003 - Maidstone Hospital, Maidstone, Kent
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

They had two children who are both living.
picture

George H. Meredith and Mary Anne Evans




Husband George H. Meredith




         Born: 13 Feb 1778 - Castlebromwich, Birmingham, Warwick, England
   Christened: 23 Apr 1791 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwick
         Died: 21 Jun 1856 - Swanport, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Sally Turner


     Marriage: 30 Oct 1820 - Wales

 Other Spouse: Sarah Westall Hicks - 16 Sep 1805 - Abingdon, Berkshire




Wife Mary Anne Evans

         Born: 1795
   Christened: 
         Died: 1842 - circa
       Buried: 21 Nov 1842



Children
1 M Henry Meredith

         Born: 1821
   Christened: 
         Died: 1836
       Buried: 



2 M John Meredith




         Born: 1822 - Cambria, Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1909
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Maria Hammond
         Marr: 20 Oct 1851 - Fingal, Tasmania



3 F Maria Meredith

         Born: 1824
   Christened: 31 Dec 1829 - Tasmania
         Died: 1882
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Captain Joseph Henry Kay R.N. F.R.S.
         Marr: 6 Nov 1845 - Great Swanport, Glamorgan District, Tasmania



4 M Edwin Meredith

         Born: 22 Aug 1827 - Swan Port, Tasmania
   Christened: 31 Dec 1829
         Died: 5 Mar 1907 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Jane Caroline Chalmers
         Marr: 16 Dec 1852 - St. George's Church, Hobart, Tasmania



5 F Clara Meredith

         Born: Sep 1828
   Christened: 31 Dec 1829 - Tasmania
         Died: 1904 - Circa
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sir Richard Dry
         Marr: 27 Apr 1853 - All Saint's Church, Swansea, Tasmania



6 F Fanny Meredith

         Born: 1831 - about
   Christened: 16 Apr 1834 - Tasmania
         Died: 1910
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor



7 F Rosina Meredith

         Born: 1833
   Christened: 
         Died: 1858
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Captain Frederick William Despard




General Notes (Husband)

George Meredith was at one time known as "the king of the east coast of Van Diemen's Land"!

George served in the navy.

George entered the Navy in 1794. He was a Lieutenant in the Marines and served in America, the West Indies and Egypt.14 It was reported that at Alexandria, in 1803, he scaled the 180-foot high Pompey's Pillar, to remove the French cap-of-liberty placed there by Napoleon's forces and replace it with the Union Jack. Subsequently, the cap was suspended from the ceiling of the grand hall of the British Museum.

George retired in 1806 on half pay and farmed first near Newbury (a conveyance of 1809 records the location)16 and then at Rhyndaston in Pembrokeshire before emigrating to Australia in 1820, shortly after his 2nd marriage.

MEREDITH, GEORGE (1777-1856), settler, was born on 13 February 1777 near Birmingham, England, the fourth son of John Meredith and his wife Sally, née Turner; his father was a prominent barrister and solicitor and descended from the ancient Amerydeth family of Devon and Wales. In 1796 Meredith was commissioned second lieutenant in the marines and later served in the West Indies, at the blockade of Ferrol in Spain and on the Mediterranean Station. At Alexandria in 1803 he made a daring ascent of Pompey's Pillar, a granite column 180 feet (55 m) high, to fasten the Union Jack in place of a French cap-of-liberty placed there by Napoleon's forces. In 1805 when recruiting in Berkshire he met and married Sarah, the daughter of H. W. Hicks. Next year he retired on half-pay and commenced farming at Newbury; later the family move to Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, and farmed there until 1819 when the post-war rural depression stimulated his interest in emigration. He then had two boys and three girls, the eldest being...

Meredith resolved to settle in Van Diemen's Land and applied to the Colonial Office for letters of introduction. In company with several partners he chartered a ship, but early in 1820 his wife died suddenly, thus jeopardizing the whole venture. By good fortune their former governess and companion, Mary Evans, consented to take care of the young family on the voyage. In July official permission was granted and in October the ship was loaded with personal possessions, extensive farm equipment and a small flock of merino sheep. An agreement had already been made to obtain additional stock from Edward Lord's flocks already on the island. The original partners, Meredith, Joseph Archer and Thomas Gregson, were joined by a number of passengers, including the Amos family, John Kerr, Francis Desailly and John Meredith, a cousin of the family. Before embarkation George Meredith and Mary Evans were quietly married and on 8 November the expedition sailed in the Emerald and reached Hobart Town on 13 March 1821.

After settling the family in temporary lodgings Meredith presented his letters of introduction to Lieutenant-Governor William Sorell and began to look for suitable land. He had already experienced the limited market outlets for inland farms in England and Wales, and was determined to secure coastal grants if possible. According to government surveys the most promising land lay at Oyster Bay, about 140 miles (225 km) distant on the eastern coast, and a small party set out in a whale-boat to visit the district. Close examination proved the land to be greatly inferior to the official descriptions, but certain parts capable of development were selected and the party returned to Hobart on 24 April to lodge the formal applications.

Official permission was duly given to the whole scheme, which included the individual grants, and late in September, after the first livestock were dispatched overland, a small schooner was chartered to take the settlers to Oyster Bay. There they found part of the granted land occupied by William Talbot, an emigrant Irishman who had already unsuccessfully sought inclusion in the group and now claimed that the land had been granted to him. Vigorously protesting he withdrew from the district but the dispute was finally decided in Meredith's favour in 1826.

Meanwhile the grants were developed and improved, both for seasonal crops and grazing stock; a tannery and flour-mill were established at the Meredith River, and bay whaling stations set up on near-by islands to try out whale oil for export. In a shipyard at Waterloo Point were built several trading vessels and also small craft for the use of sealing gangs on their visits to the Bass Strait islands. These enterprises required both skilled labour and special equipment and necessitated repeated visits to Hobart, so Meredith was able to maintain a close interest and participation in the public affairs of the free colonists. In 1824, after the declaration of a new Charter of Justice for Van Diemen's Land, Meredith and many other colonists met publicly to express their appreciation and to seek more benefits from the British government. In March 1827, after news that property owners in New South Wales were petitioning for an elective legislature, Meredith and other landowners arranged a public meeting to encourage similar efforts in Van Diemen's Land. A petition and addresses were prepared for submission to London by Lieutenant-Governor (Sir) George Arthur. Through misunderstanding the documents were delayed; copies were later sent privately to England but the whole matter lapsed because the Colonial Office disapproved the colonists' attitude toward Arthur. Later that year Meredith and others again came into conflict with the lieutenant-governor over legislation to license the press, with which Meredith had strong connexions. Bitter official opposition toward Meredith continued throughout Arthur's term and constituted a severe restriction to his personal life and public spirit.

In the early 1820s many isolated settlements were under repeated attack from escaped convicts. In October 1825 the homestead at Oyster Bay was raided in Meredith's absence by the bushranger Matthew Brady. None of the family was injured but the house was ransacked and a servant taken hostage was later killed; fortunately the plate and other valuables were found buried near Hobart and returned. The family had first lived at Redbanks, a turf hut strengthened with timber, on the south bank of the Meredith River. About 1827 they moved into Belmont, a more spacious home lying about one mile (1.6 km) further inland. About 1836 they moved into Cambria, a large dwelling designed by Meredith near the original home and surrounded by gardens which had been steadily developed since their arrival. From that time the management of the property devolved more upon the eldest sons, and they took the entire care of the estate when his wife Mary died unexpectedly in 1842. By his second marriage he had three sons and four daughters, of whom the second son John remained in charge at Oyster Bay until George Meredith died in 1856.

Several of Meredith's children became prominent in later years; his second son, Charles, was appointed colonial treasurer of Van Diemen's Land in 1857 and continued in high public offices for twenty years; the fourth son, John, was appointed a magistrate at Swansea in 1855 and contributed greatly to the welfare of the district; the fifth son, Edwin, migrated to New Zealand as a pioneer colonist in 1851, and the fifth, daughter Clara, married Richard Dry.

George Meredith possessed qualities of endurance and strength which, coupled with his early experience at sea in command of men and subsequent farming life in England, resulted in a character eminently suitable for pioneer colonial life. The enthusiasm and encouragement of his wife Mary also contributed greatly to his successful career in public and private life.

When George and his family immigrated, the ages of his children increased somewhat quickly - possibly due to the fact that they became eligible for land grants sooner? It appears that George overstated their ages.

Sarah died in about 1820 (in childbirth from memory), after which George married Mary Anne Evans who had been the children's nanny.

his wife Sarah had died in 1820 and in 1818 George got their 18 years old "handsome and voluptuous" servant Mary Evans (later to become his 2nd wife) pregnant. By changing the ages this would cloud the fact?

Pioneers of the East Coast from 1642

Swansea, Bicheno

by Karl von Steiglitz

Extracts

LIEUT. GEORGE MEREDITH (LATE OF THE ROYAL MARINES) ARRIVES IN HOBART TOWN AND PREPARES TO VISIT THE COAST WITH THE BROTHERS AMOS

Some of our most important settlers arrived in Tasmania aboard the ship "Emerald"' (about 400 tons), under Capt. Elliott, on the 17th March, 1821. George Meredith, snr,, and, it is supposed, Joseph Archer, had chartered her privately, to bring them and their families to this country, making history from the fact that she was the first vessel to be privately, chartered for Van Diemen's Land. The "Emerald" had left privately, four months earlier and called in at Teneriffe and the Cape on the way out.

Other pioneering families on board included Adam Amos, his wife and three sons; John Amos, his wife and one son-, the Gregson family; and J. C. Tolman, who was found to be suffering from scurvy on arrival.

Only a fortnight passed before the quick actin Meredith was able to write home and give an interesting account of his impressions and intentions. The letter is dated 2nd April 1821, from Hobart Town. George Meredith to his brother John Meredith, Old Square, Birmingham.

“Dear John. Our safe arrival at our destined port and the land of promise safely over, we are living in a cottage Mr. Lord provided for us, about three miles distant from Hobart Town, which, although small and unfurnished, is definitely preferable to residing with the Place itself, and, indeed, offers comforts superior to any our passengers have met with; for I must needs confess no station I ever yet visited boasted so little accommodation or convenience for strangers. However, it is as yet in its infancy and many circumstances combine to account for the present state of things.

“I have been well received by His Honour the Lieut.-Governor (Sorell) partly owing to my private letter from Mr. Goulburn and perhaps the more so from my acquaintance with Mr. Lord, who appears to be on the best footing with him. I have dines once with him and had several private interviews; the last this day previous to my setting off for the Eastern Coast, where I think it highly probable from the concurring information I have received, that I and my party shall settle. It was always my view from the first to branch out to some coast situation calculated for the site of a new township, with a back country fit for intended locations and I have some confidence that the result of my projected excusion (sic) and survey will make me amends for the disappointment I suffered in not finding a desirable opening on the Western Coast, as I had expected, at one of the newly discovered harbours of Port Davey and McQuarrie in the vicinity of neither of which is there any desirable open country - and, if there was, the prevailing winds would be unfavourable to water communication, and a chain of mountains which run from a little to the westward or Port Dalrymple nearly to this plain, interpose and effectual ban to inland intercourse.

The country between this and Port Dalrymple still affords many desirable situations for a settlement except as to distance from either port or market, nothing to any extent being VACANT within less than 20 to 30 miles from water carriage which is a great objection, independently of a settlement in that line of country bringing me in contact with residents of an inferior and perhaps not very moral class.

Now, if I do fix on the Eastern Coast which the Lieut. Governor is desirous to have respectably settled, I do not doubt being followed by succeeding emigrants from England and I have already come to a satisfactory understanding with the Lieut.-Governor on the subject. There are many of the natives at present along that coast but they will necessarily give way as we establish and extend ourselves. They are the most wretched of all aborigines I have yet seen or heard of. Cowardly but treacherous, I understand, and several persons have been violently speared by them for want of due precaution. I shall, however, have four free persons with me and, though an excursion of from nine days to a fortnight among them and their wiles may not be altogether a pleasurable one, I look to it as safe and advantageous. When I return I will speak of the country of which at present I know nothing but by report.

“The borders of the Derwent are high land and almost one entire forest. The sheep here are large but rather leggy - and wool still coarse. The pigs very good; cattle but middling and horses small and exceptionally dear; one worth £20 in England being here of the value of £50 at least. The climate is indeed fine and vegetation of all kinds rapid and vigorous. The sweet briar is a common hedge and the most beautiful green-house plants grow wild.

“Money was never scarcer than at present, that is Government Bills, which almost exclusively form the medium of remittance to England. The market for nearly everything I have brought out is overstocked and my only chance to convert my goods is to have them retailed but I will write Henry on this subject. If the two stills I ordered are not sent out the smaller one of 30 gallons must be exchanged for one of not less that 40. Nothing under that will be allowed to work here and distillation commences August 1822. I have written but a disjointed letter and must be more connected and explanatory when my mind is less occupied and when I can give my observations instead of the report of others. Thank God we all enjoy good health and spirits and WE ALL send our united good wishes to YOU ALL and with every kind sentiment towards you all believe me Ever Your Affectionate Brother Geo. H. Meredith.”

THE FIRST SETTLERS AND THE LAND THEY FOUND

Diary of Lieut. George Meredith R.N., written in 1821 when he sailed up the east coast with the brothers Amos in search of land for settlement.

April 5th. Left Newtown, Thursday morning, 5th April, 9 o'clock in a whaleboat. Self and six people. Pulled down to Iron Pot Island, partly calm, partly against sea-breeze, by 2 o'clock. Ran down thence to about 6 miles short of East Bay Neck with a fine sea breeze by ½ past 5. The wind failing and near sunset, beach on the larboard side. N.B. - Slopen Island a good place to form a raft near and erect boilers for whale fishing. Abundance of large crabs off Hog Island as well as Dough Boy Island.

April 6th. Broke camp at half past seven. Arrived at East Bay Neck at half past nine but made for the wrong side. Rowed round and landed at ten at low water. Waited for flood to get the boat up. Meantime carried over things. I examined the land to the westward. When the boat was got over, strong breeze set right ahead and again encamped for the night. N.B.-East Bay divided in two by a point and a reef of rocks near the centre. Land to the W. is left of point. Good rich marly loam, nearly all the breadth but does not reach all the way to the other bay. Another considerable breadth of similar land lies on the ….or E. end of the bay, but does not run so far inland. The middle part, through which the boat carriage road runs, is light sandy earth, but might be brought under the plough and made turnip and barley land, but the whole is thickly timbered and would occasion much labour and expense. It certainly would be desirable to have a settlement at the Neck, conditioning for a team to be always ready to haul over a boat upon wheels fitted on purpose at a fixed rate. And if Oyster Bay on the Eastern Coast is settled, small grants may be properly reserved along the boat road for the settler to erect granaries or depots on. The beach on the East Bay side is bare sand for a great distance, and the creek on the other side mud down to low water mark. A pier might be run out on the inside and a landing place made on the other side by laying some fallen trees with a little jetty at the end.

ARRIVAL AT OYSTER BAY

10th April. Saw the tracks of dogs and men on the sand and waited till about two o'clock and Mr. Amos not arrived. Concluded therefore they might have gone on to Inlet Bay (Little Swan Port?) to meet us there and launched the boat to proceed there.

There is no river at Grindstone Bay and had three miles to go for water-stagnant and tasting of gum leaf.

The land behind Grindstone Bay is partly good light soil with a marly substratum and partly of the character of the flats around Skate Bay (Spring Bay) which, in fact, come down to Grindstone Bay, and the valley flats land appears to run along the coast behind the highland bluffs to a considerable distance with almost a level inland communication the whole way.

Arrived off Inland Bay about three o'clock, but for the chance of Mr. Amos seeing the boat, remained on the Sandy Bay beyond it where I landed at four o'clock and walked back in order to examine the country between the bays. Did not reach the tent for fear of having ranged rather far for the time of day. Still no tidings of Mr. Amos. This land will come under the general description tomorrow. Flat land….all the way.

April 11th. After breakfast, Mr. Amos not having arrived, sent two men by land to the herdsmen's hut for intelligence and set off with one man to examine the land round to the south of the inlet leaving two persons in charge of the tent with directions not to fire except something of moment occurred, as I should consider it an alarm.

At ten o'clock heard a musket fired at the tent, hastened towards it, but hearing a second, concluded there could be nothing serious and Mr. Amos had returned, therefore answered it and continued our walk.

On returning to the tent, found Mr. Amos and the guide who had gone on as far as the Great Salt Water River round the N. point of Grindstone Bay.

Went out after a scanty meal with the hut guide and four dogs to get a kangaroo for supper. Put up two, and each taking a different course, killed both. While half skinning the last, the two men who had been to the hut joined us with the other two stockmen and six does and two kangaroos they had killed. N.B.-Good entertainment for man and beast.

April 12th. Immediately after breakfast departed with the intention of being governed by the wind as to proceeding on to Great Swan Port and taking the intermediate places back or not.

The wind being ahead with a dense fog just as we rounded the point into a kind of bay at the south end of which is a salt water river, with a narrow channel to enter on the N. side of the mouth, close to the shore which is rocky and a surf runs all the way from this side to the other across the sandy beach.

It was nearly low water as we proceeded up, the channels for the boat were narrow and intricate. Through one which reached right across from N. to S. over a pebbly bottom with weedy mud on both sides it was difficult to get the boat ahead against the tide current. With both sails and oars, following the sinuosities of the river, I suppose we proceeded up about three miles when we stuck fast and with difficulty got the boat clear again. This was just above a small green-margined low island with a channel each side. We took the S. side but it afterwards appeared the other side was the most direct. The mud and weeds coming as far into the river on each side, we had to fall down considerably before we could land, which we effected at the upper or western point of the creek, the first principal one on the S. side, about two miles up, at the head of which a mountain stream runs in winter. Indeed, about a mile or one half inland there was a weak spring still running for a short distance, but it had no apparent source or termination. It seemed to rise through and lose itself again in the loose sandy soil. This spring Mr. Amos had crossed on his way to this river and he confirmed my conviction that there was a vale and level communication at the back of the coast all the way from Prossers Bay.

The day being far spent, had only time to cross one of these easy ascents of forest land which constitute the chief of all this coast country, and found it tally precisely with that already noted. The low valleys vary in width, sometimes not more than a hundred yards, sometimes even a mile, but the great extent of arable land offers itself on the banks of this spreading river, and the accumulation of mud and vegetable matter, from the mouth upwards would be a never ceasing supply of manure for it. There was every appearance of summer streams emptying themselves in many places on both sides and at its head. I have no doubt water may be obtained all the year by sinking wells in the lower land or even by damming up the mountain rivers and clearing out pools for it to lodge in a body. Killed one black swan.

April 13th, Came down the river, which now, being high water, with mud banks covered, presented a beautiful and grand appearance, but I would advise it to be first entered with the young flow immediately after low water that the proper channels may be known - otherwise a boat would be continually grounding.

On opening the Bay in clear weather, found the level ground to extend about two miles to the N. with a considerable depth inland all round by the river.

GREAT SWAN PORT IS REACHED

Stood over direct for Great Swan Port with a fine breeze across a wide and deep bay to the west I n which Little Swan Port is stated to lay. Entered the river at one o'clock over the bar or sand spit instead of the proper channel which lies close to shore. Sailed up the river as far as the fourth reach where the channel circles round to southward. Landed about two to dine and examine the neck between the river and bay which is about ½ mile wide and a mere deposit of sand by the ocean, though timber of considerable size grows on it.

At three o'clock proceeded up as far as the depth of water would admit, but not finding a sufficient channel by sunset returned for the night down to the point of land on the N. side above the circle. Unfortunately had no water remaining and could not meet any, although a swan fold was on the spot - a circumstance to us indicative of there being water to hand. Sought again in the morning without success, and were obliged to leave without having taken tea, supper or breakfast.

April 14th. Again proceeded up to the same place we met the obstruction last night but without better success, and after trying several hours were again obliged to relinquish the task and return and seek for water as the first object.

Instead of going down to the mouth where water was stated to be, proceeded up what had the appearance of a creek or inlet round to the E. of the point where we had slept the night before to try both for water and to examine if it led to any inland communication, and after about half a mile were agreeably surprised to find it turn to the N. and continue a fine open deep river channel. Landed and found water round the first point on the E. side where we made a hearty meal of steamed kangaroo, and leaving two men in charge of the tent and things, proceeded up the river to see if it really did continue to any extent.

Proceeded as far as the sand bank at the head of the third reach and seeing a large breadth of water both round to the N.E. over on the other side of the sand bank, and also round to the S.W., returned to the tent for the night in full confidence that the latter would lead us into the fresh water river communicating with the Plains, and that the former would lead up to some other river and desirable land. N.B. - the land all along the east side where we slept is a deep pure sand without any substratum within a foot or eighteen inches in the places we tried - Yet the timber grows well.

April 15th. Proceeded after breakfast up the river, but on rounding the mud and sand banks on the western hand began to lose hoped of the S.W. water leading inland to the Great Swan River as it seemed to be completely landlocked and a mere bay. When we got within about 150 yards of the termination round at the southern end, the boat grounded and I sent two men on shore to end all doubts. In an hour they returned with a full conviction of having found an entrance a little to the east, but on questioning them I found that they had merely seen the passages we had already tried from a new position. Pulled all round the west shore without finding either river, spring, or run of fresh water, nor could we discover an entrance into a sheet of water seen over the sand bank to the N.E.. Landed over on the western and northern shores and found a considerable breadth of flat land of a better quality than any yet seen, with more low ground. Deep water and a bold shore for a boat to land on the further N. side. Returned after sunset to last night's camp.

April 16th. Proceeded after breakfast to make one more effort to pass up the main course into the fresh water river at high tide. At half past eleven o'clock again gave up the attempt and made for the place where we dined on the 13th for the purpose of walking up the south side to examine the channel at low water from the shore and determine if it were possible to effect a passage. On arriving opposite the place where we were obstructed in the boat, sent a man across the water, the tide being nearly ebb and found there was no channel whatever. Therefore, if there should be so great a body of fresh water coming down the river from the Plains as is stated, it must spread itself over the great expanse of tide water and be lost in it.

Crossed over the Isthmus to the ocean to ascertain how far it would be expedient to send a boat round to meet me on my return from the Plains to which I determined to walk the next day, although lame and suffering from a bowel complaint. Found this part of the neck of the Isthmus like the lower, an entire bed of sand. Bathed in the sea and walked along the fine sand till opposite our tent.

April 17th. Set off with Mr. Amos and the two guides for the Plains leaving four men at the tent. Found all the south side one entire bed of flags, rushes and swamp (after passing the tide way) which continued extending to the southward far above the real mouth of the river. Crossed through the top part at the expense of a wetting, it having rained hard the preceding night.

These rushes, etc., extend from the river's mouth for a mile then abrupt stony hills for about two more, when you enter upon the plains. after walking a mile or better, settled for the night with merely a few boughs placed as a screen against the wind, but unluckily it rained nearly the whole night and having come in wet the middle, and my bowel complaint becoming more severe, passed a very unpleasant night, the ground very wet. We had two kangaroo dogs and a man killed us a kangaroo for supper.

April 18th. After taking some kangaroo soup, proceeded along the riverside to the N.W. about two miles when I sent Watson (the guide?) back to the tent to take the boat round the isthmus to meet us at the bottom of the bay as it would save half a day in time besides giving us an opportunity of taking a much greater sweep of country to the westward and southward on our way back.

About two miles further up, the river contracts, and there is a fall of, say about two feet in twenty yards and the water a few inches deep only. It then opens and deepens again and afterwards again contracts and becomes shallow so as to be a mere brook.

At this place we made a fire and some kangaroo soup, when at the moment of sitting down to it, a most violent thunderstorm came on with hail and rain and completely drenching us through, and it rained more or less nearly the remainder of the day.

From this point we made first S. and then S.E. for the head of the Bay where we arrived about half past seven, having travelled through the bush an hour after dark. Those parts of the Plains seen certainly do not answer to the high character given by Watson, but it is fair to state that he considers the best land to be more to the southward and westward than we reached. The low lands are mostly flooded in winter and have a rather peaty surface with a good marly substratum. The Higher levels are of light sandy earth and no substratum within a foot wherever we tried, with one exception, though I incline to think clay might be found at a lower depth.

As we returned we crossed a large tract of higher and poor forest land commencing with a point near where we struck off to return, and which Watson could not have seen, as it formed part of what he described as all plains.

Upon the whole I could not but feel disappointed, although the country about the Plains is very pleasing to the eye and if anything, rather too lightly timbered.

About half past eight the boat arrived, the people as well as ourselves wet through. However a good fire, moonlight night, and the tent, formed a pleasing contrast with last night's accommodation.

April 19th. My bowel complaint still affecting me, for I had thoughtlessly come away without any of those medicines proper to carry on such occasions. I could not venture in the boat, and resolved to devote the day to examine the country around this little bay, and if there were any vale communication with the Plains above G.S.P., which, from many circumstances, I inclined to believe I should find.

About noon, for we had gone to rest late the night before and had little sleep the previous one, set off along the south side of an inlet or creek of salt water situate just at the point of this bay where it rounds off from the sandy beach at the back of the isthmus, but the mouth was now choked up by the beach for want of rains to force its way into the ocean.

For about half a mile it continues westerly and meanders to the south. Salt and brackish, and is navigable for boats when full, and partly so now. To that distance, the land on either side, low and level - timbered land at least of average quality with the chief of that already seen - a light brown earth with a substratum of good gravel for six feet. At this distance the fresh water pools commenced with dry shoals between, and beyond this I should not rely on boats going up.

There we crossed, having ascertained the width of low level land to the southward and which is bounded by stoney (sic) rises and poor forest land with narrow vale patches occasionally. All round to the westward these flats are bounded by stoney hills and poor forest land and which appear to join the many Tiers which bound the Plains to the S. and W..

Took a circle over this miserable land to the N. still hoping to find the vale communication I sought and after two hours walking came upon a large lagoon of 100 acres and upwards. Sent two persons round the south side and kept the north myself without either finding any outlet for the water to run off in winter. It must be a receiver for the winter rains which it appears to retain all through the dry season.

LAND IS CHOSEN

Going on the N.E. crossed a considerable breadth of low forest and vale land, chiefly inclined to the above lagoon but partly apparently to the inlet near our tent. Crossed right over this level to the eastward till we came to the sough end of the isthmus or neck of land between the Bay and G.S.P.. I did this to have a comprend (sic) of the country to the N.W. to ascertain if there were any hills or interruptions to what I now felt confident was a land of communication from the Bay to the Plains. This brought us to the beach about a mile north of the tent by dark, and resolved to go, or send Mr. Amos, in the morning from the inlet to the point where we crossed the flat to make certain as I INTEND TO FIX OUR GRANTS HERE and across to the G.S.P. river if it prove so on examination.

April 20th. While the people were gone for water and to kill kangaroos, Mr. Amos traced the valley from the Inlet to the place mentioned and confirmed my expectation, the distance being about two miles with a lagoon of 30 to 40 acres at half a mile distance from the Inlet. The lagoon had water standing in it but there was a visible outlet where the water ran out in winter.

Wishing, if possible, to make out a complete vale communication between the coast bluffs and points, I sent the boat with five hands to attend my motions and walked by land with two others as far as a fresh water summer river in which were still occasional pools, but the mouth was locked by sand. This is situated on the N. side the second point of land from where we slept, the Tier appearing to come down to a point very near the coast about a mile or better N.W. of this river.

All the way we came we had vale and flat forest land with hills towards the coast and rises over others inland, but towards where we started from and where we slept at the mouth of the river, the low lands are of great breadth.

As the wind was contrary and no desirable place to stop the night at the point, continued trace communications. At the back and S.W. of the mouth of this river is some good forest and flat land bound by the mountains to the N.. The fresh water run still having pools of good water….as in…..but at the distance of about two miles S.W. the main Tiers curved round and came down to the coast at the next point of land, so that any inland road or connection must be to the westward of them. There is a narrow strip of flat land across this point to the next point where the Tiers came down to the coast - but it is of very little depth under the Tiers.

April 21st. Started on our return home doubting more than ever the reality of any other L.S.P. or of the large, fine river and boat harbour mentioned by Watson. For two hours it was nearly calm when, a northerly breeze springing up, reached Skate Bay (Spring Bay) soon after sunset and pitched the tent on the old spot occupied 8th and 9th. Having on our return hugged the coast…..found my fears confirmed that there was neither other L.S.P. or river emptying itself into Oyster Bay. Indeed the whole coast from where the Tiers come down to the point of land south of where we slept last night, to within about four miles of the Salt Water River, or real L.S.P. and where they again recede back to the…..head of L.S.P. and come down again at Prosser's river show at once there can be no sheet of water or breadth of land such as is described by Watson.

SECOND VISIT OF AMOS AND MEREDITH FIVE MONTHS LATER

Sept. 29th. At daylight, we found we were in the bay off Little Swan Port. Pulled for three hours and, a favourable breeze springing up, made Meredith's creek about ten o'clock where we found Mr. Amos had built a small hut on the south side of the creek. (On the site of present Redbanks House). Planted the fruit trees.

Sept. 30th. Looked around for a convenient place to build a store to receive and lodge our goods, implements, etc., etc., and live in till the surveyor measures off the Grants and we can each fix a final residence, and farm buildings, stockyards, etc.. Caught fish.

Oct. 1st. Dug the foundation of the store house on the north side of the creek about half a mile from the mouth. Commenced falling timber, etc..

Oct. 2nd. Wind westerly. Sent off boat to East Bay Neck for another load.

Oct. 3rd. Proceeded with the store house, cutting timber, etc.. Had the cattle down from the Great River to the north side of the creek to fold land for garden and corn.

Oct. 4th. Going on with building and made fold yards for cattle.

Oct. 6th. Sixty head of cattle besides calves arrived with five of the people leaving the sheep and four people on the other side of Little Swan Port. Also arrived the boat from East Bay Neck with all the things, both what were left and what the boat brought the second time.

Oct. 6th. Sent off the boat to East Bay Neck and to leave tea, sugar, meat, etc. with the people along with the sheep.

Oct. 7th. Set off to the Plains to examine the country more particularly, from the Creek along the west side of sandy peninsula and between the sand bank and the lagoon and marsh which extend to the Great River (Swan River?). On the banks of the Great River is some marsh land and dry ground fir for anything - say fifty acres. Then to the west are rocky hills on the side of the river, fit for sheep - but inland all the ground though low and level is poor, sandy, and wet till about a mile or a mile and a half up the river from the west side of the marshes running north and south - that is from the Creek to the Great River when you come upon a tract of land similar to that on each side of the creek, viz., dry red earth. This extends to the inland rivulet running from the mountain to the Great River, say north and south, and may comprise 200 acres, not more. On the other side of this rivulet is some good marshy land, from 100 to 200 acres, running a good way back towards the hills. Beyond this, the land lays in strips of dry poor land and low marsh towards the river, but the poor land predominates, and more inland, it is chiefly poor with little or no interruption. Went over the river and had a most charming prospect from a small hill - up the plain and over the whole country to the south west. Walked up the north side of the river a mile or two, and found it chiefly of the same character as the side we had left. Returned under the mountains or hills and over poor sandy land until we fell in with the great lagoon towards our Creek after nightfall, and reached the hut at ten o'clock, greatly disappointed at the result of our day's inspection, having expected to find all the plain good rich land as described by Rice and Watson on whose report to the Governor I had relied.

Oct. 6th to 12th. Employed felling timber, making enclosures for folding cattle over land intended for corn and potatoes. Building a hut. etc..

Oct. 13th. Mr Amos, James Amos (son of Adam) and Stansfield set off to meet the sheep coming down overland.

Oct. 14th. Walked up the river above the creek, following its turns until the mountains became entire timber and rocks. Crossed about half a mile below where it bands to the north and followed this branch about three miles round, then came over the hills a little below where we crossed it and examined the hills on the south side, which, though frequently rocky and abrupt, are very fine sheep pasture and apparently much better than the other side, which, indeed, where we walked was barrenness itself, though lower down towards the creek, by the side of the river they look much better and tolerably fair sheep pasture. On the south side occasional green valleys and slopes of land fir for cattle or sheep, and the whole will prove a very desirable run for the farm on this side of the creek which appears to show quite as much good land as that on the other side. There is a low marshy flat of land of loamy clay and sand mixed likely to prove good wheat land, lying under the hills and directly between them and the creek, flat red land, but it is thickly wooded though the timber is not large.

STOCK YARDS AND A BRIDGE

Oct. 15th. Yoked the bullock Young with the Jericho white bullock and began to haul timber and logs for the yoking yard, this to prepare them for ploughing, they being very wild. The men together with Mr. A. Amos who had gone to meet them arrived with about 830 sheep from the New Plains, having killed ten, eight lost, eight left on the road down. Many of the sheep lame, but all in good condition.

Oct. 21st. Mr. Amos set off to explore the upper part of the Great River and Plains, etc., and returned the 22nd at night.

Oct. 24th. Recovered two bullocks, Young and Peter, who had been astray a week or more. Yoked Young and Pretty instead of Peter who would not go steady as leader, and put the two young steers, Strawberry and George, behind, and began to plough for spring wheat and barley, etc., clearing the land of timber and roots in the most open spots. Killed a bullock of Jericho herd. No scales to weigh, suppose about four hundredweight.

Oct. 25th. Rained all day more or less. Bullocks again astray. Got in the old ones at night but not the young ones. Planted one bed of potatoes in the lower folded ground in the lazy bed way - about ¾ bushel.

Oct. 27th. Sent the boat to the Neck for the remaining things and Master George and man left in charge.

Oct. 28th. Made an excursion up the Great River with Mr. A. and J. Amos and Dickons. Crossed the two more western branches and at upper part of the middle one, adjoining the N. one, found a breadth of good land similar to that at the Creek but not so stoney or in such rises - say about two to three hundred acres, laying along the river side - and another breadth, Mr. Amos states to lay along the middle branch on the north side of it, about 200 acres of similar quality.

Oct. 30th. Sowed about one acre of spring wheat.

Oct. 31st. Mr. Amos returned having been to the head of the eastern branch of Great Swan Port (along the sand bar of which I formerly passed in boat). He describes a fine wet marsh of very great extent to be at the head of this tide water, about six miles above the sand bar, and which can be easily drained and through which he conceives there is a constant stream of fresh water, and he also believes he saw a continued valley from the head of this marsh to the eastern coast and ocean to the north of Schouten Tier. Boat arrived from E.B. Neck.

Nov. 1st. Set off in boat to explore the country about the eastern branch of Great Swan Port, but the wind setting in strong ahead with very heavy rains, returned.

Nov. 2nd. Started again and made the north end of Great Swan Port as the wind and sea were too high to discover the channel into the eastern branch. Took dinner and set off about 3 p.m. over the hills with my son, Mr. Amos and a man to carry rug and tea kettle, etc.. Came upon the middle of the marsh at about four miles distance (having fallen with two separate mobs of natives who ran from their fires on out approach). The marsh is now a lagoon being covered entirely with water, although in summer, evidently, many parts will be nearly dry. A considerable river empties itself into it at the head and after running as a river about a mile it spread itself wholly over it. Slept at night near the lower end of the river on the west side.

Nov. 3rd. Walked up the west side to find a fording place to cross the river and found a narrow rocky part with a strong current about three feet deep three miles higher up. Crossed and came down along the eastern side where all the land is mountainous and barren down to the very beach where we attempted to cross, first through high tea tree bush and scrub growing in water and scarcely passable, then along the beach about a leg deep, on rushy bottom. Then came to a small dry circular rise with some timber growing on it. Proceeding about 200 yards further and were then stopped by deep channels running from the lagoon to the Bay. It being late, returned to the dry hill for the night without bread, meat or grog - having only a little sugar and a few grains of tea left.

Nov. 4th. Pulled down a pole and also carried a dead tree to make a bridge which being launched across the deep channel we passed on it and then hauled it after us and carried it to a second, after which we walked up into the lagoon round a broad deep stream through which the lagoon chiefly empties itself into the Bay, and where the tide water flows up about half a mile and the fresh water stands all round about a foot deep, but deeper higher up the lagoon. In fact, it could not be drained without making a new channel along one of the banks for the river at its head to run in so as to lead it off the lagoon, and also forming a bank to keep back the tide water from overflowing it. Could this be done, it would make a large breadth of valuable land and has a narrow range of very capital grazing along the west bank about three or four miles up from the Bay.

Reached the boat at 2 p.m., took dinner and returned down Swan Port to the sandy peninsula on its larboard entrance and walked home over the sand about ten o'clock.

END OF DIARY

Cambria

(Dr. E. Brettingham-Moore)

This is the key property of the Swansea district and caused a good deal of bickering when it was founded. This was caused by the fact that when Lieut. Thomas Buxton came through to the East Coast as manager for William Talbot in 1821, he and Talbot selected land which had already been marked out for George Meredith. Bitter quarrels followed between Meredith and Talbot. Appeals were made to Governor Sorell, rude remarks were made and general unpleasantness prevailed for years. The land in question is now known as Belmont. (Buxton lived for a time at Old Belmont, a mile up the Wye River from the present Belmont House.)

Creek Hut, Oyster Bay
4th March, 1822.

Geo. Meredith to William Talbot. “I have chosen and am authorised by His Honour, the Lieut. Governor, to occupy 2000 acres of land, extending north from the creek and river near my hut, and situate between the sandbank on the East and the Hills to the West and including the lands on which you have caused huts to be built and which you have otherwise taken forcible possession. And I hereby give you further notice that you and your servants immediately remove from the said land and I shall hold you accountable to me for all loss, damage or expenses I have sustained or may sustain by you or your servants occupying or trespassing on the same.”

There is no room here to enlarge on a controversy that caused endless talk in the old days and made family feuds that dragged on for years, but many letters on the subject expressing all angles of feeling, may be read in the Historical Records (Vol. 4, series 3). Deputy Surveyor General G. W. Evans and Thomas Scott, another fine surveyor, were called in to settle the dispute and Surveyor General Oxley, under orders from Governor-in-chief Sir Thomas Brisbane, made recommendations, but the affair dragged on interminably. Talbot was only partially appeased in the end when he was given a large grant of land at Fingal, which he named Malahide, after his family estate in Ireland.

George Meredith then added considerably to his property at Swan Port, and in the end, before final adjustment by the Caveat Board, his estate must have covered about 50,000 acres. This included John Amos” land at Riversdale which Meredith claimed as his own.

Talbot in his rage had accused everyone but Buxton of being in league against him, including John Amos, but Governor Sorell knew that Amos had nothing to do with Meredith's grant. “I know Mr. Amos, whom I have appointed Chief District Constable and Keeper of the Pound, as a settler on his own land,” Sorell told Talbot when replying to this accusation. “He is not an overseer or in any way dependent on Mr. Meredith, a fact which Mr. Meredith has officially certified……With respect to your statement that your stock and Mr. Meredith's are the only stock likely to trespass at Swan Port, this would in no way effect Mr. Amos's appointment. But in fact I see marked on the map of Swan Port several other names as being located there, amongst which are Major Honner, Mr. Compton and Mr. Hart of Little Swan Port and may reasonably suppose that the settlement will increase.”

In reply Talbot said he was being cheated out of the land, hinting very plainly that Sorell was biased - which, as a matter of fact, he was not.

The first cottage built on Cambria by George Meredith, and referred to by him in correspondence as Creek Hut, was the usual sort of split log cabin built by most of the early settlers. Daubed with clay and mud, with shutter windows and thatched roof made of sags and rushes, it served very well as a temporary home while a strong house was being built. The greatest worry of the pioneers in the meantime being the ever-present fear of fire, either from flying sparks or deliberate malice. When materials were ready for building the present Cambria homestead, Charles Meredith (George senior's second son by his first wife, who is best known now from the fact that he was the husband of his delightful wife, Louise Anne Meredith, authoress and painter) tells that the builder and architect was close at hand. “Old Bull built the house,” says Meredith, “also Riversdale, Spring Vale, and, in fact, the greater part of the houses at Swan Port. His weight did not exceed nine stone. Originally this faithful, honest man had been transported from the Old Country. Twice he escaped, and claimed to be the only escaped convict to reach Sydney without being recaptured. While escaping through the bush his companions were all murdered by the blacks and he had to hide for three days under a log before it was safe for him to come out. Reaching Sydney he was flogged and sent back to Van Diemen's Land, where he became my father's servant.”

Whatever else old Bull may have done, there is no doubt that he left a worthwhile monument to himself in Cambria House, which is a delightful place, well made and strong, even if it lacks some of the continuity a trained architect would have given it. Single storey in front, with a long wide stone-flagged verandah, onto which French windows open, it goes up to three storeys at the back. The bottom storey at the rear of the house actually consists of the cellars, only one side of which is visible, as both ends and back are let into the side of a little hill on which the house was built. A low wall closing in the back yard, gives the impression that it is a sunken garden when viewed from the side of the house, for there are beds of bright flowers in it. There the warm coloured bricks and three rows of windows glow in the afternoon sunshine over the gardens and grass, giving an intensely English effect.

Down in the orchard and vegetable garden there are the remains of a round old brick rabbit hutch, where the precious little animals were closely guarded as delicacies for the table - such a delightful change from the everlasting pickled port (sic), beef and mutton of those early days. Fortunately the little creatures multiplied so rapidly that Mrs. Meredith was able to give some to her friends and the day even came when they were able to liberate a few as an experiment. (How charming; how very much like home it would be; to see real rabbits frisking about and even perhaps, making a burrow in a sandy bank by a briar hedge. Almost certainly the defenceless little things, deprived of the lettuce and cabbage leaves that was their usual diet, would be eaten by the hyenas - Tasmanian Tigers, as they were beginning to call them, or by those nasty smelly wild cats that were always prowling about. Still, it was worth trying.)

Hawthorn hedges protect the garden and orchard, and looking down from the old hot house where fabulous grapes used to ripen, you may see at the foot of a steep bank towards the river, the grandfather of all the oaks, whose branches reach for 34 paces over the green grass, and all is shady and pleasant. It is a beautiful spot and what Louisa Anne Meredith would have called a “dell”. She would have had every reason for doing so, for there is not a tree to be seen in any direction that did not originate in the Old Country.

George Meredith, the eldest son, quarrelled with his father over their sealing and bay whaling activities and started to work on his own account. George, Snr., built a top-sail schooner on the banks of the Meredith River and called her the “Independent”, and George, Jnr., also built himself a ship which he named the “Defence”. The “Independent” was known for years along the coast, under Capt. Thos. Furlong, until at last she was wrecked on Bruny Island.

Young George met his death at St. Vincent's Gulf near what is now Glenelg (South Australia). One Sunday morning with his whaleboat hauled up on the beach nearby, while he was reading his bible, some natives crept out from the scrub and clubbed him to death. He had sold his share of Cambria to Edward Carr Shaw in 1829.

When they arrived in Van Diemen's Land the Meredith family consisted of George, Snr., his second wife, and six children: George, jnr., who was nineteen years old; Sarah, Louisa, Sabina, Charles, Henry and Edwin. John was native born. Of these, Louisa married Capt. Bell and Edwin went over to New Zealand where he settled near Christchurch. Charles was appointed M.H.A. for Glamorgan in 1856 and held other positions as mentioned elsewhere. He died 2nd March, 1880, and was buried in Hobart. George, Snr., died in June, 1856, leaving an estate of 11,000 acres. His wife had died in November, 1842. The Cambria stud of six Saxon Merino rams and ten ewes, the first in the district, if not in Tasmania, was brought out on the “Emerald” by the Merediths.

BUSHRANGER BRADY AT CAMBRIA

Not long after their escape from Macquarie Harbour in 1824, Matthew Brady and his mate, McCabe, attacked Cambria with the intention of robbing Mr. Meredith.

It is said that Mrs. Meredith had the presence of mind to hide her husband in a cider barrel and, trusting to Brady's reputation for unfailing gallantry to women, with pounding heart went out alone to face the bushrangers. She told them that Mr. Meredith had gone away and would not be back before nightfall.

Brady robbed the place of a quantity of food and most of the family silver. Then he drank a glass of wine to the lady's health and took his leave in one of Meredith's whaleboats, lifting his cap and bowing courteously as he went.

Most of the silver was recovered months afterwards, from under some rocks where it had been hidden on the bank of the Derwent by the bushrangers.

It seems likely that the story of Meredith hiding in the barrel was added to the otherwise true story by his enemies. Whatever his weaknesses may have been, Meredith was no coward, and would have been sure to give a good account of himself.

Edwin Meredith in his journal informs us that his father built old Belmont house and lived there while preparing the site of Cambria, about a mile distant. The trees, hedges and orchard of Cambria were being planted while Edwin and his mother, with a gardener, marked out the flower and vegetable gardens.

His half-brother, George, meanwhile helped with ship building and the dealing and whaling. The first vessel built by Meredith on his own property was a small schooner, the “Cygnet”, which proved to be too small for the sealing work it was intended for and was sold in Hobart. “The Black Swan”, also a schooner, was then built to take her place, but she was wrecked while sealing in Bass Strait. Meredith then built his third schooner, the “Independent”. Edwin's half-brother, Charles, at this time was in charge of the whaling station at Maria Island. When Edwin started off to settle in New Zealand his father gave him £2,000 with which he bought a property he named Riversdale in the North Island. His three half-sisters were: Sarah, who married James Poynter, manager of the Bank of Australasia in Hobart; Louisa, married Capt. John Bell, of Bellevue, New Town; and Sabina married John Boyes, merchant, of Hobart Town and London.

George Meredith's family by his second wife consisted of Harry, who was killed when thrown from his horse; Edwin, married Jane Chalmers, of Hobart, and became a pioneer settler in New Zealand on an estate near Otago, which he named Riversdale; John moved over to Mt. Gambier in South Australia and owned a property named Mingbool; Maria was married from Cambria by Bishop Nixon to Lieut. Kay, R.N., of the astronomical station in Hobart; Clara, married Sir Richard Dry of Quamby. Two other sisters, Fanny (who lived in England with Lady Dry and died in London during May of the present year at the age of 94), and Rosina, did not marry. Charles Meredith and his wife Louisa Anne (referred to elsewhere) had a family of three sons, George, Owen and Charles (who never married). Owen married Eliza Jane Windsor; their children were five daughters and one son, the present Mr. David Owen Meredith (mining and metallurgical engineer) of Hobart, whose daughter, Mrs. Alice Hodgson, has two sons, Michael Meredith and David Neil. Mr Michael M. Hodgson married Miss Rosemary Grueber and has an infant son (Lucian Guy).

LIEUT. GEORGE MEREDITH CLIMBS POMPEY'S PILLAR

Pompey's Pillar, a celebrated column of red granite, stands on an eminence south of the walls of Alexandria, in Egypt. Including a ten foot high pedestal, it reaches 98 ft. 9 in. from the ground and is 29 ft. 8 in. in circumference; being, it is said, the largest block of hewn granite in the world. By Napoleon's orders a French “Cap of Liberty” - made of boiler plate, about 7 ft. long, 4 ft. wide, and 3 ft. high, was placed on top of the pillar and firmly fixed there, as an act of defiance during the French occupation.

In 1801, soon after the surrender of Alexandria to Col. Hutchinson, George Meredith, then a young lieutenant on H.M.S. Hinde, was on service in the port and made up his mind to bring down the Cap by hook or by crook. The Governor gave his permission for the attempt to be made provided no harm came to Pompey's Pillar, at the same time pointing out that Meredith was unlikely to succeed where so many others had failed already.

But Meredith vowed he would neither eat nor drink until the accursed Cap was brought down. By means of a kite (the method Napoleon had used) he at last succeeded in getting a rope over the top of the column and dislodging the Cap, which was then lowered to the ground, and the Union Jack left proudly blowing in its place.

The Governor of Alexandria delightedly offered to exchange the trophy for as much coined silver as it would hold, but Meredith took it home with him to Birmingham. Later on it was presented to the Museum there, through the medium of the Earl of Dartmouth, who commemorated the event by presenting George Meredith with a gold ring studded with stones.

The ring is now owned by Mr. David Meredith's grandson, Mr. Michael Meredith Hodgson, in Hobart.

The Charles Merediths

“The Life of a Pioneer Boy”

No history of the East Coast would be complete without some mention of the delightful Mrs. Charles Meredith (1912-1895) whose books (“My Home in Tasmania”, and others) and drawings, made known the life and beauties of the coast all over the Empire.

They struck hard times, for he was no money maker, and that added incentive to her busy pen, although she had published a book of poems, and another of nature studies, before her marriage. Observant, capable and generous, her simple books will always be among the classics of Tasmania.

Charles Meredith, second son of George Meredith, was born at Poyston, Pembrokeshire, on the 29th May, 1811, and came out here with his father. “I well remember that it was a bitter cold night when my brother George, our three sisters and myself were called in from our school to join the 'Emerald'”, he wrote afterwards. “On the way out we fought off a pirate ship near St. Helena, where napoleon Bonaparte was then confined, and reported the action to H.M. frigate 'Mona', then cruising on guard off St. Helena.”

At Cambria Charles and his brother George led a harsh but adventurous life sometimes experienced by young pioneers. “I used to be sent out on frosty mornings with no breakfast, from the tent in which I lived, to take 300 Merino sheep to their feeding ground. When it happened to be convenient a pannikin of tea and a piece of damper were brought to me by anyone who thought of it or had time - perhaps one of my sisters, but I did not go home at night till there was barely enough light for me to put my sheep into the yard. Then I had my supper and went to my tent. This routine went on wed or dry for many months, when my 300 sheep were eventually joined to the large flock and that occupation was gone. I used to sit under a tree and read, for the poor lonely little shepherd had some glorious companions in his solitude. Shakespeare and his myriad creatures lived beside me and Don Quixote and Sancho performed their feats of arms beneath the gum tree boughs. Many a time whilst in this company I have laughed aloud and then, terrified at my imprudence, have sprung to my feet and gazed in fear around, lest some hideous black shape, spear in hand, should have heard it too and come to murder me.

“When I was only eleven years old, it was my duty to take the dogs out to catch kangaroo for meat, as my father's sheep were all of the valuable Merino breed, and far too precious in those early days to be killed for that purpose. If I got brush kangaroo I carried them home myself; if foresters, which were often very large and heavy, I had to go again and take a man to help me bring them in.

“My father was kind, brave and generous and as children we honoured and yielded him implicit obedience but the hand he ruled with wore an iron glove. Any one or two of the scores of half-occupied men on my father's establishment could have done my allotted duties but it was his pleasure and command that the duty should be mine, no matter what the difficulty, toil or danger, and I would not have dared to utter, or look, any remonstrance.

“Horses were scarce in those days, and even had they been plentiful I don't suppose I should have had the use of one. Starting off at dawn into the bush….hunting on one occasion…I struck up towards the hills and after heading the stony creek the dogs caught two brush kangaroo, which were as much as I could carry, so I turned again seawards, having made a half-circle of five or six miles, intending to return along the beach. As I neared the sea I listened repeatedly, in case any of the blacks should be about, and on quitting the forest for the more open sandbank, I crept along on my hands and knees from the shelter of one boobialla bush to another, until I could look down on the broad sands. I then saw that there were fresh tracks of bare feet. The black tribe had evidently just passed by; men, women and children, going north, the same direction in which I was bound. Had I been a few minutes earlier I should have been in advance of them and been plainly seen on the long stretch of sand and, as a certain consequence, pursued and speared. I could not even now be sure that all the tribe had passed, some might be still behind, and should I venture on the beach, I might be hemmed in between the two parties. I was very tired with my long walk, heavily laden as I was, but there was only one thing to do - to make my way back by the same circuitous route I had come, following up the creek….and striking across the rough hills and forest for home.

“As I plodded wearily along I came upon another set of tracks of the aborigines…..but keeping the dogs silent and close beside me; creeping along noiselessly and steadily, and keenly listening for every sound that might warn me of the enemy's neighbourhood, I got safely home. There I was sharply taken to task for having dawdled so long on the way and straightway ordered off on some other task.”

Perhaps George Meredith, Senior, Treated his boys a little more harshly than most; he was certainly a severe man, but it may be gathered by the notes left by Charles that his hostility had been aroused by the manner adopted by his family to their new step-mother. Mrs. Charles Meredith gives some indication of this in her book, “Tasmanian Friends and Foes”, in which her husband appears under the name of Merton and tells tales of his youth in almost the exact paraphrase of some of the notes he left. Some of these are in the library of the Royal Society in Hobart, and some are in the possession of his descendents.

Charles Meredith started life for himself as a squatter in New South Wales at the age of twenty-three and after two years returned to England where he married his cousin, Louisa Anne Twamley, at Edybaston (sic) Church, Birmingham, in 1838. They lived in New South Wales for a time, where he suffered severely from bad seasons. Then he brought her to Oyster Bay and lived on his father's property, Riversdale, while Spring Vale was being built fore them to live in. For thirty-eight years after that he was in politics, being a member of the House of Assembly for Glamorgan and holding various important positions - Colonial Treasurer and Minister for Lands and Works. Governor Eardley Wilmot then appointed him Police Magistrate at Port Sorell.

Among the measures he introduced was an Act for the protection of black swans, which were then in danger of extermination, although once they had been counted in millions. He died in Launceston, 2nd March, 1880, and five years later a fountain was raised to his memory on the Queen's Domain, in Hobart. His wife died in Melbourne on the 21st October, 1895.

“My grandfather was a solicitor in Birmingham.” Charles Meredith tells us, “and lived at Castle Bromwick (sic) where he died at the age of 48, leaving six children, of which my father was the youngest, born 13th February, 1778. My mother had been Miss Sarah Westall Hicks, whom he married in 1805 while he was recruiting for the Royal Marines. My father sold my mother's property in Berkshire and with the proceeds purchased our estate in Wales, Rhyndaston, about eight miles from Hertford, but, almost immediately after her death, my father sold Rhyndaston (which had been rented to the two brothers, Amos) and with the proceeds of the sale obtained orders for grants of land in Tasmania. These first grants were Cambria and Riversdale.

“My father then married miss Mary Evans, my mother's companion, and taking us with them, left for Hobart Town.”

The Naval Chronicle
Publiushed by J. Gold, 1805
Item Notes: v. 14

Marriages

September 13.............

16............

Lieutenant Meredith, of the Royal Marines, to Miss Hicks of Enbourne.

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, October 12, 1805; Issue 2737

At Abingdon, Lieut. G. Meredith, of the Royal Marines, to Miss Hicks of Enhorne. Berks.

There was a dispute in 1809 over some property - the case cited was Meredith v. King. The Plaintiffs were George Meredith and his wife and the defendants were John King and Thomas Hicks.

Meredith - Hicks
Certified copy of a conveyance D/EX 104111 1809

Contents:

1. Thomas Hicks and Mary his wife late of Newbury now of Enborne, gent. and others to

2. John Meredith of Brumagham co. Warwick, gent, (a trustee of George Meredith, late a Lieutenant in His Majesty's Corps of marines, now of Speen, esq.)

Messuage, barn, outhouses, orchards, stables near the wash in Newbury, and about 100 acres (with abuttals) dispersed in the common fields (known as Northcroft, Eastfield and Westfield), in Newbury

Included in the property is a messuage outhouses and barns and just over 10 acres of land (specified) in Enborne near the Newbury property above. The deed contains topographical detail in the abuttals of the Enborne property, such as 'King's Ditch' and 'Nightingale Lane' etc.. The Enborne property includes several coppices

Consideration: £4765





General Notes (Wife)

George married Mary Anne Evans who had been the children's nanny.

Mary had "lustrous dark brown eyes".


General Notes for Child John Meredith

John had 5 sons and 5 daughters.


General Notes for Child Edwin Meredith

Edwin migrated from Tasmania and became a pioneer settler in New Zealand on an estate near Otago, which he named Riversdale.

His obituary in the Wanganui Herald of 5 March 1907, Page 7 reads:

“DEATH OF AN OLD PIONEER. MASTERTON, March 5. An old and respected pioneer resident of Masterton passed away at an early hour this morning at his residence, Upper Plain, in the person of Edwin Meredith, aetat (aged) eighty. He was born in Tasmania, and was a son of an old Peninsula officer. He came to New Zealand 57 years ago, taking up a Crown run of 80,000 acres in Otago. He held land in 1853 in Hawke's Bay, and subsequently settled in Whareama, remaining there for 25 years. He removed in 1879 to Llandaff, on the Upper Plain, Masterton, where he has resided since. At different times he was a member of the Masterton Road Board, Wairarapa North County Council, and the Masterton A. and P. Association. He leaves many descendants.”

A Genealogical and Heraldic
History
of the
Colonial Gentry

By
Sir Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D.
1891

Meredith of Landaff.

MEREDITH, EDWIN, Esq. of Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand, member of the County Council, North Wairarapa, and chairman of the Whareama Road Board, b. 22nd August, 1827, m. 14th December, 1852, Jane Caroline, eldest daughter of Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers, and has issue,

I. Edwin, of Te Nui, New Zealand, b. 30th October, 1853, m. Ada Steuart Johnstone, and has issue,

1. Guy Owen.
2. William Laird.
3. George Steuart.
4. Ada :Matilda.

II. Richard Reibey, b. 4th February, 1857, m. Theodora Alice Lane, and has issue,

1. Owen Glendower.
2. Gwylfa Glendower.

III. Clarence Kay, b. 28th November, 1858; assumed the surname of Kaye in addition to and after that of Meredith; m., 26th February, 1884, his cousin, Rosina Maria, only child of Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S. (who d. at South Yarra, Victoria), by Maria, his wife, eldest daughter of George Meredith, Esq. of Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania, by Mary Evans, his second wife, and has issue,

1. Gladys Maria.

IV. John Montague, b. 5th December, 1862, unm.

I. Mary.
II. Rosina.
III. Clara, m., 21st December, 1887, Robert Heaton Rhodes, Esq.
IV. Elsie Emmeline.
V. Edith Dry.
VI. Janie Chalmers.
VII Gwendoline Meredyth.
VIII. Melita Meredyth.
IX. Kathleen Meredyth.

Lineage

The family of Meredith can trace a descent, through a long line of the princes of South Wales, from Owen Glendower.

John Meredith, Esq. of Temple-street, Birmingham, co. Warwick, England, and afterwards of Castle Bromwich Hall, near Birmingham, solicitor and barrister, m., about 1768, Miss Sally Turner, of Birmingham, and by her (who d. 1819) had issue,

I. John, an eminent solicitor of Birmingham, m. Lucy, sister of Sir Thomas Lawrence, the artist, and had one daughter, Lucy Louisa Ann, m., about 1824, John Aslan, of Birmingham, and has numerous issue.

II. Charles, of Leicester, England, solicitor, coroner, &c., had issue, one daughter, Fanny, deceased.

III. Henry, of Birmingham, gunmaker, had two sons, only one of whom, Henry, attained manhood.

IV. George, of whom presently.

I. Louisa Ann, b. about 1772, m. Thomas Twamley, of Hampstead, near Birmingham, and had one daughter, Louisa Anne, b. in Birmingham, 20th July, 1812 ; m. at Edgbaston, near Birmingham, 18th April, 1839, her cousin, the Hon. Charles Meredith.

II. Anne, d, unm.

One of Mr. Meredith's sisters married a Mr. Linwood, whose daughter Mary was the Miss Linwood whose wonderfully clever and artistic pictures in worsted crewel-work were the admiration of the world in the first quarter of the present century. He d. in 1788. His fourth and youngest son,

George Meredith, Esq. of Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania, b. in 1778, entered the Navy in 1794, and, as lieutenant in the Marines, served in America, the West Indies, and Egypt ; was invalided on full pay in 1805. He formerly resided at Castle Bromwich, and subsequently, on retiring from the Marines, at Newbury, and at Rhyndaston, Pembrokeshire, Wales, from which place he emigrated to Tasmania, arriving at Hobart, 18th March, 1821, in the "Emerald." During his residence in Tasmania, Mr. Meredith experienced many difficulties and dangers, and on one occasion his house was broken into by the noted bushranger Brady. Mr. Meredith m., first, 1805, Sarah Westall Hicks, an heiress, and by her (who d. in 1820 at Rhyndaston) had issue,

I. George, believed to have been murdered by aborigines in Kangaroo Land, about 1832.

II. Charles (Hon.),of Malunnah, Orford; and Hobart, Tasmania. He was for 24 years a member of the House of Assembly, an executive councillor for 23 years, a minister of the Crown in four administrations, a magistrate of the territory 36 years, &c., &c., b. 29th May, 1811, at Poyston, co. Pembroke, Wales; in 1821 emigrated, with his father and family, to Tasmania, which he left for New South Wales in 1833, and took up runs on the Murrumbidgee, Manaroo, and Limestone Plains; visited England in 1838, returned to Sydney the following year, and resided for some little time at the old house, Homebush; subsequently returned to Tasmania, landing in Hobart, October, 1840, and purchased from his father the estate of Spring Vale, was some time resident magistrate for the district of Port Sorell, which office he vacated in 1848, and during the succeeding ten years rented his father's estates and resided in the district of Glamorgan; subsequently, in 1858, removing to his own estates at Prossor's Plains. He was returned a member of the then nominee-elective Council, and took his seat, 17th July, 1855, and 2nd December, 1856, took his seat as the first member for Glamorgan, in the first representative Parliament of Tasmania; shortly afterwards was called upon to accept office as colonial treasurer in the cabinet formed by Mr. Gregson: was next returned for the City of Hobart; again took office as colonial treasurer, which he held until November, 1866; in the new Parliament represented Kingborough until 1871, in which year he was returned for West Devon, for which constituency he sat until his final retirement from Parliament in1879. In 1872-3 he held office as minister of lands and works; in the Reibey ministry of 1876-7 again occupied his former position as colonial treasurer, and immediately after his resignation was appointed police magistrate of Launceston, whither, in June, 1879, he removed from Malunnah, Orford. He m., at Old Edgbaston Church, near Birmingham, 18th April, 1839, his cousin, Louisa Anne, daughter of Thomas Twamley, Esq. of Hampstead, near Birmingham. She was b. in Birmingham, 20th July, 1812, and is the authoress of Notes and Sketches of New South Wales, My Home in Tasmania, Over the Straits, &c., &c., nearly all of which works were illustrated by herself. She has been awarded prize medals in London, Sydney, Melbourne, and Calcutta, for paintings illustrating Australian natural history, and is the only woman holding one of the fifty "Special" silver medals of the Melbourne Exhibition of 1866-7 for ''art and literature combined." This lady was elected honorary member of the Tasmanian Royal Society, "in recognition of services rendered to art and science in Tasmania," and on like grounds enjoys a pension from the Tasmanian Government. Mr. Meredith d. at Launceston, Tasmania, 2nd March, 1880, having had issue,

1. George Campbell, b. 1st July, 1840.

2. Charles, b. 5th .April, 1844, d. 15th September, 1888.

3. Owen, mining engineer, b. 6th April, 1847 ; m. 1st November, 1871, Eliza Jane Winasor, (sic) and has issue, 1, David Owen; 1, Louisa Anne, b. 10th September, 1873; 2, Winifred Eliza; 3. Sabina Ida; 4. Violet; 5. Corinna Ruby.

I. Sarah, m., at Hobart, James B. Poynter, Esq., banker and merchant, and had issue, three sons and one daughter, who reside in the colonics.

II. Louisa, m., at Hobart. Captain John Bell, merchant and shipowner, and has issue, one son, George Meredith, living in Southland, New Zealand, and three daughters, residing in England.

III. Sabina, m., at Hobart, .John Boyes, Esq., merchant, and had issue, five sons (one in the army, one a captain R.N., and another, now deceased, who received the Victoria Cross for gallant conduct at Nagasaki) and four daughters.

Mr. George Meredith m., secondly, 30th October, 1820, Mary Evans, and by her (who d. 21st November, 1842) had issue,

III. Henry, d. unm.

IV. John, m. Maria Hammond, and has five sons and five daughters.

V. Edwin, of whom we treat.

IV. Maria, m., 6th November, 1845, Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S., who entered the Navy, 18th December, 1827; obtained his commission, 6th April, 1839: from the 15th of the following May until his return to England in 1843 was engaged in an exploring expedition to the Antarctic regions in the "Terror," and subsequently became director of H.M. Magnetic Observatory at Hobart Town ; and by him (who d. at South Yarra, Victoria) has issue, a daughter, Rosina Maria, who m., 26th February, 1884, her cousin, Clarence Kaye Meredith- Kaye, Esq., before mentioned, third son of Edwin Meredith, Esq. of Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand, and has issue.

V. Clara, m. Sir Richard Dry, who was a member of the old Legislative Council of Tasmania, afterwards represented Launceston in the House of Assembly, chosen first speaker, and was colonial secretary and premier of Tasmania, from 24th November, 1866, to 1st August, 1869 ; but by him (who d. October, 1869) has no issue.

VI. Fanny, m. Captain F. S. Gaynor, of the 99th Regiment, and has one son and one daughter.

VII. Rosina, m. Captain F. Despard, of the 99th Regiment, and has one daughter.

He died in 1856.

Arms used-Arg., a lion, ramp., sa., gorged with a collar, and chain affixed thereto reflexed over the back or ; with seven quarterings. Crest-A demi lion, ramp., sa., collared and chained as in the arms. Motto-Spes est in Deo.

Residence- Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand.

New Zealand Free Lance, Volume 1, Issue 13, 29 September 1900, Page 18

The patriarch of Upper Plain, the venerable Edwin Meredith, has affected smoked goggles. The effect is stunning, reminds one somehow of an ancient billy goat, taking a sombre look at creation. What sacrilege to poke at the topsawyer of the district. Never mind, blue blood and spectacles can put up with more than that. Nous verrons.

The Courier (Hobart) Saturday 18 December 1852, Page 2

Married
On Tuesday, the 14th inst., at St. George's Church, Hobart Town, by the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Tasmania, Edwin Meredith, Esq., youngest son of G. Meredith, Esq., of Swanport, to Jane Caroline, eldest daughter of Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers, of Baghdad.
picture

George J. Evered and Constance Lucy Meredith




Husband George J. Evered

         Born: 1862 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1892 - September Quarter - Farnham, Hampshire




Wife Constance Lucy Meredith

         Born: 1862 - June Q. - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Bult Meredith
       Mother: Penelope





Children
1 M Eric G. Evered

         Born: 1894 - circa - Staines, Middlesex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1901 Census

Berkshire
Egham
Rose Cottage

George J. Evered - head - 39 - Director of Metal Works - Employer - London, Oxford Street.
Constance L. - wife - 39
Eric G. - son - 7

picture

Alfred John Rouse Meredith and Sarah Florence Evered




Husband Alfred John Rouse Meredith

         Born: 1855 - Circa - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Dec 1936 - Warlingham, Surrey
       Buried: 


       Father: John Bult Meredith
       Mother: Eliza Rouse


     Marriage: 1884 - Wandsworth, London




Wife Sarah Florence Evered

         Born: 1864 - circa - Kentish Town, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Harry Rouse Meredith

         Born: 27 Apr 1885 - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 Sep 1958 - Tunbridge Wells, Kent
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Margaret Edith Underhill
         Marr: 17 Mar 1917 - Romford Essex



2 M Alan Alfred Meredith

         Born: 1888 - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: May
         Marr: 1917 - circa



3 F Kathleen Meredith

         Born: 1894 - circa - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: F.-Lt. Edmund G. Pole R.A.F.V.R.




General Notes (Husband)

1901 Census Collection:

Alfred, a timber merchant, (aged 46) was living in Warlingham, Surrey with his wife Sarah F. (aged 37), their son Harry R. (aged 15), their son Alan A. (aged 12) and their daughter Kathleen (aged 7)

The Times - Monday 10 February 1936, Page 15

Mr. Alfred John Rouse Meredith, of Warlingham, Surrey, a director of Meredith and Wise and Aston Grant & Co., timber importers, died on December 5, leaving estate of the gross value of £43,815, with net personalty £41,796 (duty paid £5,651) He gives: £250 to the Caterham and District Hospital.


General Notes for Child Harry Rouse Meredith

The Times, Tuesday, March 20, 1917; Page 1

Meredith: Underhill.--On the 17th March, 1917, at Romford, Essex. Pte. Harry Rouse Meredith, 2nd Artists Rifles O.T.C., elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred John Rouse Meredith, of Warlingham, Surrey, to Margaret Edith, elder daughter of Lieut. J. Underhill, A.S.C., and Mrs. Underhill, of Warlingham, Surrey.


General Notes for Child Alan Alfred Meredith

The Times, Wednesday, Dec 16, 1959; pg. 12; Issue 54645; col D

Mr. A. A. Merdith

A memorial service for Mr. Alan Alfred Meredith was held yesterday at St. Michael's Cornhill. The Rev. Norman Motley officiated. Mr. A.C. Grover (chairman of Lloyd's) was among those present.

The Times, Monday, Jun 06, 1960; pg. 8; Issue 54790; col F

Underwriters £116,000 Estate

Mr. Alan Alfred Meredith, of Hassocks, Sussex, underwriting member of lloyd's, lefy £116,220 gross, £108,628 net (duty paid, £59,635).

picture

Twamley Owen Meredith and Jessica Farquhar




Husband Twamley Owen Meredith

         Born: 6 Sep 1871 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Campbell Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth Jillett


     Marriage: 10 Jun 1896 - Hobart, Tasmania




Wife Jessica Farquhar

         Born: 6 Mar 1873 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Owen Tasman Meredith

         Born: 11 Nov 1896 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Beryl Jessie Meredith

         Born: 1898
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Lizzie Ella Meredith

         Born: 1900
   Christened: 
         Died: 1985
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Claude Lodwyck McMillen




General Notes (Husband)

Twin of John Charles - some references have Twamley Owen as a son of Owen and Eliza Jane.
picture

Ronald Fraiser and Molly Meredith




Husband Ronald Fraiser

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Molly Meredith

         Born: 1919 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1989 - circa
       Buried: 


       Father: Alan Alfred Meredith
       Mother: May




picture
Henry Gale and Mary Hicks




Husband Henry Gale

         Born: 1807 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 28 Aug 1832 - Handborough, Oxfordshire




Wife Mary Hicks

         Born: 1805 - circa
   Christened: 9 Jun 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Hicks
       Mother: Mary Payne





Children
1 M Jno. Alfred Estcourt Gale

         Born: 1834 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Eliza Jane Gale

         Born: 1840 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Mary Frederica Gale

         Born: 1845 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Thomas Estcourt Theobald Gale

         Born: 1949 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Henry Gale was the Rector of Treborough, author of “Apostolic Temperance”, and a Temperance activist.

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, September 1, 1832; Issue 4140

On Tuesday last was married, at Handborough, by his brother, the Rev. W.W. Gale, Henry Gale, Esq., of Trinity hall, Cambridge, to Mary, youngest daughter of the late Thomas Hicks, Esq., of Cope Hall, Enborne, Berks.

1851 Census:

Wiltshire
Milborne
Henry Gale - Head - 44
Mary Gale - wife - 45
Jno. Alfred Estcourt Gale - son - 17
Eliza Jane - daughter - 11
Mary Frederica - daughter - 6
Thomas Estcourt Theobald - 2

1861 Census:

Somerset
Treborough
The Rectory
Henry Gale - Head - 54 - Rector of Treborough
Mary - wife - 55
Eliza Jane - daughter - 21
Mary Frederica - daughter - 15






picture

Sir William Jaffray 2nd Bart. and Alice Mary Galloway




Husband Sir William Jaffray 2nd Bart.

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Alice Mary Galloway

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mabel Violet Mary Jaffray

         Born: 27 Nov 1890
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 Dec 1961
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sir - Captain Charles Richard Henry Wiggin 3rd Bart
         Marr: 24 Jul 1916




General Notes for Child Mabel Violet Mary Jaffray

Mabel Violet Mary was the daughter of Sir William Jaffray, 2nd Bart. and Alice Mary Galloway.
picture

Bryan Gaynor




Husband Bryan Gaynor

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor

         Born: 1827
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Fanny Meredith
       Spouse: Amelia Jane Huston
         Marr: 15 May 1854 - Norfolk Island




General Notes for Child Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor

Francis and Fanny had one son and one daughter.

Francis Seymour Gaynor was a Major in the 99th Regiment, and the son of Bryan Gaynor of Killiney House, County Dublin.
picture

Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor and Fanny Meredith




Husband Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor

         Born: 1827
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Bryan Gaynor
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 

 Other Spouse: Amelia Jane Huston - 15 May 1854 - Norfolk Island




Wife Fanny Meredith

         Born: 1831 - about
   Christened: 16 Apr 1834 - Tasmania
         Died: 1910
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Mary Anne Evans





Children
1 M Francis Seymour Gaynor

         Born: 1864
   Christened: 
         Died: 1899
       Buried: 



2 F Female Gaynor

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Francis and Fanny had one son and one daughter.

Francis Seymour Gaynor was a Major in the 99th Regiment, and the son of Bryan Gaynor of Killiney House, County Dublin.
picture

Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor and Amelia Jane Huston




Husband Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor

         Born: 1827
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Bryan Gaynor
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 15 May 1854 - Norfolk Island

 Other Spouse: Fanny Meredith




Wife Amelia Jane Huston

         Born: 15 May 1836 - Hamilton, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Apr 1860 - Frescale, New Norfolk, Australia
       Buried: 


       Father: George Francis Huston
       Mother: Sarah Hawthorn





Children
1 F Amy Maria Gaynor

         Born: 12 Aug 1856
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Mary Lloyd Gaynor

         Born: 10 Feb 1859
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Hamilton Wise
         Marr: 13 Jun 1889 - Tasmania




General Notes (Husband)

Francis and Fanny had one son and one daughter.

Francis Seymour Gaynor was a Major in the 99th Regiment, and the son of Bryan Gaynor of Killiney House, County Dublin.


General Notes (Wife)

Amelia Jane was the eldest child of George Francis Huston, surgeon-superintendent of the Asylum at New Norfolk (1855-80) and Sarah, née Hawthorn.

picture

John Hamilton Wise and Mary Lloyd Gaynor




Husband John Hamilton Wise

         Born: 1864 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 13 Jun 1889 - Tasmania




Wife Mary Lloyd Gaynor

         Born: 10 Feb 1859
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor
       Mother: Amelia Jane Huston




picture
William Allan Smith-Masters and Kathleen Amy Gore




Husband William Allan Smith-Masters

         Born: 1851 - circa - Humber, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 Aug 1937 - Camer, Meopham, Kent
       Buried: 31 Aug 1937 - Meopham Church
     Marriage: 22 Feb 1919 - Hertingfordbury, Hertfordshire

 Other Spouse: Mary Coxe - 19 Oct 1876 - London, St. Mary Magdalene's, Paddington




Wife Kathleen Amy Gore

         Born: 1877 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 May 1965 - Meopham, Kent
       Buried: 


       Father: Spencer William Gore
       Mother: 




General Notes (Husband)

In 1881 William Allan Smith-Masters was a farmer of 670 acres employing 20 men and 6 boys at Camer House, Meopham in Kent.13 After the death of his first wife Mary, he married secondly Kathleen Amy Gore on 22 Feb 1919.

The Times, Saturday, Oct 21, 1876; pg. 1; Issue 28766; col A

On the 19th Oct., at St. Mary Magdalene's, Paddington, by the Rev. Seymour R. Coxe, Vicar of Brompton, Yorks., brother-in-law of the bride, assisted by the Rev. R.W. Randall, Vicar of All Saints, Clifton, uncle of the bridegroom, and the Rev. Dr. West, Vicar of the parish, William Allan Smith-Masters, of Camer, Kent, Esq., to Mary, younger daughter of the late Phillip S. Coxe, Esq., of 34, Ladbroke-grove, Kensington-park-gardens.

The Times, Monday, Aug 30, 1937; pg. 1; Issue 47776; col A

Smith-Masters. - On Aug. 27, 1937, William Allen Smith-Masters, of Camer, Meopham, Kent, at the age of 87. Funeral at Meopham Church tomorrow (Tuesday), 2.30 pm.

1881 Census:

Kent
Meopham
Camer House
William A. Smith-Masters - head - 37
Mary - wife - 29
Edith Monica - daughter - 1

1901 Census:

Kent
Meopham
Camer House
William A. Smith-Masters - head - 57 - J.P. - living on own means
Mary - wife - 49
Edith M. - daughter - 21


General Notes (Wife)

The Times, Saturday, May 01, 1965; pg. 12; Issue 56310; col G

Smith-Masters, Mrs. Kathleen Amy, of Meopham, Kent, widow of W.A. Smith-Masters (gross, £109,544)(duty is not shown) £104,791.
picture

Spencer William Gore




Husband Spencer William Gore

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Kathleen Amy Gore

         Born: 1877 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 May 1965 - Meopham, Kent
       Buried: 
       Spouse: William Allan Smith-Masters
         Marr: 22 Feb 1919 - Hertingfordbury, Hertfordshire




General Notes for Child Kathleen Amy Gore

The Times, Saturday, May 01, 1965; pg. 12; Issue 56310; col G

Smith-Masters, Mrs. Kathleen Amy, of Meopham, Kent, widow of W.A. Smith-Masters (gross, £109,544)(duty is not shown) £104,791.
picture

Benjamin Whitcott and Catherine Gough




Husband Benjamin Whitcott

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 21 Feb 1774 - Clungunford, Shropshire




Wife Catherine Gough

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Catherine Whitcott

         Born: 21 Nov 1774
   Christened: 12 Feb 1775 - St. Chad, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
         Died: 7 November 1827 aged 53
       Buried: 
       Spouse: David Meredith
         Marr: 6 Feb 1800




picture
Mr Gough and Hannah Stephens




Husband Mr Gough

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Hannah Stephens

         Born: 1807 - circa
   Christened: 11 Oct 1807 - Knill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Stephens
       Mother: Susannah Beaumont




General Notes (Husband)

Mr Gough, a solicitor of Hereford. (information contained in private correspondence of the Jukes family)
picture

Franklin Stanhope Grant and Jessie Rosina Meredith




Husband Franklin Stanhope Grant




         Born: 31 Mar 1860 - Fingal, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Dec 1926 - Atherton, Queensland
       Buried: 


       Father: James Grant
       Mother: Charlotte Mary Thomas


     Marriage: 4 Jun 1897 - Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania




Wife Jessie Rosina Meredith




         Born: 23 Nov 1863 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Nov 1944 - Swansea, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Maria Hammond





Children
1 M Franklin Leslie Meredith Grant

         Born: 23 Oct 1898 - Herberton, Queensland
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 Aug 1964 - Maryborough, Queensland
       Buried: 



2 M James Lionel LeNeve Grant

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Jessie Grant

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
James Grant and Charlotte Mary Thomas




Husband James Grant

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Charlotte Mary Thomas

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Franklin Stanhope Grant




         Born: 31 Mar 1860 - Fingal, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Dec 1926 - Atherton, Queensland
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Jessie Rosina Meredith
         Marr: 4 Jun 1897 - Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania




picture
Alleyne Reynolds and Alice Elizabeth Greaves




Husband Alleyne Reynolds

         Born: 1866 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: Dec 1918 - Monmouthshire
       Buried: 


       Father: Edward Reynolds
       Mother: Maria Louisa Parker


     Marriage: 1892 September Quarter - Ecclesall Bierlow, Yorkshire




Wife Alice Elizabeth Greaves

         Born: 1861 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Edward Alleyne Reynolds

         Born: 1893 - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Gladys Holden
         Marr: 27 Jun 1922 - Westminster, All Souls Church, Langham Place



2 F Mabel Reynolds

         Born: 1899 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M James F. Reynolds

         Born: 1900 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Wednesday, May 07, 1913; pg. 27; Issue 40205; col A

Faults of Present-Day Furnaces.

A paper by Mr. Alleyne Reynolds was entitled "Some Fundamental Faults of Present-Day Furnaces and their Remedies."

After having discussed the principles of combustion the author gave details regarding some devices arranged by him for securing correct and complete combustion. Where coal or other solid fuel was employed the device embodied a chamber, connected to a source of high-pressure air, having two closed branches, one being provided with connexions to the air inlet of the gas producer, and the other with the air inlet or inlets of the firnace. The connexions betwen the chamber and the branches were provided with valves and seatings, the diameters of the latter being such that their areas were proportional to ratios of the primary and secondary air supplies required................

1901 Census

Yorkshire
Upper Hallam
Riverdale

Alleyne Reynolds - Head - 34 - Metallurgical Engineer - Employer - Sheffield
Alice E - wife - 40 - Sheffield
Edward A. - son - 7
Mabel - daughter - 2
James F. - son - 9 months


General Notes for Child Edward Alleyne Reynolds

The Times, Friday, Jun 30, 1922; pg. 1; Issue 43071; col A

Reynolds: - Holden.-On the 27th June, at All Souls, Langham-place, W., by the Rev. G. Robinson Lees, cousin of the bride, assisted by the Rev. Arthur Buxton, Vicar, Edward Alleyne Reynolds, eldest son of the late Mr. Alleyne Reynolds of Hove, Sussex and Mrs. A. Reynolds, of Broomfield, Sheffield, to Gladys, third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Holden, of Hove.

picture

Charles Meredith and Mary Greaves




Husband Charles Meredith

         Born: 1771 - Circa
   Christened: 28 Aug 1771 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 14 Jun 1843
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Sally Turner


     Marriage: 




Wife Mary Greaves

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Rev. Thos. Greaves
       Mother: Frances Liptrott





Children
1 F Frances Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1868
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Rev. Henry Griffin Williams
         Marr: 3 Apr 1855




General Notes (Husband)

Charles was a partner in the firm of Meredith & Brown, solicitors of Leicester. John Liptrott Greaves was a brother-in-law. John Liptrott Greaves may be the son of Rev. Thomas Greaves (1734-1806) and Frances Liptrott (1737-1811) d/o Rev. John Liptrott. The reverends were rectors of Broughton Astley

ASTON v. MEREDITH.

1871 Feb. 25.

Practice-Partition-Sale-31 & 32 Vict. c. 40, s. 4.

A sale may be decreed under the Partition Act, 1868, although the bill contains no prayer for partition.

CHARLES MEREDITH, by his will, dated the 7th of June, 1841, devised real estate to the use of John Liptrott Greaves and Joseph Brown, upon trust, after decease and failure of children of his daughter Frances .Meredith, for all and every his nephews and nieces, children of his sister Louisa Ann Twamley, and his brothers John, Henry, and George, who should be living at the decease of his daughter, and who should attain twenty-one or marry, as tenants in common; and also the issue then living, who should attain twenty-one or marry, of any of his said nephews or nieces who might have died in the lifetime of his daughter, such issue to take per stirpes as tenants in common. He appointed the above-named trustees his executors.

The testator died on the 14th of June, 1843. The executors renounced probate, and never accepted or acted in the trusts; and the testator's brother and heir-at-law, John Meredith, conveyed the freeholds to the use of himself and the Plaintiff John Aston.

Testator's daughter Frances died in 1868, without having had issue.

Louisa Ann Twamley died in 1840, having had one child, Louisa Ann, wife of Charles Meredith.

John Meredith died in 1850, having had one child, the Plaintiff, Lucy Louisa Ann, wife of the Plaintiff John Aston.

Henry Meredith died on the 21st of May, 1841, having had two children, one of whom died in December, 1819, an infant. The other was the Defendant Henry Meredith.

George Meredith died in 1856, having had eleven children, namely, George, who died in the year 1836, never having been married ;Sarah Poynter, widow; Louisa Bell, widow; Sabina Boyes, widow; Charles; John; Maria, wife of Joseph Henry Kay; Edwin; Clara Dry, widow; Fanny, wife of Francis Seymour Gaynor ;and Rosina Despard, who died before 1868, leaving one child, Frederica Mary, now an infant.

The bill was filed in April, 1869, stating the above facts, and that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Meredith, Mrs. Boyes, Charles and John Meredith, Mrs. Kay, Edwin Meredith, Mrs. Dry and Miss Despard were out of the jurisdiction ; and alleging as follows:-

'' Having regard to the nature of the property, and the number of the parties interested therein, and to the absence abroad or disability of some of the parties, it will be much more beneficial to the parties interested that each property should be sold, and the proceeds of such sale distributed amongst such parties according to their rights and interests, than that such property should be partitioned amongst them."

The bill then prayed for a sale, without any prayer for a partition.

On the 11th of June, 1869, a decree was made, upon motion for decree, directing inquiries as to the interested.

On the 1st of October, 1869, Mrs. Poynter died, having devised her interest in the real estate unto and to the use of James Goodall Francis, Elizabeth Sabina Poynter, Charles Meredith Poynter, and George Farbrace Poynter, and their heirs, upon trusts for sale, for the benefit of the three last-named persons. She appointed the same four persons executors. They also were out of the jurisdiction.

Notice of the motion for decree had been served on all of the above persons who were adults, except J. G. Francis, and on the guardian of the infant.
The cause now came on upon further consideration.

Mr. L. Field, for the Plaintiffs:-

We ask for a sale: Silver v. Udall (1). All the parties have been served, in accordance with Hurry v. Hurry (2), except J. G. Francis, who is a bare trustee of a power.

It should be stated, however, that Lord Romilly, in a case of Teall v. Watts (3), seems to have thought it right that a bill seeking a sale under the Partition Act should contain a prayer for partition.

Mr. Dunn for the Defendants, supported the application, which was not opposed.

SIR JAMES BACON, V.C., decreed a sale of the property in the usual form; the money to be paid into Court, subject to further order.

Solicitors : Messrs. Field, Roscoe, Field & Francis, agents for Messrs. Stone, Paget, & Billson, Leicester.

ASTON v. MEREDITH.

1872, March 16.

Practice-Partition Act, 1868-Payment out of proceeds of Sale.

The Court will not make an order for payment out to trustees of money produced by a sale under the Partition Act, 1868, where it had been paid into Court, and some of the persons interested were married women, and resident in Australia.

THIS was a suit instituted under the Partition Act, 1858 (31& 32 Vict. c. 40), for a sale in lieu of partition. At the original hearing of the cause inquiries were directed as to who were the parties interested, and in what shares. At the hearing on first further consideration a sale was directed. The case is reported (1), where the facts are fully stated. The property having been sold, and the purchase-money paid into Court, the cause now came on for hearing on second further consideration.

The property was divisible into thirteenths. One of the persons interested was an infant. Four of the persons interested, two of whom mere married women, were resident in England; and the persons entitled to the other shares, two of whom mere married women, were resident in Australia. The purchase-money had been invested, and was now represented by £12,500 2s. 5d. consols.

Mr. Kay, Q.C. (Mr. L. Field with him), for the Plaintiffs (the surviving trustee of the settlement, and his wife, who was entitled to one share), asked that the fund in Court, with the exception of the infant's share, which was to be carried to her separate account, might, under sect. 23 of the Leases and Sales of Settled Estates Act (19 & 20 Vict. c. 120), which is incorporated in the Partition Act, 1868 (31 6-32 Vict. c. 40, s. s), be paid over to the Plaintiff, the surviving trustee, or to have a new trustee to be approved by the Court, in order that it might be paid by them to the persons entitled. In consequence of many of the persons interested being in Australia, great delay and expense would be incurred if these shares were ordered to be paid out to them in the usual manner, and powers of attorney had consequently to be obtained. He referred to cases under the Lands Clauses Consolidation Act, 1845,and other cognate Acts, in which similar orders had been made: Re Roberts (1) ; Grant v. Grant (2) ;and distinguished the present case from Higgs v. Dorkis (3), in which Vice-Chancellor Wickens had declined-- married woman and an infant being the only persons interested--o order the money produced by a sale under the Act to be paid to trustees.

Mr. E. C. Dunn, for the Defendant and persons served with notice of the decree (the other persons interested), supported the application.

SIR JAMES BACON, V.C., said that, although he was always anxious, where it was possible, with due regard to the protection of the persons interested, to save as much as possible delay and expense, he did not think he should, under :the, circumstances of the case, be justified in making the order applied for. The fund must accordingly be paid out to the persons interested in the usual manner.

Solicitors for all parties: Messrs. Field, Roscoe, Field, & Francis.

1841 Census:

Warwickshire
Leamington Priors
Newbold Road
Charles Meredith - 65 - Independent

picture

Rev. Thos. Greaves and Frances Liptrott




Husband Rev. Thos. Greaves

         Born: 1734
   Christened: 
         Died: 1806
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Frances Liptrott

         Born: 1737
   Christened: 
         Died: 1811
       Buried: 


       Father: Rev. John Liptrott
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Mary Greaves

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Charles Meredith



2 M John Liptrott Greaves

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M James Bexworth Greaves

         Born: 1781 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 January 1802 - aged 21
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child James Bexworth Greaves

Greaves - Lieutenant James Bexworth - 3rd Madras Native Infantry - died 22nd January 1802.

Memorial at St. Marys church, Broughton Astley, Leicestershire - "In memory of James Bexworth Greaves son of the Revd Thos Greaves and Frances his wife, Lieutenant in the 3d Regt Native Infantry in the service of the Honourable East India Company at Madrass. In 1801 for his services in the defence of a fort, he was appointed Quarter Master of Brigade to the Detachment and Aid-de-camp to Adjutt Genl Lieutt Coll Agnew. He died in the East Indies the 22d January 1802 in the 21st year of his age. In his short military career his humanity as well as bravery was conspicuous, at Panjalamcourchy he was severely wounded in rescuing a disabled soldier from the hands of the enemy. He was sincerely a Christian. The esteem and most marked confidence of his Commanding Officers and the strong testimony borne by them to his good conduct and military acquirements prove how bright a lustre true religion throws over the profession of a soldier and how powerfully it commands the esteem of real judges of merit".
picture

John Meredith and Maria Hammond




Husband John Meredith




         Born: 1822 - Cambria, Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1909
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Mary Anne Evans


     Marriage: 20 Oct 1851 - Fingal, Tasmania




Wife Maria Hammond




         Born: 1827 - Fingal, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1912
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Henry Montague Meredith

         Born: 27 Jan 1854 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1902 - Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Minnie (Minna) Holmes
         Marr: 1883 - Greta, New South Wales



2 M George Llewellyn Meredith

         Born: 28 Sep 1855 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Oct 1937
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alicia Louisa Maclean
         Marr: 24 Jul 1886 - Sydney, Australia
       Spouse: Eleanor Bond Ward
         Marr: 30 Nov 1899 - Sydney, Australia



3 M James Ernest Meredith

         Born: 3 Dec 1859 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1910
       Buried: 



4 F Clara Sabina Meredith




         Born: 1 Mar 1857 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1924
       Buried: 



5 F Fanny Maria Meredith

         Born: 1 Apr 1862 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M John Percival O. Meredith

         Born: 20 Nov 1865 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1916
       Buried: 



7 F Jessie Rosina Meredith




         Born: 23 Nov 1863 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Nov 1944 - Swansea, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Franklin Stanhope Grant
         Marr: 4 Jun 1897 - Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania



8 M Edwin Mervyn Meredith

         Born: 1867
   Christened: 
         Died: 1929
       Buried: 



9 F Elsie Dry Meredith

         Born: 1869
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 May 1918 - Edmonton Private Hospital
       Buried: 
       Spouse: E. S. Emerson



10 F Mary Rose Meredith

         Born: 1852
   Christened: 
         Died: 1884 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George Albert Mace
         Marr: 1878 - Glamorgan District, Tasmania




General Notes (Husband)

John had 5 sons and 5 daughters.


General Notes (Wife)

Maria's uncle, Thomas Mitchell Hammong (1795-1854) was a surgeon of Brixton, UK. He married Maria Neve (1794-1826) (the surname was originally Le Neve). Their son was Thomas Montague Hammond (1826-1860). He was consumptive, and travelled to Tasmania, Australia, for his health, with his cousin, James Grant junior. Thomas Montague Hammond settled at Emley Park, Ballan, Victoria, Australia, & married his cousin, Rose Grant (1831-1905).


General Notes for Child Henry Montague Meredith

Henry Montague Meredith moved to the Hunter Valley in New South Wales. There is a cemetery adjacent to a property called “The Wilderness” where members of the Holmes family are buried. Inter alia, Minna Holmes is buried there - she was described as the widow of Henry Montague Meredith.

The Rothbury cemetery was established on land adjacent to a property "The Wildernes" on Wilderness Road. The property was owned by Mr Joseph Broadbent Holmes. In 1866 Mr Holmes commissioned a
Church to be build next to the Cemetery. It was completed in 1868. Unfortunately this church is now no longer there.

Joseph and most of his children ( some of whom were born and died at "The Wilderness") and their spouses, together with some family connections are buried there:-

Joseph Broadbent Holmes and wife Harriet Pawsey Holmes (nee Philips)
Maxwell Philips Holmes and wife Mariane /Mary Anne Holmes (nee Glennie - daughter of Rev Alfred Glennie)
Minna Holmes (widow of Henry Montague Meredith)
Ellen Miller Holmes
Elizabeth Philips Holmes
Spencer Harrison Holmes
Arthur Broadbent Holmes and wife Florence Adair Holmes (nee Silby)
Edith Ellan Kelman (nee Holmes) and spouse Lewis Chalmers Kelman
Rev Alfred Glennie
Samuel Athanasius Cusack (brother in law of Joseph)
Maude Cusack (infant daughter of Samuel and Joseph's sister Geogiana)
Catherine Edith Hutchinson (grand daughter of Joseph and daughter of
Edith Ellen Holmes and Lewis Kelman

There are a number of well known HUNTER VALLEY FAMILIES who have members buried there, including:

WILKINSON, TYRRELL, HUNGERFORD, CAMPBELL.

Violet Ethel Mace, born in 1883 was adopted by Henry and Minna.


General Notes for Child George Llewellyn Meredith

The Argus - Monday 14 December 1931

Launceston - Saturday - George Llewellyn Meredith and Reginald Askew Farmilo Sutton were charged on three counts in the police court with having conspired with Walter John Howard Eastland and Richard William Musson to cheat and defraud members of the public by False pretences and crafty devices to become members of Tasmanian Credits Ltd. A remand until December 19 was granted.

The Argus - Friday 29 April, 1932

DEALINGS IN SHARES.
Tasmanian Conspiracy Case, LAUNCESTON (T. ), Thursday - The charge of conspiracy against George Llewellyn Meredith, Reginald Asken Farmilo Sutton and Richard William Musson in connection with a company known as Tasmanian Credits Ltd was continued in the Criminal Court today before Mr. Justice Crisp and a special jury.

C.E.H. Ferguson, the liquidator, gave a statement of the disposal ot the funds of the company and the various bank accounts
operated by Tasmanian Brokers and Underwriters, a subsidiary company. He stated that one account out of four was used as a clearing account for the adjusting and splitting of commission and it drew nearly £2 000 more from the other accounts than they drew from it.

Referring to Rapson shares, Ferguson said that the shares purchased totalled 16,520 of which 14,500 were vendors' shares and cost £8,700. The shares were not bought in the name of the subsidiary company. He considered that the whole transaction was irregular, as trust and borrowed money was used to traffic in shares, and the transactions were not put through in the company's name, while Sutton appeared to have received 6d a share as an overriding commission.

picture

John Stephens and Mary Harris




Husband John Stephens

         Born: 1770 - circa
   Christened: 22 Dec 1770 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Lawrence Stephens
       Mother: Hannah Meredith


     Marriage: 31 Oct 1803 - Eardisley, Herefordshire




Wife Mary Harris

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Jane Stephens

         Born: 1804 - circa
   Christened: 31 Oct 1804 - Pembridge, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: William Reynolds
         Marr: Bef 1825



2 F Mary Stephens

         Born: 1806 - Circa - Hereford
   Christened: 21 Sep 1806 - Pembridge, Herefordshire
         Died: 16 December 1880 - aged 74
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John of Eardisley Castle,farmer. (extracted from the private letters of the Jukes family)


General Notes for Child Jane Stephens

Jane died prematurely and her sister Mary brought up the family.


General Notes for Child Mary Stephens

Mary brought up her sister’s family, Mrs. Reynolds having died. In the 1871 England census she was enumerated at 18 St. George’s Square, London, with nieces Alice J. Reynolds (a teacher aged 27) and Mary Reynolds (aged 41), and a cousin Elizabeth Stephens (aged 47).

1851 Census:

Middlesex
St. Botolph Bishopsgate
Mary Stevens - Head - 44 - Fund Holder
William Reynolds - brother in law - 56 - retired farmer
Jane Reynolds - sister - 46
Edward Reynolds - nephew - 25 - engineer
Mary - niece - 21 - teacher - unemployed
Herbert - nephew - 16 -Clerk
Frederic C. - nephew - 14 - scholar
Arthur - nephew - 12
Alice - niece - 7

1871 Census:

St. George Hanover Square
Belgrave
St. George's Square

Mary Stephens - 64
Maryt Reynolds - 41
Alice J. Reynolds - 27
Elizabeth Stephens - 47
Sarah Stephens - 52
Martha Smith - 16



picture

George Francis Huston and Sarah Hawthorn




Husband George Francis Huston

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Hawthorn

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Amelia Jane Huston

         Born: 15 May 1836 - Hamilton, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Apr 1860 - Frescale, New Norfolk, Australia
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Captain Francis Seymour Gaynor
         Marr: 15 May 1854 - Norfolk Island




General Notes for Child Amelia Jane Huston

Amelia Jane was the eldest child of George Francis Huston, surgeon-superintendent of the Asylum at New Norfolk (1855-80) and Sarah, née Hawthorn.

picture

John Mackersey and Ann Harriet Headlam




Husband John Mackersey

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Ann Harriet Headlam

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M James John Mackersey

         Born: 7 Mar 1856 - Kenilworth, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Jun 1902 - Wellington, New Zealand
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edith Dry Meredith
         Marr: 29 Apr 1890 - Masterton, St. Matthews, New Zealand




General Notes for Child James John Mackersey

James John was the son of John Mackersey and Ann Harriet Headlam.

picture

James Hearne




Husband James Hearne

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah Ann Hearne

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Thomas Wragge
         Marr: 8 Aug 1861 - Broadmeadows, Melbourne




picture
Thomas Wragge and Sarah Ann Hearne




Husband Thomas Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Wragge
       Mother: Emma Ingleby


     Marriage: 8 Aug 1861 - Broadmeadows, Melbourne




Wife Sarah Ann Hearne

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: James Hearne
       Mother: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Derby Mercury, Wednesday, November 6, 1861; Issue 26437

On the 8th August, at Broad Meadows, Melbourne, Australia, by the Rev. T. Stair, Thomas, fourth son of George Wragge, Esq., Chaddesden, Derbyshire, to Sarah Ann, second daughter of the late James Hearne, Esq., Thorne Grove, Australia.
picture

John Benbow Hebbert and Myrrha Devon Pemberton




Husband John Benbow Hebbert

         Born: 28 Apr 1853
   Christened: 17 Jun 1853 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Benbow Hebbert
       Mother: Julia Lucy Aston


     Marriage: 1877




Wife Myrrha Devon Pemberton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George A. Pemberton
       Mother: Maria





Children
1 M Oliver Lyttleton Hebbert

         Born: 15 Aug 1861
   Christened: 29 Apr 1862 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John Benbow Hebbert was a solicitor. He was known as Benbow Hebbert.


General Notes (Wife)

Myrrha was the daughter of George A. Pemberton and his wife Maria. He was a Brassfounder in Birmingham in 1861.
picture

John Padbury and Elizabeth Hicks




Husband John Padbury

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Hicks

         Born: 1759 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Nov 1792
       Buried: 


       Father: John Hicks
       Mother: Mary King





Children
1 M John Henry Padbury

         Born: 1783 - circa - Berkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: Mar 1863 - Newbury, Berkshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Eliza



2 F Eliza Padbury

         Born: 1792 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child John Henry Padbury

1851 Census:

Berkshire
Speen
John Henry Padbury - 68 - Retired Coach Builder
Eliza Padbury - 62 - wife
Eliza Padbury - 59 - Sister
picture

Eugene Hicks and Anne Sharps




Husband Eugene Hicks

         Born: 1802 - circa
   Christened: 7 Jun 1802 - Enborne, Berkshire
         Died: Mar 1870 - Bath, Avon, Somerset
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Hicks
       Mother: Mary Payne


     Marriage: 30 Oct 1830 - Highworth, Wiltshire




Wife Anne Sharps

         Born: 1800 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Eugene Hicks was described in his father's Will as illegitimate, although his parents subsequently married.

1841 Census:

Berkshire
Enborne
Cope Hall
Eugene Hicks - 35 - Independent
Anne Hicks - 35 - Independent
Maria Hicks - 8
Thomas Hicks - 7
Mary Hicks - 5
Sarah Hicks - 2

1851 Census:

Somerset
Walcot
Lansdown
Down House
Charlotte Sharps - 60 - Fund Holder
Eugene Hicks - 60
Ann Hicks - 67 - sister
Maria A. Hicks - 18 - Niece
Thomas - 16 - nephew
Hannah?? - 12 - niece
Sarah Hicks - 10


1861 Census:

Somerset
Lyncombe and Widcombe
Eugene Hicks - 58
Anne - 61
Daughter - 28
picture

John Hicks and Mary King




Husband John Hicks

         Born: 1726 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 September 1768 - aged 43
       Buried: 


       Father: Jonathon Hicks (Hix)
       Mother: Unknown Boddington


     Marriage: 

 Other Spouse: Mary Payne - 25 Mar 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire




Wife Mary King

         Born: 1720 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Jan 1806
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Hicks

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Thomas Hicks

         Born: 1752 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Oct 1817 - Cope Hall, Enborne, Berkshire
       Buried: 1817 - Newbury Parish Church, Berkshire
       Spouse: Mary Payne
         Marr: 25 Mar 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire
       Spouse: Unknown



3 F Elizabeth Hicks

         Born: 1759 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Nov 1792
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Padbury



4 M Major Henry Wilkins Hicks

         Born: 1762 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Jan 1812 - India
       Buried: 



5 F Mary Hicks

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Rawlins




General Notes (Husband)

John Hicks was described in his Will of 21 June 1768 as a Mason of Speenhamland in the Parish of Speen, Berkshire. His Will was probated on 29 Oct 1768.

by P S Spokes, Berkshire Archaeological Society, Berkshire Archaeological Society - Berkshire (England) - 1934
Money, Hist, of Speen (1892), 32, states, " This Mr. Hicks was a stone-mason at
... John Hicks, d. 1768, aged 42. Mary, his wife ; d. 1806, aged 86.


General Notes (Wife)

Mary's siblings included Richard, William, Susanna, John and Martha. Her Will was dated 18 Jun 1795 with a codicil of 17 Jun 1800, and it was probated on 28 June 1806. She was living at Skinners Green in the Parish of Enborne in 1795.


General Notes for Child John Hicks

John was the oldest son. He made his Will on 20 Sep 1770 and soon after went to sea. He died in India.


General Notes for Child Thomas Hicks

Thomas's Will of 5 Feb 1814 describes him as Thomas Hicks of Skinners Green in the parish of Enborne Berkshire Gentleman. It is not known whether he continued the stonemason's business of his father John. The identity of the mother of his daughter Sarah Westall Meredith nee Hicks is not known.

The History of the Ancient Town and Borough of Newbury in the County of Berks.

By Walter Money

"Hicks, Thomas, of Cope Hall, d. 6 Oct. 1817, a. 65."

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, May 28, 1825; Issue 3761

"Mary, relict of Thomas Hicks, Esq, of Cope Hall, near Newbury"

Certified copy of a conveyance D/EX 1041/1 1809

1 bdl

Contents:

1. Thomas Hicks and Mary his wife late of Newbury now of Enborne, gent. and others to:

2. John Meredith of Brumagham co. Warwick, gent, (a trustee of George Meredith, late a Lieutenant in His Majesty's Corps of Marines, now of Speen, esq.)

Messuage, barn, outhouses, orchards, stables near the Wash in Newbury, and about 100acres (with abuttals) dispersed in the common fields (known as Northcroft, Eastfield and Westfield), in Newbury
Included in the property is a messuage outhouses and barns and just over 10 acres of land (specified) in Enborne near the Newbury property above. The deed contains topographical detail in the abuttals of the Enborne property, such as 'King's Ditch' and 'Nightingale Lane' etc.. The Enborne property includes several coppices. Consideration: £4765


General Notes for Child Major Henry Wilkins Hicks

Henry Wilkins Hicks was a Major in the 11th Regiment Native Infantry in the service of the East India Company.

The Will of Thomas Hicks refers to Thomas William as an illegitimate son of Henry Wilkins Hicks, formerly residing with Thomas and his family at Skinner's Green but since having sailed for Malta.

A monument in India:

Sacred to the memory of Major Henry Wilkins Hicks, 11th Regt. N.I. - Obit. 6 January 1812 Aged 50 years.

picture

John Hicks and Mary Payne




Husband John Hicks

         Born: 1726 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 September 1768 - aged 43
       Buried: 


       Father: Jonathon Hicks (Hix)
       Mother: Unknown Boddington


     Marriage: 25 Mar 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire

 Other Spouse: Mary King




Wife Mary Payne

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: May 1825 - circa
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Maria Hicks

         Born: 1805 - before
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Ann Hicks

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John Hicks was described in his Will of 21 June 1768 as a Mason of Speenhamland in the Parish of Speen, Berkshire. His Will was probated on 29 Oct 1768.

by P S Spokes, Berkshire Archaeological Society, Berkshire Archaeological Society - Berkshire (England) - 1934
Money, Hist, of Speen (1892), 32, states, " This Mr. Hicks was a stone-mason at
... John Hicks, d. 1768, aged 42. Mary, his wife ; d. 1806, aged 86.

picture

Major Henry Wilkins Hicks




Husband Major Henry Wilkins Hicks

         Born: 1762 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Jan 1812 - India
       Buried: 


       Father: John Hicks
       Mother: Mary King


     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Thomas William Hicks

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Henry Wilkins Hicks was a Major in the 11th Regiment Native Infantry in the service of the East India Company.

The Will of Thomas Hicks refers to Thomas William as an illegitimate son of Henry Wilkins Hicks, formerly residing with Thomas and his family at Skinner's Green but since having sailed for Malta.

A monument in India:

Sacred to the memory of Major Henry Wilkins Hicks, 11th Regt. N.I. - Obit. 6 January 1812 Aged 50 years.


General Notes for Child Thomas William Hicks

The Will of Thomas Hicks refers to Thomas William as an illegitimate son of Henry Wilkins Hicks, formerly residing with Thomas and his family at Skinner's Green but since having sailed for Malta.

picture

John Rawlins and Mary Hicks




Husband John Rawlins

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Mary Hicks

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Hicks
       Mother: Mary King





Children
1 M John Rawlins

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
George H. Meredith and Sarah Westall Hicks




Husband George H. Meredith




         Born: 13 Feb 1778 - Castlebromwich, Birmingham, Warwick, England
   Christened: 23 Apr 1791 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwick
         Died: 21 Jun 1856 - Swanport, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Sally Turner


     Marriage: 16 Sep 1805 - Abingdon, Berkshire

 Other Spouse: Mary Anne Evans - 30 Oct 1820 - Wales




Wife Sarah Westall Hicks

         Born: 1779 - circa - Berkshire
   Christened: 19 Dec 1779 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: Feb 1820
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Hicks
       Mother: Unknown





Children
1 M George Meredith

         Born: 1806 - Poyston, Pembroke, Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 1836 - Circa
       Buried: 



2 F Sarah Westall Meredith

         Born: 19 Dec 1808
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 Oct 1869
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James Peck Poynter
         Marr: 30 Apr 1836 - St. David's Church



3 M Charles Meredith




         Born: 29 May 1811 - Poyston, Pembroke, Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 2 Mar 1880 - Launceston, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Louisa Anne Twamley
         Marr: 18 Apr 1839 - Edgbaston Old Church, Warwickshire



4 F Louisa Meredith

         Born: 1808 - Oxford, Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1890
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Captain John Bell
         Marr: 16 Jun 1832 - Hobart, Tasmania



5 F Sabina Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1877
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Boyes
         Marr: 9 Mar 1833 - Hobart, Tasmania




General Notes (Husband)

George Meredith was at one time known as "the king of the east coast of Van Diemen's Land"!

George served in the navy.

George entered the Navy in 1794. He was a Lieutenant in the Marines and served in America, the West Indies and Egypt.14 It was reported that at Alexandria, in 1803, he scaled the 180-foot high Pompey's Pillar, to remove the French cap-of-liberty placed there by Napoleon's forces and replace it with the Union Jack. Subsequently, the cap was suspended from the ceiling of the grand hall of the British Museum.

George retired in 1806 on half pay and farmed first near Newbury (a conveyance of 1809 records the location)16 and then at Rhyndaston in Pembrokeshire before emigrating to Australia in 1820, shortly after his 2nd marriage.

MEREDITH, GEORGE (1777-1856), settler, was born on 13 February 1777 near Birmingham, England, the fourth son of John Meredith and his wife Sally, née Turner; his father was a prominent barrister and solicitor and descended from the ancient Amerydeth family of Devon and Wales. In 1796 Meredith was commissioned second lieutenant in the marines and later served in the West Indies, at the blockade of Ferrol in Spain and on the Mediterranean Station. At Alexandria in 1803 he made a daring ascent of Pompey's Pillar, a granite column 180 feet (55 m) high, to fasten the Union Jack in place of a French cap-of-liberty placed there by Napoleon's forces. In 1805 when recruiting in Berkshire he met and married Sarah, the daughter of H. W. Hicks. Next year he retired on half-pay and commenced farming at Newbury; later the family move to Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, and farmed there until 1819 when the post-war rural depression stimulated his interest in emigration. He then had two boys and three girls, the eldest being...

Meredith resolved to settle in Van Diemen's Land and applied to the Colonial Office for letters of introduction. In company with several partners he chartered a ship, but early in 1820 his wife died suddenly, thus jeopardizing the whole venture. By good fortune their former governess and companion, Mary Evans, consented to take care of the young family on the voyage. In July official permission was granted and in October the ship was loaded with personal possessions, extensive farm equipment and a small flock of merino sheep. An agreement had already been made to obtain additional stock from Edward Lord's flocks already on the island. The original partners, Meredith, Joseph Archer and Thomas Gregson, were joined by a number of passengers, including the Amos family, John Kerr, Francis Desailly and John Meredith, a cousin of the family. Before embarkation George Meredith and Mary Evans were quietly married and on 8 November the expedition sailed in the Emerald and reached Hobart Town on 13 March 1821.

After settling the family in temporary lodgings Meredith presented his letters of introduction to Lieutenant-Governor William Sorell and began to look for suitable land. He had already experienced the limited market outlets for inland farms in England and Wales, and was determined to secure coastal grants if possible. According to government surveys the most promising land lay at Oyster Bay, about 140 miles (225 km) distant on the eastern coast, and a small party set out in a whale-boat to visit the district. Close examination proved the land to be greatly inferior to the official descriptions, but certain parts capable of development were selected and the party returned to Hobart on 24 April to lodge the formal applications.

Official permission was duly given to the whole scheme, which included the individual grants, and late in September, after the first livestock were dispatched overland, a small schooner was chartered to take the settlers to Oyster Bay. There they found part of the granted land occupied by William Talbot, an emigrant Irishman who had already unsuccessfully sought inclusion in the group and now claimed that the land had been granted to him. Vigorously protesting he withdrew from the district but the dispute was finally decided in Meredith's favour in 1826.

Meanwhile the grants were developed and improved, both for seasonal crops and grazing stock; a tannery and flour-mill were established at the Meredith River, and bay whaling stations set up on near-by islands to try out whale oil for export. In a shipyard at Waterloo Point were built several trading vessels and also small craft for the use of sealing gangs on their visits to the Bass Strait islands. These enterprises required both skilled labour and special equipment and necessitated repeated visits to Hobart, so Meredith was able to maintain a close interest and participation in the public affairs of the free colonists. In 1824, after the declaration of a new Charter of Justice for Van Diemen's Land, Meredith and many other colonists met publicly to express their appreciation and to seek more benefits from the British government. In March 1827, after news that property owners in New South Wales were petitioning for an elective legislature, Meredith and other landowners arranged a public meeting to encourage similar efforts in Van Diemen's Land. A petition and addresses were prepared for submission to London by Lieutenant-Governor (Sir) George Arthur. Through misunderstanding the documents were delayed; copies were later sent privately to England but the whole matter lapsed because the Colonial Office disapproved the colonists' attitude toward Arthur. Later that year Meredith and others again came into conflict with the lieutenant-governor over legislation to license the press, with which Meredith had strong connexions. Bitter official opposition toward Meredith continued throughout Arthur's term and constituted a severe restriction to his personal life and public spirit.

In the early 1820s many isolated settlements were under repeated attack from escaped convicts. In October 1825 the homestead at Oyster Bay was raided in Meredith's absence by the bushranger Matthew Brady. None of the family was injured but the house was ransacked and a servant taken hostage was later killed; fortunately the plate and other valuables were found buried near Hobart and returned. The family had first lived at Redbanks, a turf hut strengthened with timber, on the south bank of the Meredith River. About 1827 they moved into Belmont, a more spacious home lying about one mile (1.6 km) further inland. About 1836 they moved into Cambria, a large dwelling designed by Meredith near the original home and surrounded by gardens which had been steadily developed since their arrival. From that time the management of the property devolved more upon the eldest sons, and they took the entire care of the estate when his wife Mary died unexpectedly in 1842. By his second marriage he had three sons and four daughters, of whom the second son John remained in charge at Oyster Bay until George Meredith died in 1856.

Several of Meredith's children became prominent in later years; his second son, Charles, was appointed colonial treasurer of Van Diemen's Land in 1857 and continued in high public offices for twenty years; the fourth son, John, was appointed a magistrate at Swansea in 1855 and contributed greatly to the welfare of the district; the fifth son, Edwin, migrated to New Zealand as a pioneer colonist in 1851, and the fifth, daughter Clara, married Richard Dry.

George Meredith possessed qualities of endurance and strength which, coupled with his early experience at sea in command of men and subsequent farming life in England, resulted in a character eminently suitable for pioneer colonial life. The enthusiasm and encouragement of his wife Mary also contributed greatly to his successful career in public and private life.

When George and his family immigrated, the ages of his children increased somewhat quickly - possibly due to the fact that they became eligible for land grants sooner? It appears that George overstated their ages.

Sarah died in about 1820 (in childbirth from memory), after which George married Mary Anne Evans who had been the children's nanny.

his wife Sarah had died in 1820 and in 1818 George got their 18 years old "handsome and voluptuous" servant Mary Evans (later to become his 2nd wife) pregnant. By changing the ages this would cloud the fact?

Pioneers of the East Coast from 1642

Swansea, Bicheno

by Karl von Steiglitz

Extracts

LIEUT. GEORGE MEREDITH (LATE OF THE ROYAL MARINES) ARRIVES IN HOBART TOWN AND PREPARES TO VISIT THE COAST WITH THE BROTHERS AMOS

Some of our most important settlers arrived in Tasmania aboard the ship "Emerald"' (about 400 tons), under Capt. Elliott, on the 17th March, 1821. George Meredith, snr,, and, it is supposed, Joseph Archer, had chartered her privately, to bring them and their families to this country, making history from the fact that she was the first vessel to be privately, chartered for Van Diemen's Land. The "Emerald" had left privately, four months earlier and called in at Teneriffe and the Cape on the way out.

Other pioneering families on board included Adam Amos, his wife and three sons; John Amos, his wife and one son-, the Gregson family; and J. C. Tolman, who was found to be suffering from scurvy on arrival.

Only a fortnight passed before the quick actin Meredith was able to write home and give an interesting account of his impressions and intentions. The letter is dated 2nd April 1821, from Hobart Town. George Meredith to his brother John Meredith, Old Square, Birmingham.

“Dear John. Our safe arrival at our destined port and the land of promise safely over, we are living in a cottage Mr. Lord provided for us, about three miles distant from Hobart Town, which, although small and unfurnished, is definitely preferable to residing with the Place itself, and, indeed, offers comforts superior to any our passengers have met with; for I must needs confess no station I ever yet visited boasted so little accommodation or convenience for strangers. However, it is as yet in its infancy and many circumstances combine to account for the present state of things.

“I have been well received by His Honour the Lieut.-Governor (Sorell) partly owing to my private letter from Mr. Goulburn and perhaps the more so from my acquaintance with Mr. Lord, who appears to be on the best footing with him. I have dines once with him and had several private interviews; the last this day previous to my setting off for the Eastern Coast, where I think it highly probable from the concurring information I have received, that I and my party shall settle. It was always my view from the first to branch out to some coast situation calculated for the site of a new township, with a back country fit for intended locations and I have some confidence that the result of my projected excusion (sic) and survey will make me amends for the disappointment I suffered in not finding a desirable opening on the Western Coast, as I had expected, at one of the newly discovered harbours of Port Davey and McQuarrie in the vicinity of neither of which is there any desirable open country - and, if there was, the prevailing winds would be unfavourable to water communication, and a chain of mountains which run from a little to the westward or Port Dalrymple nearly to this plain, interpose and effectual ban to inland intercourse.

The country between this and Port Dalrymple still affords many desirable situations for a settlement except as to distance from either port or market, nothing to any extent being VACANT within less than 20 to 30 miles from water carriage which is a great objection, independently of a settlement in that line of country bringing me in contact with residents of an inferior and perhaps not very moral class.

Now, if I do fix on the Eastern Coast which the Lieut. Governor is desirous to have respectably settled, I do not doubt being followed by succeeding emigrants from England and I have already come to a satisfactory understanding with the Lieut.-Governor on the subject. There are many of the natives at present along that coast but they will necessarily give way as we establish and extend ourselves. They are the most wretched of all aborigines I have yet seen or heard of. Cowardly but treacherous, I understand, and several persons have been violently speared by them for want of due precaution. I shall, however, have four free persons with me and, though an excursion of from nine days to a fortnight among them and their wiles may not be altogether a pleasurable one, I look to it as safe and advantageous. When I return I will speak of the country of which at present I know nothing but by report.

“The borders of the Derwent are high land and almost one entire forest. The sheep here are large but rather leggy - and wool still coarse. The pigs very good; cattle but middling and horses small and exceptionally dear; one worth £20 in England being here of the value of £50 at least. The climate is indeed fine and vegetation of all kinds rapid and vigorous. The sweet briar is a common hedge and the most beautiful green-house plants grow wild.

“Money was never scarcer than at present, that is Government Bills, which almost exclusively form the medium of remittance to England. The market for nearly everything I have brought out is overstocked and my only chance to convert my goods is to have them retailed but I will write Henry on this subject. If the two stills I ordered are not sent out the smaller one of 30 gallons must be exchanged for one of not less that 40. Nothing under that will be allowed to work here and distillation commences August 1822. I have written but a disjointed letter and must be more connected and explanatory when my mind is less occupied and when I can give my observations instead of the report of others. Thank God we all enjoy good health and spirits and WE ALL send our united good wishes to YOU ALL and with every kind sentiment towards you all believe me Ever Your Affectionate Brother Geo. H. Meredith.”

THE FIRST SETTLERS AND THE LAND THEY FOUND

Diary of Lieut. George Meredith R.N., written in 1821 when he sailed up the east coast with the brothers Amos in search of land for settlement.

April 5th. Left Newtown, Thursday morning, 5th April, 9 o'clock in a whaleboat. Self and six people. Pulled down to Iron Pot Island, partly calm, partly against sea-breeze, by 2 o'clock. Ran down thence to about 6 miles short of East Bay Neck with a fine sea breeze by ½ past 5. The wind failing and near sunset, beach on the larboard side. N.B. - Slopen Island a good place to form a raft near and erect boilers for whale fishing. Abundance of large crabs off Hog Island as well as Dough Boy Island.

April 6th. Broke camp at half past seven. Arrived at East Bay Neck at half past nine but made for the wrong side. Rowed round and landed at ten at low water. Waited for flood to get the boat up. Meantime carried over things. I examined the land to the westward. When the boat was got over, strong breeze set right ahead and again encamped for the night. N.B.-East Bay divided in two by a point and a reef of rocks near the centre. Land to the W. is left of point. Good rich marly loam, nearly all the breadth but does not reach all the way to the other bay. Another considerable breadth of similar land lies on the ….or E. end of the bay, but does not run so far inland. The middle part, through which the boat carriage road runs, is light sandy earth, but might be brought under the plough and made turnip and barley land, but the whole is thickly timbered and would occasion much labour and expense. It certainly would be desirable to have a settlement at the Neck, conditioning for a team to be always ready to haul over a boat upon wheels fitted on purpose at a fixed rate. And if Oyster Bay on the Eastern Coast is settled, small grants may be properly reserved along the boat road for the settler to erect granaries or depots on. The beach on the East Bay side is bare sand for a great distance, and the creek on the other side mud down to low water mark. A pier might be run out on the inside and a landing place made on the other side by laying some fallen trees with a little jetty at the end.

ARRIVAL AT OYSTER BAY

10th April. Saw the tracks of dogs and men on the sand and waited till about two o'clock and Mr. Amos not arrived. Concluded therefore they might have gone on to Inlet Bay (Little Swan Port?) to meet us there and launched the boat to proceed there.

There is no river at Grindstone Bay and had three miles to go for water-stagnant and tasting of gum leaf.

The land behind Grindstone Bay is partly good light soil with a marly substratum and partly of the character of the flats around Skate Bay (Spring Bay) which, in fact, come down to Grindstone Bay, and the valley flats land appears to run along the coast behind the highland bluffs to a considerable distance with almost a level inland communication the whole way.

Arrived off Inland Bay about three o'clock, but for the chance of Mr. Amos seeing the boat, remained on the Sandy Bay beyond it where I landed at four o'clock and walked back in order to examine the country between the bays. Did not reach the tent for fear of having ranged rather far for the time of day. Still no tidings of Mr. Amos. This land will come under the general description tomorrow. Flat land….all the way.

April 11th. After breakfast, Mr. Amos not having arrived, sent two men by land to the herdsmen's hut for intelligence and set off with one man to examine the land round to the south of the inlet leaving two persons in charge of the tent with directions not to fire except something of moment occurred, as I should consider it an alarm.

At ten o'clock heard a musket fired at the tent, hastened towards it, but hearing a second, concluded there could be nothing serious and Mr. Amos had returned, therefore answered it and continued our walk.

On returning to the tent, found Mr. Amos and the guide who had gone on as far as the Great Salt Water River round the N. point of Grindstone Bay.

Went out after a scanty meal with the hut guide and four dogs to get a kangaroo for supper. Put up two, and each taking a different course, killed both. While half skinning the last, the two men who had been to the hut joined us with the other two stockmen and six does and two kangaroos they had killed. N.B.-Good entertainment for man and beast.

April 12th. Immediately after breakfast departed with the intention of being governed by the wind as to proceeding on to Great Swan Port and taking the intermediate places back or not.

The wind being ahead with a dense fog just as we rounded the point into a kind of bay at the south end of which is a salt water river, with a narrow channel to enter on the N. side of the mouth, close to the shore which is rocky and a surf runs all the way from this side to the other across the sandy beach.

It was nearly low water as we proceeded up, the channels for the boat were narrow and intricate. Through one which reached right across from N. to S. over a pebbly bottom with weedy mud on both sides it was difficult to get the boat ahead against the tide current. With both sails and oars, following the sinuosities of the river, I suppose we proceeded up about three miles when we stuck fast and with difficulty got the boat clear again. This was just above a small green-margined low island with a channel each side. We took the S. side but it afterwards appeared the other side was the most direct. The mud and weeds coming as far into the river on each side, we had to fall down considerably before we could land, which we effected at the upper or western point of the creek, the first principal one on the S. side, about two miles up, at the head of which a mountain stream runs in winter. Indeed, about a mile or one half inland there was a weak spring still running for a short distance, but it had no apparent source or termination. It seemed to rise through and lose itself again in the loose sandy soil. This spring Mr. Amos had crossed on his way to this river and he confirmed my conviction that there was a vale and level communication at the back of the coast all the way from Prossers Bay.

The day being far spent, had only time to cross one of these easy ascents of forest land which constitute the chief of all this coast country, and found it tally precisely with that already noted. The low valleys vary in width, sometimes not more than a hundred yards, sometimes even a mile, but the great extent of arable land offers itself on the banks of this spreading river, and the accumulation of mud and vegetable matter, from the mouth upwards would be a never ceasing supply of manure for it. There was every appearance of summer streams emptying themselves in many places on both sides and at its head. I have no doubt water may be obtained all the year by sinking wells in the lower land or even by damming up the mountain rivers and clearing out pools for it to lodge in a body. Killed one black swan.

April 13th, Came down the river, which now, being high water, with mud banks covered, presented a beautiful and grand appearance, but I would advise it to be first entered with the young flow immediately after low water that the proper channels may be known - otherwise a boat would be continually grounding.

On opening the Bay in clear weather, found the level ground to extend about two miles to the N. with a considerable depth inland all round by the river.

GREAT SWAN PORT IS REACHED

Stood over direct for Great Swan Port with a fine breeze across a wide and deep bay to the west I n which Little Swan Port is stated to lay. Entered the river at one o'clock over the bar or sand spit instead of the proper channel which lies close to shore. Sailed up the river as far as the fourth reach where the channel circles round to southward. Landed about two to dine and examine the neck between the river and bay which is about ½ mile wide and a mere deposit of sand by the ocean, though timber of considerable size grows on it.

At three o'clock proceeded up as far as the depth of water would admit, but not finding a sufficient channel by sunset returned for the night down to the point of land on the N. side above the circle. Unfortunately had no water remaining and could not meet any, although a swan fold was on the spot - a circumstance to us indicative of there being water to hand. Sought again in the morning without success, and were obliged to leave without having taken tea, supper or breakfast.

April 14th. Again proceeded up to the same place we met the obstruction last night but without better success, and after trying several hours were again obliged to relinquish the task and return and seek for water as the first object.

Instead of going down to the mouth where water was stated to be, proceeded up what had the appearance of a creek or inlet round to the E. of the point where we had slept the night before to try both for water and to examine if it led to any inland communication, and after about half a mile were agreeably surprised to find it turn to the N. and continue a fine open deep river channel. Landed and found water round the first point on the E. side where we made a hearty meal of steamed kangaroo, and leaving two men in charge of the tent and things, proceeded up the river to see if it really did continue to any extent.

Proceeded as far as the sand bank at the head of the third reach and seeing a large breadth of water both round to the N.E. over on the other side of the sand bank, and also round to the S.W., returned to the tent for the night in full confidence that the latter would lead us into the fresh water river communicating with the Plains, and that the former would lead up to some other river and desirable land. N.B. - the land all along the east side where we slept is a deep pure sand without any substratum within a foot or eighteen inches in the places we tried - Yet the timber grows well.

April 15th. Proceeded after breakfast up the river, but on rounding the mud and sand banks on the western hand began to lose hoped of the S.W. water leading inland to the Great Swan River as it seemed to be completely landlocked and a mere bay. When we got within about 150 yards of the termination round at the southern end, the boat grounded and I sent two men on shore to end all doubts. In an hour they returned with a full conviction of having found an entrance a little to the east, but on questioning them I found that they had merely seen the passages we had already tried from a new position. Pulled all round the west shore without finding either river, spring, or run of fresh water, nor could we discover an entrance into a sheet of water seen over the sand bank to the N.E.. Landed over on the western and northern shores and found a considerable breadth of flat land of a better quality than any yet seen, with more low ground. Deep water and a bold shore for a boat to land on the further N. side. Returned after sunset to last night's camp.

April 16th. Proceeded after breakfast to make one more effort to pass up the main course into the fresh water river at high tide. At half past eleven o'clock again gave up the attempt and made for the place where we dined on the 13th for the purpose of walking up the south side to examine the channel at low water from the shore and determine if it were possible to effect a passage. On arriving opposite the place where we were obstructed in the boat, sent a man across the water, the tide being nearly ebb and found there was no channel whatever. Therefore, if there should be so great a body of fresh water coming down the river from the Plains as is stated, it must spread itself over the great expanse of tide water and be lost in it.

Crossed over the Isthmus to the ocean to ascertain how far it would be expedient to send a boat round to meet me on my return from the Plains to which I determined to walk the next day, although lame and suffering from a bowel complaint. Found this part of the neck of the Isthmus like the lower, an entire bed of sand. Bathed in the sea and walked along the fine sand till opposite our tent.

April 17th. Set off with Mr. Amos and the two guides for the Plains leaving four men at the tent. Found all the south side one entire bed of flags, rushes and swamp (after passing the tide way) which continued extending to the southward far above the real mouth of the river. Crossed through the top part at the expense of a wetting, it having rained hard the preceding night.

These rushes, etc., extend from the river's mouth for a mile then abrupt stony hills for about two more, when you enter upon the plains. after walking a mile or better, settled for the night with merely a few boughs placed as a screen against the wind, but unluckily it rained nearly the whole night and having come in wet the middle, and my bowel complaint becoming more severe, passed a very unpleasant night, the ground very wet. We had two kangaroo dogs and a man killed us a kangaroo for supper.

April 18th. After taking some kangaroo soup, proceeded along the riverside to the N.W. about two miles when I sent Watson (the guide?) back to the tent to take the boat round the isthmus to meet us at the bottom of the bay as it would save half a day in time besides giving us an opportunity of taking a much greater sweep of country to the westward and southward on our way back.

About two miles further up, the river contracts, and there is a fall of, say about two feet in twenty yards and the water a few inches deep only. It then opens and deepens again and afterwards again contracts and becomes shallow so as to be a mere brook.

At this place we made a fire and some kangaroo soup, when at the moment of sitting down to it, a most violent thunderstorm came on with hail and rain and completely drenching us through, and it rained more or less nearly the remainder of the day.

From this point we made first S. and then S.E. for the head of the Bay where we arrived about half past seven, having travelled through the bush an hour after dark. Those parts of the Plains seen certainly do not answer to the high character given by Watson, but it is fair to state that he considers the best land to be more to the southward and westward than we reached. The low lands are mostly flooded in winter and have a rather peaty surface with a good marly substratum. The Higher levels are of light sandy earth and no substratum within a foot wherever we tried, with one exception, though I incline to think clay might be found at a lower depth.

As we returned we crossed a large tract of higher and poor forest land commencing with a point near where we struck off to return, and which Watson could not have seen, as it formed part of what he described as all plains.

Upon the whole I could not but feel disappointed, although the country about the Plains is very pleasing to the eye and if anything, rather too lightly timbered.

About half past eight the boat arrived, the people as well as ourselves wet through. However a good fire, moonlight night, and the tent, formed a pleasing contrast with last night's accommodation.

April 19th. My bowel complaint still affecting me, for I had thoughtlessly come away without any of those medicines proper to carry on such occasions. I could not venture in the boat, and resolved to devote the day to examine the country around this little bay, and if there were any vale communication with the Plains above G.S.P., which, from many circumstances, I inclined to believe I should find.

About noon, for we had gone to rest late the night before and had little sleep the previous one, set off along the south side of an inlet or creek of salt water situate just at the point of this bay where it rounds off from the sandy beach at the back of the isthmus, but the mouth was now choked up by the beach for want of rains to force its way into the ocean.

For about half a mile it continues westerly and meanders to the south. Salt and brackish, and is navigable for boats when full, and partly so now. To that distance, the land on either side, low and level - timbered land at least of average quality with the chief of that already seen - a light brown earth with a substratum of good gravel for six feet. At this distance the fresh water pools commenced with dry shoals between, and beyond this I should not rely on boats going up.

There we crossed, having ascertained the width of low level land to the southward and which is bounded by stoney (sic) rises and poor forest land with narrow vale patches occasionally. All round to the westward these flats are bounded by stoney hills and poor forest land and which appear to join the many Tiers which bound the Plains to the S. and W..

Took a circle over this miserable land to the N. still hoping to find the vale communication I sought and after two hours walking came upon a large lagoon of 100 acres and upwards. Sent two persons round the south side and kept the north myself without either finding any outlet for the water to run off in winter. It must be a receiver for the winter rains which it appears to retain all through the dry season.

LAND IS CHOSEN

Going on the N.E. crossed a considerable breadth of low forest and vale land, chiefly inclined to the above lagoon but partly apparently to the inlet near our tent. Crossed right over this level to the eastward till we came to the sough end of the isthmus or neck of land between the Bay and G.S.P.. I did this to have a comprend (sic) of the country to the N.W. to ascertain if there were any hills or interruptions to what I now felt confident was a land of communication from the Bay to the Plains. This brought us to the beach about a mile north of the tent by dark, and resolved to go, or send Mr. Amos, in the morning from the inlet to the point where we crossed the flat to make certain as I INTEND TO FIX OUR GRANTS HERE and across to the G.S.P. river if it prove so on examination.

April 20th. While the people were gone for water and to kill kangaroos, Mr. Amos traced the valley from the Inlet to the place mentioned and confirmed my expectation, the distance being about two miles with a lagoon of 30 to 40 acres at half a mile distance from the Inlet. The lagoon had water standing in it but there was a visible outlet where the water ran out in winter.

Wishing, if possible, to make out a complete vale communication between the coast bluffs and points, I sent the boat with five hands to attend my motions and walked by land with two others as far as a fresh water summer river in which were still occasional pools, but the mouth was locked by sand. This is situated on the N. side the second point of land from where we slept, the Tier appearing to come down to a point very near the coast about a mile or better N.W. of this river.

All the way we came we had vale and flat forest land with hills towards the coast and rises over others inland, but towards where we started from and where we slept at the mouth of the river, the low lands are of great breadth.

As the wind was contrary and no desirable place to stop the night at the point, continued trace communications. At the back and S.W. of the mouth of this river is some good forest and flat land bound by the mountains to the N.. The fresh water run still having pools of good water….as in…..but at the distance of about two miles S.W. the main Tiers curved round and came down to the coast at the next point of land, so that any inland road or connection must be to the westward of them. There is a narrow strip of flat land across this point to the next point where the Tiers came down to the coast - but it is of very little depth under the Tiers.

April 21st. Started on our return home doubting more than ever the reality of any other L.S.P. or of the large, fine river and boat harbour mentioned by Watson. For two hours it was nearly calm when, a northerly breeze springing up, reached Skate Bay (Spring Bay) soon after sunset and pitched the tent on the old spot occupied 8th and 9th. Having on our return hugged the coast…..found my fears confirmed that there was neither other L.S.P. or river emptying itself into Oyster Bay. Indeed the whole coast from where the Tiers come down to the point of land south of where we slept last night, to within about four miles of the Salt Water River, or real L.S.P. and where they again recede back to the…..head of L.S.P. and come down again at Prosser's river show at once there can be no sheet of water or breadth of land such as is described by Watson.

SECOND VISIT OF AMOS AND MEREDITH FIVE MONTHS LATER

Sept. 29th. At daylight, we found we were in the bay off Little Swan Port. Pulled for three hours and, a favourable breeze springing up, made Meredith's creek about ten o'clock where we found Mr. Amos had built a small hut on the south side of the creek. (On the site of present Redbanks House). Planted the fruit trees.

Sept. 30th. Looked around for a convenient place to build a store to receive and lodge our goods, implements, etc., etc., and live in till the surveyor measures off the Grants and we can each fix a final residence, and farm buildings, stockyards, etc.. Caught fish.

Oct. 1st. Dug the foundation of the store house on the north side of the creek about half a mile from the mouth. Commenced falling timber, etc..

Oct. 2nd. Wind westerly. Sent off boat to East Bay Neck for another load.

Oct. 3rd. Proceeded with the store house, cutting timber, etc.. Had the cattle down from the Great River to the north side of the creek to fold land for garden and corn.

Oct. 4th. Going on with building and made fold yards for cattle.

Oct. 6th. Sixty head of cattle besides calves arrived with five of the people leaving the sheep and four people on the other side of Little Swan Port. Also arrived the boat from East Bay Neck with all the things, both what were left and what the boat brought the second time.

Oct. 6th. Sent off the boat to East Bay Neck and to leave tea, sugar, meat, etc. with the people along with the sheep.

Oct. 7th. Set off to the Plains to examine the country more particularly, from the Creek along the west side of sandy peninsula and between the sand bank and the lagoon and marsh which extend to the Great River (Swan River?). On the banks of the Great River is some marsh land and dry ground fir for anything - say fifty acres. Then to the west are rocky hills on the side of the river, fit for sheep - but inland all the ground though low and level is poor, sandy, and wet till about a mile or a mile and a half up the river from the west side of the marshes running north and south - that is from the Creek to the Great River when you come upon a tract of land similar to that on each side of the creek, viz., dry red earth. This extends to the inland rivulet running from the mountain to the Great River, say north and south, and may comprise 200 acres, not more. On the other side of this rivulet is some good marshy land, from 100 to 200 acres, running a good way back towards the hills. Beyond this, the land lays in strips of dry poor land and low marsh towards the river, but the poor land predominates, and more inland, it is chiefly poor with little or no interruption. Went over the river and had a most charming prospect from a small hill - up the plain and over the whole country to the south west. Walked up the north side of the river a mile or two, and found it chiefly of the same character as the side we had left. Returned under the mountains or hills and over poor sandy land until we fell in with the great lagoon towards our Creek after nightfall, and reached the hut at ten o'clock, greatly disappointed at the result of our day's inspection, having expected to find all the plain good rich land as described by Rice and Watson on whose report to the Governor I had relied.

Oct. 6th to 12th. Employed felling timber, making enclosures for folding cattle over land intended for corn and potatoes. Building a hut. etc..

Oct. 13th. Mr Amos, James Amos (son of Adam) and Stansfield set off to meet the sheep coming down overland.

Oct. 14th. Walked up the river above the creek, following its turns until the mountains became entire timber and rocks. Crossed about half a mile below where it bands to the north and followed this branch about three miles round, then came over the hills a little below where we crossed it and examined the hills on the south side, which, though frequently rocky and abrupt, are very fine sheep pasture and apparently much better than the other side, which, indeed, where we walked was barrenness itself, though lower down towards the creek, by the side of the river they look much better and tolerably fair sheep pasture. On the south side occasional green valleys and slopes of land fir for cattle or sheep, and the whole will prove a very desirable run for the farm on this side of the creek which appears to show quite as much good land as that on the other side. There is a low marshy flat of land of loamy clay and sand mixed likely to prove good wheat land, lying under the hills and directly between them and the creek, flat red land, but it is thickly wooded though the timber is not large.

STOCK YARDS AND A BRIDGE

Oct. 15th. Yoked the bullock Young with the Jericho white bullock and began to haul timber and logs for the yoking yard, this to prepare them for ploughing, they being very wild. The men together with Mr. A. Amos who had gone to meet them arrived with about 830 sheep from the New Plains, having killed ten, eight lost, eight left on the road down. Many of the sheep lame, but all in good condition.

Oct. 21st. Mr. Amos set off to explore the upper part of the Great River and Plains, etc., and returned the 22nd at night.

Oct. 24th. Recovered two bullocks, Young and Peter, who had been astray a week or more. Yoked Young and Pretty instead of Peter who would not go steady as leader, and put the two young steers, Strawberry and George, behind, and began to plough for spring wheat and barley, etc., clearing the land of timber and roots in the most open spots. Killed a bullock of Jericho herd. No scales to weigh, suppose about four hundredweight.

Oct. 25th. Rained all day more or less. Bullocks again astray. Got in the old ones at night but not the young ones. Planted one bed of potatoes in the lower folded ground in the lazy bed way - about ¾ bushel.

Oct. 27th. Sent the boat to the Neck for the remaining things and Master George and man left in charge.

Oct. 28th. Made an excursion up the Great River with Mr. A. and J. Amos and Dickons. Crossed the two more western branches and at upper part of the middle one, adjoining the N. one, found a breadth of good land similar to that at the Creek but not so stoney or in such rises - say about two to three hundred acres, laying along the river side - and another breadth, Mr. Amos states to lay along the middle branch on the north side of it, about 200 acres of similar quality.

Oct. 30th. Sowed about one acre of spring wheat.

Oct. 31st. Mr. Amos returned having been to the head of the eastern branch of Great Swan Port (along the sand bar of which I formerly passed in boat). He describes a fine wet marsh of very great extent to be at the head of this tide water, about six miles above the sand bar, and which can be easily drained and through which he conceives there is a constant stream of fresh water, and he also believes he saw a continued valley from the head of this marsh to the eastern coast and ocean to the north of Schouten Tier. Boat arrived from E.B. Neck.

Nov. 1st. Set off in boat to explore the country about the eastern branch of Great Swan Port, but the wind setting in strong ahead with very heavy rains, returned.

Nov. 2nd. Started again and made the north end of Great Swan Port as the wind and sea were too high to discover the channel into the eastern branch. Took dinner and set off about 3 p.m. over the hills with my son, Mr. Amos and a man to carry rug and tea kettle, etc.. Came upon the middle of the marsh at about four miles distance (having fallen with two separate mobs of natives who ran from their fires on out approach). The marsh is now a lagoon being covered entirely with water, although in summer, evidently, many parts will be nearly dry. A considerable river empties itself into it at the head and after running as a river about a mile it spread itself wholly over it. Slept at night near the lower end of the river on the west side.

Nov. 3rd. Walked up the west side to find a fording place to cross the river and found a narrow rocky part with a strong current about three feet deep three miles higher up. Crossed and came down along the eastern side where all the land is mountainous and barren down to the very beach where we attempted to cross, first through high tea tree bush and scrub growing in water and scarcely passable, then along the beach about a leg deep, on rushy bottom. Then came to a small dry circular rise with some timber growing on it. Proceeding about 200 yards further and were then stopped by deep channels running from the lagoon to the Bay. It being late, returned to the dry hill for the night without bread, meat or grog - having only a little sugar and a few grains of tea left.

Nov. 4th. Pulled down a pole and also carried a dead tree to make a bridge which being launched across the deep channel we passed on it and then hauled it after us and carried it to a second, after which we walked up into the lagoon round a broad deep stream through which the lagoon chiefly empties itself into the Bay, and where the tide water flows up about half a mile and the fresh water stands all round about a foot deep, but deeper higher up the lagoon. In fact, it could not be drained without making a new channel along one of the banks for the river at its head to run in so as to lead it off the lagoon, and also forming a bank to keep back the tide water from overflowing it. Could this be done, it would make a large breadth of valuable land and has a narrow range of very capital grazing along the west bank about three or four miles up from the Bay.

Reached the boat at 2 p.m., took dinner and returned down Swan Port to the sandy peninsula on its larboard entrance and walked home over the sand about ten o'clock.

END OF DIARY

Cambria

(Dr. E. Brettingham-Moore)

This is the key property of the Swansea district and caused a good deal of bickering when it was founded. This was caused by the fact that when Lieut. Thomas Buxton came through to the East Coast as manager for William Talbot in 1821, he and Talbot selected land which had already been marked out for George Meredith. Bitter quarrels followed between Meredith and Talbot. Appeals were made to Governor Sorell, rude remarks were made and general unpleasantness prevailed for years. The land in question is now known as Belmont. (Buxton lived for a time at Old Belmont, a mile up the Wye River from the present Belmont House.)

Creek Hut, Oyster Bay
4th March, 1822.

Geo. Meredith to William Talbot. “I have chosen and am authorised by His Honour, the Lieut. Governor, to occupy 2000 acres of land, extending north from the creek and river near my hut, and situate between the sandbank on the East and the Hills to the West and including the lands on which you have caused huts to be built and which you have otherwise taken forcible possession. And I hereby give you further notice that you and your servants immediately remove from the said land and I shall hold you accountable to me for all loss, damage or expenses I have sustained or may sustain by you or your servants occupying or trespassing on the same.”

There is no room here to enlarge on a controversy that caused endless talk in the old days and made family feuds that dragged on for years, but many letters on the subject expressing all angles of feeling, may be read in the Historical Records (Vol. 4, series 3). Deputy Surveyor General G. W. Evans and Thomas Scott, another fine surveyor, were called in to settle the dispute and Surveyor General Oxley, under orders from Governor-in-chief Sir Thomas Brisbane, made recommendations, but the affair dragged on interminably. Talbot was only partially appeased in the end when he was given a large grant of land at Fingal, which he named Malahide, after his family estate in Ireland.

George Meredith then added considerably to his property at Swan Port, and in the end, before final adjustment by the Caveat Board, his estate must have covered about 50,000 acres. This included John Amos” land at Riversdale which Meredith claimed as his own.

Talbot in his rage had accused everyone but Buxton of being in league against him, including John Amos, but Governor Sorell knew that Amos had nothing to do with Meredith's grant. “I know Mr. Amos, whom I have appointed Chief District Constable and Keeper of the Pound, as a settler on his own land,” Sorell told Talbot when replying to this accusation. “He is not an overseer or in any way dependent on Mr. Meredith, a fact which Mr. Meredith has officially certified……With respect to your statement that your stock and Mr. Meredith's are the only stock likely to trespass at Swan Port, this would in no way effect Mr. Amos's appointment. But in fact I see marked on the map of Swan Port several other names as being located there, amongst which are Major Honner, Mr. Compton and Mr. Hart of Little Swan Port and may reasonably suppose that the settlement will increase.”

In reply Talbot said he was being cheated out of the land, hinting very plainly that Sorell was biased - which, as a matter of fact, he was not.

The first cottage built on Cambria by George Meredith, and referred to by him in correspondence as Creek Hut, was the usual sort of split log cabin built by most of the early settlers. Daubed with clay and mud, with shutter windows and thatched roof made of sags and rushes, it served very well as a temporary home while a strong house was being built. The greatest worry of the pioneers in the meantime being the ever-present fear of fire, either from flying sparks or deliberate malice. When materials were ready for building the present Cambria homestead, Charles Meredith (George senior's second son by his first wife, who is best known now from the fact that he was the husband of his delightful wife, Louise Anne Meredith, authoress and painter) tells that the builder and architect was close at hand. “Old Bull built the house,” says Meredith, “also Riversdale, Spring Vale, and, in fact, the greater part of the houses at Swan Port. His weight did not exceed nine stone. Originally this faithful, honest man had been transported from the Old Country. Twice he escaped, and claimed to be the only escaped convict to reach Sydney without being recaptured. While escaping through the bush his companions were all murdered by the blacks and he had to hide for three days under a log before it was safe for him to come out. Reaching Sydney he was flogged and sent back to Van Diemen's Land, where he became my father's servant.”

Whatever else old Bull may have done, there is no doubt that he left a worthwhile monument to himself in Cambria House, which is a delightful place, well made and strong, even if it lacks some of the continuity a trained architect would have given it. Single storey in front, with a long wide stone-flagged verandah, onto which French windows open, it goes up to three storeys at the back. The bottom storey at the rear of the house actually consists of the cellars, only one side of which is visible, as both ends and back are let into the side of a little hill on which the house was built. A low wall closing in the back yard, gives the impression that it is a sunken garden when viewed from the side of the house, for there are beds of bright flowers in it. There the warm coloured bricks and three rows of windows glow in the afternoon sunshine over the gardens and grass, giving an intensely English effect.

Down in the orchard and vegetable garden there are the remains of a round old brick rabbit hutch, where the precious little animals were closely guarded as delicacies for the table - such a delightful change from the everlasting pickled port (sic), beef and mutton of those early days. Fortunately the little creatures multiplied so rapidly that Mrs. Meredith was able to give some to her friends and the day even came when they were able to liberate a few as an experiment. (How charming; how very much like home it would be; to see real rabbits frisking about and even perhaps, making a burrow in a sandy bank by a briar hedge. Almost certainly the defenceless little things, deprived of the lettuce and cabbage leaves that was their usual diet, would be eaten by the hyenas - Tasmanian Tigers, as they were beginning to call them, or by those nasty smelly wild cats that were always prowling about. Still, it was worth trying.)

Hawthorn hedges protect the garden and orchard, and looking down from the old hot house where fabulous grapes used to ripen, you may see at the foot of a steep bank towards the river, the grandfather of all the oaks, whose branches reach for 34 paces over the green grass, and all is shady and pleasant. It is a beautiful spot and what Louisa Anne Meredith would have called a “dell”. She would have had every reason for doing so, for there is not a tree to be seen in any direction that did not originate in the Old Country.

George Meredith, the eldest son, quarrelled with his father over their sealing and bay whaling activities and started to work on his own account. George, Snr., built a top-sail schooner on the banks of the Meredith River and called her the “Independent”, and George, Jnr., also built himself a ship which he named the “Defence”. The “Independent” was known for years along the coast, under Capt. Thos. Furlong, until at last she was wrecked on Bruny Island.

Young George met his death at St. Vincent's Gulf near what is now Glenelg (South Australia). One Sunday morning with his whaleboat hauled up on the beach nearby, while he was reading his bible, some natives crept out from the scrub and clubbed him to death. He had sold his share of Cambria to Edward Carr Shaw in 1829.

When they arrived in Van Diemen's Land the Meredith family consisted of George, Snr., his second wife, and six children: George, jnr., who was nineteen years old; Sarah, Louisa, Sabina, Charles, Henry and Edwin. John was native born. Of these, Louisa married Capt. Bell and Edwin went over to New Zealand where he settled near Christchurch. Charles was appointed M.H.A. for Glamorgan in 1856 and held other positions as mentioned elsewhere. He died 2nd March, 1880, and was buried in Hobart. George, Snr., died in June, 1856, leaving an estate of 11,000 acres. His wife had died in November, 1842. The Cambria stud of six Saxon Merino rams and ten ewes, the first in the district, if not in Tasmania, was brought out on the “Emerald” by the Merediths.

BUSHRANGER BRADY AT CAMBRIA

Not long after their escape from Macquarie Harbour in 1824, Matthew Brady and his mate, McCabe, attacked Cambria with the intention of robbing Mr. Meredith.

It is said that Mrs. Meredith had the presence of mind to hide her husband in a cider barrel and, trusting to Brady's reputation for unfailing gallantry to women, with pounding heart went out alone to face the bushrangers. She told them that Mr. Meredith had gone away and would not be back before nightfall.

Brady robbed the place of a quantity of food and most of the family silver. Then he drank a glass of wine to the lady's health and took his leave in one of Meredith's whaleboats, lifting his cap and bowing courteously as he went.

Most of the silver was recovered months afterwards, from under some rocks where it had been hidden on the bank of the Derwent by the bushrangers.

It seems likely that the story of Meredith hiding in the barrel was added to the otherwise true story by his enemies. Whatever his weaknesses may have been, Meredith was no coward, and would have been sure to give a good account of himself.

Edwin Meredith in his journal informs us that his father built old Belmont house and lived there while preparing the site of Cambria, about a mile distant. The trees, hedges and orchard of Cambria were being planted while Edwin and his mother, with a gardener, marked out the flower and vegetable gardens.

His half-brother, George, meanwhile helped with ship building and the dealing and whaling. The first vessel built by Meredith on his own property was a small schooner, the “Cygnet”, which proved to be too small for the sealing work it was intended for and was sold in Hobart. “The Black Swan”, also a schooner, was then built to take her place, but she was wrecked while sealing in Bass Strait. Meredith then built his third schooner, the “Independent”. Edwin's half-brother, Charles, at this time was in charge of the whaling station at Maria Island. When Edwin started off to settle in New Zealand his father gave him £2,000 with which he bought a property he named Riversdale in the North Island. His three half-sisters were: Sarah, who married James Poynter, manager of the Bank of Australasia in Hobart; Louisa, married Capt. John Bell, of Bellevue, New Town; and Sabina married John Boyes, merchant, of Hobart Town and London.

George Meredith's family by his second wife consisted of Harry, who was killed when thrown from his horse; Edwin, married Jane Chalmers, of Hobart, and became a pioneer settler in New Zealand on an estate near Otago, which he named Riversdale; John moved over to Mt. Gambier in South Australia and owned a property named Mingbool; Maria was married from Cambria by Bishop Nixon to Lieut. Kay, R.N., of the astronomical station in Hobart; Clara, married Sir Richard Dry of Quamby. Two other sisters, Fanny (who lived in England with Lady Dry and died in London during May of the present year at the age of 94), and Rosina, did not marry. Charles Meredith and his wife Louisa Anne (referred to elsewhere) had a family of three sons, George, Owen and Charles (who never married). Owen married Eliza Jane Windsor; their children were five daughters and one son, the present Mr. David Owen Meredith (mining and metallurgical engineer) of Hobart, whose daughter, Mrs. Alice Hodgson, has two sons, Michael Meredith and David Neil. Mr Michael M. Hodgson married Miss Rosemary Grueber and has an infant son (Lucian Guy).

LIEUT. GEORGE MEREDITH CLIMBS POMPEY'S PILLAR

Pompey's Pillar, a celebrated column of red granite, stands on an eminence south of the walls of Alexandria, in Egypt. Including a ten foot high pedestal, it reaches 98 ft. 9 in. from the ground and is 29 ft. 8 in. in circumference; being, it is said, the largest block of hewn granite in the world. By Napoleon's orders a French “Cap of Liberty” - made of boiler plate, about 7 ft. long, 4 ft. wide, and 3 ft. high, was placed on top of the pillar and firmly fixed there, as an act of defiance during the French occupation.

In 1801, soon after the surrender of Alexandria to Col. Hutchinson, George Meredith, then a young lieutenant on H.M.S. Hinde, was on service in the port and made up his mind to bring down the Cap by hook or by crook. The Governor gave his permission for the attempt to be made provided no harm came to Pompey's Pillar, at the same time pointing out that Meredith was unlikely to succeed where so many others had failed already.

But Meredith vowed he would neither eat nor drink until the accursed Cap was brought down. By means of a kite (the method Napoleon had used) he at last succeeded in getting a rope over the top of the column and dislodging the Cap, which was then lowered to the ground, and the Union Jack left proudly blowing in its place.

The Governor of Alexandria delightedly offered to exchange the trophy for as much coined silver as it would hold, but Meredith took it home with him to Birmingham. Later on it was presented to the Museum there, through the medium of the Earl of Dartmouth, who commemorated the event by presenting George Meredith with a gold ring studded with stones.

The ring is now owned by Mr. David Meredith's grandson, Mr. Michael Meredith Hodgson, in Hobart.

The Charles Merediths

“The Life of a Pioneer Boy”

No history of the East Coast would be complete without some mention of the delightful Mrs. Charles Meredith (1912-1895) whose books (“My Home in Tasmania”, and others) and drawings, made known the life and beauties of the coast all over the Empire.

They struck hard times, for he was no money maker, and that added incentive to her busy pen, although she had published a book of poems, and another of nature studies, before her marriage. Observant, capable and generous, her simple books will always be among the classics of Tasmania.

Charles Meredith, second son of George Meredith, was born at Poyston, Pembrokeshire, on the 29th May, 1811, and came out here with his father. “I well remember that it was a bitter cold night when my brother George, our three sisters and myself were called in from our school to join the 'Emerald'”, he wrote afterwards. “On the way out we fought off a pirate ship near St. Helena, where napoleon Bonaparte was then confined, and reported the action to H.M. frigate 'Mona', then cruising on guard off St. Helena.”

At Cambria Charles and his brother George led a harsh but adventurous life sometimes experienced by young pioneers. “I used to be sent out on frosty mornings with no breakfast, from the tent in which I lived, to take 300 Merino sheep to their feeding ground. When it happened to be convenient a pannikin of tea and a piece of damper were brought to me by anyone who thought of it or had time - perhaps one of my sisters, but I did not go home at night till there was barely enough light for me to put my sheep into the yard. Then I had my supper and went to my tent. This routine went on wed or dry for many months, when my 300 sheep were eventually joined to the large flock and that occupation was gone. I used to sit under a tree and read, for the poor lonely little shepherd had some glorious companions in his solitude. Shakespeare and his myriad creatures lived beside me and Don Quixote and Sancho performed their feats of arms beneath the gum tree boughs. Many a time whilst in this company I have laughed aloud and then, terrified at my imprudence, have sprung to my feet and gazed in fear around, lest some hideous black shape, spear in hand, should have heard it too and come to murder me.

“When I was only eleven years old, it was my duty to take the dogs out to catch kangaroo for meat, as my father's sheep were all of the valuable Merino breed, and far too precious in those early days to be killed for that purpose. If I got brush kangaroo I carried them home myself; if foresters, which were often very large and heavy, I had to go again and take a man to help me bring them in.

“My father was kind, brave and generous and as children we honoured and yielded him implicit obedience but the hand he ruled with wore an iron glove. Any one or two of the scores of half-occupied men on my father's establishment could have done my allotted duties but it was his pleasure and command that the duty should be mine, no matter what the difficulty, toil or danger, and I would not have dared to utter, or look, any remonstrance.

“Horses were scarce in those days, and even had they been plentiful I don't suppose I should have had the use of one. Starting off at dawn into the bush….hunting on one occasion…I struck up towards the hills and after heading the stony creek the dogs caught two brush kangaroo, which were as much as I could carry, so I turned again seawards, having made a half-circle of five or six miles, intending to return along the beach. As I neared the sea I listened repeatedly, in case any of the blacks should be about, and on quitting the forest for the more open sandbank, I crept along on my hands and knees from the shelter of one boobialla bush to another, until I could look down on the broad sands. I then saw that there were fresh tracks of bare feet. The black tribe had evidently just passed by; men, women and children, going north, the same direction in which I was bound. Had I been a few minutes earlier I should have been in advance of them and been plainly seen on the long stretch of sand and, as a certain consequence, pursued and speared. I could not even now be sure that all the tribe had passed, some might be still behind, and should I venture on the beach, I might be hemmed in between the two parties. I was very tired with my long walk, heavily laden as I was, but there was only one thing to do - to make my way back by the same circuitous route I had come, following up the creek….and striking across the rough hills and forest for home.

“As I plodded wearily along I came upon another set of tracks of the aborigines…..but keeping the dogs silent and close beside me; creeping along noiselessly and steadily, and keenly listening for every sound that might warn me of the enemy's neighbourhood, I got safely home. There I was sharply taken to task for having dawdled so long on the way and straightway ordered off on some other task.”

Perhaps George Meredith, Senior, Treated his boys a little more harshly than most; he was certainly a severe man, but it may be gathered by the notes left by Charles that his hostility had been aroused by the manner adopted by his family to their new step-mother. Mrs. Charles Meredith gives some indication of this in her book, “Tasmanian Friends and Foes”, in which her husband appears under the name of Merton and tells tales of his youth in almost the exact paraphrase of some of the notes he left. Some of these are in the library of the Royal Society in Hobart, and some are in the possession of his descendents.

Charles Meredith started life for himself as a squatter in New South Wales at the age of twenty-three and after two years returned to England where he married his cousin, Louisa Anne Twamley, at Edybaston (sic) Church, Birmingham, in 1838. They lived in New South Wales for a time, where he suffered severely from bad seasons. Then he brought her to Oyster Bay and lived on his father's property, Riversdale, while Spring Vale was being built fore them to live in. For thirty-eight years after that he was in politics, being a member of the House of Assembly for Glamorgan and holding various important positions - Colonial Treasurer and Minister for Lands and Works. Governor Eardley Wilmot then appointed him Police Magistrate at Port Sorell.

Among the measures he introduced was an Act for the protection of black swans, which were then in danger of extermination, although once they had been counted in millions. He died in Launceston, 2nd March, 1880, and five years later a fountain was raised to his memory on the Queen's Domain, in Hobart. His wife died in Melbourne on the 21st October, 1895.

“My grandfather was a solicitor in Birmingham.” Charles Meredith tells us, “and lived at Castle Bromwick (sic) where he died at the age of 48, leaving six children, of which my father was the youngest, born 13th February, 1778. My mother had been Miss Sarah Westall Hicks, whom he married in 1805 while he was recruiting for the Royal Marines. My father sold my mother's property in Berkshire and with the proceeds purchased our estate in Wales, Rhyndaston, about eight miles from Hertford, but, almost immediately after her death, my father sold Rhyndaston (which had been rented to the two brothers, Amos) and with the proceeds of the sale obtained orders for grants of land in Tasmania. These first grants were Cambria and Riversdale.

“My father then married miss Mary Evans, my mother's companion, and taking us with them, left for Hobart Town.”

The Naval Chronicle
Publiushed by J. Gold, 1805
Item Notes: v. 14

Marriages

September 13.............

16............

Lieutenant Meredith, of the Royal Marines, to Miss Hicks of Enbourne.

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, October 12, 1805; Issue 2737

At Abingdon, Lieut. G. Meredith, of the Royal Marines, to Miss Hicks of Enhorne. Berks.

There was a dispute in 1809 over some property - the case cited was Meredith v. King. The Plaintiffs were George Meredith and his wife and the defendants were John King and Thomas Hicks.

Meredith - Hicks
Certified copy of a conveyance D/EX 104111 1809

Contents:

1. Thomas Hicks and Mary his wife late of Newbury now of Enborne, gent. and others to

2. John Meredith of Brumagham co. Warwick, gent, (a trustee of George Meredith, late a Lieutenant in His Majesty's Corps of marines, now of Speen, esq.)

Messuage, barn, outhouses, orchards, stables near the wash in Newbury, and about 100 acres (with abuttals) dispersed in the common fields (known as Northcroft, Eastfield and Westfield), in Newbury

Included in the property is a messuage outhouses and barns and just over 10 acres of land (specified) in Enborne near the Newbury property above. The deed contains topographical detail in the abuttals of the Enborne property, such as 'King's Ditch' and 'Nightingale Lane' etc.. The Enborne property includes several coppices

Consideration: £4765





General Notes (Wife)

Sarah was an heiress.

Sarah Westall Hicks was the daughter of Thomas Hicks. The Australian Dictionary of Biography mistakenly refers to her as the daughter of H. W. Hicks but a Henry Wilkins Hicks was in fact the brother of Thomas Hicks, as is clear from his Will.

Sarah was living at Enborne, Berkshire at the time of her marriage.


General Notes for Child George Meredith

George was murdered by natives on Kangaroo Island in 1834

....George Meredith, a sealer, spent a few years on Kangaroo island before deciding to establish himself on the eastern shores of St. Vincent's Gulf, opposite Kangaroo island, in about 1834. He left Kangaroo island with an aboriginal working team, including Sal, who was later lioving on Kangaroo island with Betty, and two young mainland aboriginal men. When they reached the mainland, one of the young men killed Meredith and the three then used his boat and tools to carry out their own hunting.

With a boat in the ownership of the aborigines on the other side of the strait, there was a sudden reversal of power--now the islanders feared they would be attacked. They particularly feared "encounter Bay Bob", a most notorious warrior, who they believed would come and kill them all. But their fears were never realised; Meredith's boat lost its moorings and was smashed at sea. Ten years after the event, Sal and Suke were arrested for Meredith's murder; it was on this story that Cawthorne based his novel The Islanders. However, The women were discharged on discovering the killer had been dead a few years. There are many stories regarding Meredith's death but most seem to agree that it was on the mainland near Yankalilla around 1834.

In Alas for the Pelicans by Anne Chittleborough - page 8:

.....The Kangaroo Islanders, a novel written by William Cawthorne in 1854 and published in 1865, which represents not only the sealers and the women who lived with them but a Tasmanian sealing master named George Meredith, murdered by the Kaurna in 1836.........

Meredith's Whaleboat and Defiance - Defiance was a schooner of 24 ton commanded by George Meredith Jnr. in 1833-1834. She left Sydney on a sealing trip in September 1833 and was wrecked on Howe's Island. A Mr James Manning was either a crewman or passenger on this voyage, and when the ship was wrecked he accompanied the commander, a man named Jacob Seaman and a native woman names Sal to Kangaroo Island in a whaleboat which had been cargo on the ship, reaching the Island in February 1834. Meredith was later found murdered at Yankalilla on the mainland near Cape Jervis by a native boy. The whaleboat was taken to Encounter Bay and used by the natives there for sealing and fishing.

South Australia Police Historical Society

A tragedy of pre settlement days in the Yankalilla district concerns George Meredith, the adventurous son of a prominent Hobart town businessman, who came to Kangaroo Island, seeking his fortune among the sealers.

He had with him, on landing on the Island, a Tasmanian native woman, named Sal. Later he “acquired” two young men from the Encounter Bay area, and these he trained to help him in his hunting expeditions.

Meredith, much against the advice of his fellow sealers, decided to come across to the then unsettled mainland.

Some time later, his companions found the reason for his non return, and discovering Sal, were told that Meredith had been despatched by a blow by one of his native offsiders, who had then returned to his tribe.

Meredith’s father asked for inquires to be made into the murder, but there being no European settlement at that time, and thus no police to make investigations, nothing could be done.

Years later police inquiries were made into the case.

Sal was found, but, by that time, the man suspected of the murder of Meredith was himself dead.

For years afterwards stories persisted that Meredith’s store of gold coins was hidden somewhere near Western River where he had set up his residence.

________________________________________________________________

However:

It was erroneous to believe that white people had been the aggressors; so wrote Louisa. "British farmers and country gentlemen, not usually considered a desperately ferocious and blood-thirsty class " were blameless. The colony owed an enormous debt of gratitude to Mr. George Augustus Robinson for his capture of the Aborigines; he thereby "saved the lives of thousands of defenceless persons," and restored prosperity to the colony which had been steadily undermined by the ongoing hostilities. Refuting any suggestions that this colonial prosperity had come about through British aggression against Aborigines, Meredith expressed the hope of making known "the real state of affairs formerly existing between the Aborigines and the colonists, which is so greatly misunderstood in England."

But in arguing the innocence of white settlers based on her husband's accounts, Louisa Meredith maintained silence about the members of the Meredith family's personal involvement in frontier violence. Indeed, she might have been less grateful to Protector Robinson if she had known of entries he had made in his diary during the 1830's. Charles Meredith's oldest brother, named George after his father, had met a violent death in "mysterious" circumstances across the Bass Strait in the Port Phillip District (later the Colony of Victoria). Robinson knew the details: George Meredith had been involved in a nefarious trade, kidnapping Aboriginal women, some from near Kangaroo Island, some from Port Phillip, and selling them to sealers on the islands off the coast of Tasmania to serve as forced labor and sexual partners. Hence arose his death at the hands of Aboriginal men. On May 9,1836, Robinson wrote in his diary that he had sought magisterial powers over all the islands in the straits to remove women held against their will. A white man living on Flinders Island of the name of Proctor, who was married to an Aboriginal woman, informed Robinson of this tragic business. "Proctor informed me that the New Holland women was [sic] brought to the islands by George Meredith, that Munro has one, Baily has one, and the other sealer the last." Further, "George Meredith was speared by the natives on the coast of New Holland, no doubt in retaliation for the injuries he had done to them. This was a just retribution. Many aggressions had been committed by the Merediths on the natives at Oyster Bay." Thus Robinson accused Charles Meredith's father and other men of the Meredith family of ill-treating certain Aborigines. This throws further light on Charles Meredith's stories of Aborigines'"unprovoked attacks" and on his brother George's eventual death at the hands of Aborigines.

Although few white settler women witnessed the direct hostilities between white men and Aborigines and fewer still wrote about them, it seems Louisa Meredith could not miss the opportunity to present the settlers' version of the hostilities to an English audience. In 1890 she was still at work with her pen, describing Aborigines in racist and derogatory terms. The Tasmanian Aborigines were "surely the very lowest creatures in human form. Their countenances as shown by the excellent photographs of the last four, made at my suggestion for the Melbourne Exhibition many years ago, bore a curiously close resemblance to pug dogs, and they possessed all the animal instinct and adroitness for self-preservation and concealment."

Meredith's Whaleboat and Defiance - Defiance was a schooner of 24 ton commanded by George Meredith Jnr. in 1833-1834. She left Sydney on a sealing trip in September 1833 and was wrecked on Howe's Island. A Mr James Manning was either a crewman or passenger on this voyage, and when the ship was wrecked he accompanied the commander, a man named Jacob Seaman and a native woman names Sal to Kangaroo Island in a whaleboat which had been cargo on the ship, reaching the Island in February 1834. Meredith was later found murdered at Yankalilla on the mainland near Cape Jervis by a native boy. The whaleboat was taken to Encounter Bay and used by the natives there for sealing and fishing.

In a letter from Louisa Anne Twamley in 1833 to her uncle and her cousin George's father George Meredith in Tasmania, she says:

.........I have received from George a very long and truly interesting letter, which has given us more information than all the other letters (except your own) yet arrived from Tasmania; I cannot express to you how much it gratifies me, more especially from the inexplicable and mysterious silence respecting him, which is so strictly maintained by yourself and the other members of your family, you have give distinct hints which at such a distance are, pardon my freedom, ill-advised, as they lead to endless and distressing conjectures - He mentions his intended voyage to New Zealand, and Mr. Watson in a letter from London to myself mentions his own, Mr.W's regret at the "circumstances which compel him to quit his adopted country" - You may imagine we feel great anxiety respecting his real fate, and sincerely hope to receive more satisfactory and decisive intelligence.......


General Notes for Child Sarah Westall Meredith

Sarah Westall Poynter

Painter and sketcher, was the eldest daughter of George Meredith, pioneer settler of the Great Swanport district in Van Diemen's Land, and his first wife, Sarah Westall Hicks. Sarah was probably born in Wales but she lived mainly in England. She came to Van Diemen's Land with her father, step-mother and other members of the family, leaving from London in the Emerald on 8 November 1820. Her view of The Old Cottage at Red Banks (the original wattle-and-daub cottage built by her father at Cambria in 1821) was copied in 1846 by her half-sister Fanny Meredith. It is now known only from the copy.

After her marriage to James Peck Poynter in the 1830s Sarah lived at Bathurst, New South Wales, where James managed the local bank. Her brother Charles and his wife Louisa Anne Meredith, a cousin whom she had known all her life, visited in October 1839 and met the Poynters' first surviving son, Charles, born in March. The Poynters finally had a family of three boys and a girl. James died in 1847 and Sarah returned to England. She apparently paid a visit to her Tasmanian relatives in the late 1850s and seems to have been staying with her father's family at the grander Cambria, Great Swanport, in 1858 when she exhibited her oil painting, Lake St. Clair, Tasmania, in the Hobart Town Art-Treasures Exhibition (unless this was copied from a Prout drawing or engraving in England). She died in England in 1869.

Sarah Poynter's original sketches are in the Crowther Library. In 1936 Violet Mace, the last of the George Meredith descendants to live at Cambria, made four crude pencil copies after Poynter drawings for the Royal Society of Tasmania. These depict Bothwell Church, two general views of Port Arthur and Sketch of Commandant's House, Port Arthur Showing Point Puer in Distance (TMAG). The originals have not been located.


General Notes for Child Charles Meredith

Charles Meredith was an Australian grazier and politician. He was Tasmanian colonial treasurer for several years and was also minister for lands and works.

Visited England in 1838 and married his cousin Louise in 1839. He returned to Tasmania in 1840.

Meredith was born at Poyston Lodge, Pembroke, Wales, the youngest son of George Meredith and his wife, Sarah Westall Hicks. His father saw service in the royal marines during the Napoleonic wars, and later decided to emigrate to Van Diemen's Land (later called Tasmania. He arrived at Hobart with his wife and family on 13 March 1821 and became one of the best known of the early pioneers. Charles assisted his father in farming in Tasmania for some time.

In 1834 Meredith went to New South Wales and took up land on the Murrumbidgee River after being denied a grant of land by Lieutenant-Governor George Arthur. He visited England in 1838 and on 18 April 1839 married his cousin, Louisa Anne Twamley. On his return to Australia he spent two years in New South Wales, but it was a depressed period and he made heavy losses. He then went to Tasmania, and in 1843 was appointed a police magistrate at Sorell in the north-east.

Political career

Meredith became a member of the original Tasmanian Legislative Council and was elected for Glamorgan in the first house of assembly in 1856. He was colonial treasurer in the Thomas Gregson ministry for two months in 1857, and held the same position in the James Whyte ministry from January 1863 to November 1866. He was opposition leader 1862–63 and November 1866–72. He held the lands and works portfolios in the Frederick Innes cabinet from November 1872 to August 1873, and was again colonial treasurer in the Thomas Reibey ministry from July 1876 to August 1877. In total, he was in parliament almost 24 years and was a member of the executive council for 17 years.

Late life and legacy

Meredith resigned his seat on account of ill-health in 1879, and died at Launceston, Tasmania , on 2 March 1880. His wife and children survived him.

Meredith was one of the few Tasmanians whose name has been publicly commemorated; a mountain range in nort-east Tasmania is named for him and a fountain in his memory was erected in the Queen's domain, Hobart, in 1885.

Tigress in Exile

Page 178-179

….and were called upon to keep the farming interests going to provide for the family's needs. George and Owen seemed to inherit the good qualities of both parents and were popular and well-liked men in the mining communities in which they moved when they left home.

So it was that in 1856 Louisa found herself in a predominantly male household. The interests of the male members of the family were essentially practical and a good deal of their time was spent in general farming duties, as Charles was still running sheep and cattle in the Swan Port area until 1858.

Louisa turned her attention to her husband. It was obvious to Louisa that from this point onwards it would be necessary for her to direct the family's fortunes. She was very fond of her handsome, charming husband and delighted in his company, but she could not ignore the sad fact that Charles was incompetent and completely incapable of providing for the family and steering it through the troubles lying ahead. Louisa faced the problem of her husband's weakness squarely and unflinchingly. Louisa became the governing force in the Meredith family.

At this time Charles was in an unenviable position in society. At an age when most of his contemporaries had consolidated their positions in one of the professions or on the land and had established themselves in pleasant houses and comfortable surroundings, affording their families good educations and every opportunity of enjoying the society of the island, Charles, at forty-four, had neither position nor prospects. He lived in a relatively humble house and could not afford to educate his children to any high degree.

With precious little capital to draw upon and no prospects of further inheritance, it was clear to Louisa that something must be found for Charles to do, preferably something which would employ his talents and give him back some of the status that he had enjoyed as heir to the 'Cambria' estates. Charles was a good-tempered spend-thrift whose chief asset was his silver tongue and a ready wit. It was the latter two attributes that Louisa felt could be most usefully employed.

To Louisa's despair, all his life money seemed to slip through Charles's fingers without any gain whatever. In the 1860s or 1870s both Louisa and Charles, at the death of their Uncle Charles Meredith, the lawyer in Leamington Priors in England, inherited £2,000 each. The estate was valued at about £40,000 and, according to Louisa,

ought to have been divided at once among his nephews and nieces, but Mr. Aston, cousin Lucy's husband, and the only surviving executor, made delays and played tricks which considerably reduced our shares. My Uncle would not have allowed Molly's brood to share his carefully-guarded wealth had he known what she and they were!

The inheritance once again sparked Louisa's bitterness against George's second family, and was a great disappointment to her. 'With my share,' she wrote, 'I paid off the mortgage on "Birch Grove" and hoped my husband would relieve "Twamley" with his, but he could not, and what became of his share I never knew.'

With Charles obviously incapable of succeeding in any commercial enterprise, Louisa came up with a clever solution: Charles would become a politician. His popularity on a personal level would help to elect him without too much trouble. Most important, his election would gain him recognition and status, which were lacking at this time of his life. The idea appealed to Charles. He had not, it is true, shown much interest in politics up to this time but, with the support of his wife and remembering her experience in active political work in Birmingham in the 'thirties, Charles felt confident that Louisa was right; politics were for him.

There was one drawback: politicians at this time were unpaid. The state of Victoria passed a bill in 1870 to provide payment for members of its parliament, but from 1856 when the first representative parliament was instituted, to 1890, Tasmania paid only the members of the Executive Council: the premier and his ministers. In 1890 a bill was passed to allow all members of the Tasmanian Legislative Council and the House of Assembly expenses of £100 per annum, payable only after each member had attended twenty sittings.

Charles's project would therefore be interesting, rewarding, demanding but non-productive financially and, unless he became a member of the Executive Council, it would be necessary to maintain a farm to provide for the family. This Louisa felt, was a small price to pay in return for Charles gaining a significant place in life.

In 1851 Charles had made his first, hesitant political move. 'Mr. Charles .Meredith declared elected amongst great celebrations around a cyder cask', wrote James Amos in his diary. 'A great many had too much to drink.' A rowdy meeting took place in the old Swan Inn. Charles had reluctantly agreed to accept endorsement for the Oatlands seat on the first Elective Legislative Council, but this move was made simply to demonstrate that Glamorgan, an important portion of the district to its settlers, was practically disfranchised by being overwhelmed by the voting power of Oatlands proper. Charles's feelings about his first essay into politics can be judged by his own words to John: 'You will have heard that I have been lucky enough…………..

Pages 218-219

……..underlined in her letter to Parkes for, ten years later, nothing had come of the Royal promise.

She asked Sir Henry to write a few lines to Gladstone. 'Add all your styles and titles of importance to your letter', she directed, and Sir Henry must have done so, as his recommendation was effective. To her intense satisfaction, on 20 October 1884, a bill was enacted in Tasmania authorising payment of a pension of £100 per annum to Louisa Anne Meredith, widow of the Honourable Charles Meredith who 'has by her writings and paintings rendered considerable services to the cause of Science, Literature and Art in Tasmania'.

An English newspaper reported:

The small colony of Tasmania has just done a generous and noble deed. For the first time in its history it has voted a pension as a reward for distinguished literary and artistic merit . . . Mrs. Meredith is well-known, not only as an authoress, but as an artist of singular grace and power. She has done more to illustrate the beautiful flora and singular fauna of Tasmania than any other person.

The pension was granted at a most opportune moment for its recipient, for after Charles's death financial problems became even more distressing.

Charles's will, dated 20 April 1868, was rather an eccentric one. It clearly reflected a distrust of the legal profession, possibly caused by the drastic reduction of an expected legacy from their Uncle Charles for which he and Louisa blamed the lawyers and the executor, Aston. The will is quoted here in full:

By this Will I revoke all other wills made by me and declare the Will in possession of Allport Roberts and Allport null and void. By this my last will and testament I give and bequeath all my goods, chattels, lands, houses and estates to my wife to be held and enjoyed by her during her life and in trust for my three sons, George Campbell Meredith, Charles Twamley Meredith and Owen Meredith whom I constitute and appoint my sole executors and who are, at their mother's death to divide my estate real and personal amongst themselves as may seem to them the best taking share and share alike and I entreat them to act together as loving brothers and to take care of their mother and not to quarrel with each other the real meaning of this my last will cannot be mistaken my object in making it so short and clear and leaving the disposal of my said estate to act with my wife and three sons is to prevent the lawyers from having anything to receive out of the hard earnings of my life.

His whole estate was valued at no more than £690 at the time of his death.

At sixty-eight years of age, Louisa was left to cope as well as she could on this pitifully small amount of capital. It is possible that she had their son Charles to provide for as well, until he died in September 1888 and was buried at St Anne's Church, 'Triabunna, at the age of forty-four. The day after his funeral Louisa donated to this church

the sweet sonorous bell which has been to me and mine as a familiar home-voice-at "Riversdale", at "Twamley" and at "Malunnah" for the past forty years. I shall not listen for it again but I pray you when you hear it, think kindly of my dear lamented dead, and let it toll for an hour at noon on the day of my own burial, whenever that may be.

After Charles's death in Launceston, Louisa returned to live at 'Malunnah', but when her son died she moved to a flat in a house in Davey Street, Hobart, owned by Captain W.S. Vernon. During these years of widowhood Louisa remained as busy as ever. Her grandchildren visited her frequently at 'Malunnah' and George Glendower, George's eldest son, had vivid memories all his life of his grandmother gathering a new botanical specimen from the bush or coming in with a freshly-caught fish still glistening from the sea and sitting down with paint and brush to record its colours immediately, before they faded. His grandmother gave him a beautiful painting which is one of the best examples of her work extant.

As Louisa grew older, it was left to another Louisa Anne, the eldest daughter of Owen Meredith, to comfort and take care of her in her final years. This Louisa Anne was a high-spirited girl, capable of coping with her grandmother's domineering and demanding manner. Louisa Anne vent to live permanently with her grandmother in about 1888.

Louisa had lost the sight of her right eye some time in the 1880s and she suffered much pain from chronic sciatica, which caused her to limp badly and required her to use a stick. But Sir Henry Parkes, knowing the incredible spirit and determination of his old friend, was not really surprised when he opened his mail one morning in 1889 to find yet another request from Louisa Meredith. This time, she said, she wanted his help in getting her to England to launch her next book in person!

She was an old lady, she acknowledged, but her grand-daughter Louisa Anne had promised to go with her-she was just seventeen. She described the voyage as 'doubtless an exploit of less wisdom than valour but asked Sir Henry to obtain a passage for her at reduced………


General Notes for Child Sabina Meredith

1851 Census:

Sabina was enumerated in the England census of 1851 at 3 Paragon Buildings, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire with sons George (aged 9), Edward (aged 7), Frank (aged 6) and Duncan (aged 4), daughters Louisa (aged 17) and Isabella (aged 10), and four servants.

1861 Census:

Middlesex
Paddington
St. John
8 Kensington Gardens Terrace
John Boyes - Head - 61 - Fund Holder
Sabina - wife - 51
Charles - son - 22
Elizabeth - daughter - 25
Sabina M. - daughter - 24
Helen C. - daughter - 8


picture

Thomas Hicks and Mary Payne




Husband Thomas Hicks

         Born: 1752 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Oct 1817 - Cope Hall, Enborne, Berkshire
       Buried: 1817 - Newbury Parish Church, Berkshire


       Father: John Hicks
       Mother: Mary King


     Marriage: 25 Mar 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire

 Other Spouse: Unknown




Wife Mary Payne

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 28 May 1825
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Hannah Hicks

         Born: 1767 - circa
   Christened: 11 Jan 1767 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Jane Hicks

         Born: 1768 - circa
   Christened: 16 Jan 1768 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M William Hicks

         Born: 1769 - circa
   Christened: 16 Jul 1769 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Thomas Hicks

         Born: 1771 - circa
   Christened: 2 Jun 1771 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Elizabeth Hicks

         Born: 1771 - circa
   Christened: 14 Jul 1771 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Elizabeth Hicks

         Born: 1773 - circa
   Christened: 25 Apr 1773 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Anne Hicks

         Born: 1775 - circa
   Christened: 2 Apr 1775 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 F Mary Hicks

         Born: 1777 - circa
   Christened: 16 Feb 1777 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 F Mary Hicks

         Born: 1805 - circa
   Christened: 9 Jun 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Henry Gale
         Marr: 28 Aug 1832 - Handborough, Oxfordshire



10 M Eugene Hicks

         Born: 1802 - circa
   Christened: 7 Jun 1802 - Enborne, Berkshire
         Died: Mar 1870 - Bath, Avon, Somerset
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Anne Sharps
         Marr: 30 Oct 1830 - Highworth, Wiltshire




General Notes (Husband)

Thomas's Will of 5 Feb 1814 describes him as Thomas Hicks of Skinners Green in the parish of Enborne Berkshire Gentleman. It is not known whether he continued the stonemason's business of his father John. The identity of the mother of his daughter Sarah Westall Meredith nee Hicks is not known.

The History of the Ancient Town and Borough of Newbury in the County of Berks.

By Walter Money

"Hicks, Thomas, of Cope Hall, d. 6 Oct. 1817, a. 65."

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, May 28, 1825; Issue 3761

"Mary, relict of Thomas Hicks, Esq, of Cope Hall, near Newbury"

Certified copy of a conveyance D/EX 1041/1 1809

1 bdl

Contents:

1. Thomas Hicks and Mary his wife late of Newbury now of Enborne, gent. and others to:

2. John Meredith of Brumagham co. Warwick, gent, (a trustee of George Meredith, late a Lieutenant in His Majesty's Corps of Marines, now of Speen, esq.)

Messuage, barn, outhouses, orchards, stables near the Wash in Newbury, and about 100acres (with abuttals) dispersed in the common fields (known as Northcroft, Eastfield and Westfield), in Newbury
Included in the property is a messuage outhouses and barns and just over 10 acres of land (specified) in Enborne near the Newbury property above. The deed contains topographical detail in the abuttals of the Enborne property, such as 'King's Ditch' and 'Nightingale Lane' etc.. The Enborne property includes several coppices. Consideration: £4765


General Notes (Wife)

Jackson's Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, May 28, 1825; Issue 3761.

Death Notices:

Mary, relict of Thomas Hicks, Esq., of Cope Hall near Newbury.


General Notes for Child Eugene Hicks

Eugene Hicks was described in his father's Will as illegitimate, although his parents subsequently married.

1841 Census:

Berkshire
Enborne
Cope Hall
Eugene Hicks - 35 - Independent
Anne Hicks - 35 - Independent
Maria Hicks - 8
Thomas Hicks - 7
Mary Hicks - 5
Sarah Hicks - 2

1851 Census:

Somerset
Walcot
Lansdown
Down House
Charlotte Sharps - 60 - Fund Holder
Eugene Hicks - 60
Ann Hicks - 67 - sister
Maria A. Hicks - 18 - Niece
Thomas - 16 - nephew
Hannah?? - 12 - niece
Sarah Hicks - 10


1861 Census:

Somerset
Lyncombe and Widcombe
Eugene Hicks - 58
Anne - 61
Daughter - 28
picture

Frederick Charles Hodgson and Alice Meredith




Husband Frederick Charles Hodgson

         Born: 13 Jun 1901 - Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 Jun 1959 - Queensland
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 24 Jun 1925




Wife Alice Meredith

         Born: 30 Jan 1902 - New South Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Nov 1986 - Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: David Owen Meredith
       Mother: Alice Vicary Cottrell




picture
Edward Alleyne Reynolds and Gladys Holden




Husband Edward Alleyne Reynolds

         Born: 1893 - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Alleyne Reynolds
       Mother: Alice Elizabeth Greaves


     Marriage: 27 Jun 1922 - Westminster, All Souls Church, Langham Place




Wife Gladys Holden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Walter J. Holden
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Alleyne H (Holden??) Reynolds

         Born: Mar 1925 - Glanford Brigg, Lincolnshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Elizabeth James




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Friday, Jun 30, 1922; pg. 1; Issue 43071; col A

Reynolds: - Holden.-On the 27th June, at All Souls, Langham-place, W., by the Rev. G. Robinson Lees, cousin of the bride, assisted by the Rev. Arthur Buxton, Vicar, Edward Alleyne Reynolds, eldest son of the late Mr. Alleyne Reynolds of Hove, Sussex and Mrs. A. Reynolds, of Broomfield, Sheffield, to Gladys, third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Holden, of Hove.


General Notes (Wife)

Gladys Holden was the third daughter of Mr and Mrs Walter J. Holden of Hove.


General Notes for Child Alleyne H (Holden??) Reynolds

The Times, Thursday, Feb 01, 1951; pg. 1; Issue 51914; col A

Reynolds. -- On January 30, 1951, at Oakvale Nursing Home, Sheffield, to Elizabeth (nee James), wife of Alleyne H. Reynolds - a son.

The Times, Friday, Apr 27, 1984; pg. 16; Issue 61816; col G

BAT Industries, Britain's third largest company, and one that is already in the van among private-sector providers of workshops for small businesses, plans to gear up its efforts to provide not only workshops but offices and retail units. The plan could lead to a quadrupling of the number of small workshops so far being provided, adding up to 800 to those already on offer in Liverpool and those soon to be on the market in Brixton.

The assessment comes from Alleyne Reynolds, mamaging director of BAT Industries Small Business. This subsidiary was created three years ago to focus BAT's efforts in helping small business in areas where BAT is a big employer, leading intitially to four target areas, the others being Southampton and Bristol.

picture

Walter J. Holden




Husband Walter J. Holden

         Born: Hove
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Gladys Holden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edward Alleyne Reynolds
         Marr: 27 Jun 1922 - Westminster, All Souls Church, Langham Place




General Notes for Child Gladys Holden

Gladys Holden was the third daughter of Mr and Mrs Walter J. Holden of Hove.
picture

Holdsworth and Sarah Stephens




Husband Holdsworth

         Born:  - Huddersfield
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Stephens

         Born: 1813 - circa
   Christened: 28 Mar 1813 - Knill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Stephens
       Mother: Susannah Beaumont




picture
H.F.K. Holloway




Husband H.F.K. Holloway

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Catherine Holloway

         Born: 1846 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Feb 1936 - Marchwood, Northam, Devon
       Buried: 7 Feb 1936 - Abbotsham Church
       Spouse: Major-General John Edward Boyes
         Marr: 23 Oct 1866 - Marchwood Church, Southampton




General Notes for Child Mary Catherine Holloway

The Times, Thursday, February 6, 1936; Page 1:

BOYES--On Feb. 4, 1936, at Marchwood, Northam, Devon, Mary Catherine Boyes, widow of Major-General John Edward Boyes, C.B., aged 90. Funeral in Abbotsham Church tomorrow (Friday) at 2.30.

1881 Census:

Dorset
Fordington
Fordington House
Mary Catherine Boyes - Head - 34
Mary Boyes - daughter - 13
George Boyes - son - 6
Francis Boyes - brother-in-law - 36
Helen Boyes - sister-in-law - 27

picture

Joseph Broadbent Holmes and Harriette Pawsey Philips




Husband Joseph Broadbent Holmes

         Born: 13 Jul 1817 - Godstone, Surrey
   Christened: 14 Aug 1817 - St. Nicholas
         Died: 17 Dec 1897 - The Wilderness, Hunter Valley
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 31 November 1841 - Westbury-on-Severn, Gloucestershire




Wife Harriette Pawsey Philips

         Born: 9 Nov 1813 - Newnham, Gloucestershire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1889
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Philips
       Mother: Phoebe Maxwell





Children
1 F Minnie (Minna) Holmes

         Born: 1852
   Christened: 
         Died: 1917 - Mosman, Sydney, New South Wales
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Henry Montague Meredith
         Marr: 1883 - Greta, New South Wales



2 F Edith Ellen Holmes

         Born: 1848
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Maxwell Philips Holmes

         Born: 1842
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Spencer H. Holmes

         Born: 1844
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Charles P. Holmes

         Born: 1850
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Elizabeth P. Holmes

         Born: 1848
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Edith E. Holmes

         Born: 1846
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Joseph Broadbent Holmes established a large vineyard and was the president of the Hunter River Vineyard Association in 1852.

Joseph Broadbent Holmes was born on Godstone, Surrey, England on 13/7/1817. He was baptised at St Nicholas on 14/8/1817. He died at the Wilderness on 17/12/1897. He married Harriet Pawsey Phillips (born 9/11/1813 at Newnham, Gloucs.) Her parents were Charles Philips and Phoebe Maxwell. Joseph and Harriet were married at Westbury-on-Severn in Gloucestershire in on 31/11/1841. Within a year they had travelled to Australia, and soon after purchased a property from a Robert Coulson, not far from Allandale, near Maitland in the Hunter Valley.

The name "Wilderness" came from the name of a lake in Cumberland.

Joseph built a house near Black Creek and developed a vineyard. In 1852 he was the president of the Hunter River Vineyard Association in 1852. His eventual property was 2,000 acres in size of which 100 acres was under grapes.

The family had a close association with the local Anglican minister, who kept a detailed diary (often mentioning the Holmes family). One of the eight children, Maxwell Pillips Holmes, married the minister's daughter Mary Anne Glennie.

Joseph and Harriet had eight children, the eldest Maxwell.

Joseph was the son of a minister and a noted martinet.

Joseph's sister was Georgiana Frances Holmes.

Joseph's younger brother was Arthur Parker Holmes - he was at Trinity College Dublin studying medicine in the 1850's.

The Wilderness comprises 2060 acres on Black Creek - Church services were held in the homestead until the construction of Rothbury church on Wilderness land deeded to the church.

Lewis Chalmers Kelman was married to Edith Ellen Holmes, eldest daughter of Joseph and Harriet in 1872.

Arthur Broadbent Holmes, born in 1855, was the youngest child of Joseph and Harriet - he married Isobel Blanche Evans and his nephew, Harry Glennie Holmes married her sister, Leonora Marguerite Evans

In 1842, William Boughton was brought to Australia by Joseph Broadbent Holmes to establish his vineyards on the Hunter River, NSW.

In 1841 William Boughton was an agricultural labourer living with his parents in Minsterworth, Glos. (which was an area that grew cider apples). Significantly, in that it substantiates a connection between the two families, in 1841 William's wife-to-be, Eliza Virgo, was employed as a female servant in the household where Harriet Phillips, Joseph's wife-to-be, resided in Newnham, Glos.

In the 1860s, Joseph Holmes planted "The Wilderness and Caerphilly", either side of the Branxton Road near the intersection with The Wilderness Road.



picture

Henry Montague Meredith and Minnie (Minna) Holmes




Husband Henry Montague Meredith

         Born: 27 Jan 1854 - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1902 - Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Maria Hammond


     Marriage: 1883 - Greta, New South Wales




Wife Minnie (Minna) Holmes

         Born: 1852
   Christened: 
         Died: 1917 - Mosman, Sydney, New South Wales
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Broadbent Holmes
       Mother: Harriette Pawsey Philips





Children
1 M Hammond Meredith

         Born: 1886 - West Maitland, New South Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 1945 - Canterbury, N.S.W.
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ethel M. Weckes
         Marr: 1914 - St. Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales



2 M Owen Montague Meredith

         Born: 1888 - Greta, New South Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Irene M. McBride
         Marr: 1921 - Wellington, New South Wales



3 M Noelle Holmes Meredith

         Born: 23 Jun 1891 - Greta, New South Wales
   Christened: 
         Died: 1969 - St. Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Henry Montague Meredith moved to the Hunter Valley in New South Wales. There is a cemetery adjacent to a property called “The Wilderness” where members of the Holmes family are buried. Inter alia, Minna Holmes is buried there - she was described as the widow of Henry Montague Meredith.

The Rothbury cemetery was established on land adjacent to a property "The Wildernes" on Wilderness Road. The property was owned by Mr Joseph Broadbent Holmes. In 1866 Mr Holmes commissioned a
Church to be build next to the Cemetery. It was completed in 1868. Unfortunately this church is now no longer there.

Joseph and most of his children ( some of whom were born and died at "The Wilderness") and their spouses, together with some family connections are buried there:-

Joseph Broadbent Holmes and wife Harriet Pawsey Holmes (nee Philips)
Maxwell Philips Holmes and wife Mariane /Mary Anne Holmes (nee Glennie - daughter of Rev Alfred Glennie)
Minna Holmes (widow of Henry Montague Meredith)
Ellen Miller Holmes
Elizabeth Philips Holmes
Spencer Harrison Holmes
Arthur Broadbent Holmes and wife Florence Adair Holmes (nee Silby)
Edith Ellan Kelman (nee Holmes) and spouse Lewis Chalmers Kelman
Rev Alfred Glennie
Samuel Athanasius Cusack (brother in law of Joseph)
Maude Cusack (infant daughter of Samuel and Joseph's sister Geogiana)
Catherine Edith Hutchinson (grand daughter of Joseph and daughter of
Edith Ellen Holmes and Lewis Kelman

There are a number of well known HUNTER VALLEY FAMILIES who have members buried there, including:

WILKINSON, TYRRELL, HUNGERFORD, CAMPBELL.

Violet Ethel Mace, born in 1883 was adopted by Henry and Minna.

picture

David Meredith and Elinor Howels




Husband David Meredith

         Born: 1695 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 25 May 1727 - Leintwardine, Herefordshire




Wife Elinor Howels

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Margaret Meredith

         Born: 15 May 1734 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Clement Ingleby and Elizabeth Jukes




Husband Clement Ingleby

         Born: 10 Oct 1786 - Kings Heath, Warwick
   Christened: 16 Oct 1786 - Cheadle, Stafforrshire
         Died: 21 Aug 1859 - Westfield
       Buried: 


       Father: William Ingleby
       Mother: Ann Tomlinson


     Marriage: 9 May 1812 - Saint Martin, Birmingham




Wife Elizabeth Jukes

         Born: 7 Dec 1782
   Christened: Birmingham, Unitarian Church New Meeting House
         Died: 1877 - June Q - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
       Buried: 


       Father: John Jukes
       Mother: Elizabeth Mansfield





Children
1 M Clement Mansfield Ingleby




         Born: 29 Oct 1823 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
   Christened: 2 Nov 1823 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
         Died: 26 Sep 1886 - Valentines, Ilford, Essex
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Oakes
         Marr: 3 Oct 1850 - St. Mary's, Ilford



2 F Elizabeth Anne Ingleby

         Born: 1820 - circa
   Christened: 7 Oct 1820 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Jeremiah Finch Smith
         Marr: 6 May 1847 - Kings Norton, Worcestershire




General Notes (Husband)

Clement was a solicitor. His death announcement in the Gentleman's Magazine described him as "the father of the legal profession in Birmingham".


General Notes for Child Clement Mansfield Ingleby

Clement & Sarah had 4 children.

Clement Mansfield Ingleby (1823 - 1886)

Clement Ingleby was born on 29 October 1823 at Edgbaston, (at that time 'near Birmingham') only son of Clement Ingleby, a well-known solicitor, who became well-respected because of his work in connection with the construction of canals and railways at that time. He was a delicate child, not expected to survive, and suffered from ill-health most of his life. He was educated at home but entered Trinity College at Cambridge when he was twenty, becoming B.A., M.A., and LL.D. in 1859.

His early working life was spent with his father, eventually being taken into partnership as a solicitor in the family firm in Birmingham. However he did not enjoy the legal profession and in his spare time he studied metaphysiscs, mathematics and English literature.
Apparently Clement Ingleby first became interested in Shakespeare through an acquaintance with Howard Staunton with whom he played chess. Staunton was the champion chess player in 1843 and a Shakespearean scholar who produced an edition of Shakespeare in 1858-60. Clement Ingleby's first paper on Shakespeare was read before a literary society in Birmingham in 1850, the year he married.
Quite how he met Sarah Oakes is not known, but she had been brought up by her uncle, Charles Holcombe, and had lived at Valentines since 1838. She was just a few weeks younger than Clement and they were married on 3 October 1850 at the parish church of Great Ilford. They settled down together at their home in Edgbaston and had four children: Arthur born in September 1852, Holcombe in March 1854, Herbert born in May 1856 and Clementina Rose born just after Christmas 1857.

As well as his legal work, for a time Clement held the Chair of Logic at the Birmingham and Midland Institute, but an interest in Shakespeare was taking over as his main preoccupation. In 1859 he published a study of the 'Perkins Folio' which had been claimed as a newly discovered work of Shakespeare but was later acknowledged as a forgery. His legal training and logical mind were soon put to good use in setting out the facts in a more detailed work. For this 'he was a constant visitor to the library of the British Museum'. At about this time he moved away from Birmingham, taking his wife and their young family back to her earlier home at Valentines.

Dr Clement Ingleby became one of the members of the literary society of London - the Athenaeum Club - and his literary life was spent chiefly in its library, and his own pleasant library at Valentines. He wrote widely, contributing essays to learned periodicals and producing about twenty books. He was a Trustee of Shakespeare's Birthplace and he took an active part in the festivities held in Birmingham in 1864 to celebrate the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth. He had a fine singing voice which he put to good use in performing some of Shakespeare's songs.

In 1877 and 1881 he published the two volumes of his work on Shakespeare - The Man and the Book. This was a compilation of his writings gathered from a number of sources, some published in magazines, some previously unpublished. He also wrote poetry, some of which was published in periodicals. His verses were collected together after his death and printed for private circulation.

Clement Ingleby suffered a serious rheumatic attack in August 1886 and, although he seemed to recover, he died on 26 September. To quote from his obituary in Shakespeariana, 'he died - honoured and mourned by all who knew him best and longest. His cheerfulness and courtesy and kindness were extreme. He was a generous opponent, and a frank and candid friend. His manners were gracious, his temper unperturbable, and he met even a sarcasm with a smile. ... He had a bright and pleasant face, a kindly presence, a hearty laugh. Welcomed alike by children and by older folk, he probably never made an enemy and never lost a friend.'

picture

Clement Mansfield Ingleby and Sarah Oakes




Husband Clement Mansfield Ingleby




         Born: 29 Oct 1823 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
   Christened: 2 Nov 1823 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
         Died: 26 Sep 1886 - Valentines, Ilford, Essex
       Buried: 


       Father: Clement Ingleby
       Mother: Elizabeth Jukes


     Marriage: 3 Oct 1850 - St. Mary's, Ilford




Wife Sarah Oakes

         Born: 22 Dec 1823 - Milton, nr. Gravesend, Kent, England
   Christened: 16 Jun 1824 - Saint Peter And Saint Paul, Milton By Gravesend, Kent, England
         Died: 3 Jan 1906 - Romford, Essex
       Buried: 


       Father: Robert Oakes
       Mother: Sarah





Children
1 M Rev. Arthur Ingleby

         Born: 1852 - December Quarter - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Minnie Paula Walker
         Marr: 3 Oct 1876 - Holy Trinity, Barking Side



2 M Holcombe Ingleby

         Born: 18 Mar 1854 - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Aug 1926 - Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe
         Marr: 27 Oct 1886 - Kings Lynn Catholic Church, Norfolk



3 M Herbert Ingleby

         Born: 1856 - June Quarter - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Clementina Rose Ingleby

         Born: 1858 - March Quarter - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 Feb 1938 - Church House, Heacham
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Clement & Sarah had 4 children.

Clement Mansfield Ingleby (1823 - 1886)

Clement Ingleby was born on 29 October 1823 at Edgbaston, (at that time 'near Birmingham') only son of Clement Ingleby, a well-known solicitor, who became well-respected because of his work in connection with the construction of canals and railways at that time. He was a delicate child, not expected to survive, and suffered from ill-health most of his life. He was educated at home but entered Trinity College at Cambridge when he was twenty, becoming B.A., M.A., and LL.D. in 1859.

His early working life was spent with his father, eventually being taken into partnership as a solicitor in the family firm in Birmingham. However he did not enjoy the legal profession and in his spare time he studied metaphysiscs, mathematics and English literature.
Apparently Clement Ingleby first became interested in Shakespeare through an acquaintance with Howard Staunton with whom he played chess. Staunton was the champion chess player in 1843 and a Shakespearean scholar who produced an edition of Shakespeare in 1858-60. Clement Ingleby's first paper on Shakespeare was read before a literary society in Birmingham in 1850, the year he married.
Quite how he met Sarah Oakes is not known, but she had been brought up by her uncle, Charles Holcombe, and had lived at Valentines since 1838. She was just a few weeks younger than Clement and they were married on 3 October 1850 at the parish church of Great Ilford. They settled down together at their home in Edgbaston and had four children: Arthur born in September 1852, Holcombe in March 1854, Herbert born in May 1856 and Clementina Rose born just after Christmas 1857.

As well as his legal work, for a time Clement held the Chair of Logic at the Birmingham and Midland Institute, but an interest in Shakespeare was taking over as his main preoccupation. In 1859 he published a study of the 'Perkins Folio' which had been claimed as a newly discovered work of Shakespeare but was later acknowledged as a forgery. His legal training and logical mind were soon put to good use in setting out the facts in a more detailed work. For this 'he was a constant visitor to the library of the British Museum'. At about this time he moved away from Birmingham, taking his wife and their young family back to her earlier home at Valentines.

Dr Clement Ingleby became one of the members of the literary society of London - the Athenaeum Club - and his literary life was spent chiefly in its library, and his own pleasant library at Valentines. He wrote widely, contributing essays to learned periodicals and producing about twenty books. He was a Trustee of Shakespeare's Birthplace and he took an active part in the festivities held in Birmingham in 1864 to celebrate the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth. He had a fine singing voice which he put to good use in performing some of Shakespeare's songs.

In 1877 and 1881 he published the two volumes of his work on Shakespeare - The Man and the Book. This was a compilation of his writings gathered from a number of sources, some published in magazines, some previously unpublished. He also wrote poetry, some of which was published in periodicals. His verses were collected together after his death and printed for private circulation.

Clement Ingleby suffered a serious rheumatic attack in August 1886 and, although he seemed to recover, he died on 26 September. To quote from his obituary in Shakespeariana, 'he died - honoured and mourned by all who knew him best and longest. His cheerfulness and courtesy and kindness were extreme. He was a generous opponent, and a frank and candid friend. His manners were gracious, his temper unperturbable, and he met even a sarcasm with a smile. ... He had a bright and pleasant face, a kindly presence, a hearty laugh. Welcomed alike by children and by older folk, he probably never made an enemy and never lost a friend.'


General Notes (Wife)

In 1838 Charles Holcombe purchased Valentines and moved there with his wife Margaret and his niece, Sarah Oakes, who had been under his care since infancy. He was an industrialist who ran a brass foundry, and a tar and asphalt works at Greenwich. He is also described as a "refiner of coal tar, spirit, pitch and varnish". He built a wharf with a road and some houses, and a pub called The Sea Witch, at the side of the Thames (destroyed in 1940).

In 1850 Sarah Oakes married Clement M.Ingleby and went to live in his home town of Edgbaston where they had four children. In April 1860 Mrs. Margaret Holcombe died and around this time the Inglebys moved back to Valentines. There is a table tomb to Margaret and Charles Holcombe (1792-1870) in the churchyard of St.Mary's church in Ilford High Road.

Mrs Ingleby became a typical upper class Victorian lady.

Her life spanned 1823 - 1906; Queen Victoria lived from 1819 to 1901. Victoria was crowned in 1838, the year Sarah moved to Valentines. Sarah married in 1850; Queen Victoria had married ten years earlier.

The Great Exhibition was held in 1851 and Charles Holcombe may have been an exhibitor.

Mrs Beeton published her book on household management in 1859-60, just as Mrs Ingleby moved back to Valentines with her young family.

When Mrs Ingleby died on 3rd January 1906 her obituary noted her many acts of generosity, particularly in the Beehive neighbourhood where many of the estate workers lived.


General Notes for Child Rev. Arthur Ingleby

The Ingleby's eldest son became a clergyman. The Rev Arthur Ingleby, M.A., became the Chaplain of St.Mary's Hospital Chapel at Ilford in 1882, a position he held for ten or so years. He was responsible for the installation of the stained glass windows showing St.Clement, Pope and Martyr, and St.Valentine, Priest and Martyr, both designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones (1833-98) in memory of his father, Dr.Ingleby.

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, October 7, 1876; Issue 6445

Oct. 3, at Holy Trinity, Barking Side, the Rev. Arthur Ingleby, B.A., eldest son of C.M. Ingleby, Esq., LL.D., of Valentines, Essex, to Minnie Paula, eldest daughter of the Rev. T.A. Walker, of Barking Side, Essex.


General Notes for Child Holcombe Ingleby

Holcombe Ingleby practised as a solicitor, his firm being Ingleby and Royds. He was Member of Parliament for King's Lynn from 1910 to 1918.

Holcombe was member of parliament for Kings Lynn.

On her death, Valentines was inherited by Sarah's second son, Holcombe Ingleby. In 1907 he gave the older gardens near the mansion to the people of Ilford in memory of, his parents. lt was at this time that the park was renamed Valentines Park.

In 1912 a specially formed group, the Valentines Park Extension Council, campaigned to save as much as possible of the estate from development. Holcombe Ingleby sold the land for £10,630 and the house and its outbuildings for a mere £1,000 to Ilford Council and retired to his estates in Norfolk. The mansion and its immediate grounds were absorbed into the park and the Old English Garden planted in the former walled garden. The final addition to the Park came in the1920 s when the golf course, lido and model yacht pond were laid out on what had been Middlefield Farm.

Holcombe Ingleby married Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe who was a renowned artist and spent some time in Australia. 84 of her watercolours were donated to Queensland Art Gallery by her son Major Clement Ingleby.


The Times, Saturday, Aug 07, 1926; pg. 15; Issue 44344; Col B

Mr. Holcombe Ingleby.
Category: Obituaries
MR. HOLCOMBE INGLEBY.

Many friends, especially Norfolk men and the surviving members of the 1910 Parliament, will hear with regret that Mr. Holcombe Ingleby, who was for eight years; member for King's Lynn, died yesterday at Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk, at the age of 72.

Born on March 18, 1854, he was the son of the distinguished Shakespearian scholar. Clement Mansfield Ingleby, of whom he contributed an interesting memoir to the " Dictionary of National Biography.” From him-originally a Birmingham man who settled near Ilford, in Essex-Holcombe Ingleby inherited everything except the ill-health which interfered so much with the elder Ingleby's work; he had wealth, for instance, some antiquarian tastes, much musical knowledge, and a fine voice. He went it up to Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and took honours in history. After entering at the Inner Temple, he changed his mind and was admitted a solicitor, practicing for several years in London. The title of his firm was Ingleby and Royds, which afterwards became d Royds, Rawstorne, and Co.
His marriage in 1886 to Miss Neville Rolfe. daughter of Mr. C.F. Neville Rolfe, of Heacham Hall. took him to Norfolk and King's Lynn. There he passed most of the remaining years of his life, throwing himself into the affairs of the ancient borough, of which he became Mayor in 1909, and again from 1919 to 1922. He had desired that office, partly because he was fond of the place and people and a born administrator, but also for the sentimental reason that his wife's ancestors had held it 200 years before. In 1919 and 1923 he edited the "Red Register” of King's Lynn. described in The Times as a collection of records of no little importance for students of social life and organization in England during the 14th and 15th centuries. In 1910 he stood as Conservative candidate for the borough, and defeated the former member, the energetic and independent Mr. Thomas Gibson Bowles, by a majority of 97.

What followed caused some scandal and much amusement. Three humble voters, confessedly backed by more powerful people, petitioned against the new member, on the ground that he and his agents had been guilty of bribery and corruption. The case was tried at King's Lynn before Mr. Justice Ridley and Mr. Justice Channell, and the hearing lasted several days, reports being eagerly read all over the country. Mr. Ingleby had undoubtedly been the most lavish of entertainers. At his house, Sedgeford Hall. a few miles away, he had habitually received vast parties of guests, providing them with "pageants and carnivals," not to speak of refreshments, the attendance numbering 7,000 in 1905 and 3,000 in 1909. At that time he was not a Parliamentary candidate, but something of the kind went on after he became one, while presents of game were abundant. In giving evidence, the Liberal agent declared that rabbits bad been scattered among the voters; but he had to confess that he himself had accepted a couple of wild duck! In the end, the Judges decided that the festivals and gifts had not been corruptly provided, and Mr. Ingleby was declared duly elected, and held the seat till 1918.

It was not only in Norfolk, where he was High Sheriff in 1923, that Mr. Ingleby was popular. The House of Commons liked him for his geniality and common sense; at the Carlton Club, at Bootles, and at the Athenaeum he was always welcome. He will be greatly missed. He leaves one son, who lost a foot in the war, and one daughter, a full qualified M.D., highly regarded.


General Notes for Child Clementina Rose Ingleby

The Times, Wednesday, Feb. 23, 1938; Page 1

INGLEBY.--On Feb. 7, 1938, at the Church House, Heacham, Clementina Rose Ingleby, daughter of the late Clement Mansfield Ingleby, LL.D. and Mrs. Ingleby of Valentines, Ilford, aged 80.
picture

Thomas Ward and Elizabeth Ingleby




Husband Thomas Ward

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 4 Jan 1808




Wife Elizabeth Ingleby

         Born: 1778 - circa
   Christened: 29 May 1778 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Ingleby
       Mother: Ann Tomlinson




picture
Jeremiah Finch Smith and Elizabeth Anne Ingleby




Husband Jeremiah Finch Smith

         Born: 1 Jul 1815 - Manchester
   Christened: 29 Sep 1815 - St. Peter's, Manchester
         Died: 15 Sep 1895 - Litchfield
       Buried: 


       Father: Rev. Jeremiah Smith
       Mother: Felicia Anderton


     Marriage: 6 May 1847 - Kings Norton, Worcestershire




Wife Elizabeth Anne Ingleby

         Born: 1820 - circa
   Christened: 7 Oct 1820 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Clement Ingleby
       Mother: Elizabeth Jukes





Children
1 F Annie Finch Smith

         Born: 1856 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Jeremiah Finch was the Rector of Aldridge from 1849 and prebendary of Lichfield Cathedral form 1884. In 1891 Jeremiah and Elizabeth Anne were living at The Close, Lichfield. He edited the Admission Register of the Manchester School.

Jeremiah Finch Smith was Rector of Aldridge in the 1851,61,71,81 England censuses

The first Rector of Aldridge after it was made a separate Parish from Barr in 1849 was the Rev. Jeremiah Finch Smith. He made great steps in restoring and improving the church.A new Aisle and Vestry were added, the Galleries, which had been put in to seat the local school children, were demolished and the Nave was opened into the lower part of the Tower. He also had the old pews which had doors on them removed and more modern pews without doors, ( The first in Staffordshire) were installed. These have themselves since been removed. Rev. Smith also added extra seats for the poor of the Parish.

He published an alumni book - The Admission Register of the Manchester School with Some Notices of the More Distinguished Scholars. The book was published in Manchester by the Chetham Society in 1874. The book included an account of Jeremiah's wife's uncle, Alfred Jukes the surgeon.

The Times, Thursday, May 13, 1847; Page 9; Issue 19548; Col A

Married

On Thursday, the 6th inst, at King's Norton, Worcestershire, by the Rev. W. Anderton Smith, the Rev. J. Finch Smith, M.A., of St. Mary Church, near Torquay, Devonshire, eldest son of the Rev. Jeremiah Smith, D.D., vicar of Great Wilbraham, Cambridgeshire, and late High Master of Manchester School, to Elizabeth Anne, only daughter of Clement Ingleby, Esq., of Cannon-hill, Moseley, Worcestershire.

picture

George Wragge and Emma Ingleby




Husband George Wragge

         Born: 1786 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 Feb 1873 - Chaddesden
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 15 Oct 1807 - Cheadle, Staffordshire




Wife Emma Ingleby

         Born: 1784 - circa
   Christened: 3 May 1784 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Ingleby
       Mother: Ann Tomlinson





Children
1 M Clement Ingleby Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 19 Sep 1814 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 1857
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Anna Maria Downing
         Marr: 21 Oct 1851 - Clent, Worcester



2 M William Henry Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 27 Dec 1817 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Amelia



3 F Emma Mary Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 27 Dec 1817 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Frances Ann Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 15 Aug 1808 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Charles John Wragge
         Marr: 17 Mar 1835 - Cheadle, North Staffordshire



5 M Thomas Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Ann Hearne
         Marr: 8 Aug 1861 - Broadmeadows, Melbourne



6 M George Paulson Wragge

         Born: 1811 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Elizabeth Arnold
         Marr: 4 Sep 1851 - Kenilworth




General Notes (Husband)

George Wragge and his brother-in-law Clement later formed the solicitors partnership of Wragge and Ingleby.

The Derby Mercury, Wednesday, February 19, 1873; Issue 8274

Wragge - Feb. 7, at Chaddesden, Mr. George Wragge, in the 75th year of his age.

1841 Census:

Staffordshire
Cheadle
Oakamoor Lodge
George Wragge - 55 - Merchant
Henry Wragge - 40 - Lieutenant of Militia
Margaret - 45 - Independent


General Notes (Wife)

1851 Census:

Staffordshire
Cheadle
Oakamoor
Emma Wragge - Head - 66
???? - sister in law - 55 - annuitant - unmarried
Henry Wragge - brother in law - 54 - unmarried - Lieutenant half pay Derbyshire Militia

1861 Census:

Staffordshire
Cheadle
Oakamoor
Emma Wragge - Head - 76
George P. Wragge - son - 50 - solicitor
Elizabeth - daughter-in-law - 39
Elizabeth - grand-daughter - 1
Emma G - grand-daughter - 6 months
Clement L. - grandson - 8
Ellen ?? - grand-daughter -




General Notes for Child Clement Ingleby Wragge

George Wragge and Emma had a son Clement Ingleby Wragge who was christened on 19 Sep 1814 in Cheadle, and who also became a solicitor.

1841 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Frederick St
George Wragg - 30 - solicitor
Clement Wragge - 25 - solicitor


General Notes for Child William Henry Wragge

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
William Henry Wragge - Head - 33 - Copper Agent
Amelia - wife - 35


General Notes for Child Emma Mary Wragge

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Priory Road
George Paulson Wragge - head - 40 - solicitor
Emma Mary Wragge - sister - 34


General Notes for Child Frances Ann Wragge

1871 Census:

Middlesex
Teddington
Frances A Wragge - Head - 62 - Annuitant
Ellen E - daughter - 31 - annuitant
Bertha M. - daughter - 25
Catherine E. - daughter - 24
Clement L. Wragge - nephew - 18


General Notes for Child Thomas Wragge

The Derby Mercury, Wednesday, November 6, 1861; Issue 26437

On the 8th August, at Broad Meadows, Melbourne, Australia, by the Rev. T. Stair, Thomas, fourth son of George Wragge, Esq., Chaddesden, Derbyshire, to Sarah Ann, second daughter of the late James Hearne, Esq., Thorne Grove, Australia.


General Notes for Child George Paulson Wragge

The Morning Chronicle (London), Monday, September 8, 1851; Issue 26437

On the 4th inst., at Kenilworth, George paulson Wragge, Esq., of Priory Grove, Edgbaston, Birmingham, to Elizabeth, second daughter of the late John Arnold, Esq., of Moor Green, Moseley.

1841 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Frederick St
George Wragg - 30 - solicitor
Clement Wragge - 25 - solicitor

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Priory Road
George Paulson Wragge - head - 40 - solicitor
Emma Mary Wragge - sister - 34

1861 Census:

Staffordshire
Cheadle
Oakamoor
Emma Wragge - Head - 76
George P. Wragge - son - 50 - solicitor
Elizabeth - daughter-in-law - 39
Elizabeth - grand-daughter - 1
Emma G - grand-daughter - 6 months
Clement L. - grandson - 8
Ellen ?? - grand-daughter -

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Priory Road
George Paulson Wragge - head - 60 - solicitor
Elizabeth - wife - 48
Elixabeth ???? - daughter - 11
Emma Gertrude - daughter - 10
Kathleen ?????? - daughter - 7

picture

Holcombe Ingleby and Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe




Husband Holcombe Ingleby

         Born: 18 Mar 1854 - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Aug 1926 - Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk
       Buried: 


       Father: Clement Mansfield Ingleby
       Mother: Sarah Oakes


     Marriage: 27 Oct 1886 - Kings Lynn Catholic Church, Norfolk




Wife Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe

         Born: 3 Jan 1850 - Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk
   Christened: 
         Died: 11 Oct 1928 - Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Fawcett Neville-Rolfe Neville-Rolfe
       Mother: Martha Holt Chapman





Children
1 M Major Clement Rolfe Ingleby

         Born: 20 Oct 1888
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Muriel Nordheimer
         Marr: 1915 - circa



2 F Helen Ingleby

         Born: 17 Aug 1887
   Christened: 
         Died: 1973
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Holcombe Ingleby practised as a solicitor, his firm being Ingleby and Royds. He was Member of Parliament for King's Lynn from 1910 to 1918.

Holcombe was member of parliament for Kings Lynn.

On her death, Valentines was inherited by Sarah's second son, Holcombe Ingleby. In 1907 he gave the older gardens near the mansion to the people of Ilford in memory of, his parents. lt was at this time that the park was renamed Valentines Park.

In 1912 a specially formed group, the Valentines Park Extension Council, campaigned to save as much as possible of the estate from development. Holcombe Ingleby sold the land for £10,630 and the house and its outbuildings for a mere £1,000 to Ilford Council and retired to his estates in Norfolk. The mansion and its immediate grounds were absorbed into the park and the Old English Garden planted in the former walled garden. The final addition to the Park came in the1920 s when the golf course, lido and model yacht pond were laid out on what had been Middlefield Farm.

Holcombe Ingleby married Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe who was a renowned artist and spent some time in Australia. 84 of her watercolours were donated to Queensland Art Gallery by her son Major Clement Ingleby.


The Times, Saturday, Aug 07, 1926; pg. 15; Issue 44344; Col B

Mr. Holcombe Ingleby.
Category: Obituaries
MR. HOLCOMBE INGLEBY.

Many friends, especially Norfolk men and the surviving members of the 1910 Parliament, will hear with regret that Mr. Holcombe Ingleby, who was for eight years; member for King's Lynn, died yesterday at Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk, at the age of 72.

Born on March 18, 1854, he was the son of the distinguished Shakespearian scholar. Clement Mansfield Ingleby, of whom he contributed an interesting memoir to the " Dictionary of National Biography.” From him-originally a Birmingham man who settled near Ilford, in Essex-Holcombe Ingleby inherited everything except the ill-health which interfered so much with the elder Ingleby's work; he had wealth, for instance, some antiquarian tastes, much musical knowledge, and a fine voice. He went it up to Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and took honours in history. After entering at the Inner Temple, he changed his mind and was admitted a solicitor, practicing for several years in London. The title of his firm was Ingleby and Royds, which afterwards became d Royds, Rawstorne, and Co.
His marriage in 1886 to Miss Neville Rolfe. daughter of Mr. C.F. Neville Rolfe, of Heacham Hall. took him to Norfolk and King's Lynn. There he passed most of the remaining years of his life, throwing himself into the affairs of the ancient borough, of which he became Mayor in 1909, and again from 1919 to 1922. He had desired that office, partly because he was fond of the place and people and a born administrator, but also for the sentimental reason that his wife's ancestors had held it 200 years before. In 1919 and 1923 he edited the "Red Register” of King's Lynn. described in The Times as a collection of records of no little importance for students of social life and organization in England during the 14th and 15th centuries. In 1910 he stood as Conservative candidate for the borough, and defeated the former member, the energetic and independent Mr. Thomas Gibson Bowles, by a majority of 97.

What followed caused some scandal and much amusement. Three humble voters, confessedly backed by more powerful people, petitioned against the new member, on the ground that he and his agents had been guilty of bribery and corruption. The case was tried at King's Lynn before Mr. Justice Ridley and Mr. Justice Channell, and the hearing lasted several days, reports being eagerly read all over the country. Mr. Ingleby had undoubtedly been the most lavish of entertainers. At his house, Sedgeford Hall. a few miles away, he had habitually received vast parties of guests, providing them with "pageants and carnivals," not to speak of refreshments, the attendance numbering 7,000 in 1905 and 3,000 in 1909. At that time he was not a Parliamentary candidate, but something of the kind went on after he became one, while presents of game were abundant. In giving evidence, the Liberal agent declared that rabbits bad been scattered among the voters; but he had to confess that he himself had accepted a couple of wild duck! In the end, the Judges decided that the festivals and gifts had not been corruptly provided, and Mr. Ingleby was declared duly elected, and held the seat till 1918.

It was not only in Norfolk, where he was High Sheriff in 1923, that Mr. Ingleby was popular. The House of Commons liked him for his geniality and common sense; at the Carlton Club, at Bootles, and at the Athenaeum he was always welcome. He will be greatly missed. He leaves one son, who lost a foot in the war, and one daughter, a full qualified M.D., highly regarded.


General Notes (Wife)

Harriet Jane was a painter and sketcher. She was fourth of the nine children of Charles Fawcett Neville-Rolfe and Martha Holt, née Chapman.

Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe was a renowned artist and spent some time in Australia. 84 of her watercolours were donated to Queensland Art Gallery by her son Major Clement Ingleby.


General Notes for Child Major Clement Rolfe Ingleby

He leaves one son, who lost a foot in the war.


General Notes for Child Helen Ingleby

.....And one daughter, a full qualified M.D., highly regarded in her profession.
picture

John Ingleby and Ann Maria Wragge




Husband John Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 1794 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Ingleby
       Mother: Ann Tomlinson


     Marriage: 7 Aug 1820




Wife Ann Maria Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Clement's brother John was a doctor and as John Tomlinson Ingleby he became known as the most successful midwifery practioner in the Midlands.

picture

Joseph Ingleby




Husband Joseph Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M William Ingleby

         Born: 19 Feb 1748 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 May 1819
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ann Tomlinson
         Marr: 20 Oct 1777 - Cheadle, Staffordshire




General Notes for Child William Ingleby

William was described as a country gentleman of Cheadle.

A copper and brass manufacturing company was founded in Cheadle in 1717 by Thomas Patten, and Cheadle brass was celebrated for its quality. Clement Ingleby's grandfather was probably the Joseph Ingleby, who was involved in the brass manufacturing business in the 1700s, which would have been the source of the family's wealth. William Ingleby, Clement's father was born 19 Feb 1748 in Cheadle and died 15 May 1819 (IGI). There is an inconsistent record (possible a typo) that has him christened to a Joseph and Ann Ingleby on 25 May 1743 in St Matthew Walsall. An abstract of a document in the UK National Archives describes William as one of the proprietors of the Brass Wire Company of Cheadle ca. 1788. A memorial in St Giles Church, Cheadle records the death of William in 1819 and Anne in 1828. According to the IGI, William married Ann Tomlinson on 20 Oct 1777 in Cheadle.

picture

Major Clement Rolfe Ingleby and Muriel Nordheimer




Husband Major Clement Rolfe Ingleby

         Born: 20 Oct 1888
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Holcombe Ingleby
       Mother: Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe


     Marriage: 1915 - circa




Wife Muriel Nordheimer

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sylvia Florence Ingleby

         Born: 30 Mar 1920
   Christened: 
         Died: Still Living - 2008
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alexander James Stevenson
         Marr: 10 Oct 1944 - St. Mary's, Sedgeford



2 M Christopher Rolfe Ingleby

         Born: 23 Feb 1929
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M William Holcombe Ingleby

         Born: 4 Feb 1916
   Christened: 
         Died: Still Living - 2008
       Buried: 



4 F Pauline Ingleby

         Born: 10 Jan 1919
   Christened: 
         Died: Still Living - 2008
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

He leaves one son, who lost a foot in the war.
picture

Rev. Arthur Ingleby and Minnie Paula Walker




Husband Rev. Arthur Ingleby

         Born: 1852 - December Quarter - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Clement Mansfield Ingleby
       Mother: Sarah Oakes


     Marriage: 3 Oct 1876 - Holy Trinity, Barking Side




Wife Minnie Paula Walker

         Born: 1849 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1936
       Buried: 


       Father: Rev. T.A. Walker
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Charles Herbert Evelyn Ingleby

         Born: 2 May 1881
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Richard Arthur Oakes Ingleby

         Born: 27 Jan 1879
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Ethel Mary Rose Ingleby

         Born: 1877
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Ingleby's eldest son became a clergyman. The Rev Arthur Ingleby, M.A., became the Chaplain of St.Mary's Hospital Chapel at Ilford in 1882, a position he held for ten or so years. He was responsible for the installation of the stained glass windows showing St.Clement, Pope and Martyr, and St.Valentine, Priest and Martyr, both designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones (1833-98) in memory of his father, Dr.Ingleby.

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, October 7, 1876; Issue 6445

Oct. 3, at Holy Trinity, Barking Side, the Rev. Arthur Ingleby, B.A., eldest son of C.M. Ingleby, Esq., LL.D., of Valentines, Essex, to Minnie Paula, eldest daughter of the Rev. T.A. Walker, of Barking Side, Essex.


General Notes (Wife)

Minnie Paula was the eldest daughter of the Rev. T.A. Walker of Barkingside, Essex.
picture

Alexander James Stevenson and Sylvia Florence Ingleby




Husband Alexander James Stevenson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: 
       Mother: W.B. Stevenson


     Marriage: 10 Oct 1944 - St. Mary's, Sedgeford




Wife Sylvia Florence Ingleby

         Born: 30 Mar 1920
   Christened: 
         Died: Still Living - 2008
       Buried: 


       Father: Major Clement Rolfe Ingleby
       Mother: Muriel Nordheimer




General Notes (Husband)

Alexander James was the only son of Rev. Dr. W. B. Stevenson. He was a Wing Commander at the time of his marriage to Sylvia Florence.

The Times, Monday, Sep 25, 1944; pg. 6; Issue 49963/2; col B

Wing Commander A.J. Stevenson and Miss S.F. Ingleby

A marriage has been arranged, and will take place quietly at Sedgeford on October 10, between Wing Commander Alexander James Stevenson, R.A.F.V.R., son of Mrs. W.B. Stevenson, 28, Inverleith Place, Edinburgh, and of the late Dr. W.B. Stevenson, D.D., and Sylvia Florence, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clement Rolfe Ingleby, of Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk.

The Times, Thursday, Oct. 19, 1944; pg. 7; Issue 49977/2; col C

Wing Commander A.J. Stevenson and Miss S.F. Ingleby
The marriage took place quietly on October 10, at St. Mary's Sedgeford of Wing Commander Alexander James Stevenson, R.A.F.V.R., only son of Mrs. W.B. Stevenson, 28, Inverleith Place, Edinburgh, and of the late Rev. Dr. W.B. Stevenson, and Miss Sylvia Florence Ingleby, younger daughter of Major and Mrs. Clement Rolfe Ingleby, of Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk. The Rev. Frederick Ward officiated, assisted by the Rev. William Clark.

picture

William Ingleby and Ann Tomlinson




Husband William Ingleby

         Born: 19 Feb 1748 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 May 1819
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Ingleby
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 20 Oct 1777 - Cheadle, Staffordshire




Wife Ann Tomlinson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1828
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Elizabeth Ingleby

         Born: 1778 - circa
   Christened: 29 May 1778 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Thomas Ward
         Marr: 4 Jan 1808



2 M Joseph Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 9 Jun 1779 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Jane Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 14 Jan 1781 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Rupert Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 1 Apr 1782 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Emma Ingleby

         Born: 1784 - circa
   Christened: 3 May 1784 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George Wragge
         Marr: 15 Oct 1807 - Cheadle, Staffordshire



6 M Clement Ingleby

         Born: 10 Oct 1786 - Kings Heath, Warwick
   Christened: 16 Oct 1786 - Cheadle, Stafforrshire
         Died: 21 Aug 1859 - Westfield
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Elizabeth Jukes
         Marr: 9 May 1812 - Saint Martin, Birmingham



7 F Dorothea Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 11 Jul 1789 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 M Thomas Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 23 Jul 1791 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 M John Ingleby

         Born: 
   Christened: 1794 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ann Maria Wragge
         Marr: 7 Aug 1820




General Notes (Husband)

William was described as a country gentleman of Cheadle.

A copper and brass manufacturing company was founded in Cheadle in 1717 by Thomas Patten, and Cheadle brass was celebrated for its quality. Clement Ingleby's grandfather was probably the Joseph Ingleby, who was involved in the brass manufacturing business in the 1700s, which would have been the source of the family's wealth. William Ingleby, Clement's father was born 19 Feb 1748 in Cheadle and died 15 May 1819 (IGI). There is an inconsistent record (possible a typo) that has him christened to a Joseph and Ann Ingleby on 25 May 1743 in St Matthew Walsall. An abstract of a document in the UK National Archives describes William as one of the proprietors of the Brass Wire Company of Cheadle ca. 1788. A memorial in St Giles Church, Cheadle records the death of William in 1819 and Anne in 1828. According to the IGI, William married Ann Tomlinson on 20 Oct 1777 in Cheadle.


General Notes for Child Joseph Ingleby

Clement Ingleby's brothers Joseph and Rupert Ingleby are recorded as partners in the Cheadle Copper & Brass Company in 1839.


General Notes for Child Rupert Ingleby

Clement Ingleby's brothers Joseph and Rupert Ingleby were recorded as partners in the Cheadle Copper & Brass Company in 1839.


General Notes for Child Emma Ingleby

1851 Census:

Staffordshire
Cheadle
Oakamoor
Emma Wragge - Head - 66
???? - sister in law - 55 - annuitant - unmarried
Henry Wragge - brother in law - 54 - unmarried - Lieutenant half pay Derbyshire Militia

1861 Census:

Staffordshire
Cheadle
Oakamoor
Emma Wragge - Head - 76
George P. Wragge - son - 50 - solicitor
Elizabeth - daughter-in-law - 39
Elizabeth - grand-daughter - 1
Emma G - grand-daughter - 6 months
Clement L. - grandson - 8
Ellen ?? - grand-daughter -




General Notes for Child Clement Ingleby

Clement was a solicitor. His death announcement in the Gentleman's Magazine described him as "the father of the legal profession in Birmingham".


General Notes for Child John Ingleby

Clement's brother John was a doctor and as John Tomlinson Ingleby he became known as the most successful midwifery practioner in the Midlands.

picture

John Inglesby




Husband John Inglesby

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Hannah Inglesby

         Born: 1764
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 May 1848 - Lambeth, London
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Bult




General Notes for Child Hannah Inglesby

Hannah's father was John Inglesby. Her death announcement describes her as Hannah, widow of John Bult Esq. late of Wigmore Street, Cavendish Square and of Brook Green, Hammersmith.

1841 Census:

Middlesex
St. Pancras
Kentish Town
Bartholomew Place
Hannah Bult - 75
picture

Sir - Captain Charles Richard Henry Wiggin 3rd Bart and Mabel Violet Mary Jaffray




Husband Sir - Captain Charles Richard Henry Wiggin 3rd Bart

         Born: 21 Mar 1885
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Sep 1972
       Buried: 


       Father: Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin 2nd Bart.
       Mother: Annie Sarah Cope


     Marriage: 24 Jul 1916




Wife Mabel Violet Mary Jaffray

         Born: 27 Nov 1890
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 Dec 1961
       Buried: 


       Father: Sir William Jaffray 2nd Bart.
       Mother: Alice Mary Galloway





Children
1 M Sir John Henry Wiggin 4th Bart.

         Born: 3 Mar 1921
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 January 1992 - Aged 70
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Cecilia Evelyn Anson
         Marr: 30 Sep 1947




General Notes (Husband)

Charles Richard Henry was Captain of the Staffordshire Yeomanry. He succeeded as 3rd Baronet in 1917 on the death of his father.


General Notes (Wife)

Mabel Violet Mary was the daughter of Sir William Jaffray, 2nd Bart. and Alice Mary Galloway.


General Notes for Child Sir John Henry Wiggin 4th Bart.

John Henry and Cecilia Evelyn divorced in 1961. He succeeded as 4th Baronet in 1972 upon the death of his father.
picture

Jacobus Nicolaas Mooyart and Johanna Catherine Jahn




Husband Jacobus Nicolaas Mooyart

         Born: 8 Sep 1781
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 2 Feb 1815 - Tranquebar




Wife Johanna Catherine Jahn

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Edward Mooyart

         Born: 5 Apr 1817 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 15 Jun 1817
         Died: Bef 1891
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Jane Stephens
         Marr: 1860 - December Q - Notting Hill, London



2 F Sophia Mooyart

         Born: 7 Nov 1815 - Colombo, Sri Lanka
   Christened: 10 Mar 1816
         Died: 27 Apr 1838 - Putlam
       Buried: 



3 F Julia Mooyart

         Born: 4 Sep 1819
   Christened: 14 Nov 1819
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Charles Cameron
         Marr: 11 Jun 1840 - Kandy, Sri Lanka



4 F Amelia Mooyart

         Born: 25 Aug 1821
   Christened: 23 Sep 1821
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Male (Een zoon - a son) Mooyart

         Born: 29 Jan 1823
   Christened: 30 Jun 1823
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Henry Mooyart

         Born: 3 May 1825
   Christened: 25 Dec 1825
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Edward Mooyart

The Venerable Archdeacon Mooyart of Ceylon.

1861 Census:

Berkshire
Winkfield
Edward Mooyaart - 44 - Chaplain at Galle, Sri Lanka
Mary J. - wife - 38

1871 Census:

London
St Marylebone
Rectory
Edward Mooyaart - Head - 53 - Archdeacon of Colombo Ceylon
Mary Jane - wife - 45
Henry Mooyaart - brother - unmarried - 42 - Late of the Ceylon Civil Service - retired




picture

Alleyne H (Holden??) Reynolds and Elizabeth James




Husband Alleyne H (Holden??) Reynolds

         Born: Mar 1925 - Glanford Brigg, Lincolnshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edward Alleyne Reynolds
       Mother: Gladys Holden


     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth James

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Unknown Reynolds

         Born: 30 Jan 1951 - Oakvale Nursing Home, Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Thursday, Feb 01, 1951; pg. 1; Issue 51914; col A

Reynolds. -- On January 30, 1951, at Oakvale Nursing Home, Sheffield, to Elizabeth (nee James), wife of Alleyne H. Reynolds - a son.

The Times, Friday, Apr 27, 1984; pg. 16; Issue 61816; col G

BAT Industries, Britain's third largest company, and one that is already in the van among private-sector providers of workshops for small businesses, plans to gear up its efforts to provide not only workshops but offices and retail units. The plan could lead to a quadrupling of the number of small workshops so far being provided, adding up to 800 to those already on offer in Liverpool and those soon to be on the market in Brixton.

The assessment comes from Alleyne Reynolds, mamaging director of BAT Industries Small Business. This subsidiary was created three years ago to focus BAT's efforts in helping small business in areas where BAT is a big employer, leading intitially to four target areas, the others being Southampton and Bristol.

picture

Arthur Jukes and Margaret Jellie




Husband Arthur Jukes

         Born: 7 Mar 1857
   Christened: 
         Died: 1947
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred Meredith Jukes
       Mother: Margaret McWilliams


     Marriage: 1884




Wife Margaret Jellie

         Born: 1856 - Circa - Belfast, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: William Jellie
       Mother: Johanna Cassidy





Children
1 F Sarah Meredith Jukes

         Born: 1885
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Frederick Jukes

         Born: 1886
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Florence Gladys Boyle
         Marr: 4 Aug 1915 - "Renfrew" Camperdown



3 F Ethel Jukes

         Born: 1888
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Mabel Jukes

         Born: 1890
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Frederick Jukes

The Argus - Monday 30 August 1915

Jukes-Boyle

On the 4th August at "Renfrew" Camperdown, by the Rev. Andrew Dunn, Frederick only son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jukes of Brighton, to Florence Gladys, eldest daughter of Mr. and <rs. W. Boyle, "Renfrew", Camperdown

They had three daughters.
picture

George Campbell Meredith and Elizabeth Jillett




Husband George Campbell Meredith




         Born: 1 Jul 1840 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 Jul 1917 - Lansdowne Cres. (Son's Residence)
       Buried: 26 Jul 1917 - Cornelian Bay Cemetery - 5.45 pm


       Father: Charles Meredith
       Mother: Louisa Anne Twamley


     Marriage: 13 Jan 1868 - Oatland, Tasmania




Wife Elizabeth Jillett

         Born: 2 Feb 1846 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Jillett
       Mother: Phoebe Triffitt





Children
1 M George Glendower Meredith




         Born: 20 Dec 1868
   Christened: 
         Died: 1957
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Nora Gytha Michelmore
         Marr: 1937



2 M Twamley Owen Meredith

         Born: 6 Sep 1871 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Jessica Farquhar
         Marr: 10 Jun 1896 - Hobart, Tasmania



3 M John Charles Meredith

         Born: 1871
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Louisa May Stephenson
         Marr: 7 May 1895 - Zeehan, Tasmania



4 M Mervyn Louis Meredith

         Born: 31 Jul 1873 - Springbay, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1920
       Buried: 



5 F Sarah Louisa Meredith

         Born: 22 Feb 1876 - Springbay, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1977
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Crammond



6 F Phoebe Evangeline Meredith

         Born: 5 Mar 1878
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: J. Paton



7 F Gladys Alice Meredith

         Born: 12 Jun 1884 - Clarence, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 26 Jan 1888
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Their eldest son, George Campbell, was born in 1840 in NSW, but the other four surviving children were born in Tasmania. George married Elizabeth Jillett, grand-daughter of Robert Jillett and Elizabeth Bradshaw, in 1868.


General Notes (Wife)

Elizabeth was the daghter of John Jillett (1819-1868) of Hobart and Phoebe Triffitt (1823-1868).


General Notes for Child George Glendower Meredith

George Glendower was of the firm Oldham, Beddome and Meredith, Booksellers, Hobart.

George and Nora had no children.


General Notes for Child Twamley Owen Meredith

Twin of John Charles - some references have Twamley Owen as a son of Owen and Eliza Jane.


General Notes for Child John Charles Meredith

Twin of Twamley Owen.
picture

John Jillett and Phoebe Triffitt




Husband John Jillett

         Born: 1819
   Christened: 
         Died: 1868
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Phoebe Triffitt

         Born: 1823
   Christened: 
         Died: 1868
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Elizabeth Jillett

         Born: 2 Feb 1846 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George Campbell Meredith
         Marr: 13 Jan 1868 - Oatland, Tasmania




General Notes for Child Elizabeth Jillett

Elizabeth was the daghter of John Jillett (1819-1868) of Hobart and Phoebe Triffitt (1823-1868).
picture

Benjamin John Johnson




Husband Benjamin John Johnson

         Born:  - London, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Walter Rankin Johnson

         Born: 11 Jul 1787
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 Oct 1844 - The Vicarage, West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Louisa Stephens
         Marr: 2 Dec 1840 - Weobley, Herefordshire




General Notes for Child Walter Rankin Johnson

Walter was the son of Benjamin Johnson of London. He was admitted to Trinity College 27 May 1805 aged 17. Ordained deacon (Bristol) 3 Apr 1813 and priest (London) 19 May 1815. Appointed Stipendiary Curate of West Wycombe in 1832 (£150 and the use of the vicarage house).


picture

Mr. Johnson and Anne Stephens




Husband Mr. Johnson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Anne Stephens

         Born: 1782 - circa
   Christened: 29 Mar 1782 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Lawrence Stephens
       Mother: Hannah Meredith




General Notes (Husband)

Mr Johnson was a surgeon of Dowgate Hill, London - they had no children. (an extract from private correspondence of the Jukes family)
picture

Walter Rankin Johnson and Louisa Stephens




Husband Walter Rankin Johnson

         Born: 11 Jul 1787
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 Oct 1844 - The Vicarage, West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire
       Buried: 


       Father: Benjamin John Johnson
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 2 Dec 1840 - Weobley, Herefordshire




Wife Louisa Stephens

         Born: 1818 - circa - Dinedor, Herefordshire
   Christened: 20 Jan 1818 - Dinedor, Herefordshire
         Died: Sep 1885 - Kensington, London
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Stephens
       Mother: Susannah Beaumont



 Other Spouse: Philip Smith Coxe - 1849 - June Quarter - Marylebone, London



Children
1 F Isabella Ann Johnson

         Born: 1843 - circa - West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1923
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Walter was the son of Benjamin Johnson of London. He was admitted to Trinity College 27 May 1805 aged 17. Ordained deacon (Bristol) 3 Apr 1813 and priest (London) 19 May 1815. Appointed Stipendiary Curate of West Wycombe in 1832 (£150 and the use of the vicarage house).


picture

Edwin Meredith and Ada Steuart Johnstone




Husband Edwin Meredith

         Born: 30 Oct 1853 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Jan 1885 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Jane Caroline Chalmers


     Marriage: 1877 - Launceston, Tasmania




Wife Ada Steuart Johnstone

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Guy Owen Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Laird A. William Meredith

         Born: 1881 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ivy Tatham
         Marr: 12 May 1909 - Masterton, St. Matthews, New Zealand



3 M George Steuart Meredith

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ethel Nancy Roxburgh
         Marr: 21 Oct 1913 - Launceston, Tasmania



4 F Ada Matilda (Meta) Meredith

         Born: 23 Aug 1886 - New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Aug 1956 - Launceston, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Evelyn Stanley Archer
         Marr: 28 Oct 1913




General Notes (Husband)

Evening Post, Issue 15, 19 January 1885, Page 3

Mr. Edwin Meredith, jun, of Riversdale, died today, after a long illness.


General Notes for Child Laird A. William Meredith

New Zealand Free Lance, Volume 9, Issue 463, 15 May 1909, Page 14

A wedding in which considerable interest was manifested was celebrated at St. Matthew's Church, Masterton, last Wednesday afternoon. The contracting parties were Miss Ivy Tatham, of "Homewood" East Coast, and Mr. Laird A.W. Meredith, of "Waioronga" East Coast, second son of the late Mr. Edwin Meredith, of Riversdale, and grandson of the late Mr. Edwin Meredith of "Llandaff" Masterton. The Rev. J.H. Sykes of Upper Hutt, performed ther marriage ceremony, and he was assisted by the Rev. H. Watson.


General Notes for Child George Steuart Meredith

Evening Post, Issue 60, 7 September 1912, Page 7:

The Australasian announces the engagement of George Stewart, youngest son of Mrs. Meredith, Orui, Elphin-road, Launceston, and of the late Mr. Edwin Meredith, Riversdale, Whareama, New Zealand, to Ethel Nancy, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Roxburgh, Bank of Australasia, Launceston.

Evening Post, Volume 86, Issue 121, 18 November 1913

On the 21st October, at Launceston, Tasmania, the marriage took place of Mr. George Stewart Meredith, third son of the late Mr. Edward Meredith, jun., of Waironga, East Coast, New Zealand, to Ethel Nancy, only daughter of J.W. Roxburgh, of the bank of Australasia, Launceston.
picture

George Jones




Husband George Jones

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Jane Walker Jones

         Born: 1806
   Christened: 
         Died: 14 Oct 1855
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Meredith
         Marr: 9 Aug 1825 - Saint Martin's, Birmingham, Warwickshire




General Notes for Child Jane Walker Jones

The Will of Jane Walker Meredith 25 May 1855 proved 23 Nov 1855 [25]: also mentions son George Frederick and daughter Constance. Appointed George Frederick Meredith James Bellamy Elkington of Birmingham silversmith and William Jacot of Liverpool Merchant as
Executors and leaves her share in business to them. Gives date of John Meredith’s death as 17 Jul 1851. Mentions Varnish Manufacture business at 107 and 108 Lionel Street Birmingham and 29 Great Queen Street, Lincoln Inn Fields [London]

Memorial plaque (with doubtful dates): in memory of John Meredith, late of Harborne, who died July 17, 1851, also of his wife Jane Walker Meredith, who died October 14, 1865.
picture

John Meredith and Jane Walker Jones




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 15 Apr 1800
   Christened: 24 Apr 1800 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 17 Jul 1851
       Buried: 


       Father: James Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather


     Marriage: 9 Aug 1825 - Saint Martin's, Birmingham, Warwickshire




Wife Jane Walker Jones

         Born: 1806
   Christened: 
         Died: 14 Oct 1855
       Buried: 


       Father: George Jones
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Georgina Augusta Meredith

         Born: 21 Aug 1826
   Christened: 8 Nov 1826 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 17 Jan 1882
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Joseph Beete Jukes
         Marr: 22 Sep 1849



2 M John Meredith

         Born: 13 Mar 1828
   Christened: 10 Jun 1828 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M George Frederick Meredith

         Born: 1830 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 Aug 1896 - West Retford, Nottinghamshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Eliza Scholefield
         Marr: 1857 - March Quarter - St. James, Westminster



4 F Margaret Meredith

         Born: 1832 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1886 - March Quarter - Llanelly, Wales
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James Balleney Elkington
         Marr: 1854, March Quarter - Harbonne, Warwickshire



5 M Llewellyn Meredith

         Born: 1834 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Nov 1864
       Buried: 



6 F Constance Meredith

         Born: 1832 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Conway Meredith

         Born: 1837 - Circa - Erdington, Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1897 - December Quarter - Llanelly, Wales (Aged 61 -  BMD)
       Buried: 



8 M Alban Meredith

         Born: 1838 - September Quarter
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 M Ernest Meredith

         Born: 1841 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Insured: James Meredith, John Meredith and Samuel Meredith, 29 Great Queen Street Lincolns Inn Fields, dealers in varnish.

This looks to me as though James Meredith’s three sons, James, John and Samuel are the varnish manufacturers – it would make the three of them in the region of 30 years of age.

James, John's father, is described in Vivienne Rae-Ellis Louis Anne Meredith - A Tigress in Exile (Blubber Head Press, Tasmania: 1979), as a cousin of John Meredith with 6 sons and 1 daughter. John travelled to Van Diemen's Land with John Meredith's son, George Meredith but returned.

A John Meredith was established as a varnish maker in 1780. The firm became Meredith & Clinton, Meredith, Clinton & Lawrence (1830) and Meredith & Co - this was probably John's uncle, also John Meredith.

Meredith John, varnish manufacturer, 108, Lionel street; house, Harborne Park in an 1850 Directory.

22 Sep 1849 At Harborne, J. Beete Jukes, esq. of the Geological Survey of Great Britain, to Augusta-Georgina, eldest dau. of John Meredith, esq. of Harborne Park, Staffordshire.

1841 Census at Belle Vue, Hill, Hales Owen, Shropshire: John Meredith (age 40) varnish manufacturer, Jane (age 35), Georgina (aged 30) – ages rounded and Conway b.ca. 1835, Alban b. 1838, Ernest b. 1841.

IGI: children of John Meredith and Jane Walker:
Georgina Augusta Meredith b. 21 Aug 1826 bapt. 08 Nov 1826 at St. Phillips.
John Meredith b. 13 Mar 1828 and bapt. 10 Jun 1828 at St. Phillips.


General Notes (Wife)

The Will of Jane Walker Meredith 25 May 1855 proved 23 Nov 1855 [25]: also mentions son George Frederick and daughter Constance. Appointed George Frederick Meredith James Bellamy Elkington of Birmingham silversmith and William Jacot of Liverpool Merchant as
Executors and leaves her share in business to them. Gives date of John Meredith’s death as 17 Jul 1851. Mentions Varnish Manufacture business at 107 and 108 Lionel Street Birmingham and 29 Great Queen Street, Lincoln Inn Fields [London]

Memorial plaque (with doubtful dates): in memory of John Meredith, late of Harborne, who died July 17, 1851, also of his wife Jane Walker Meredith, who died October 14, 1865.


General Notes for Child Georgina Augusta Meredith

IN LOVING REMEMBERANCE OF GEORGINA AUGUSTA MEREDITH WIDOW OF THE LATE JOSEPH BEETE JUKES M.A.F.R.S. WHO DIED JANUARY 17TH 1882. AGED 56. "REST IN THE LORD WAIT PATIENTLY FOR HIM"


General Notes for Child John Meredith

Not mentioned in mother’s will of 1855. This is probably explained by the following extract from a letter by Beatrice Allen:

"I have often heard another story of her cousin John - a very handsome young man - I seem to remember that he enlisted for a time in the Austrian army where I suppose he met his wife. He afterwards went to Australia but neither he nor his son were very satisfactory and were soon lost news of."


General Notes for Child George Frederick Meredith

George Frederick was a Varnish Manufacturer - reported in the 1861 England Census.

In the Great Western Railway Shareholder listing his death was recorded as 15 August 1896 - address given as West Retford. Nottinghamshire and also a London address - Kensington, Middlesex.

Extract of a letter by Beatrice Allen:

"Of his brothers you will probably remember George Meredith, a most charming man who at one time lived next door to the Garnetts at Kensington. He had a very bigoted R. C. wife and one daughter who married but of course could not carry on the name."


General Notes for Child Margaret Meredith

Margaret Elkington is at Pembrey House in the 1871 Wales Census with sister Constance.


General Notes for Child Llewellyn Meredith

The Brisbane Courier - 13 January 1865

We regret to learn that great apprehensions are entertained for the safety of Mr. Meredith and his overseer, the two having left Mr. Meredith's station, near the Flinders, to meet the drays returning with rations, and reported to be sixty miles off. A Mr. Sutherland, who remained at Mr. Meredith's station sixteen days after his disappearance reports that the teams had arrived without having seen Mr. Meredith, and it is conjectured from the troublesome nature of the natives there, that the two unfortunate individuals have fallen victims to some attack of the blacks.

Extract from the Brisbane Courier - Saturday 29th July 1865

…….After a sojourn of a week at Bowen Downs, we had the good fortune to meet with a traveller who was acquainted with the route to Port Denison. His intention was to meet a flock of sheep on the further side of the poison country, and to pave the way for them by cutting down tho noxious plant. Our route lay north east, in the direction of Suttor Creek, or (when the combined streams are spoken of) more properly, the Belyando. There is abundance of water for fifty-eight miles, as far as the Fisheries, on Cornish Creek. This point was so named as being a fishing ground for the blacks, and their peculiar process of catching was to construct a hedge across the creek. This is a dangerous locality, if one may judge from tho mysterious disappearance, a few weeks previous, of my friend Mr. Meredith and an overseer. Their encampment had been since identified, mid some of their property had been found in possession of the blacks. Altogether, they were both such good bushmen that there is no likelihood of
their having been lost while searching for their horses in the morning; although thoy may have met their fate while so engaged……..

The Brisbane Courier - Tuesday 17th January 1865

Great apprehensions are entertained for the welfare of Mr. Meredith and his overseer, who are missing from their station on the Flinders River. Both had left the station in company with the object of meeting the homeward bound teams with supplies ; the teams have since arrived, but the two gentlemen have not since been seen or heard of. Tho blacks have long been troublesome in tho Flinders country.

From the Hobarton Paper of February 15th 1865

The murder of Mr. Llewellyn Meredith by the blacks in Queensland.

The report lately received of the murder of Mr. Llewellyn Meredith by the natives in Northern Queensland is unhappily but too well founded.

Accounts confirming the terrible fate have been brought by Mr. J. B. Poynter, who had been for two years residing on Mr. Hervey's station with Mr. Meredith and who has fearlessly and perseveringly exerted himself to discover the remains of his lost relative, and of the servant who shared his fate.

It appears that Mr. Meredith had accompanied a dray which was bringing up supplies from ???? for the station and when within three days ride of home, he proceeded alone, and found a large mob of blacks camped close to the road. They followed him in a threatening manner and on his arrival at the station he heard that they had tried to surround some drays a short time before. Having to return to the dray, in order to see it safe home, he took a man with him, both being well armed; but in the night of November 20th when they were camped on the creek where the blacks were, they were both murdered.

A week afterwards, when anxiety began to be felt at the station concerning the non-appearance of either Mr. Meredith or the dray, a person passing informed Mr. Poynter that the draymen were waiting for someone to fetch them on, neither Mr. Meredith nor his companion having reached them. Mr. Poynter then at once set forth in search, taking two men and a black native boy with him, and on arriving at the “creek” he found the missing horses hobbled in the bush. Continuing the search next day, the saddles, bridles, rifle etc. were found broken up, in a deserted blacks camp, the late dwellers of which were next pursued, and found about twenty miles down the creek, and in their camp were the ?????, quart-pots, blankets and everything belonging to the lost white men, even to their clothes. Mr. Poynter then endeavoured to find out from the blacks what had been done with the bodies, and the black boy tried to communicate with them, but the dialects of different tribes are often so dissimilar and it was impossible to elicit any distinct information. The searching party occupied more than a week in following up the blacks and trying to discover the remains of the murdered White men, but without learning any further particulars as to the circumstances under which the poor fellows met their awful fate. Mr. Meredith was well known and universally esteemed and respected in Northern Queensland where his cruel murder has created a deep sensation of sorrow and horror. His brave genial disposition and keen intelligence, his noble handsome person and winning courtesy will be long and affectionately remembered and his tragic and early death sincerely mourned by many friends and a wide circle of relatives both in this and in the old country.

This seems to be a letter to Sarah Jukes (nee Meredith) Alfred Jukes” wife.

Extract from Mrs. Meredith's letter dated February 20th 1865

“It is sad new I have to tell you dear friend. We have received the melancholy tidings of our poor Llewellyn's untimely death in Queensland. He said when he left us for Queensland that he should either return in a carriage or not at all. for the ???? of the enterprise was well known and his foreboding has been terribly fulfilled. He was murdered by natives on the night of the 20th November last, but the length and difficulty of the journey over land (our ????? occupies 8 days in crossing) and the double or treble voyage have prevented our hearing until this month.

James Poynter our nephew, who had been at Tower Hill with poor Llewellyn the past two years made every effort regardless of danger to discover the remains of his lost friend and of the servant who shared his awful fate, but though the horses, ???? blankets, arms, and even the clothes of the victims were found, no clue could be obtained as to the hiding place of the bodies. I sent you a newspaper with an account I made out from James' narration and that is all we know now - of course further investigation will be carried on - and you shall know the result.

I cannot tell you the shock and grief this has been to me and to us all - for his dear father's sake, as well as his own. He was dear to me and my sons loved him and lament him as a brother - he was liked and respected by all who knew him, and James says his sad and early fate has created a deep and bitter sensation in Queensland.

I have written to Georgina Jones who seemed to have especially selected Llewellyn for her own. I know how much attached to her he was and I have written to Beete that he might tell Augusta - I send ???? to them and to your brother Samuel. I would have written to Joseph but ?? if I could have done so in the time - what little remains for me to do, I have sadly and faithfully performed and shall forward whatever ???? or property our lost one has left - I will send a ???? and write to your Alfred at Warrnambool.

February 19th 1865

I have just written to Beete that he may break to Augusta the terrible news of poor Llewellyn's murder in Queensland by the blacks. The paper containing the account he can send to you.

Our nephew James Poynter (married to Sarah Westall Meredith) was with Llewellyn for two years, and did all he could in endeavouring to find his remains and that of the man who shared his terrible fate, but in vain.

He was murdered on the night of the 20th November last, but owing to the long time occupied by the journey, James only arrived in Melbourne the end of January.

He sent a telegram from Brisbane with the first facts - but we tried not to believe them - - now I have his own account and there is no longer a doubt.

Everything belonging to Llewellyn and his servant was found in or near the Black's camps - but no enquiry or search served to show where the bodies were ????.

It is a melancholy business. We were much attached to poor Llewellyn and mourn his fearful death most sincerely. Charles' eldest brother was murdered years ago by natives at Kangaroo Island.


General Notes for Child Conway Meredith

1841 Census: Belle Vue, Halesowen, The Hill, Shropshire

In the 1861 England Census was at 107 Lionel Street. Manager of Varnish Manufactory.

In the 1871 Wales Census he was a manager at the Pembrey Copper Works - The Elkington family established the Pembrey Copperworks Company in Wales in 1849. Conway's sister Margaret was married to James Balleney Elkington.

1881 Census: Address: 1 Old Dock, Pembrey, Carmarthenshire

MEREDITH, Conway Head Single M 44 1837 Clerk At Copper Works
Born at Erdington Near Birmingham Warwickshire

Conway was unmarried in 1891.


General Notes for Child Alban Meredith

Alban was still unmarried in 1871 - he was a mechanical engineer.

Alban Meredith arrived in New York about 26 April 1872 on the steam-ship Helvetia from London - New York Times of that date.



picture

Samuel Jones and Decima Frances Meredith




Husband Samuel Jones

         Born: 1854 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1876 - December Q - Leominster, Herefordshire




Wife Decima Frances Meredith

         Born: 1854 - March Q - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1885 - September Quarter - Shifnal, Shropshire
       Buried: 


       Father: James Meredith
       Mother: Phoebe Wylde




General Notes (Husband)

1881 Census:

Decima described as a bailiffs wife - husband Samuel Jones was a bailiff - age 25 born in Radnorshire Wales - living at Heath Farm, Stoke St Milborough, Shropshire.
picture

Alfred Jukes and Sarah Meredith




Husband Alfred Jukes

         Born: 24 Sep 1792 - Bordesley House, Nr. Birmingham
   Christened: 31 Oct 1792 - New Meeting House, Moor St - Unitarian, Birmingham
         Died: 9 October 1844 (Death Cert.) - 17 New Hall Street, Birmingham
       Buried: 


       Father: John Jukes
       Mother: Elizabeth Mansfield


     Marriage: 7 Apr 1825 - St. Martin, Birmingham




Wife Sarah Meredith

         Born: 7 Apr 1799
   Christened: 28 Apr 1799 - Summer Lane Formerly New Hall Street New Jerusalem, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 14 Nov 1884 - Willesden, London
       Buried: 


       Father: James Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Rhodes (Sally) Mather





Children
1 F Sarah Elizabeth Jukes

         Born: 1826 Circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1926 - March Q - Hampstead
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Charles Harris Allen
         Marr: 1859



2 M Alfred Meredith Jukes

         Born: 29 Nov 1827
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Aug 1872 (Death Cert)
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Margaret McWilliams
         Marr: 29 Dec 1853 - Melbourne, Victoria



3 M Joseph Hordern Jukes

         Born: 1835 Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 14 Mar 1903 - Headington, Buckinghamshire
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Reported as a surgeon living at 17 New Hall St, Birmingham, aged 49. Living with his wife Sarah (nee Meredith - aged 42) and their sons Alfred (aged 13) and Joseph (aged 6) with two servants.

Death Certificate:

When and Where Died: 9 October 1844 at 17 New Hall St.
Name and Surname: Alfred Jukes
Sex: Male
Age: 52 Years
Occupation: Surgeon
Cause of Death: Lumbar Abscess
Signature, Description and Residence of Informant: Mary Ann Sharp in attendance, 17 New Hall St.
When Registered: 12 October 1844
Registrar: Joseph Smith

"Brooks says the engraving was done by a young gentleman who had studied anatomy under him, Alfred Jukes of Birmingham. It is possible he is a relative of Frederick Jukes of the General Hospital Birmingham who published on Silurian trilobites and cephalopods from the Birmingham area in the Magazine of Natural History series, vol. 2 in 1829, which would suggest, if so, a family interest in fossils."

Christened at New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham. He was the 8th son. He was surgeon to the Birmingham Hospital

The Rev. Jeremiah Finch (Smith) published The Admission Register of the Manchester School with Some Notices of the More Distinguished Scholars. The book was published in Manchester by the Chetham Society in 1874. The book included an account of Jeremiah's wife's uncle, Alfred Jukes the surgeon.

FINCH, REV. JEREMIAH FINCH: The Admission Register of the Manchester School with Some Notices of the More Distinguished Scholars. Manchester, Chetham Society, 1874 vol. 3: pt. 1. Chetham Society, First Series, Vol. 93.

“Alfred, son of John Jukes, merchant, Birmingham.

Alfred Jukes, born on 24th September 1792, the eighth son of Mr. John Jukes, merchant, of Bordesley House near Birmingham (a sufferer in the Church and King riots in that town of 1791), became fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, and a distinguished surgeon in his native town. On leaving school he attended the practice of the General Hospital, Birmingham, and of the Westminster Hospital, London, continuing his studies under Joshua Brookes, the great anatomist, John Hunter and others, was admitted a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, and on the 15th June 1813 was elected house surgeon to the first-named institution. In September 1820 he resigned the office, and the degree to which his services were appreciated will be best understood when it is recorded that the governors of the hospital voted 30l (£) to be expended in a piece of plate presented to him 'in testimony of their sense of his meritorious and exemplary discharge of the arduous duties of house surgeon during seven years.' In March 1823 Mr. Jukes was elected one of the surgeons of the hospital, on the occasion of a vacancy, and retained the office until 1843, a period of twenty years, when impaired health, and the onerous duties of private practice compelled him to retire from it. He died on the 9th October in the following year, at the age of 52, after a long and painful illness, aggravated if not caused by injury received whilst dressing a very bad case of a patient at the hospital. He was buried at the Birmingham general cemetery, where there is a monument with an inscription referring to him in terms of praise, both as regards his professional and private life. At the time of his death a short notice of his career appeared in the Birmingham papers. He deservedly enjoyed a high place in the estimation of his professional brethren as a sound master in surgery, and few ever possessed in a larger degree the confidence of their patients. He occasionally contributed papers to medical periodicals, and published in 1842, A Case of Carcinomatous Stricture of the Rectum. As an operator he was most successful, especially in cases of strangulated hernia, and lithotomy.

Mr. Jukes married on the 7th April 1825 Sarah, only daughter of Mr. James Meredith of Birmingham, and left two sons and one daughter. His elder son, Alfred Meredith, is a solicitor in Australia; the younger, Joseph Hordern, M.A. of Wadham college, Oxford, is in holy orders. His daughter, Sarah, married Mr. Charles H. Allen of Stoke Newington, F.R.C.S., and author of A Visit to Queensland and her Goldfields, very recently published, London, Chapman and Hall.

This scholar was uncle to the late J. Beete Jukes, esq., A.M., F.R.S., &c., professor of geology at the Royal college of science, and author of several valuable works on geology, and director of the Geographical survey department in Ireland, who died in Dublin on the 29th July 1869.

The father of this scholar died on the 10th October 1822, aged 66, and his widow, Elizabeth, daughter of William Mansfield, of Bushbury hill, Staffordshire, to whom he was married in February 1782, lived to the age of 80, dying on the 9th June 1839.

Plarr's Lives of the Fellows Online
Jukes, Alfred ( - 1847) MRCS, April 17th, 1812; FRCS, Dec 11th, 1843, one of the original 300 Fellows.

General surgeon

Held the office of House Surgeon to the Birmingham General Hospital for ten years; he was then elected Surgeon in 1823 and held office until March, 1843, when his place was filled by S H Amphlett (qv), who had been his pupil. He appears to have belonged to a medical family in the town, for Fred Jukes, living at 45 Cherry Street, took his MRCS in 1819 and was also for ten years Resident Surgeon to the Birmingham General Hospital. Alfred Jukes died on or before July 28th, 1847.

The Humane Society established in the town for the recovery of persons apparently drowned, or otherwise in a state of suspended animation has been for many years attached to the General Hospital, where printed directions to be observed in such cases can be had gratis.

The principal Officers of this Institution in the present year (1829) are -

Physicians Surgeons
Dr. John Johnstone, Mr. Richard Wood,
Dr. Geo. Edward Male, Mr. Bowyer Vaux,
Dr. John K. Booth, Mr. Joseph Hodgson,
Dr. G. De Lys, Mr. Alfred Jukes,

House Surgeons and Apothecary-Mr. Frederick Jukes.
Matron-Mrs. Caroline Hawkes.
Secretary, House Steward, and Collector-Mr. John Underhill.
Treasurers-Messrs. Taylors and Lloyds, Bankers, Birmingham.





General Notes (Wife)

Sarah Meredith d/o James Meredith m. Alfred Jukes on 7 Apr 1825 at St. Martin, Birmingham and left 2 sons and 1 daughter. Sarah Elizabeth Jukes aged 25 (and her mother) were living with her uncle Joseph Meredith in the 1851 census. The family was indexed in the UK 1841 census as Tukes.


General Notes for Child Sarah Elizabeth Jukes

Letter written by Sarah Elizabeth Allen (nee Jukes)

"From a letter of condolence after our sad loss in the spring, from our Australian friend Mrs. Norvill who visited us whilst in England with her grandmother Mrs. Charles Meredith of Hobart Tasmania in 1890 & 1891.

'The picture of Alfred has laways stayed in my memory. I went to church with Mr. Allen on Sunday & it was a dull day. Alfred was in the choir in his chorister's gown, & all of a sudden a ray of light lit up his hair, & I remember thinking it looks like a halo.'

17 Well Walk
Hampstead
1916

Alfred was her son Alfred Jukes Allen who died in 1916. Mrs Norvill is Louisa Anne Norvill (nee Meredith) who was born in 1872/73 and her grandmother was Mrs. Charles Meredith who was Louisa Anne Meredith (nee Twamley).
______________________________________________________________________

National Archive

KGA/RAMSAY/1/13 1849

Contents:

Letts's diary no. 1, 1849. Boards (lock removed.) 25 x 20 cms, 231ff. Daily diary, in parts in very great detail, dealing principally with ACR's love affair with Miss Sarah (Sally) Jukes, cousin of J B Jukes and apparently also related to Mrs Playfair. Monthly accounts at end. ff.84, 86: letters from J B Jukes on the love affair; f93, on his own marriage. ff.103, 106, 110, 122, 157, 161, and 172: letters on the same subject from Lyon Playfair who acted as a go between. ff.119, 131, 151, 165, 176, 184, 190: letters from his wife, Margaret Playfair, also on the same subject. f.230 is a despairing poem, with a profile sketch of a woman's head on the back of the sheet. The tone of the diary may be represented by the entry on f.145, September 17: 'A day of horror and unutterable depression. Life seems a blank to me'.
[no title] KGA/RAMSAY/1/14 1850

Contents:

Letts's diary no.1, 1850. Boards, with damaged lock, 25 x 20 cms, 202ff. A continued detailed account of ACR's love affairs: decline of feeling for Miss Jukes (who from being an angel becomes an icicle) and first meetings with Miss Louisa Williams. f43, 19 April: account of R I discourse. 'Playfair's fortune is made now I believe' f.74: letter from Mrs Playfair. Monthly accounts at end.
[no title] KGA/RAMSAY/8/552/1-4 n.d

Contents:

JUKES, Sarah. Mrs Alfred Jukes and her daughter Sarah.
Four letters

ACR would have been Andrew Crombie Ramsay, who became President of the Geological Society.

According to records in the UK National Archives, Sarah Elizabeth had a love affair with Andrew Crombie Ramsay ca. 1849, who later became President of the Geological Society.


General Notes for Child Alfred Meredith Jukes

On the 29th of December, 1853, at St. Peter's Church, Collingwood, Victoria, Alfred Meredith Jukes, Esq., solicitor, of Melbourne, eldest son of the late Alfred Jukes, Esq., surgeon, of Birmingham, to Margaret Strathern, niece of Mrs. A. D. Thomson, of Grosvenor-street, Grosvenor-square, and Belvedere, Tunbridge-wells. [28]

Marriage Certificate:

Married on the 29th day of December, 1853 at St. Peter's Church, Melbourne, Registered by the Revd. H.L.P. Handfield, Alfred Meredith Jukes of Birmingham (aged 26), solicitor, living in Richmond, Victoria, son of Alfred Jukes, surgeon, and Sarah Meredith, married to Margaret McWilliam of Glasgow (aged 20), living in Collingwood, Victoria, daughter of John McWilliam, a weaver and Amelia Thomson.

4 October 1873
On the 13 Aug after a long illness in his 45th year, *Alfred Meredith
Jukes*, solicitor of Warrnambool, Victoria, eldest son of the late
Alfred Jukes, FRCS of Birmingham.

July 1857
Mr.Jukes (Alfred Meredith) came out and settled about Hoy's farm.

Died of a brain disease of some kind - difficult to read the death certificate.




General Notes for Child Joseph Hordern Jukes

Joseph Hordern Jukes was a clergyman, unmarried. He died aged 68 on 14 Mar 1903 at 8 Park-crescent, Oxford.

The Times, Monday, Mar. 16, 1903; page 1; Issue 37029; Col A

JUKES--On the 14th inst., at 8, Park Crescent, Oxford, the Rev. Joseph Hordern Jukes, M.A., Assistant Curate of Abingdon, Berkshire, son of the late Alfred Jukes, F.R.C.S., of Birmingham, aged 68. No flowers, by request.

Also:

The Times, Tuesday, March 17, 1903; Page 10; Issue 37030; Col C - Obituary

The Rev. J. Hordern Jukes, who died at his residence in Oxford, in his 60th year, was the last surviving son of the late Mr. Alfred Jukes, F.R.C.S of Birmingham. With hi disappears the last male representitive in England of a talented band of brothers, formerly well known in the Midlands. Mr. Jukes had taken very high rank as a Freemason.

Palladian Lodge (No. 120) of Freemasons (meetings held at the Green Dragon Hotel monthly, except from June to September both inclusive).-Rev. Joseph Hordern Jukes, M.A., Hon. Secretary.

Royal Arch Palladian Chapter (No. 120) of Freemasons (meetings held at the Green Dragon Hotel quarterly).-Rev. J. H. Jukes, M.A., Hon. Secretary.

Joseph Hordern, M.A. of Wadham college, Oxford, is in holy orders.

The Rugby School Register - 1850
Jukes Joseph Hordern, son of late Alfred Jukes, Esq. aged 15, Nov. 3

picture

Alfred Meredith Jukes and Margaret McWilliams




Husband Alfred Meredith Jukes

         Born: 29 Nov 1827
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Aug 1872 (Death Cert)
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred Jukes
       Mother: Sarah Meredith


     Marriage: 29 Dec 1853 - Melbourne, Victoria




Wife Margaret McWilliams

         Born: 1833 - Circa - Glasgow, Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 June 1915 - 29 June - 'The Argus'
       Buried: 


       Father: John McWilliams
       Mother: Amelia Thompson





Children
1 M Alfred Wingfield Jukes

         Born: 15 Sep 1854
   Christened: 30 Nov 1854 - St. Stephens, Richmond, Victoria
         Died: 25 May 1875 - aged 21
       Buried: 



2 F Margaret Thomson Jukes

         Born: 23 Jan 1856 - Melbourne, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 Feb 1856 - Melbourne, Victoria
       Buried: 



3 M Arthur Jukes

         Born: 7 Mar 1857
   Christened: 
         Died: 1947
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Margaret Jellie
         Marr: 1884



4 F Edith Isabella Jukes

         Born: 19 Sep 1858
   Christened: 
         Died: Bef 1920
       Buried: 



5 F Pauline Cecilia Jukes

         Born: 5 Oct 1860
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Clement Ingleby Jukes

         Born: 29 Jun 1862
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Cecil Meredith Jukes

         Born: 9 Apr 1864
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Oct 1878
       Buried: 



8 M Charles Allen Jukes

         Born: 6 Aug 1867 - Melbourne, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Harvie (Harriet) Nicholson
         Marr: 1896



9 F Sarah Blanche Jukes

         Born: 15 Mar 1870
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Samuel Macaulay Cromie
         Marr: 17th Apil 1895 - Willesden, Victoria St. Warrnambool, Victoria



10 M James Fraser Jukes

         Born: 23 Jan 1873
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

On the 29th of December, 1853, at St. Peter's Church, Collingwood, Victoria, Alfred Meredith Jukes, Esq., solicitor, of Melbourne, eldest son of the late Alfred Jukes, Esq., surgeon, of Birmingham, to Margaret Strathern, niece of Mrs. A. D. Thomson, of Grosvenor-street, Grosvenor-square, and Belvedere, Tunbridge-wells. [28]

Marriage Certificate:

Married on the 29th day of December, 1853 at St. Peter's Church, Melbourne, Registered by the Revd. H.L.P. Handfield, Alfred Meredith Jukes of Birmingham (aged 26), solicitor, living in Richmond, Victoria, son of Alfred Jukes, surgeon, and Sarah Meredith, married to Margaret McWilliam of Glasgow (aged 20), living in Collingwood, Victoria, daughter of John McWilliam, a weaver and Amelia Thomson.

4 October 1873
On the 13 Aug after a long illness in his 45th year, *Alfred Meredith
Jukes*, solicitor of Warrnambool, Victoria, eldest son of the late
Alfred Jukes, FRCS of Birmingham.

July 1857
Mr.Jukes (Alfred Meredith) came out and settled about Hoy's farm.

Died of a brain disease of some kind - difficult to read the death certificate.




General Notes for Child Alfred Wingfield Jukes

The index also listed the death of their (only?) child in 1856. Interesting that they chose Thomson as middle name, which gives some credibility to the Times article that cited Mrs. A.D. Thomson as the aunt. So perhaps Margaret McWilliam's mother was a Thomson and perhaps A.D. Thomson was well-known enough at the time for that detail to be worth including. So that this child must have died prior to 1856 when the second child died.


General Notes for Child Charles Allen Jukes

The Argus Saturday 31 July 1920, page 20. News 238 words
... WARRNAMBOOL. Councillor C. A. Jukes, who has represented the Hopkins ward in the city council for three years, has resigned owing to ill-health............


General Notes for Child Sarah Blanche Jukes

The Argus - Saturday 17 April 1920 - silver wedding commemoration:

On 17th April 1895 at the residence of the bride's mother, Willesden, Victoria St., Warrnambool, by the Rev. Gray Dixon, M.A. Samuel Macaulay eldest son of John Cromie of Warrnambool, to Blanche Sarah only surviving daughter of the late Alfred Meredith Jukes of Warrnambool.
picture

Charles Allen Jukes and Mary Harvie (Harriet) Nicholson




Husband Charles Allen Jukes

         Born: 6 Aug 1867 - Melbourne, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred Meredith Jukes
       Mother: Margaret McWilliams


     Marriage: 1896




Wife Mary Harvie (Harriet) Nicholson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Charles Allen Jukes

         Born: 1896
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 May 1959 - Warrnambool, Victoria
       Buried: 



2 M Mark Nicholson Jukes

         Born: 1898
   Christened: 
         Died: 9 October 1916 - 11 October - 'The Argus' - Spence St., Warrnambool - parents home
       Buried: 



3 M Reynold Meredith Jukes

         Born: 1906
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Argus Saturday 31 July 1920, page 20. News 238 words
... WARRNAMBOOL. Councillor C. A. Jukes, who has represented the Hopkins ward in the city council for three years, has resigned owing to ill-health............


General Notes for Child Charles Allen Jukes

Charles Allan Jukes
Regimental number: 5400
Religion: Church of England
Occupation: Horticulturist
Address: Warrnambool, Victoria
Marital status: Single
Age at embarkation: 19
Next of kin: Father, C A Jukes, Spence Street, Warrnambool, Victoria
Enlistment date: 22 January 1916
Rank on enlistment: Private
Unit name: 14th Battalion, 17th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number: 23/31/4
Embarkation details: Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 4 April 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll: Private
Unit from Nominal Roll: 3rd Machine Gun Battalion
Recommendations (Medals and Awards): Congratulatory Card Recommendation date: 5 March 1918
Date Returned to Australia: 12 June 1919
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll): Spelt Charles Allen Jukes on NR


General Notes for Child Mark Nicholson Jukes

The Argus - Wednesday 11th October 1916

Jukes - On the 9th October, at his parents residence, Spence St., Warrnambool, Mark Nicholson, second beloved son of CHarles Allen and Mary Harvie Jukes, in his 18th year.
picture

Edward Jukes and Phebe Burridge (Burnidge) Welch




Husband Edward Jukes

         Born: 1794 Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Jukes
       Mother: Elizabeth Mansfield


     Marriage: 20 Apr 1824 - St. Phillip's, Birmingham




Wife Phebe Burridge (Burnidge) Welch

         Born: 1803 - circa
   Christened: 21 Feb 1803 - St. Phillip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: James Welch
       Mother: Elizabeth





Children
1 M Joseph Mansfield Jukes

         Born: 1827 - circa
   Christened: 25 Oct 1827 - St. Matthew, Walsall, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M James Mansfield Jukes

         Born: 29 Mar 1825
   Christened: 20 Apr 1825 - St. Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

It is assumed that Edward is the son of John Jukes and Elizabeth nee Mansfield, solely on the basis of their choice of Mansfield for the middle name of their two sons. The family may have emigrated before 1841 as family members do not appear in the UK censuses.

History of the Free-schools, Colleges, Hospitals, and Asylums of Birmingham, and Their Fulfilment. With Twelve Illustrations.
By George Griffith
Published by W. Tweedie, 1861

In the year 1823, the committee purchased of Edward Jukes, leasehold land, situate in Water-lane, in the parish of Aston, for the sum of £79 7s 6d., there being at that period an unexpired term of 87 years in the said lease, subject to an annual ground rent of £137 14s 4d.
picture

Pitt and Elizabeth Jukes




Husband Pitt

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Jukes

         Born: 1734 - circa
   Christened: 5 Jan 1734 - John St. Presbytarian Church, Wolverhampton
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Richard Jukes
       Mother: Phebe





Children
1 M William Pitt

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M John Pitt

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Wife)

It has assumed that Elizabeth Jukes is the mother of John and William Pitt, mentioned in the Will of Richard Jukes as his grandchildren, but there is no documentary evidence for this.
picture

John Jukes and Elizabeth Mansfield




Husband John Jukes

         Born: 1756 - circa - Bordesley, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Oct 1822 - Bordesley, Birmingham
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Jukes
       Mother: 


     Marriage: Feb 1782 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England




Wife Elizabeth Mansfield

         Born: 1759 - circa
   Christened: 11 Mar 1759 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England
         Died: 9 Jun 1839
       Buried: 


       Father: William Mansfield
       Mother: Elizabeth





Children
1 F Elizabeth Jukes

         Born: 7 Dec 1782
   Christened: Birmingham, Unitarian Church New Meeting House
         Died: 1877 - June Q - Kings Norton, Warwickshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Clement Ingleby
         Marr: 9 May 1812 - Saint Martin, Birmingham



2 M Joseph Jukes

         Born: 17 Nov 1783
   Christened:  - New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 1820 - Before May
       Buried: 



3 M William Mansfield Jukes

         Born: 1784 - circa
   Christened: 17 Sep 1784 - Birmingham, Unitarian Church New Meeting House Moor Street
         Died: 3 Oct 1784 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England
       Buried: 



4 M John Jukes

         Born: 1785 - circa
   Christened: 10 Oct 1785 - Birmingham, Unitarian Church New Meeting House Moor Street
         Died: Oct 1785
       Buried: 21 Oct 1785 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England



5 M John Jukes

		 Born: 12 October 1786 - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   	     Christened: 20 Nov 1786 - New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 24 April 1819 - Aged 32
         Buried: 
       Spouse: Sophia (Jane) Beete
         Marr: 8 Jan 1811



6 F Jane Jukes

		 Born: 25 June 1791 - Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Christened: 10 Aug 1791 - New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 1873 - September Quarter - Birmingham
         Buried: 



7 M William Mansfield Jukes


   	Born: 21 January 1788
Christened: 5 Mar 1788 - New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 1844 - June Quarter - Birmingham
       Buried: 

1841 England Census
Warwickshire
Birmingham
St Paul
District 12
George Street

Will Jukes - 53 - Artist
Jane Jukes - 49
Sarah Elizabeth - 15

Unusually for the 1841 census, exact ages are given. William Mansfield's sister Jane was recorded together with Jane and William's neice, Sarah Elizabeth, the daughter of Alfred Jukes and Sarah Meredith. The 1841 census record for Alfred and Sarah only had their other two children Alfred and Joseph.

Note the census entry also includes J. W. Hulme who was described as an ornamental painter.
One may speculate whether William, and perhaps, Mr. Hulme were working for Jukes and Pitts as contract painters of plated items.


8 M Henry Walter Jukes

		Born: 19 March 1789 - Birmingham, Warwickshire
        Christened: 11 Jun 1789 - New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham, Warwick, England
        Died: 
       	Buried: 



9 M James Jukes

         Born: 1790 - circa
   Christened: 18 May 1790 - New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 



10 M Alfred Jukes

         Born: 24 Sep 1792 - Bordesley House, Nr. Birmingham
   Christened: 31 Oct 1792 - New Meeting House, Moor St - Unitarian, Birmingham
         Died: 9 October 1844 (Death Cert.) - 17 New Hall Street, Birmingham
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Meredith
         Marr: 7 Apr 1825 - St. Martin, Birmingham



11 M Edward Jukes

         Born: 1794 Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Phebe Burridge (Burnidge) Welch
         Marr: 20 Apr 1824 - St. Phillip's, Birmingham



12 M Frederick Jukes

         Born: Jun 1796 - Birmingham
   Christened: 
         Died: 12 Sep 1857 (Medical Times) - Birmingham
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John was a button manufacturer as was his father Joseph. (Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

In a Poll of 1820 John Jukes of Bordesley was listed as a Freeholder of Warwickshire.

John Jukes of Bordesley nr Birmingham: died "in his 67th year" Announcement in Warwick & Warwickshire General Advertiser edition of 22 Oct 1822

Wrightson's Triennial Directory 1818:
Jukes, John Senr, Plater, Button Mkr, New St, Birmingham.

UK National Archives: Abstract of title of John Jukes and Clement Ingleby to a cottage and premises in Green Lanes, Bordesley. 15 June, 1775 - 13 July, 1814. MS 3069/Acc1930-022/372065 13 July, 1814

IGI - Second marriage to Mary Thomas - gives age of John as 39 and Mary as 35 at the time of the marriage

UK National Archives: Abstract of title of John Jukes and Clement Ingleby to a cottage and premises in Green Lanes, Bordesley. 15 June, 1775 - 13 July, 1814. MS 3069/Acc1930-022/372065 13 July, 1814

In a Poll of 1820 John Jukes of Bordesley was listed as a Freeholder of Warwickshire


General Notes (Wife)

The Gentleman's Magazine
Published by W. Pickering, 1839
Item Notes: v. 166 (July-Dec. 1839)

June 9, Aged 80, Elizabeth, relict of J. Jukes, esq., of Bordesley-house, near Birmingham.


General Notes for Child Joseph Jukes

For details of death - see the admin papers. Joseph was unmarried at the time of his death.

Joseph died intestate. His brother Alfred Jukes, a surgeon applied for Letters of Administration of his brothers estate and effects. The estate was declared by him to be less than £200. The application was sworn by Alfred on 4 May 1820.


General Notes for Child John Jukes

John was a button manufacturer, as was his father John and his grandfather, Joseph.

John had three daughters, who were referred to as the siblings of Joseph Beete Jukes in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

John died intestate. As a result, Administration had to be sought in the Bishop's Court of Lichfield. Sophia, his wife appeared personally as the party applying for Letters of Administration of her deceased husband's estate and effects, together with her late husband's two brothers, Joseph Jukes a plater and Alfred Jukes, a surgeon. The declaration was signed by all three of them. His estate, before deducting debts, was less than £2000. The Application was sworn on 14 July, 1819. It is stated on the document that he died on the 14 June, 1819. Administration was granted on 6 October, 1819.


General Notes for Child Jane Jukes

Jane was unmarried. She had a deep interest in geology - a passion that she imparted to Joseph Beete Jukes, her nephew.

The BMD gives age at death as 82.


General Notes for Child Alfred Jukes

1841 Census:

Reported as a surgeon living at 17 New Hall St, Birmingham, aged 49. Living with his wife Sarah (nee Meredith - aged 42) and their sons Alfred (aged 13) and Joseph (aged 6) with two servants.

Death Certificate:

When and Where Died: 9 October 1844 at 17 New Hall St.
Name and Surname: Alfred Jukes
Sex: Male
Age: 52 Years
Occupation: Surgeon
Cause of Death: Lumbar Abscess
Signature, Description and Residence of Informant: Mary Ann Sharp in attendance, 17 New Hall St.
When Registered: 12 October 1844
Registrar: Joseph Smith

"Brooks says the engraving was done by a young gentleman who had studied anatomy under him, Alfred Jukes of Birmingham. It is possible he is a relative of Frederick Jukes of the General Hospital Birmingham who published on Silurian trilobites and cephalopods from the Birmingham area in the Magazine of Natural History series, vol. 2 in 1829, which would suggest, if so, a family interest in fossils."

Christened at New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham. He was the 8th son. He was surgeon to the Birmingham Hospital

The Rev. Jeremiah Finch (Smith) published The Admission Register of the Manchester School with Some Notices of the More Distinguished Scholars. The book was published in Manchester by the Chetham Society in 1874. The book included an account of Jeremiah's wife's uncle, Alfred Jukes the surgeon.

FINCH, REV. JEREMIAH FINCH: The Admission Register of the Manchester School with Some Notices of the More Distinguished Scholars. Manchester, Chetham Society, 1874 vol. 3: pt. 1. Chetham Society, First Series, Vol. 93.

“Alfred, son of John Jukes, merchant, Birmingham.

Alfred Jukes, born on 24th September 1792, the eighth son of Mr. John Jukes, merchant, of Bordesley House near Birmingham (a sufferer in the Church and King riots in that town of 1791), became fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, and a distinguished surgeon in his native town. On leaving school he attended the practice of the General Hospital, Birmingham, and of the Westminster Hospital, London, continuing his studies under Joshua Brookes, the great anatomist, John Hunter and others, was admitted a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, and on the 15th June 1813 was elected house surgeon to the first-named institution. In September 1820 he resigned the office, and the degree to which his services were appreciated will be best understood when it is recorded that the governors of the hospital voted 30l (£) to be expended in a piece of plate presented to him 'in testimony of their sense of his meritorious and exemplary discharge of the arduous duties of house surgeon during seven years.' In March 1823 Mr. Jukes was elected one of the surgeons of the hospital, on the occasion of a vacancy, and retained the office until 1843, a period of twenty years, when impaired health, and the onerous duties of private practice compelled him to retire from it. He died on the 9th October in the following year, at the age of 52, after a long and painful illness, aggravated if not caused by injury received whilst dressing a very bad case of a patient at the hospital. He was buried at the Birmingham general cemetery, where there is a monument with an inscription referring to him in terms of praise, both as regards his professional and private life. At the time of his death a short notice of his career appeared in the Birmingham papers. He deservedly enjoyed a high place in the estimation of his professional brethren as a sound master in surgery, and few ever possessed in a larger degree the confidence of their patients. He occasionally contributed papers to medical periodicals, and published in 1842, A Case of Carcinomatous Stricture of the Rectum. As an operator he was most successful, especially in cases of strangulated hernia, and lithotomy.

Mr. Jukes married on the 7th April 1825 Sarah, only daughter of Mr. James Meredith of Birmingham, and left two sons and one daughter. His elder son, Alfred Meredith, is a solicitor in Australia; the younger, Joseph Hordern, M.A. of Wadham college, Oxford, is in holy orders. His daughter, Sarah, married Mr. Charles H. Allen of Stoke Newington, F.R.C.S., and author of A Visit to Queensland and her Goldfields, very recently published, London, Chapman and Hall.

This scholar was uncle to the late J. Beete Jukes, esq., A.M., F.R.S., &c., professor of geology at the Royal college of science, and author of several valuable works on geology, and director of the Geographical survey department in Ireland, who died in Dublin on the 29th July 1869.

The father of this scholar died on the 10th October 1822, aged 66, and his widow, Elizabeth, daughter of William Mansfield, of Bushbury hill, Staffordshire, to whom he was married in February 1782, lived to the age of 80, dying on the 9th June 1839.

Plarr's Lives of the Fellows Online
Jukes, Alfred ( - 1847) MRCS, April 17th, 1812; FRCS, Dec 11th, 1843, one of the original 300 Fellows.

General surgeon

Held the office of House Surgeon to the Birmingham General Hospital for ten years; he was then elected Surgeon in 1823 and held office until March, 1843, when his place was filled by S H Amphlett (qv), who had been his pupil. He appears to have belonged to a medical family in the town, for Fred Jukes, living at 45 Cherry Street, took his MRCS in 1819 and was also for ten years Resident Surgeon to the Birmingham General Hospital. Alfred Jukes died on or before July 28th, 1847.

The Humane Society established in the town for the recovery of persons apparently drowned, or otherwise in a state of suspended animation has been for many years attached to the General Hospital, where printed directions to be observed in such cases can be had gratis.

The principal Officers of this Institution in the present year (1829) are -

Physicians Surgeons
Dr. John Johnstone, Mr. Richard Wood,
Dr. Geo. Edward Male, Mr. Bowyer Vaux,
Dr. John K. Booth, Mr. Joseph Hodgson,
Dr. G. De Lys, Mr. Alfred Jukes,

House Surgeons and Apothecary-Mr. Frederick Jukes.
Matron-Mrs. Caroline Hawkes.
Secretary, House Steward, and Collector-Mr. John Underhill.
Treasurers-Messrs. Taylors and Lloyds, Bankers, Birmingham.





General Notes for Child Edward Jukes

It is assumed that Edward is the son of John Jukes and Elizabeth nee Mansfield, solely on the basis of their choice of Mansfield for the middle name of their two sons. The family may have emigrated before 1841 as family members do not appear in the UK censuses.

History of the Free-schools, Colleges, Hospitals, and Asylums of Birmingham, and Their Fulfilment. With Twelve Illustrations.
By George Griffith
Published by W. Tweedie, 1861

In the year 1823, the committee purchased of Edward Jukes, leasehold land, situate in Water-lane, in the parish of Aston, for the sum of £79 7s 6d., there being at that period an unexpired term of 87 years in the said lease, subject to an annual ground rent of £137 14s 4d.


General Notes for Child Frederick Jukes

Frederick was a resident surgeon at Birmingham Hospital and an M.R.C.S. (1819) and L.S.A. (1820) He published several articles on fossils.

He died unmarried on 12 September 1857 aged 61 years (Medical Times).

1841 Census:

Frederick was reported as a surgeon, aged 45, living at Cherry St, Birmingham with one female servant

His will, in which he made numerous bequests to sisters, nephews and nieces, was probated on 26 September 1857.

The Humane Society established in the town for the recovery of persons apparently drowned, or otherwise in a state of suspended animation has been for many years attached to the General Hospital, where printed directions to be observed in such cases can be had gratis.

The principal Officers of this Institution in the present year (1829) are -

Physicians Surgeons
Dr. John Johnstone, Mr. Richard Wood,
Dr. Geo. Edward Male, Mr. Bowyer Vaux,
Dr. John K. Booth, Mr. Joseph Hodgson,
Dr. G. De Lys, Mr. Alfred Jukes,

House Surgeons and Apothecary-Mr. Frederick Jukes.
Matron-Mrs. Caroline Hawkes.
Secretary, House Steward, and Collector-Mr. John Underhill.
Treasurers-Messrs. Taylors and Lloyds, Bankers, Birmingham.

picture

Joseph Jukes




Husband Joseph Jukes

         Born: 1731 - Circa
   Christened: 20 Apr 1731 - John St. Presbytarian Church, Wolverhampton
         Died: October 1811 - The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine 1869 p.85
       Buried: 


       Father: Richard Jukes
       Mother: Phebe


     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Jukes

         Born: 1756 - circa - Bordesley, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Oct 1822 - Bordesley, Birmingham
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Elizabeth Mansfield
         Marr: Feb 1782 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England




General Notes (Husband)

Joseph Jukes was christened on 20 Apr 1731 at John Street Presbyterian Church, Wolverhampton, the son of Richard Jukes.

He was listed as a Plater of 20 Paradise Row in a 1780 directory and also in an earlier edition thought to be of 1774.

His great-granddaughter Caroline Amelia recalled how he “built at Bordesley a substantial house, with oaken beams and floors, doubtless cherishing the idea that his descendants, for many generations, would appreciate its solidity, and sun themselves in the pleasant gardens and fields surrounding the house- the property being entailed in the male line. House and garden, fields and farm, now form part of the unlovely buildings and sheds belonging to the goods department of the London and North-Western Railway”. She also mentions that “he carried on a little amateur farming, as a recreation from business.”

Some accounts of the so-called ”Priestley Riots” of 1791 in Birmingham imply that Joseph’s house was looted and burnt down. In fact, he wrote an account of the riots from which it is clear that he took timely action to protect both his house and possessions. His great-great-grandson describes how:

“Jukes appears to have owed the preservation of his house, partly to his shrewdness in removing his furniture and leaving plenty of ale in a conspicuous position for the rioters to consume and partly also, as he suggests elsewhere, to the fact that, as a Guardian of the Poor, he had shown himself, on several occasions, anxious to secure a fair administration of the funds provided for the relief of the needy.”

The birth of his son John ca 1756 is consistent with Joseph’s wife being the Ann Cade who married a Joseph Jukes on 22 Sep 1755 at Birmingham, St. Martin’s. Perhaps related to this is an indenture between Anne Cade, spinster, Joseph Jukes of Birmingham, butcher [sic], and others, dated two days before the marriage. However the conclusion is doubtful and is not supported.

Joseph was described as a friend of William Hutton the "English Franklin" whose house was destroyed in the Birmingham riots of 1791 - but see above.

Death announcement:
Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, October 19, 1811; Issue 3051

"At his house in Bordesley, in the 81st year of his age, Joseph Jukes, sen. Esq."

Joseph Jukes of 20 Paradise Row was listed as a Plater in The Birmingham, Wolverhampton, Walsall, Dudley, Bilston, and Willenhall directory; or, merchant and tradesman's useful companion: ... Birmingham, 1780. He was listed as a Plater at the same address in an earlier edition thought to be of 1774.

The button manufacturing company was called Messrs. Jukes and Pitt. See the UK National Archives:

Case concerning the quality of gilt buttons manufactured by Messrs. Jukes and Pitt, Easy Row, Birmingham. MS 3069/Acc1926-021/329514 5 September, 1799.

Jukes, Son, and Pitt, Button-makers and Platers in general, Easy-row
Listed in: Bisset, J. (James), A poetic survey round Birmingham; with a brief description of the different curiosities and manufactories of the place. ... [Birmingham], [1800]. 88 pp.

Wrightson's Triennial Directory 1818: Jukes, John Senr, Plater, Button Mkr, New St.

Transactions of the Unitarian Historical Society

Editor and Secretary: Walter H. Burgess

Priestley and the Birmingham Riots

Bernard M. Allen, MA, LL.D, F.R. Hist. S.

The year 1791 - the 58th year of his life-was a momentous one for Joseph Priestley. On the opening day of the year he sent to press his "letters to Edmund Burke," in which he replied to the eloquent attack which that statesman had made upon the French Revolution. Priestley's letters, although couched in a tone of friendliness towards one whom he had long known personally and admired for his strenuous advocacy of the cause of the American colonies, were yet marked by some of those strong expressions which form such a contrast to the usually peaceful demeanour of the celebrated scientist and theologian.

For example, after lauding the sweeping resolutions which the French National Assembly had passed in the previous summer for overthrowing the existing hierarchy and for securing that henceforward ministers and bishops should be elected by the laity, he expressed the wish to see a similar measure adopted in England and then proceeded to speak of the Church of England as a "fungus" or 'parasitic plant."

Again, in his references to the Monarchy he was guilty of serious indiscretion. After taking Burke to task because he had deplored the way in which the Puritans had led Charles I. into London in triumph as a prisoner, he remarked:-

“In my opinion there was sufficient cause for triumph. The thirtieth day of January was (to use a phrase of Admiral Keppel's) 'a proud day for England,' as well as the fourteenth day of July for France."

This public association of the anniversary of the execution of an English king with the anniversary of the capture of the Bastille was destined to recoil with disastrous consequences on Priestley's head.

These indiscretions might perhaps have passed comparatively unnoticed, had it not been for two events which occurred during the next few months-one in England and one in France-and which tended to make the English people peculiarly sensitive to any hint of attack upon the throne.

The English incident was the issue of another answer to Edmund Burke written by a man who was associated in the public mind with Priestley but who was a declared advocate of revolution. In March, 1791, Thomas Paine published, in reply to Burke's "Thoughts on the French Revolution," his famous book "The Rights of Man," in which he not only upheld enthusiastically the principles of the French Revolution, but went further than the French had themselves then gone and advocated the abolition of monarchy. He spoke of "monarchical sovereignty" as the "enemy of mankind." He had himself assisted the Americans in the New World to throw off the yoke of George III. and he upheld the American Revolution as a model to be followed. "If I ask a man in America if he wants a king" he wrote, "he retorts and asks if I take him for an idiot."

This book aroused furious hostility in England and served to rally all loyal people round King George III.; and this pro-monarchical movement was enhanced by another event which took place three months later in France. On June 20th, the French King, Louis XVI., fled from Paris to join his supporters across the frontier and had almost succeeded in effecting his escape when his coach was stopped, he was surrounded by armed citizens and was led back a captive amid the execrations of the crowd into Paris. This tragic close to the French King's effort to escape aroused intense sympathy for him among the English people.

"I will venture to say," wrote a correspondent of an important London paper on July 1st, "that since the illness of our own beloved sovereign there has not been exhibited such a sense of universal consternation as was produced by the arrival of the news that Louis XVI. (betrayed by the perfidy of one of his subjects) was arrested in the flight from thraldom."

It was in the midst of this political excitement that the second anniversary of the capture of the Bastille came round and the supporters of the French Revolution in England began to make their plans for holding dinners in various parts of the country to commemorate the great event of July 14th. In London, it was arranged to ask Thomas Paine to come over specially from France and bring with him a distinguished Frenchman to attend a national commemorative dinner at the Crown and Anchor in the Strand. In Birmingham, Priestley and his friends set to work to organise a local dinner at the new Hotel in Temple Row.

It has been stated in the reminiscences of John Ryland, which Mr, Ronald Dixon published in the TRANSACTIONS OF THE UNITARIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, IN 1930, that Priestley rather discouraged the holding of the dinner. This, however, can hardly have been the case; for we learn from the diary of Catherine Hutton that on Wednesday, July 6th, Priestley, while having tea with her father, William Hutton, one of the leading citizens of Birmingham, asked him to come to a commemorative dinner oil the 14th. Hutton declined to do so, as did a Roman Catholic priest who was also having tea with Hutton, and whom Priestley also asked to attend. Some of Priestley's friends clearly regarded his proposals for celebrating the 14th July as indiscreet. Among others, however, there was much enthusiasm for the project, and the next day (July 7th), a notice was issued from the hotel inviting all friends of freedom to attend a dinner on the 14th of July, to commemorate the "Emancipation of twenty-six millions of people from the Yoke of Despotism."

The issue of this notice brought to a head the indignation which had long been seething in Birmingham against the Dissenters and especially their leading figure, Dr. Priestley; and there is evidence that, during the week that succeeded the issue of the invitation, steps were taken to work up a popular outbreak.

For example, on the morning of Monday, July 11th, an ominous notice appeared in the Birmingham Gazette, saying that the names of all those who attended the Commemoration Dinner would be noted and published. Then again, on the next day, Tuesday the 12th, an unknown person left at a public house a mysterious parcel which, on being opened, was found to contain copies of a printed handbill of an inflammatory character, which referred to "the crown of a certain great personage becoming every day too weighty for the head that wears it." The handbills were secretly circulated throughout the town, and on that very evening young Hutton heard that there was going to be a riot in the town on the Thursday. On the following day, Wednesday, the 13th, Priestley's friends issued a leaflet, repudiating all knowledge of the mysterious handbill and declaring their loyalty to the King and Constitution. They even decided to go further and cancel the arrangements for celebrating the anniversary of the 14th. But the hotel proprietor implored them to go on with the arrangements as he had made all his preparations for the dinner and would lose heavily if it were not held. It was accordingly decided not to issue the notice of cancellation.

The morning of the 14th arrived. There were unmistakable signs that some trouble was brewing. One of the Town Beadles, for instance, was heard to remark that they were going to have "such a day as Birmingham had never known," and there were other indications that the Church party were determined to strike a blow at the Dissenters and particularly at Priestley, their leading figure. In view of these disconcerting symptoms, William Russell, a well-known Birmingham man, who was one of Priestley's most staunch supporters, sent a note to him during the morning urging him not to be present at the festivity. Priestley, anxious to avoid any hostile outbreak, reluctantly acquiesced and decided to spend the day peacefully in his home at Fair Hill, about a mile from the centre of the town.

The Commemoration Dinner was fixed for three o'clock. As the guests passed into the hotel alongside St. Philip's churchyard, there was a little hissing but no disorder, and 81 guests took their seats in the banqueting room. Care had been taken to mark the loyalty of the participators by placing a fine medallion of the King's head in the centre of the table, while the assembly was presided over, not by a Dissenter, but by a distinguished churchman, Mr. James Keir, F.R.S. The same spirit of loyalty was emphasized in the toasts. The first was that of the "King and Constitution" while the Prince of Wales had one all to himself! Nor could any fault be found with the inevitable Ode which, as on all such occasions, was sung by the assembled company. It described how, at a council of the gods, France, envying the liberty which England enjoyed, asked that she too might receive the gift of freedom.

“Our neighbours in France, of our freedom aware,
And wishing such blessings might fall to their share,
For Freedom petition-The gods they agree
And issue their mandate-that France shall be free.

“The fourteenth of July was fixed as the day,
When millions their homage to freedom should pay;
In the annals of France then enrolled may it be,
Which witness'd a nation made happy and free!

"With loud acclamation let each raise his voice,
And give round the word, "Sons of Freedom, rejoice
Let each loyal Briton then cheerfully sing
The blessings of Freedom and 'Long live the King'.”

The poetry may not have been of the highest order, but the loyalty shown in the concluding words was beyond reproach. The only sign of misgiving on the part of the organisers of the programme appears to have been that the proceedings were made shorter than usual and that the number of toasts was restricted to about twenty instead of the customary number of forty! But, apart from this precaution, there seems to have been little uneasiness and all appear to have agreed that the gathering was a complete success.

One of those who was present, Mr. Joseph Jukes, my great-great-grandfather, has left in my family a manuscript account of the Riots and he briefly summarises in the following words his impression of the commemorative feast:

"Before six o'clock in the evening all the company retired from this moderate festivity in peace and perfect goodwill to all mankind."

The Chairman and some of the principal guests walked quietly across the churchyard and called on Mr. Thomas Russell in New Hall Street, where they took tea and congratulated themselves on the peaceful way in which everything had passed off. Joseph Jukes himself went back to his home at Bordesley in the Green Lanes, situated about a mile to the north-east of the town not far from Dr. Priestley's house; and before long he had retired for the night. A little before ten, when he had just gone to sleep, his son, who had a house in the town, arrived with alarming news.

"He informed me," writes Joseph Jukes in his journal, "that the windows of the hotel were broken, the New Meeting House set on fire, that the Old Meeting was shortly to share the same fate, as likewise Dr. Priestley's house, and the Doctor to be consumed in the ruins."

The elder Jukes, however, was of a sceptical turn of mind.

"Not giving credit," he writes, "to the report, nor conceiving it possible that so vile a plot was contrived or even that men could be found to execute so wicked an undertaking, I turned myself in bed and went to sleep again."

But on this occasion the sceptic was wrong and the alarming tales were true. A riot, unprecedented in the history of Birmingham, was in progress.

About eight o'clock a crowd had begun to gather outside the hotel to hoot the feasters as they came out. While they were waiting, stories were passed round as to what had happened at the dinner. Some said that Priestley had proposed the, toast of " Damnation to the King " while others said that the first toast of the evening was the "King's head on a charger." This absurd rumour may perhaps have arisen from someone associating the medallion of the King's head upon the dinner table with Priestley's unwise remarks in his letter to Edmund Burke about the execution of Charles I. In any case these stories served to add fuel to the flames, and the crowd, believing that the guests (including Priestley), were still in the hotel, began to vent their indignation by throwing stones at the windows. Shortly after, the two magistrates, Joseph Carlos, a draper, and the Rev. B. Spencer, Vicar of Aston, accompanied by a lawyer, John Brooke, came up from the Swan Inn lower down the hill, where they had been dining, and took up a position on the hotel steps. They were greeted with shouts of "Church and King for Ever" and "Damn the Presbyterians." The magistrates, instead of trying to stem the excitement, joined in the shouting and waved their hats to the crowd. Several of those who were present at the scene and made sworn depositions at the Assizes afterwards, which I have examined at the Public Record Office, declared that one of the magistrates, Mr. Carlos, was the worse for liquor. In any case he was evidently in a very excited state and under the encouragement of him and his companions the mob became still more turbulent and poured out a fresh volley of stones at the windows till every pane was smashed. Thereupon Mr. Carlos, who had meanwhile satisfied himself that all the guests had left the hotel, pointed out to the crowd that they were really only injuring the property of the landlord, a good Churchman, and he suggested that, if they wanted to be avenged on the Dissenters, they had better go down to their Meeting-house. At once the cry arose "To the New Meeting! Justice Carlos will protect us" and off they rushed down the hill to Priestley's chapel, the New Meeting House, less than half a mile away. There they set to work to destroy all the furniture and fittings and finally, as the building stood almost at the corner and had no houses adjoining it, they fetched live coals and set it on fire. With this work of destruction the rage of the mob increased and as the evening sky was lit up with the flames of Priestley's chapel, they yelled out for vengeance on Priestley himself. They threatened to kill him if they could get hold of him and a cry arose that they should march off to his house and catch him there. A liberal Churchman, Mr. Vale, who was passing at the time, was alarmed at the menacing cries of the crowd, and, happening a little later to come across Samuel Ryland, a leading member of Priestley's congregation, he told him about the mob's threats and urged him to take a carriage and drive as fast as he could to Fair Hill to warn Priestley of the approaching danger.

Samuel Ryland at once hurried off to get ready his horse and trap and, while the crowd was still shouting round the New Meeting House, he drove down the High Street over the bridge at the end of the town and out along the Stratford Road. He was well ahead of the rioters, who would take some time to cover on foot the mile of road which stretched away between the bridge and Priestley's house.

Meanwhile Priestley had been spending the day quietly at home enjoying long discussions with his friend Adam Walker, a lecturer in philosophy. After his friend had left, Priestley and his wife sat down to supper and then proceeded to play their usual game of backgammon. The first indication they received as to there being any trouble was a violent knocking on the door somewhere about nine o'clock. When the door was opened, some young men of Priestley's congregation, including T. W. Hill, who has told us the story, rushed in, and told him that his Meeting House was being demolished and that threats were being uttered against his house and his life. They begged him to let them defend the house against the mob, but Priestley sternly forbade the use of any force. It was inconsistent, he said, with the position of a Christian minister to resort to violence even in self-defence. If persecution came, it was his duty to submit to it, as his Master and His Apostles had done before him. He could not bring himself to believe that his house was really in danger from an attack from his fellow-townsmen; but as a precaution he consented to put away in a safe a few of his most valued possessions and then to withdraw to a neighbour's house.

Scarcely had he come to this decision when Samuel Ryland drove up in his chaise and assured him that his life was in real danger and that he must drive off at once before the mob arrived. Priestley accordingly stepped into the chaise with his wife and leaving his twenty-year old son, William, to continue the work of packing up his most valued possessions, was driven off to Mr. William Russell's house at Showell Green, about a mile further along the Stratford Road.

Wm. Russell was a man who, by reason both of his position as a magistrate and his strong character, exercised considerable authority in the district, although, as he resided just across the Worcestershire border, the town of Birmingham was not actually within his jurisdiction. He was an ardent supporter of Priestley, and was generally regarded as his right-hand man. When the chaise with its three occupants drove up to his house soon after half past nine that evening, Russell had already received news of the disturbances in the town. A messenger had come up in hot haste and had reported to him that the mob had divided into two parties, that one party had turned up New Street and had gone to destroy the Old Meeting-House which was situated near by; while the other party was engaged in completing the destruction of the New Meeting-House and had expressed the intention of marching along the Stratford Road and attacking first Priestley's house and then his own. Being a man of rapid decision, Russell at once decided to ride into town, find the two Birmingham magistrates and make them stop the riot. It was clearly the duty of these magistrates to read the Riot Act. If they had not already read it, he would call on them to do so. He was just engaged in loading his pistols before mounting his horse, when Samuel Ryland drove up with the Priestleys. They joined with his family in begging him not to go into Birmingham and risk his life, but he refused to listen to their entreaties, saying "he would be his own master that night."

After a ride of two miles he reached the bridge at the entrance of the town and found a crowd of people, pressing forward in a dense mass advancing along the road on the way to Priestley's house. Unable to force his way through and urged by some who knew him to give up the attempt, Russell reluctantly turned his horse back and rode ahead of the crowd to give warning of their advance. Arriving at Priestley's house, he found it occupied by young William Priestley and some of the young men of the congregation. Leaving them to continue their work of packing up the Doctor's possessions, he went out and took his stand at the garden gate and await the arrival of the mob. As the first contingent came up, he reasoned with them and urged them to withdraw, offering them money if they would depart peaceably. Some seemed inclined to obey, but as more of the crowd came up, they called out to their friends not to take any money unless they wanted to be hanged as some of the Gordon rioters had been for taking a bribe of sixpence. Some even took up stones and began to throw them. Russell saw that it was useless to stand up alone against two or three thousand men; so, telling young Priestley to lock up and bolt all doors, he rode on to his own house, where his family and the Priestleys were anxiously waiting for him. He felt sure, from what he had seen and heard, that the rioters would soon follow on after him; so he insisted that both the Priestleys and his own family should leave at once. So accordingly they drove on to the residence of a neighbour, Thomas Hawker, who lived on Moseley Wake Green, about half a mile further on to the south, while he himself went back to see what was happening at Priestley's home.

It was now past twelve o'clock. The moon was shining brightly and there was no wind blowing to ruffle the quiet of that summer night. But as Priestley paced up and down the road beside Mr. Hawker's house, sounds fell upon his ears, sounds borne across the mile or more of country that now separated him from his own house. Dimly across that distance he could hear the roar of wild voices and the rude shattering blows that a fierce mob were showering upon the walls and the crash of falling masonry. He knew that, in those moments, the treasures that he had gathered around him in all those years, including those unique scientific instruments that had made his name a household word throughout the world-were all at the mercy of a gang of ruffians and were being destroyed beyond possibility of recovery. And-what he valued much more than his scientific instruments-his manuscript writings on religion and in particular a series of notes on the whole of the New Testament, which in five days' time would have been completed and ready for the press, were left to the tender mercies of these fanatical rioters.

And yet in this fierce ordeal no sign of anger escaped him. He remained calm and unmoved and young Martha Russell, who was at his side, tells us that in this hour of anguish displayed a sublimity of demeanour that she had never seen in him before.

After a while the noise died down and it seemed as though the work of destruction was over. Then, between three and four in the morning, Russell, accompanied by young Priestley, came back and reported that, after their destruction of Priestley's house, the mob had dispersed and that those who were still in the neighbourhood were mostly lying about in the fields drunk with the wine that they had found when they broke into the cellars. Believing that the storm of violence was now practically over, Russell invited the whole party to return to his own house half a mile away and settle down to rest. They gladly accepted and soon found themselves installed in Russell's spacious apartments. There Dr. and Mrs. Priestley were just settling in for the night when news was brought that the mob had been reinforced by several hundreds of men who swarmed up from the town, and that they were clamouring for Priestley's life. All was at once in commotion again, and all realised that no time must be lost in getting the Priestleys away from the neighbourhood. So Samuel Ryland once more got ready his chaise and was off again by daybreak to convey the two fugitives to a more distant place of shelter. Skirting along through the fields and villages that lay to the south of Birmingham, they worked up well to the west of the town-the opposite side from that on which the mob had collected, and after driving for some fifteen miles, entered the town of Dudley in Staffordshire. Then after a brief halt, during which Priestley dashed off a letter to his old friend Lindsey, they drove on for a further five miles through unfrequented roads and presented themselves before breakfast at the house of William Finch, Priestley's son-in-law, who lived in a retired spot called Heath.

It was now Friday morning, the 15th, and Priestley thought that at last he would be left in peace. He knew that his meeting-house had been burnt and his house plundered. But he believed that the people would by now be sorry for what they had done. He hoped that, though his house had been almost demolished, many of his belongings might still have been saved; for he knew that, as his son William had put out all the fires in the house before the mob arrived, they would be unable to obtain fire. He did not know that, after he himself had left the neighbourhood, the reinforced mob had obtained live coals from a public house across the fields and that the whole of his possessions had been consigned to the flames.

Not being aware how far things had gone, he thought that he might go back among the people and he planned to go down on the following Sunday to the ruins of his chapel, hold a service there in the open air and preach from the text "Father forgive them for they know not what they do."

Little did he know as he sat in that quiet cottage, thinking of peace and forgiveness that on that morning the mob, which had begun by making a demonstration against Dissenters, had been swelled by the wildest and most ferocious of the population of the big town and was embarking on a wholesale course of pillage and destruction. Following the example of the Gordon rioters in London, who, eleven years before had broken open Newgate and Clerkenwell prisons, the crowd early on Friday morning marched down to the town prison, just off New Street, and the Debtors' prison in High Street, broke open the doors of both buildings and let all the prisoners and criminals loose upon the town. The cry on the lips of the mob was still the same as it had been the night before, "Church and King "-and it was still the Presbyterians and Dissenters who were the objects of attack. But it was no mere crowd of citizens and churchmen who took up the cry; it was a rabble reinforced by the vilest dregs of the population. Lists were drawn up of all the principal houses occupied by Dissenters and, under cover of zeal for the Church and loyalty to the Crown, the mob set forth, armed with bludgeons and sticks, to plunder and to burn.

The magistrates were in an awkward position. On the previous night they had encouraged the demonstration against Priestley and the Dissenters and had actually suggested the demolition of the two Meeting Houses. But the destruction of citizens' houses, especially if accompanied by acts of incendiarism, was not an offence that magistrates could possibly countenance. In fact the Riot Act contained a provision that persons who had deliberately burnt or demolished a building, were guilty of felony, even if the Riot Act had not been read beforehand. The magistrates accordingly summoned a meeting at the Swan Inn to consider what should be done. Requests were now coming in from citizens that active steps should be taken to put down the mob. News was brought to the inn that not only had William Hutton's house and shop just opposite in the High Street been attacked, but that the rioters had set off for John Ryland's magnificent house at Easy Hill, half a mile away, where they had smashed the furniture, broken into the cellars, and were now regaling themselves plentifully with liquor. At the same time William Russell, round whose country house some parties of unruly men had already begun to appear, sent in an urgent letter requesting that severe measures should at once be taken.

The magistrates, seeing that matters were serious, decided to enrol some special constables. Recruits were at once sworn in and, although they were provided with no weapons but mopsticks, they marched down from St. Phillip's churchyard, where they had been enrolled, and succeeded in driving off the gang who were attacking Hutton's house. They then proceeded up New Street to confront a huge mob of rioters who had gathered round the mansion at Easy Hill. Here they at first drove the mob before them, but before long they were overpowered by weight of numbers, and were obliged to retire, one of their members receiving injuries from which he subsequently died.

Encouraged by their success against the special constables, the mob now renewed their attack upon Hutton's town house and then set out to attack a number of the large houses in the environs of the town that had been marked down for destruction. One of these was a splendid mansion near Joseph John's house called Bordesley Hall, belonging to John Taylor. Here the first attack was beaten off by a party of special constables who had marched up to save it. But later on the rioters were reinforced by those who came on from the sacking of John Ryland's house at Easy Hill; the special constables were, like the previous patty, obliged to withdraw, and by nine o'clock in the evening the mansion was in flames. Another house that had been singled out for attack was Russell's at Showell Green, from which Priestley had escaped in the early morning. Russell knew, that as Priestley's right hand man, he was sure to be marked out for the attention of the rioters and so during the course of Friday morning, he had sent off his two daughters and his young son to a friend's house some distance away. He himself remained behind to do what he could for the protection of his property and the defence of the townspeople, and then, finding that nothing was being done to prevent the advance of parties of rioters, he went down into the town, in order to insist that the magistrates should take some more drastic action.

It was probably at this stage that the magistrates decided to send to the Secretary of State in London and apply for soldiers to be sent to keep order. There has been a considerable amount of uncertainty as to this appeal for help. The magistrates do not appear to have issued any statement that they had asked for troops to be sent. Perhaps they were unwilling publicly to confess that they were impotent themselves to deal with the situation. Whatever may have been their motive for concealment, the townspeople were all along kept ignorant of the fact that soldiers had been sent for to protect them, and Joseph Jukes, who seems to have made careful inquiries into the circumstances, goes so far as to state that in his opinion the magistrates never did apply for troops, but that the despatch of soldiers to Birmingham was due to a message which a wealthy citizen, named Samuel Garbett, sent to London at his own expense.

I have, however, been able to make sure, by searching the State Papers at the Record Office, that the magistrates actually did send off an appeal to the Secretary of State for the despatch of troops and that the appeal was sent off some time on Friday (several hours before Garbett sent off his private appeal). It was probably despatched a short time after noon; for a paragraph in one of the London papers says that a courier arrived at the Secretary of State's office early on the Saturday morning and, as the message had to be taken on horseback, it must have taken at least twelve hours, and probably more, to cover the 120 miles from Birmingham to London.

As soon as the message reached Mr. Henry Dundas, Secretary of State, at Whitehall, a Council was held to consider what should be done, and as a result, a reply was sent to the magistrates expressing the confidence of the Ministers that they were taking all possible steps to suppress the dangerous proceedings and informing them that a message was being sent by express to Nottingham, directing the commander in that town to send oft troops instantly to Birmingham to support the civil power.

Meantime, while this reply was on its way, and while the express messenger was riding from London to Nottingham with the order for troops to be sent, Birmingham was at the mercy of the mob. The special constables had proved powerless and all that the magistrates could now do was to issue pathetic appeals to the rioters to rest content with what they had done and to refrain from further violence towards the Dissenters. This is how one of the appeals issued at 5 o'clock on the Friday afternoon ran:-

"HASTY HINTS FROM A CHURCHMAN

“My Boys,

“I hereby entreat you to desist from any further Depredations and be content with the Punishment you have already inflicted on the Presbyterians."

(Then followed a statement of a legal decision which laid it down in such cases the community would be held responsible for making good all damage to property.)

In all probability this appeal was the work of the lawyer John Brooke, who had stood on the steps of the hotel with the magistrates the night before and had joined with them in cheering for "Church and King" and inciting the mob to attack the Meeting-houses. It was not likely that one who had given the lead to law-breaking would have any influence when he appealed for the law to be respected.

The magistrates themselves issued similar appeals addressed to their "Friends and Fellow-Churchmen"; but the only effect of these seems to have been to give an official Episcopalian sanction to the mob's misdeeds. This is, at any rate, the impression left on the mind of our friend Joseph Jukes, who thus describes the attack made by the rioters upon his own house at Bordesley:-

“At this period the Church and King's Friends (so denominated by the Justices) had completely finished their laudable work at Dr. Priestley's and were preparing to attack Bordesley Hall, the seat of John Taylor, Esq. Having now received further information that my person and property were destined for destruction, we lost no time in conveying the most portable furniture to the houses of my friends in the town. By eleven o'clock we had sent the last load to Mr. Horton's at Little Bromwich. The wine etc was buried in the garden and cabbages planted over it-my ale and other provisions were left to regale the zealots, Church fanatics. Before one o'clock some thousands of these pious gentry arrived and surrounded my house and appeared fully determined to demolish it. Previous to their arrival I had given six guineas in silver to Mr. Owen to distribute in such portions as he should judge most proper. I also gave five guineas in gold to Mr Benjamin Line to be applied for the same purpose. All my friends now agreed that it would not be safe for me to remain on the premises, therefore upon the arrival of these devoted members of the church, I reluctantly yielded to their entreaties and went up the fields towards the Green Lanes leaving my house to the care and management of my worthy friends, who exerted themselves with much skill and fidelity and even succeeded so far as to prevail on the goodly churchmen to retire without doing any injury to the building. However their departure was not effected until they had exhausted my ale and provisions nor did their tender consciences seem hurt by Mr Owen administrating certain fees to the leaders of this band of Episcopalians.

“I remained more than an hour in the fields expecting every moment to behold my house in flames, there being a large quantity of straw and faggots in the rickyards. Not perceiving any appearance of fire, it somewhat relieved my mind. I therefore went to Mr Ben Line's house in the Green Lanes where I was kindly received and refreshed with a dinner. During this afternoon great numbers of fiery zealots passed by laden with bottles of wine &c which had been taken from Mr. Taylor's house (Bordesley Hall) and others who had drunk so immoderately of the good creature, lay in a deplorable condition in the fields and ditches unable to proceed in their Episcopal labours."

Jukes appears to have owed the preservation of his house, partly to his shrewdness in removing his furniture and leaving plenty of ale in a conspicuous position for the rioters to consume and partly also, as he suggests elsewhere, to the fact that, as a Guardian of the Poor, he had shown himself, on several occasions, anxious to secure a fair administration of the funds provided for the relief of the needy.

There are indeed signs that the mob was able occasionally to exercise some discretion in carrying out its depredations. We read, for instance, of a Swedenborgian Minister, whose church, in the centre of the town, was in danger of being attacked, when he himself came out from his house next door, shouted to the crowd that he was not a Unitarian but a minister of the New Jerusalem Church, and then distributed among them the collection that he had taken in his church on the previous Sunday, whereupon the crowd went off crying " New Jerusalem for Ever."

But it is notoriously unsafe to rely on the whims of a mob. So most citizens felt it prudent to close their shops, put in their hats the blue cockade, which the "Church and King" party had adopted as their emblem, and to write the words "Church and King" conspicuously on the houses. While Birmingham was thus in the hands of the mob on that disastrous Friday, Priestley had been spending the Friday at his son-in law's at Heath, twenty miles away. At mid-day the household was alarmed by a message which was received from the neighbouring town of Stourbridge, saying that he had been observed as he passed through Dudley in the early morning and that the mob would follow him out to Mr. Finch's. A similar message was brought in from Dudley during the evening: but Priestley ignored this, as he had done the former one, and retired to bed at ten o'clock. An hour later he was waked up with the news that a third messenger had arrived from Dudley, asserting positively that some men were in pursuit of him and would be at Mr. Finch's house that night. The family, now thoroughly alarmed, entreated Priestley to escape while there was still time. So he dressed and, ordering the horses to be got ready, he rode off with a servant and arrived, after a ten mile ride in the moonlight, at Bridgnorth in Shropshire at two o'clock on Saturday morning. Here he snatched a couple of hours sleep and then decided to start south to London. Taking a carriage at the inn, he drove south over the Shropshire border and followed the road through Worcestershire to Kidderminster. Here he found friends, who gave him a hearty welcome and at their house he was able to enjoy a few hours of rest and peace.

As the Saturday passed without any signs of disturbance appearing, Priestley thought that he might safely now return nearer the scene of the disturbances, and accordingly, in the evening, he ordered a horse and rode back from Kidderminster direct to the house of his daughter, Mrs Finch, at Heath Forge. No sooner had he arrived there, however, than Mr. Finch came in from Dudley with the alarming information that there was momentary expectation of a riot breaking out in that town and that a crowd had assembled in the streets threatening to destroy the houses of the local Dissenting minister and his friends. It was evident to Priestley that the Finch's house would be in danger if he stayed on there. Accordingly, bidding farewell to his wife and daughter, he once more mounted his horse and rode oft with his servant along the road that led to Kidderminster. His intention was to dismount at an inn about six miles off and from there take a chaise into the town. But when he reached the inn, no chaise could be procured; so the two were obliged to continue on horseback. But a solitary night ride along unfamiliar roads was an awkward business and Priestley took the wrong turning. After riding for twelve miles or so, he and his companion found themselves at three o'clock on the Sunday morning not at Kidderminster, but once more at Bridgnorth. They had been riding away from Kidderminster instead of towards it. For a man of 58, who had not been to bed for two nights, this long night ride must have been a trying experience. By the time he got to Bridgnorth, he could hardly sit on his horse, so he put up at a little inn and got a few hours sleep. After this much needed rest, and fortified by breakfast, he again mounted his horse and, with his companion at his side, soon covered the twelve miles into Kidderminster. Here he was fortunate enough to meet a young member of his congregation, Thomas Ryland, the elder brother of the writer of those reminiscences to which I have previously referred. Young Ryland took him to the house of the friends with whom he was staking, the Browns, who, finding that Priestley. was now bent on travelling to London, urged him to change into non-clerical clothes and drop his ministerial garb. Priestley however refused to disguise himself and said he would take the risk of being recognised.

The best and safest way of reaching London was to take one of those mail coaches which Pitt had introduced seven years before in the teeth of the combined opposition of the postal authorities and the private coachmasters. One of these mails would be due in a few hours to leave Worcester, which was only 15 miles from Kidderminster. So, hiring a chaise, he drove with his friend young Ryland into Worcester and found there was just one place in the coach vacant. This his friend secured in the name of Ryland and under that assumed name Priestley at length set off for London. That the incognito was desirable is shown by the following incident. The man who had driven the two into Worcester heard afterwards that his clerical fare was none other than the notorious Dr. Priestley. "Had I known it," he remarked, "I would have overturned the chaise and broken both their necks."

So on the Sunday morning, July 17th, Priestley was being carried along by mail coach to the safe haven of London, where he arrived at the house of his friend Lindsey in Essex Street, early on Monday morning.

While he was hurrying away from Birmingham, sixty men of the 15th Dragoons were hurrying thither from Nottingham as fast as their steeds could carry them. By dint of hard riding, they covered the distance of fifty-seven miles in about eleven hours and by half past nine, on the Sunday night, they had reached Birmingham. "The Light Horse," "The Light Horse," cried out the inhabitants as they saw them advancing along the Aston Road. At those words, the rioters, who were already planning another day of burning and looting, melted away like snow, and Birmingham's three days of terror were over.

But the town had had a narrow escape. Priestley has given it as his opinion that, if the Government in London and the Commander of the troops at Nottingham had not acted with such admirable promptitude, and if the rioters had been left in control for another day, Birmingham would have been destroyed.

After it was all over, Priestley longed to return to the town where he had spent so many happy years. But the feeling against him was too bitter, and so he was never able to deliver personally that sermon of forgiveness which he planned while on his escape from the rioters and which we can now read in his collected works. As time went on and the French Revolution, which he had once hailed as the harbinger of a glorious reign of peace, plunged deeper and deeper into the horrors of massacre and bloodshed, the hostility of Englishmen towards him became still more marked, so that he eventually made up his mind to leave England and to make a fresh home in America, where in 1804, he passed peacefully away.

BERNARD M. ALLEN

June, 1932.

The Birmingham Riots of 1791

Birmingham: Corns and Bartleet, Union Street. Sold by Hamilton, Adams, and Co., Paternoster Row, London. 1867.

Many houses in the town and neighbourhood (besides those already enumerated) partially suffered, but were saved from destruction, either by persuasion, or by the gift of money ot liquor; among these are the houses of Mr. T. Russell, near Moseley; of Mr. Harry Hunt, at Ladywood; of the Rev. Mr. Coates, at the Fiveways; and Mr. Smith's house (Hay Hall). Mr Jukes having intimation that his house in the Green Lanes was to be attacked, removed all his furniture, liquors, etc, took out his sashes and window frames, and conveyed what ever the rioters were likely to pull down, to a place of security. Owing to this judicious conduct, and the remonstrances and singular exertions of the Rev. Mr. Darwell, the house was saved from destruction.

The Morning Chronicle (London) Wednesday, February 26, 1806; Issue 11480

Partnerships dissolved

Thomas Waterhouse and Joseph Jukes, jun. of Birmingham, silver platers - Jan. 1, 1806.

Will of Joseph Jukes

This is the last Will and Testament of me Joseph Jukes of Bordesley in the parish of Aston near Birmingham in the County of Warwick Gentleman Imprimis I give and devise unto my son John Jukes All my freehold Messuage farm Lands Hereditaments and Appurtenances whatsoever situate at Little Bromwich in the parish of Aston aforesaid To hold to him his Heirs and Assigns for ever And I give and devise unto my friends Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins both of Birmingham aforesaid Merchants and their Heirs All those my two freehold messuages with the Outbuildings Courts Yards and Gardens thereunto belonging situate and being in Bordesley aforesaid and in the several Occupations of myself and of Sarah Cope widow And also those two Closes pieces or parcels of Land or Ground to the said Messuages or Tenements belonging (that is to say) The Home Close and the Mount Close in my own occupation and containing together twelve Acres or thereabouts (be the same more or less) And also all other my Lands Tenements Hereditaments and Premises with the Appurtenances situate in Bordesley aforesaid consisting of Six Closes or upwards now in the several tenures or occupations of the widow Rollins Charles Hall Samuel Spencer and John Fitter or their undertenants containing the whole twenty four acres or thereabouts (be the same more or less) To have and to hold the said Messuages Lands Hereditaments and Premises with the Appurtenances unto the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs To the several uses and upon the several Trusts and subject the Provisions and Declarations hereinafter mentioned expressed and declared of and concerning the same (that is to say) To the Use and Behoof of my son John Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the life of my said son John Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent Remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make Entries and bring Actions as occasion shall be and require Yet Nevertheless to permit and suffer the same John Jukes to receive and take the Rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said son John Jukes To the use an Behoof of John Towers Lawrence of Birmingham aforesaid Furrier and Thomas Smale of the same place Button maker their Executors Administrators and Assigns for and during and unto the full end and term of Five hundred years from thence next ensuing and fully to be complete and ended Upon the Trusts and to and for the intents and purposes following (that is to say) Upon Trust that they the said John Towers Lawrence and Thomas Smale and the survivor of them and the Executors or Administrators of such survivor as soon as conveniently may be and within the space of twelve months next after the decease of my said son John Jukes or in his life time if he shall think fit and so direct by writing under his hand and seal shall and do by mortgage of the said Messuages Lands Hereditaments and Premises or of and in a competent part thereof for the said term of Five hundred years and by with and out of the Rents Issues and Profits thereof in the mean time levy and raise such sum of money as will be sufficient to pay unto each and every of the Younger children of my said son John Jukes the sum of Three hundred and fifty Pounds to be paid to them on their severally attaining the age of twenty one years and the share or shares of either or any of such younger children who shall happen to die in the mean time shall go and be payable and distributable among his her or their respective lawful Issue Provided nevertheless that in every such mortgage there be reserved a power notwithstanding such Mortgage for the person or persons who for the time being shall be intitled (sic) to the said Messuages Tenements Hereditaments and Premises either for life or in fee tail to grant building leases of the said Land or any part or parts thereof pursuant to the power hereinafter given for that purpose And in the mean time and subject to the said term of Five hundred Years so limited to the said John Towers Lawrence and Thomas Smale their Executors Administrators and Assigns and to the Trusts thereof To the use of my grandson Joseph Jukes eldest son of my said son John Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Joseph Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Joseph Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Joseph Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Joseph Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson John Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson John Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson John Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson John Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson John Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson William Mansfield Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson William Mansfield Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson William Mansfield Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson John Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson John Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Henry Walter Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Alfred Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Alfred Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Alfred Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Alfred Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Alfred Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Edward Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Edward Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Edward Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Edward Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Edward Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Frederick Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Frederick Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Frederick Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Frederick Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Frederick Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of every the daughter and daughters of my son the said John Jukes equally to be divided amongst them share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and of the several and respective heirs male of the body and bodies of all and every such Daughter and Daughters lawfully issuing and in case there shall be a failure of Issue of any one or more of such Daughters then as well as to the original share or shares of as the share or shares surviving or accruing to such last mentioned Daughter or Daughters or her or their issue To the use of all and every other the Daughter and Daughters of my said son John Jukes to be divided between them if more than one share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and of the several and respective heirs male of their bodies issuing and in case all such Daughters but one shall happen to die without Issue or if there shall be but one such Daughter then to the use of such surviving or only Daughter and of the heirs male of her body lawfully Issuing And in default of such issue To the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters of my said grandson Joseph Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson John Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson William Mansfield Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Alfred Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Edward Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Frederick Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of William Gosling Esquire of the Victualling Office London for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the life of In trust to preserve the contingent Remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make Entries and bring Actions as occasion shall be and require Yet Nevertheless to permit and suffer the same William Gosling to receive and take the Rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of the said William Gosling To the use and behoof of the heirs of the body of the said William Gosling for ever And in default of such Issue Then to the use and behoof of John Gosling Esquire of the Victualling Office aforesaid and the Heirs of his body And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of the right Heirs of my said son John Jukes for ever and to and for no other use trust intent or purpose whatsoever And my mind and will is and I do hereby expressly direct that in case either or any of the person or persons who by virtue of this my will and of the limitations hereinbefore contained or any of them shall become intitled (sic) for life or otherwise to the premises aforesaid shall at the time of their so becoming intitled (sic) be under the age of twenty one years the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs shall receive the rents issues and profits of the said premises during such minority and shall pay apply and dispose of the same towards the maintenance education or other benefit of such person or persons so intitled (sic) as aforesaid during his her or their respective minority or minorities And I do hereby will and declare that it shall and may be lawful for my said son John Jukes and my said grandson Joseph Jukes as they shall severally come into possession of the said Messuages Lands Hereditaments and Premises by virtue of the uses and limitations thereof hereinbefore expressed and declared by Indenture or Indentures under his or their hand and seal or hands and seals to demise and lease all and any or such part or parts of the Closes of Land situate in Bordesley aforesaid as they shall think advantageous and beneficial unto any person or persons whomsoever for any term or number of years not exceeding ninety nine years to take effect in possession and not in reversion So as upon every such Lease so to be made there be reserved and continue payable to the person or persons who shall become intitled (sic) to the same by virtue of this my will the best and most improved rent and rents that at the time of granting such Leases respectively can or may be had or obtained for the same And so that no fine or fines premium or consideration money be received or taken for the granting of any such Lease or Leases And so as the respective Leases of all and every such Lease or Leases do execute Counterparts of such Leases respectively And so as in such Leases there be contained conditions for reentry on nonpayment of the rent thereby reserved And so as no Clause be contained in any of the said Leases to give power to any Lessee to commit waste or to exempt him her or them from punishment for the committing the same And I do hereby declare that my said Trustees and their Heirs shall not be chargeable with or accountable for any Loss or Damage which shall or may happen to the said Trust Estate or any part thereof so as the same shall or may happen without their or either of their wilful neglect or default nor the one of them for the other of them nor for the Acts Deeds Receipts Payments Defaults or Neglects of the other or others of them but each of them for his own Acts Deeds Receipts Payments Defaults and neglects only And also that it shall and may be lawful to and for my said Trustees and their Heirs Executors and administrators to retain and reimburse himself and themselves out of the rents and profits of the said Trust Estate all Costs charges damages and expenses which they or either of them shall or may sustain expend or be put unto in or about the execution of the trusts hereby in them exposed Also I give devise and bequeath unto my said son John Jukes his Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns All and singular the rest residue and remainder of my real and personal Estate Chattels and Effects of what nature or kind soever and wheresoever not hereinbefore disposed of And Lastly I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said son John Jukes sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former and other Wills by me at any time heretobefore made and Do declare this only to be my last Will and Testament In Witness whereof I the said Testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained on nine sheets of Paper to the first eight sheets thereof set my hand and to this ninth and last sheet my hand and seal this Tenth----------day of December--------In the year of our lord One thousand eight hundred and seven-------

Signed Sealed Published and Declared by the said Testator as an for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses.


General Notes for Child John Jukes

John was a button manufacturer as was his father Joseph. (Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

In a Poll of 1820 John Jukes of Bordesley was listed as a Freeholder of Warwickshire.

John Jukes of Bordesley nr Birmingham: died "in his 67th year" Announcement in Warwick & Warwickshire General Advertiser edition of 22 Oct 1822

Wrightson's Triennial Directory 1818:
Jukes, John Senr, Plater, Button Mkr, New St, Birmingham.

UK National Archives: Abstract of title of John Jukes and Clement Ingleby to a cottage and premises in Green Lanes, Bordesley. 15 June, 1775 - 13 July, 1814. MS 3069/Acc1930-022/372065 13 July, 1814

IGI - Second marriage to Mary Thomas - gives age of John as 39 and Mary as 35 at the time of the marriage

UK National Archives: Abstract of title of John Jukes and Clement Ingleby to a cottage and premises in Green Lanes, Bordesley. 15 June, 1775 - 13 July, 1814. MS 3069/Acc1930-022/372065 13 July, 1814

In a Poll of 1820 John Jukes of Bordesley was listed as a Freeholder of Warwickshire
picture

Joseph Beete Jukes and Georgina Augusta Meredith




Husband Joseph Beete Jukes




         Born: 10 Oct 1811 - Summer Hill, Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Jul 1869 - Dublin, Ireland
       Buried: 3 Aug 1869 - St Mary's churchyard at Selly Oak, Birmingham


       Father: John Jukes
       Mother: Sophia (Jane) Beete


     Marriage: 22 Sep 1849




Wife Georgina Augusta Meredith

         Born: 21 Aug 1826
   Christened: 8 Nov 1826 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 17 Jan 1882
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Jane Walker Jones




General Notes (Husband)

Georgina Augusta was the daughter of John Meredith and granddaughter of James Meredith. James Meredith was his uncle Alfred's wife's father.

Jukes, (Joseph) Beete (1811-1869), geologist, was born at Summer Hill, near Birmingham, on 10 October 1811, the eldest child and only son of John Jukes and his wife, Sophia. Members of a dissenting family, his father and paternal grandfather were involved in button manufacturing, and his maternal grandfather-Joseph Beete-had been in trade in Demerara. His father died when Jukes was seven and his mother was left to support him and his three sisters on somewhat slender means. He became Director of the Geological Survey of Ireland

He took his degree in Cambridge in 1836.

Joseph Beete Jukes, Fellow of the Royal Society, was born in Birmingham on the 18th of October, 1811, and was educated partly at the Merchant Taylors' School in Wolverhampton, and partly at King Edward's School in Birmingham. At the latter school he gained an exhibition, which took him to Cambridge, where he entered St. John's College in 1830, and took his B.A. degree in 1836, proceeding to his M.A. in 1841.


General Notes (Wife)

IN LOVING REMEMBERANCE OF GEORGINA AUGUSTA MEREDITH WIDOW OF THE LATE JOSEPH BEETE JUKES M.A.F.R.S. WHO DIED JANUARY 17TH 1882. AGED 56. "REST IN THE LORD WAIT PATIENTLY FOR HIM"


Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 22 Jan 2009 with Legacy 5.0 from Millennia