Ancestors of



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William Meredith and Abigail




Husband William Meredith

         Born: 1690 - about
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Abigail

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Elizabeth Meredith

         Born: 1720 - circa
   Christened: 21 Aug 1720 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1725 - about
   Christened: 28 Mar 1725 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




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William Henry Wragge and Amelia




Husband William Henry Wragge

         Born: 
   Christened: 27 Dec 1817 - Cheadle, Staffordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Wragge
       Mother: Emma Ingleby


     Marriage: 




Wife Amelia

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
William Henry Wragge - Head - 33 - Copper Agent
Amelia - wife - 35
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Timothy Meredith and Ann




Husband Timothy Meredith

         Born: 1770 - Circa
   Christened: 21 Nov 1770 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 4 October 1820 - aged 49


       Father: Samuel Meredith
       Mother: Martha Carter


     Marriage: 




Wife Ann

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Eliza Meredith

         Born: 21 Apr 1802 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M William Meredith

         Born: 1804 - about
   Christened: 13 Jun 1804 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1806 - circa
   Christened: 24 Jun 1806 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Ann Meredith

         Born: 1809 - circa
   Christened: 13 Jan 1809 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1810 - about
   Christened: 20 Feb 1810 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1812 - about
   Christened: 20 Apr 1812 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




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Ann H.




Husband

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Ann H.

         Born: 1837 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Blanche Dunfee

         Born: 1867 - circa - Pimlico, Westminster
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Howard Walter Meredith
         Marr: 1886 - June Quarter - Wandsworth, London




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Matthew (Mathei in the IGI) Meredith and Anne




Husband Matthew (Mathei in the IGI) Meredith

         Born: 1620 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1660 - Before




Wife Anne

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John (Johannes in the IGI) Meredith

         Born: 1660 - Circa
   Christened: 7 Apr 1660 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1684 - Circa
   Christened: 16 Oct 1684 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




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George Caleb Atkins and Anne




Husband George Caleb Atkins

         Born: 1828
   Christened: 
         Died: 1887
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Anne

         Born: 1832
   Christened: 
         Died: 1902
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Edith Atkins

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Colonel Walter William Wiggin




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Alfred Meredith and Annie




Husband Alfred Meredith

         Born: 1849 - Circa - Canada
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Meredith
       Mother: Ellen Williams


     Marriage: 




Wife Annie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Alfred Meredith

         Born: 1875
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Annie M. Meredith

         Born: 1878
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Edith Meredith

         Born: 1882
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

In the 1901 England Census Alfred Meredith is a Bedding Manufacturer m. Annie with children Alfred (26), Annie M. (23) and Edith (19).


General Notes for Child Alfred Meredith

In 1901 Alfred was a Bedding Manufacturer.
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Charles Richard Seymour Coxe and Beatrice Brown or Gladys Harriet Singleton




Husband Charles Richard Seymour Coxe

         Born: 26 Jan 1875 - Brompton, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Feb 1942 - aged 67
       Buried: 


       Father: Canon Seymour Richard Coxe
       Mother: Fanny Coxe


     Marriage: 1907 - March Quarter - Leeds, Yorkshire

 Other Spouse: Louisa A. T. Appleyard - 1920-1941




Wife Beatrice Brown or Gladys Harriet Singleton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Richard Seymour Coxe

         Born: 1908 - March Quarter - Leeds, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1908 - circa
       Buried: 



2 M Richard Seymour Coxe

         Born: 25 Nov 1909 - 20 Alexandra Crescent, Ilkley
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Violet Seymour Coxe

         Born: 25 Nov 1909 - 20 Alexandra Crescent, Ilkley
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

In the Marlborough College Register Charles' address was given as the Bank of England, Leeds.

Charles Richard Seymour Coxe married either Beatrice Brown or Gladys Harriet Singleton in 1907.

His second wife, Louisa Appleyard was first married in 1920.

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 25, 1942; pg. 1; Issue 49169; col A

Coxe.- On Feb. 23, 1942, Charles Richard Seymour Coxe, Hurst Road, Horsham, beloved husband of Louisa (nee Appleyard), and only son of the late Canon and Mrs. Seymour Coxe, aged 67.

The Times, Monday, Nov 29, 1909; pg. 1; Issue 39129; col A

Coxe. - on the 25th Nov., at 26, Alexandra-crescent, Ilkley, the wife of Chrales R. Seymour Coxe, of twins (boy and girl).
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Joseph Meredith and Caroline




Husband Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Jul 1810 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1861-1871
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Meredith
       Mother: Esther (Hester) Marston


     Marriage: 




Wife Caroline

         Born: 1826 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1852 - After
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1848 - September Q - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M James Meredith

         Born: 1850 - March Q - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ellen



3 F Esther Meredith

         Born: Sep 1852 - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edwin Cox
         Marr: 1873 - March Q - Bedminster, Gloucestershire




General Notes (Husband)

Joseph was a farmer at Sutton St. Nicholas in 1861 - Household: Joseph Meredith [son of Thomas and Esther] with sons Joseph and James, and daughter Esther.


General Notes for Child James Meredith

Caroline was living with son James & family in 1871 and daughter Esther & Family in 1881.
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John Henry Padbury and Eliza




Husband John Henry Padbury

         Born: 1783 - circa - Berkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: Mar 1863 - Newbury, Berkshire
       Buried: 


       Father: John Padbury
       Mother: Elizabeth Hicks


     Marriage: 




Wife Eliza

         Born: 1789 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

1851 Census:

Berkshire
Speen
John Henry Padbury - 68 - Retired Coach Builder
Eliza Padbury - 62 - wife
Eliza Padbury - 59 - Sister
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John Meredith and Elizabeth




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1704 - Circa
   Christened: 18 Apr 1704 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: Bef Sep 1790
       Buried: 


       Father: Josiah Meredith
       Mother: Anne Whitcott


     Marriage: 1731 - Circa - St. Phillip, Birmingham




Wife Elizabeth

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: March 1792 - Circa
       Buried: 



Children
1 M David Meredith

         Born: 1734
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Jan 1734
       Buried: 



2 F Ann Meredith

         Born: 1736
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Nov 1736
       Buried: 



3 F Phoebe Meredith

         Born: 1737
   Christened: 
         Died: 12 Sep 1737
       Buried: 



4 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1737 - Birmingham
   Christened: 
         Died: September 1790 - After
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Isaac Whitehouse
         Marr: 3 Jan 1760 - St. Philip's, Birmingham, Warwickshire



5 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1738 - Circa
   Christened: 4 Aug 1738 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 4 Aug 1738
       Buried: 



6 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1739
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Nov 1739
       Buried: 



7 M John Meredith

         Born: 1742 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Jan 1743 - St. Philip's, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 30 Apr 1790
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sally Turner
         Marr: 20th or 28th August 1767 - St. Philip's, Birmingham



8 F Phoebe Meredith

         Born: 1740 - Circa
   Christened: 15 Oct 1740 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Cope
         Marr: 18 Feb 1770 - St. Philip's, Birmingham, Warwickshire



9 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1744 - Circa
   Christened: 9 Nov 1744 - Birmingham
         Died: 18 May 1746
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Birth and death events (children) registered at St. Phillip, Birmingham.

Birmingham Barrister and solicitor - will dated 7 April 1790 - proved 23 December 1790.


General Notes (Wife)

Elizabeth’s Will of 16 Sep 1790 makes the following bequests:

- cousins George Cutler of London, Gunmaker, s/o Benjamin Cutler of Chadwick, Bromsgrove deceased
and Mary Clintoff of London widow d/o Thomas Cutler of Leyend [Lea End] Alvechurch: property in Bromsgrove.

- John Cope the younger s/o John Cope of Birmingham Timber Merchant: 1 of 3 shares held as Proprietor of the Birmingham and Birmingham to Fazeley Canal Navigation.

- John Whitehouse s/o Isaac Whitehouse of Birmingham Enameller: 1 of 3 shares ditto.

- Sarah wife of Isaac Whitehouse: bequ. all linen, rings and writing apparell.

- appointed executors: John Cope the elder and respected friends John Tayler (Skinner) and William Brooke (Glazier?Brazier?) both of Bromsgrove: 1 of 3 shares ditto to be sold and used to pay all expenses, debts etc. and to make following bequests.

- 5 of the children of John Meredith late of Birmingham and Castle Bromwich Gentleman deceased namely Louisa, Ann, Charles, Henry and George: £50 each from above sale.

- James Whitehouse and Isaac Whitehouse the younger s/o Isaac Whitehouse: £50 each from above sale.

- Charles s/o John Cope the elder: £50 ditto.

- Frances d/o John Taylor: bequ. £50 ditto.

- John Meredith eldest s/o John Meredith deceased: remainder from above sale plus 1 share in intended Birmingham to Worcester Canal Navigation.


General Notes for Child John Meredith

In a short Will dated 7 April 1790 and proved 23 Dec 1790 John appointed his brother-in-law John Cope as his Executor.

Will of John Meredith, Gentleman of Castle Bromwich 23 December 1790 PROB 11-1199 Image 86-379 (UK National Archives) - Birmingham Barrister and Solicitor.
John Meredith is described as a clerk to:
- the Street Commisioners and the Birmingham Boat Company in 1770
- the builders of the Birmingham to Worcester Canal and the trustees for building the new church of St. Paul and St. Mary in 1772
- the builders of the Coventry and Oxford Canal in 1774.
He is listed In a Birmingham Directory of 1777 as an Attorney at Law at 17 Temple Street.
He secured a lease on Castle Bromwich Hall and the family lived there between 1785 and 1791.

He was referred to as deceased in his mother Elizabeth's Will of 16 Sep 1790.
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John Meredith and Elizabeth




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1735 - Circa
   Christened: 14 May 1735 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1756 - Before




Wife Elizabeth

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Meredith

         Born: 1756 - circa
   Christened: 17 Oct 1756 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Littleton Lowe Meredith

         Born: 1760 - about
   Christened: 26 Apr 1760 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Richard Meredith

         Born: 1763 - about
   Christened: 30 May 1763 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Wasnam
         Marr: 25 Apr 1811 - Lingen, Hereford



4 M Josiah Cook Meredith

         Born: 1765 - about
   Christened: 5 Feb 1765 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M David Meredith

         Born: 1767 - circa
   Christened: 21 May 1767 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M William Meredith

         Born: 1775 - about
   Christened: 24 Dec 1775 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Bowen Dunn Meredith

         Born: 1782 - about
   Christened: 27 Jan 1782 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




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James Welch and Elizabeth




Husband James Welch

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Phebe Burridge (Burnidge) Welch

         Born: 1803 - circa
   Christened: 21 Feb 1803 - St. Phillip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edward Jukes
         Marr: 20 Apr 1824 - St. Phillip's, Birmingham




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William Mansfield and Elizabeth




Husband William Mansfield

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 15 Apr 1765 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England



Children
1 F Ann Mansfield

         Born: 1756 - circa
   Christened: 29 Feb 1756 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Elizabeth Mansfield

         Born: 1759 - circa
   Christened: 11 Mar 1759 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England
         Died: 9 Jun 1839
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Jukes
         Marr: Feb 1782 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England



3 F Lucy Mansfield

         Born: 1757 - circa
   Christened: 17 Mar 1757 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Jane Mansfield

         Born: 1761 - circa
   Christened: 2 Jul 1761 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Sarah Mansfield

         Born: 1765 - circa
   Christened: 2 Feb 1765 - Bushbury, Staffordshire, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

William Mansfield was recorded as a churchwarden in 1755 in the Bushbury parish register.


General Notes for Child Elizabeth Mansfield

The Gentleman's Magazine
Published by W. Pickering, 1839
Item Notes: v. 166 (July-Dec. 1839)

June 9, Aged 80, Elizabeth, relict of J. Jukes, esq., of Bordesley-house, near Birmingham.
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Edward Cooper and Elizabeth




Husband Edward Cooper

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Caroline Cooper

         Born: 16 Nov 1818 - Bucknell, Shropshire (IGI)
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Thomas Meredith
         Marr: 4 Jun 1844 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



2 F Ann Cooper

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Richard Cooper

         Born: 
   Christened: 13 Oct 1816 - Bucknell, Shropshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Caroline Cooper

Caroline was recorded at the 1851 census but she was reported as a widow on later census returns.

1861 Census:

Households: (1) Caroline Meredith [nee Cooper, widow of Thomas] with sons Richard, Caleb, Aaron, and Josiah. She is a laundress living in Boresford.

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James Meredith and Ellen




Husband James Meredith

         Born: 1850 - March Q - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Meredith
       Mother: Caroline


     Marriage: 




Wife Ellen

         Born: 1850 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Ada Meredith

         Born: 1874 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Ernest Meredith

         Born: 1876 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Amy E. Meredith

         Born: 1882 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Caroline was living with son James & family in 1871 and daughter Esther & Family in 1881.
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Sir John W. Lorden J.P. and Ellen Mary (Mim)




Husband Sir John W. Lorden J.P.

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 Apr 1944 - Little Ratton, Willingdon
       Buried: 26 Apr 1944 - Putney Vale Cemetery
     Marriage: 




Wife Ellen Mary (Mim)

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Eleanor Melina (Norah) Lorden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 3 Jun 1960 - Richmond
       Buried: 13 Jun 1960 - Putney Vale Crematorium
       Spouse: Howard Douglas Meredith



2 M Henry Matthew Lorden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 3 Apr 1945
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Tuesday, Apr 25, 1944; pg. 1; Issue 49839; col A

Lorden. - On April 21, 1944, at Little Ratton, Willingdon, Sir John W. Lorden, J.P., husband of Mim, and father of Nora Meredith, Doris Keiller, and Henry. No flowers or mourning. Funeral, Putney Vale Cemetery, tomorrow (Wednesday) at 12.30 pm.


General Notes for Child Eleanor Melina (Norah) Lorden

The Times, Tuesday, Apr 25, 1944; pg. 1; Issue 49839; col A

Lorden. - On April 21, 1944, at Little Ratton, Willingdon, Sir John W. Lorden, J.P., husband of Mim, and father of Nora Meredith, Doris Keiller, and Henry. No flowers or mourning. Funeral, Putney Vale Cemetery, tomorrow (Wednesday) at 12.30 pm.

The Times, Thursday, Jun 09, 1960; pg. 1; Issue 54793; col A

Meredith. - On June 3rd 1960, suddenly, at Richmond, Eleanor Melina (Nora), widow of Howard Douglas Meredith and daughter of the late Sir John W, Lorden. Funeral service at Putney Vale Crematorium on Monday, June 13th., at 12 noon. Flowers to Saunders & Co., 28 Kew Road, Richmond.


General Notes for Child Henry Matthew Lorden

The Times, Thursday, Apr 05, 1945; pg. 1; Issue 50109; col A

Lorden. - On April 3, 1945, Henry Matthew Lorden, of Egyptian House, Piccadilly, W.1 beloved son of the late John W. Lorden (Kt.) and Ellen Mary Lorden and very dearly loved brother of Nora Meredith and Doris Keiller.
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Ralph Meredith and Ellinor




Husband Ralph Meredith

         Born: 1650 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1710-1720 Circa
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1684 - Before




Wife Ellinor

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1684 - Circa
   Christened: 1 May 1684 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1687
   Christened: 11 Nov 1687 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 25 Jun 1722 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



3 F Jane Meredith

         Born: 1690 - Circa
   Christened: 26 Dec 1690 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James Watkins
         Marr: 26 Apr 1723 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



4 F Ellinor (Elanor) Meredith

         Born: 1693
   Christened: 27 Feb 1693 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 18 Sep 1715 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



5 M Ralph Meredith

         Born: 1695
   Christened: 28 Jan 1695 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M James Meredith

         Born: 1698 - Circa
   Christened: 2 Dec 1698 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

[no title] DD/4P/52/72 1710

Contents:
Draft lease.
1) Rob. Harley of Bramton Castle, esq.
2) Rich. Trow of Bramton, yeo.
(1) to (2) Orchard Meadow, Whittons Brooke, the Burgesses and 8a. for a cowpasture, with milch cows; tenement called Kevenkelynnogg (Sa.) and sheep walk there on Forest of Clunn with sheep; all (1)'s arable in Brampton; White Leasowes under Coxhall Knowle; the New Parke; use of all oxen, tools and dairy stuff, etc. Term and rent not given. (2) to render 2/3 of cow's offspring and pay for others; to pay for 1/3 seed for arable and render 2/3 crop to (1). (2) to work for (1) when directed; having 1s. 6d. p. day. (1) to allow house, 400 faggots, and price of 4 tons of coal at Clee Hill.
[no title] DD/4P/52/73 3 Oct. 1717

Contents:
Acknowledgment by Rich. Trow of the Reves, Brampton Bryan, of rent arrears due to Harley, and surrender of premises.
[no title] DD/4P/52/74 26 Jan. 1712/13

Contents:
Proposals of Ralph Meredith for holding all the demesne of Brampton as held by Trow. Similar clauses to above; (oxen to be shooed, etc.).
[no title] DD/4P/52/75 May 1716

Contents:
Draft lease.
1) Edward, Lord Harley, s. of Rob., Earl of Oxford.
2) Ralph Meredith of Bramton Bryan, shoemaker.
(1) to (2) pastures called Whittings Brooke and Burgages, and New Park, also Wat Meadow and arable (2) holds; Kevenkelunog and sheep walk on Forest of Clun; milch cows, 10 or 12 oxen, and 500 sheep. Term not given. 40s. p.a. per cow as rent of same, pasture and hay; £20 p.a. for sheep. Seed to be clean; other covenants similar to above.
[no title] DD/4P/52/76 22 April 1717; 26 April 1717

Contents:
Draft lease.
1) Robert, Earl of Oxford.
2) Ralph Meredith.
(1) to (2) messuage and barn late Larkham's; pasture called Witings Brooke and Burgages; Broad Meadow; arable (42a.) called Bagleys Land. For 3 yrs.; for house and pasture £17 p.a., for meadow £4 10s. p.a., for arable 5s. per acre p.a. (2) to be allowed 200 faggots p.a. out of the Knowles. (2) to find ½ barley seed for 44a., to mow same and carry ½ crop to (1). (2), with use of (1)'s oxen, to carry in for (1) all hay in Wat Mead. (Brampton ?)
Endorsed survey of arable.
[no title] DD/4P/56/31 1710-1717

Contents:
Account book of Harley tenants at Kevencolunog (Sa.), (see leases), containing:-
No. of sheep delivered to Rich. Trow. May 1710.
Annual statements of Trow's accounts (rent of stock, totals of carriage owed, etc., nos. of calves reared). 1710-1713.
List of live and dead stock delivered to Ralph Meredith. May 1713.
Annual statements of Meredith's accounts as above. 1713-1716.
List of live and dead stock received from M. May 1717.

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Harold Inglesby Meredith and Grace




Husband Harold Inglesby Meredith

         Born: 1865 - circa - Wandsworth
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Josiah Inglesby Meredith
       Mother: Mary Jane Barry


     Marriage: 1891 - Bideford, Devon




Wife Grace

         Born: 1864 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Elsie M. Meredith

         Born: 1893 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Dorothy M. Meredith

         Born: 1894 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Edith G. Meredith

         Born: 1895 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Mary C. Meredith

         Born: 1896 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Ernest Cecil Meredith

         Born: 1897 - circa - Bideford, Devon
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1901 Census:

Devon
Bideford
Claremont Abbesham??
Harold I. Meredith - head - 36 - Ironmonger
Grace - wife - 37
Ernest C. - son - 4
Elsie M. - daughter - 8
Dorothy M. - daughter - 7
Edith G. - daughter - 6
Mary C. - daughter - 5
picture

Gideon Hicks (Hix) and Hanna




Husband Gideon Hicks (Hix)

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Hanna

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Jonathon Hicks (Hix)

         Born: 1675 - circa
   Christened: 8 Apr 1676 - Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire
         Died: 1 Feb 1742
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Unknown Boddington




General Notes for Child Jonathon Hicks (Hix)

Jonathan Hicks was the stonemason of Speenhamland. He built a house opposite the stone-yard known as “Albion House”. His monument in Speen Church also refers to his wife, a daughter of John Boddington of Leicestershire, who died 26 Feb 1713 aged 42. In fact, his Will indicates that he had three wives. It states his wish to be buried as near as possible to his two late wives Jane and Rebecca, as well as making bequests to his wife Dorothy. He leaves much of his property and estate to his son John Hicks “otherwise Dunbricke” who is still a minor. It is assumed that this is the same person as the John Hicks b. ca. 1726 of Speenhamland, who was also a mason. The meaning of the style “otherwise Dunbricke” is unclear.

The Will appoints as a trustee his brother (presumably brother in law) a Simon Rawlins. There is no indication which of the 3 wives was a Rawlins. Two generations later, his granddaughter Mary married a John Rawlins.

picture

John Radnor and Hannah




Husband John Radnor

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Hannah

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Esther (Hester) Radnor

         Born: 1773 - Circa
   Christened: 12 Apr 1773 - Brilley, Herefordshire
         Died: 11 June 1841 (aged 68)
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Samuel Meredith - of Wigmore
         Marr: 12 Feb 1804 - Byton, Herefordshire




picture
Francis (Frank) Campbell Boyes and Isabella




Husband Francis (Frank) Campbell Boyes

         Born: 1845 - circa - Brighton, Sussex
   Christened: 23 May 1845 - Chapel Royal, Brighton, Sussex
         Died: 1922
       Buried: 


       Father: John Boyes
       Mother: Sabina Meredith


     Marriage: 




Wife Isabella

         Born: 1857 - circa - Aberdeen
   Christened: 
         Died: After 1894 and Before 1901
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Francis Boyes

         Born: 1878 - circa - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Helen Boyes

         Born: 1880 - circa - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Duncan Boyes

         Born: 1881 - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Sabina Boyes

         Born: 1883 - circa - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Charlotte Boyes

         Born: 1884 - circa - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Thomas Boyes

         Born: 1889 - Circa - London, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Edward Boyes

         Born: 1892 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 M George Boyes

         Born: 1894 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Frank Boyes was described in the 1881 England and subsequent England censuses as a retired farmer. His wife Isabella was enumerated separately in the 1881 Scotland census as a sheep farmer's wife:

1881 Scotland Census:

Isabella Boyes
Age 24
Head
Reg District - Kelvin
Parish - Glasgow Barony
County: Lanarkshire
Address: 74 Cromwell st.
Occupation - Sheep Farmers wife
Duncan Boyes - 17 days
Francis Boyes - 4
Helen Boyes - 1

1881 Census:

Dorset
Fordington
Mary Catherine Boyes - Head - 34
Mary Boyes - daughter - 13
George Boyes - son - 6
Francis Boyes - brother-in-law - 36 - retired
Helen Boyes - sister-in-law - 27

1891 Census:

Norfolk
Tottenhill
Oakwood House
Frank Boyes - Head - 46 - Retired Farmer
Isabelle - wife - 34
Frank - son - 13
Helen - daughter - 11
Duncan - son - 10
Sabina - daughter - 8
Charlotte - daughter - 7
Thomas - son - 2

1901 Census:

Norfolk
Tottenhill
The Oakwood
Frank C. Boyes - Head - 56 - Retired Farmer - Widower
Helen - daughter - 21
Thomas - son - 12
Edward - son - 9
George - son - 7



picture

William Scholefield and Jane




Husband William Scholefield




         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Jane

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Eliza Scholefield

         Born: 31 May 1832
   Christened: 23 Oct 1832 - Saint Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George Frederick Meredith
         Marr: 1857 - March Quarter - St. James, Westminster




General Notes (Husband)

On November 5th 1838, a Charter of Incorporation made Birmingham a Parliamentary Borough. This enabled the town to have an elected town council and a mayor. The very first Birmingham Town Council chose the historic coat of arms of the de Birmingham family as its insignia and the motto ‘Forward’. The first Mayor of Birmingham, William Scholefield presided over a council of 16 Aldermen and 48 Councillors.

Extract from Middle class radicals in Birmingham:

Other Birmingham manufacturers were also at the vanguard of political radicalism. One of the most important was William Scholefield, M.P. for the town between 1847 and 1867. Originally from Sheffield, he gained work as a boy sweeping warehouse floors in Minories, near Old Square. He rose to become clerk and later partner of the business, and actually married his old employer's daughter. His rise included a spell as High Bailiff and he was also Birmingham's first Mayor.

William was a Liberal member!!


General Notes for Child Eliza Scholefield

Eliza was the daughter of William Scholefield, MP for Birmingham.

Eliza's brother was Clement Scholefield who was born: June 22, 1839, Edgbaston, West Midlands, Eng­land.

Died: Sep­tem­ber 10, 1904, Frith Hall, Godalming, Sur­rey, Eng­land.

Youngest son of William Scholefield, Member of Parliament from Birmingham, Clement at­tend­ed St. John’s Coll­ege, Cam­bridge (BA 1864, MA 1867). He was or­dained a deacon in 1867, and priest in 1869. He served churches at Hove, Brighton (1867); St. Peter’s, South Ken­sing­ton (1869); and St. Luke’s, Chelsea (1879). He was chaplain at Eton (1880-1890); vicar of Ho­ly Trin­i­ty, Knightsbridge (1890-1895); and retired in 1895. He con­trib­ut­ed hymns to Church Hymns with Tunes, by Arthur Sullivan (1874).

picture

Samuel Aston of Wroxall and Jane




Husband Samuel Aston of Wroxall

         Born: 1754 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 December 1820 - aged 66 - Rowington, Warwickshire
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Jane

         Born: 1760 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 December 1825 - aged 65
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Aston

         Born: 1800 - Circa - Sutton Coldfield
   Christened: 
         Died: 1871-1881
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith
         Marr: 8 Jun 1824 - Saint Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick, England



2 F Caroline Aston

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Jane Aston




         Born: 1781- Circa - Warwickshire
   Christened: 13 Dec 1781-1782 - Saint Martin, Birmingham
         Died: 1869 - March Quarter - aged 88 - Warwickshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Meredith
         Marr: 3 Oct 1814 - Rowington, Warwickshire




General Notes (Husband)

Notices of the Churches of Warwickshire
By Warwickshire Natural History and Archaeological Society (Warwick, England)
Published by H.T. Cooke, 1858
Item notes: v. 2 Page 73

Monuments in Rowington Church

Against the south wall is a marble tablet. Sacred to the memory of Samuel Aston, Esquire (late of Rowington Hall), who died the 20th of December, 1820. Aged 66 years.

Also to the memory of Jane Aston, relict of the above named Samuel Aston, who lived universally loved and respected, and died generally lamented, on the 7th day of December, 1825. Aged 65 years.

Wroxall lies about 6 miles north-west of Warwick and 14 miles south of Birmingham.

The manor of Wroxall belonged, therefore, to the priory from the time of its foundation until its dissolution in 1535.....From 1771 onwards the family does not appear to have resided at Wroxall, the house being let to Samuel Aston of Birmingham, who in 1806 purchased a property in Rowington (q.v.).

William Smith in 1806 sold the hall and farm to Samuel Aston of Wroxall, who added the stone front to the house. John son of Samuel Aston added to the estate and in 1896 descendants of the family were still living there.

From: 'Parishes: Rowington', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 3: Barlichway hundred (1945), pp. 146-154. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=57002. Date accessed: 22 September 2008.

Notices of the Churches of Warwickshire, Deanery of Warwick - 1858 - page

An Historical and Descriptive Account of the Town and Castle of Warwick - By William Field - 1815

.....This road branches off from the former at Hatton - about two miles beyond which, is the small village of Rowington; written in Doomsday Book, Rockington; so named, therefore, from the rocky eminance on which it is situated. Close to the road, on the right, loftily rises the village church: the ascent to which, is by steps cut in the solid rock. Near it is the handsome residence of Samuel Aston, Esq. To the left of this village runs the Warwick and Birmingham Canal.........


General Notes for Child John Aston

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Augustus Road
John Aston - Head - 60 - Button Manufacturer employing 212 persons and 6 clerks
Lucy - wife - 58
Thomas L. - son - unmarried - 31 - Button Manufacturer
Emily - daughter - Unmarried - 26
Lilias - daughter - unmarried - 24
Jane - daughter - unmarried - 20
George L. - son - unamrried - 21
Edward A. - son - unmarried - 15
Jane Meredith - visitor - 74

In the 1861 England Census John Aston was described as a button manufacturer employing 212 persons and 6 clerks, living with Lucy and their children at Augustus Road, Edgbaston. Lucy's step-mother, Jane Meredith is recorded as a visitor.

John Aston of Rowington Hall, Warwick

J. A & Sons, Ltd., John Aston & Co. Eagle Button Works Summer Hill Road, Birmingham.
Newton’s London Journal of Arts & Sciences
New Patents
Sealed in England
1846
John Aston, of Birmingham, button manufacturer, for improvements in buttons and in ornaments for dress. Sealed 28th May – 6 months for inrolment (sic).


General Notes for Child Caroline Aston

The Gentleman's Magazine - May 1814 - Page 522

Warwickshire-At Birmingham, aged 17, Carlline, sixth daughter of Samuel Aston, esq., of Rowington-Hall.


General Notes for Child Jane Aston

Of Rowington Hall - She was possibly the d/o Samuel and Jane of Rowington Hall, bapt. 1781/2 - Vivienne Rae-Ellis Louis Anne Meredith - A Tigress in Exile (Blubber Head Press, Tasmania: 1979)

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Leamington Priors
Jane Meredith - 66 - annuitant
John B, Hebbert - 39 - solicitor
Lucy Julia Hebbert - 23 - wife
Emily T. Aston - 16 - niece.

picture

Thomas Prosser and Jane




Husband Thomas Prosser

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Jane

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Prosser

         Born: 1747 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Sep 1747 - Bucknell, Shropshire
         Died: 16 March 1799 - aged 51
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Joseph Meredith
         Marr: 25 Apr 1773 - Bucknell, Shropshire




picture
Richard Meredith and Jane




Husband Richard Meredith

         Born: 1830 - circa - Llanfar, Shropshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Jane

         Born: 1833 - circa - Leintwardine, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M George Meredith

         Born: 1854 - about
   Christened: 24 Dec 1854 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1860 - circa
   Christened: 13 May 1860 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Richard Meredith

         Born: 1862 - about
   Christened: 6 Jul 1862 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M John Meredith

         Born: 1868 - about
   Christened: 7 May 1868 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Charles Meredith

         Born: 1870 - about
   Christened: 13 Nov 1870 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Andrew Meredith

         Born: 1873 - ABout
   Christened: 17 Aug 1873 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1881 Census: Lingen

MEREDITH, Richard Head Married M 51 1830 Farmer Of 20 Acres Llanfar Shropshire MEREDITH, Jane Wife Married F 48 1833 Leintwardine Herefordshire
MEREDITH, George Son Single M 26 1855 Ag Lab Birtley Herefordshire
MEREDITH, Richard Son Single M 18 1863 Ag Lab Birtley Herefordshire
MEREDITH, John Son Single M 12 1869 Birtley Herefordshire
MEREDITH, Charles Son Single M 10 1871 Scholar Birtley Herefordshire
MEREDITH, Andrew Son Single M 7 1874 Scholar Birtley Herefordshire

picture

Thomas Lawrence and Lucy




Husband Thomas Lawrence

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Lucy

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Lucy Lawrence




         Born: 1763 - Circa
   Christened: 2 Nov 1763 - Bristol, Gloucestershire
         Died: 18 Feb 1813
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Meredith
         Marr: 13 Mar 1800 - Saint Anne Soho, Westminster, London




General Notes for Child Lucy Lawrence

Lucy was the sister of the portrait painter Sir Thomas Lawrence, President of the Royal Academy of Arts.

Oxford Journal - August 25, 1934

At No. 31 we come across the Lucy Lawrence whom Fanny Burney found at the Bear at Devizes as a girl of sixteen, with her brother Thomas, then ten years old-he destined to be the well known painter and she to live in Birmingham as wife of John Meredith, an attorney, President from 1825 to 1832 of the Birmingham Law Society.

Portrait of a lady, probably Lucy Meredith, the artist's sister, seated half-length, in a white dress with paisley sash, in a feigned stone cartouche.
oil on canvas
30 1/8 x 25 1/2 in. (76.5 x 64.8 cm.)

Extract from The Gentleman's Magazine -

Sir Thomas Lawrence had two brothers and two sisters....His elder sister Lucy was married in March 1800 to Mr. Meredith, solicitor of Birmingham. She died in Febnruary 1813 leaving one daughter married to Mr. John Aston of St. Paul's-Square in Birmingham.
picture

John Meredith and Margaret




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1630 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1669 - Before




Wife Margaret

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Alice Meredith

         Born: 1669 - Circa
   Christened: 2 Mar 1669 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
George A. Pemberton and Maria




Husband George A. Pemberton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Maria

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Myrrha Devon Pemberton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Benbow Hebbert
         Marr: 1877




General Notes for Child Myrrha Devon Pemberton

Myrrha was the daughter of George A. Pemberton and his wife Maria. He was a Brassfounder in Birmingham in 1861.
picture

John Meredith and Martha




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1700 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Martha

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Meredith

         Born: 1734 - circa
   Christened: 30 Jun 1734 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John and Martha of Letton in Parish Records.
picture

Joseph Meredith and Mary




Husband Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1806 - Circa - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 1853 - March Q - Ludlow, Herefordshire
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Mary Downes


     Marriage: 1841 - before




Wife Mary

         Born: 1819 - Circa - Stourport, Worcestershire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M David Meredith

         Born: 1841 - Circa
   Christened: 5 Dec 1841 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Frances Stanley
         Marr: 1865



2 M Mary Meredith

         Born: 1842 - Circa
   Christened: 25 Nov 1842 - Brampton Bryan, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Sarah Meredith

         Born: 1844 - Circa
   Christened: 2 Jun 1844 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1845 - circa
   Christened: 17 Nov 1845 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M John Meredith

         Born: 1847 - circa
   Christened: 30 Jan 1847 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1848 - circa
   Christened: 17 Aug 1848 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M James Meredith

         Born: 1850 - circa - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 M Henry Meredith

         Born: 1853 - circa - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1851 Census: Radnorshire - Boresford and Pedwardine.

Joseph was living with his wife Mary and their sons John, Joseph and James.


General Notes (Wife)

1861 Census - Wales - Letton and Newton and Watford.

Mary was living with daughter Sarah and sons Joseph, James and Henry.


General Notes for Child David Meredith

1861 Census - Herefordshire - Yazor

Davis was described as a pupil farmer

1871 Census Collection - Bagots Bromley, Staffordshire

David Meredith of Brampton Bryan (aged 29) farmer of 384 acres employing 6 labourers and 2 boys living with his wife Fanny (aged 30) of Newport, Shropshire, his son Joseph E. (aged 5) born in Salop, David S. (aged 3) born in Monmouth, Mabel M. (aged 2) born in Monmouth, Henry S. (7 months) born in Staffordshire, David's father-in-law Henry J. Stanley, a retired grocer born in Little Wood, Staffordshire and a sister-in-law Elizabeth A. Stanley (aged 24) born in Wysley, Staffordshire

1881 Census Collection - Abergavenny, Monmouthshire - 39 Chapel Rd.

Davis Meredith of Brampton Bryan (aged 39) unemployed farmer living with his wife Fanny (aged 39) and Martha Stanley (aged 65), his mother-in-law, an annuitant, his son Joseph E (aged 15) a railway clerk, his son David S. (aged 13) a scholar, mabel M. (aged 12), John (aged 9) born in Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire, Mary E. (aged 6) born in Monmouthshire and Maria M. (aged 2) born in Monmouthshire.


General Notes for Child Mary Meredith

1871 Census - Herefordshire - St. John The Baptist.

Mary was living with her siblings Sarah, Joseph, James and Henry.


General Notes for Child Joseph Meredith

1871 Census - Herefordshire - St. John The Baptist

Living with his sister Mary - he was described as a druggists assistant - unemployed.


General Notes for Child James Meredith

1871 Census - Herefordshire - St. John The Baptist.

James was living with his sister and other siblings - he was described as a grocer's assistant.


General Notes for Child Henry Meredith

1871 Census - Herefordshire - St. John The Baptist.
James was living with his sister and other siblings - he was described as a ironmonger's apprentice.
picture

John Jukes and Mary




Husband John Jukes

         Born: 1791 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Mary

         Born: 1791 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Birmingham
All Saints
John Jukes - 50 - Glass Blower
Mary - 50 - wife
Edward - 15 - Glass Blower
Betsy - 15
Mary - 13
Eliza - 10
Henry - 9
picture

Richard Prince and Mary




Husband Richard Prince

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Mary

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Prince

         Born: 1809 - Circa
   Christened: 14 Aug 1809 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Samuel Meredith
         Marr: 15 May 1833 - Wigmore, Herefordshire



2 M John Prince

         Born: 1785 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Josiah Meredith and Mary




Husband Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1722 - Circa
   Christened: 12 Aug 1722 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Josiah Meredith
       Mother: Mary Low


     Marriage: 




Wife Mary

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Margaret Meredith

         Born: 1759 - Circa
   Christened: 22 Jul 1759 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
John Jukes and Mary Ann




Husband John Jukes

         Born: 1796 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Mary Ann

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Warwickshire
St. Martin
John Jukes - 45 - Bellows Maker
Mary Ann - 45
Thomas - 10
John - 15 - Punch Plater
picture

Alan Alfred Meredith and May




Husband Alan Alfred Meredith

         Born: 1888 - Putney, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred John Rouse Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Florence Evered


     Marriage: 1917 - circa




Wife May

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Alan Geoffrey (Geoff) Meredith

         Born: 1918 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1989 - circa
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mavis Isobel Sisely



2 F Molly Meredith

         Born: 1919 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1989 - circa
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ronald Fraiser



3 F Pat Meredith

         Born: 1920 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: McLean




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Wednesday, Dec 16, 1959; pg. 12; Issue 54645; col D

Mr. A. A. Merdith

A memorial service for Mr. Alan Alfred Meredith was held yesterday at St. Michael's Cornhill. The Rev. Norman Motley officiated. Mr. A.C. Grover (chairman of Lloyd's) was among those present.

The Times, Monday, Jun 06, 1960; pg. 8; Issue 54790; col F

Underwriters £116,000 Estate

Mr. Alan Alfred Meredith, of Hassocks, Sussex, underwriting member of lloyd's, lefy £116,220 gross, £108,628 net (duty paid, £59,635).


General Notes for Child Alan Geoffrey (Geoff) Meredith

The Times, Thursday, Nov 14, 1940; pg. 1; Issue 48773; col A

Meredith. - On Nov. 13, 1940, at Cadgwith, Caterham, Surrey, to Mavis Isobel (née Sisely), wife of Alan Geoffrey Meredith - a son.

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 24, 1943; pg. 1; Issue 49478; col A

Meredith. - On Feb. 23, 1943, at Wayside Cottage, Richmond, Surrey, to Mavis (nêe Sisely) wife of A.G. Meredith, a daughter.

The Times, Wednesday, Jan 01, 1947; pg. 1; Issue 50647; col A

Meredith. - On Dec. 28, 1946, at "Sangers", West Chiltington, Sussex, to Mavis (née Sisely), wife of A.G. Meredith - a daughter (Josephine)

picture

David Meredith and Olive




Husband David Meredith

         Born: 1630 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1664 - Before




Wife Olive

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah (Karah in the IGI) Meredith

         Born: 1664 - Circa
   Christened: 23 Oct 1664 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 16 Jun 1670 - Lingen, Hereford



2 F Anne Meredith

         Born: 1687 - Circa
   Christened: 27 Apr 1687 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Samuel Bult Meredith and Penelope




Husband Samuel Bult Meredith

         Born: 22 Aug 1822 - Woolwich, Kent, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Aug 1901 - Windsor, Surrey
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Hannah Bult


     Marriage: 




Wife Penelope

         Born: 1832 - circa - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 1897 - Croydon, Surrey
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Herbert John Meredith

         Born: Jun 1852 - Lewisham, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: Mar 1900 - Toxteth Park, Lancashire
       Buried: 



2 M Arthur Meredith

         Born: 1856 - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Sydney Havelock Meredith

         Born: 1858 - June Q. - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 1895 - March Q. - Cardiff, Wales
       Buried: 



4 F Constance Lucy Meredith

         Born: 1862 - June Q. - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George J. Evered
         Marr: 1892 - September Quarter - Farnham, Hampshire



5 M Leonard Bult Meredith

         Born: Sep 1869 - Lambeth, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1881 Census Collection:

Samuel was living with his married sister Sarah Doulton at 147 Peckham Rye, Camberwell, Surrey. Sarah was the head - assumed that her husband was deceased - living with her 5 children - he was described as a retired farmer.

The Times, Thursday, Oct 24, 1901; pg. 2; Issue 36594; col A

Re Samuel Bult Meredith deceased Pursuant to the Statute 22nd and 23rd Victoria Chap. 35, Notice is hereby given that all creditors and other persons having any claims or demands against the estate of Samuel Bult Meredith formerly of No. 16, Campbell Road Croydon in the County of Surrey but late of Springfield Villa Englefield Green in the same County retired Naval Engineer deceased (who died on the 20th day of August 1901, and whose will was proved in the Principal Registry of the Probate Division of the High Court of Justice on the 18th October 1901 by Arthur Meredith and George James Evered the Executors therein names) are hereby required to send the particulars of their claims and demands to me the undersigned on or before the 25th day of November 1901 after which date the said Executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the said deceased among the parties entitled thereto having regard only to the claims and demands of which they shall then have had notice and that they will not be liable for the assets of the said deceased or any part thereof so distributed to any person or persons of whose claims and demands they shall not then have had notice.

Dated this 23rd day of October 1901.

William B. Fairbrother 147, Leadenhall Street E.C. Solicitor for the said Executors.


General Notes for Child Herbert John Meredith

1861 Census:

Residence: Lambeth St. Mary, Surrey

1871 Census:

Residence - Lambeth

1891 Census:

Residence - Lewisham
picture

Richard Jukes and Phebe




Husband Richard Jukes

         Born: 1710 Circa - Lower Gornal, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: Nov 1775
       Buried: 4 Nov 1775 - Edgbaston Church, Warwickshire
     Marriage: 




Wife Phebe

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1773 - circa
       Buried: 10 Sep 1773 - Edgbaston Church, Warwickshire



Children
1 M Richard Jukes

         Born: 1729 - circa
   Christened: 1729 - John St. Presbytarian Church, Wolverhampton
         Died: 
       Buried: 1 Sep 1747 - Possible - Edgbaston Register



2 M Joseph Jukes

         Born: 1731 - Circa
   Christened: 20 Apr 1731 - John St. Presbytarian Church, Wolverhampton
         Died: October 1811 - The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine 1869 p.85
       Buried: 



3 F Elizabeth Jukes

         Born: 1734 - circa
   Christened: 5 Jan 1734 - John St. Presbytarian Church, Wolverhampton
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Pitt




General Notes (Husband)

The occupation of Richard Jukes is unknown, but he was wealthy enough to own property in Carr’s Lane Birmingham and in Edgbaston. It appears that he was a Dissenter, and he is most likely to be the Richard Jukes who is recorded as having led the secession from the Old Meeting House in 1747, to form the New Meeting House at Carr’s Lane in Birmingham.


General Notes for Child Richard Jukes

Last Will and Testament

In the name of God Amen I Richard Jukes of Birmingham in the County of Warwick Gentleman being Weak in Body but of Sound and disposing Mind Memory and Understanding, praised be Almighty God for the same, Do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, that is to say, first it is my wish and desire that all my just debts be paid and discharged And that my Body be decently Buried at the discretion of my Executor hereinafter Named Also I Give and Devise unto my Son Joseph Jukes and to his Heirs and Assigns for ever All that my Freehold Estate situate in Carrs Lane in Birmingham aforesaid (Subject to the Mortgage now Affecting the same) To Hold to my said Son Joseph Jukes his Heirs and Assigns for ever Also I Give and Bequeath unto my said Son Joseph Jukes All my Lifehold Estate Situate at Edgbaston in the said County of Warwick To Hold to my said son Joseph Jukes his Executors Administrators and Assigns for all the Remainder of my Term of Years Estate and Interest therein Nevertheless Subject to and I do hereby Expressly Charge the said Freehold and Lifehold Estates and premises hereinbefore Given and Devised to my said Son Joseph Jukes with the payment of one Annuity or Clear Yearly sum of Twenty Six pounds to Be ?????? and payable ?????? unto my loving wife Phebe Jukes or her Assigns during the Term of her Natural Life by four equal Quarterly payments in each year the first payment thereof to begin and made upon the Quarter day which shall next happen after my decease Also I Give and Bequeath unto my Grandson William Pitt the sum of Twenty pounds to be paid him on his Attaining the age of Twenty one years Also I Give and Bequeath unto my Grandson John Pitt the like sum of Twenty pounds to be paid him on his Attaining the Age of Twenty one Years And also I Give unto my said Wife Phebe Jukes the use and Enjoyment of all my Household Goods furniture plate and Linnen for and during the Term of her Natural Life in Case she shall so long live and Reside in Birmingham And from and after her decease of Removall from the Town of Birmingham aforesaid, as shall first happen, Then, and in such Case, I Give and Bequeath all such Household Goods Furniture plate and Linnen And all the Rest and Residue of my Personal Estate unto my said Son Joseph Jukes his Executors Administrators and Assigns And of this my Last Will and Testament I do hereby Make Nominate and Appoint my said Son Joseph Jukes Sole Executor hereby Revoking all former Wills by me made In Witness Whereof The said Richard Jukes have to this my Last Will and Testament set my Hand and Seal the Eighteenth day of May in the Eleventh Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Third by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith And so forth And in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy one.

Signed Sealed Published and declared by the Testator Richard Jukes for and as his Last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in the Sight and Presence and at the Request of the said Testator And also in the Sight and Presence of each other have Subscribed our Name As Witnesses who observed that the Interlineation between the Eleventh and Twelfth Lines was made before the said Testator Richard Jukes Signed the same


General Notes for Child Joseph Jukes

Joseph Jukes was christened on 20 Apr 1731 at John Street Presbyterian Church, Wolverhampton, the son of Richard Jukes.

He was listed as a Plater of 20 Paradise Row in a 1780 directory and also in an earlier edition thought to be of 1774.

His great-granddaughter Caroline Amelia recalled how he “built at Bordesley a substantial house, with oaken beams and floors, doubtless cherishing the idea that his descendants, for many generations, would appreciate its solidity, and sun themselves in the pleasant gardens and fields surrounding the house- the property being entailed in the male line. House and garden, fields and farm, now form part of the unlovely buildings and sheds belonging to the goods department of the London and North-Western Railway”. She also mentions that “he carried on a little amateur farming, as a recreation from business.”

Some accounts of the so-called ”Priestley Riots” of 1791 in Birmingham imply that Joseph’s house was looted and burnt down. In fact, he wrote an account of the riots from which it is clear that he took timely action to protect both his house and possessions. His great-great-grandson describes how:

“Jukes appears to have owed the preservation of his house, partly to his shrewdness in removing his furniture and leaving plenty of ale in a conspicuous position for the rioters to consume and partly also, as he suggests elsewhere, to the fact that, as a Guardian of the Poor, he had shown himself, on several occasions, anxious to secure a fair administration of the funds provided for the relief of the needy.”

The birth of his son John ca 1756 is consistent with Joseph’s wife being the Ann Cade who married a Joseph Jukes on 22 Sep 1755 at Birmingham, St. Martin’s. Perhaps related to this is an indenture between Anne Cade, spinster, Joseph Jukes of Birmingham, butcher [sic], and others, dated two days before the marriage. However the conclusion is doubtful and is not supported.

Joseph was described as a friend of William Hutton the "English Franklin" whose house was destroyed in the Birmingham riots of 1791 - but see above.

Death announcement:
Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, October 19, 1811; Issue 3051

"At his house in Bordesley, in the 81st year of his age, Joseph Jukes, sen. Esq."

Joseph Jukes of 20 Paradise Row was listed as a Plater in The Birmingham, Wolverhampton, Walsall, Dudley, Bilston, and Willenhall directory; or, merchant and tradesman's useful companion: ... Birmingham, 1780. He was listed as a Plater at the same address in an earlier edition thought to be of 1774.

The button manufacturing company was called Messrs. Jukes and Pitt. See the UK National Archives:

Case concerning the quality of gilt buttons manufactured by Messrs. Jukes and Pitt, Easy Row, Birmingham. MS 3069/Acc1926-021/329514 5 September, 1799.

Jukes, Son, and Pitt, Button-makers and Platers in general, Easy-row
Listed in: Bisset, J. (James), A poetic survey round Birmingham; with a brief description of the different curiosities and manufactories of the place. ... [Birmingham], [1800]. 88 pp.

Wrightson's Triennial Directory 1818: Jukes, John Senr, Plater, Button Mkr, New St.

Transactions of the Unitarian Historical Society

Editor and Secretary: Walter H. Burgess

Priestley and the Birmingham Riots

Bernard M. Allen, MA, LL.D, F.R. Hist. S.

The year 1791 - the 58th year of his life-was a momentous one for Joseph Priestley. On the opening day of the year he sent to press his "letters to Edmund Burke," in which he replied to the eloquent attack which that statesman had made upon the French Revolution. Priestley's letters, although couched in a tone of friendliness towards one whom he had long known personally and admired for his strenuous advocacy of the cause of the American colonies, were yet marked by some of those strong expressions which form such a contrast to the usually peaceful demeanour of the celebrated scientist and theologian.

For example, after lauding the sweeping resolutions which the French National Assembly had passed in the previous summer for overthrowing the existing hierarchy and for securing that henceforward ministers and bishops should be elected by the laity, he expressed the wish to see a similar measure adopted in England and then proceeded to speak of the Church of England as a "fungus" or 'parasitic plant."

Again, in his references to the Monarchy he was guilty of serious indiscretion. After taking Burke to task because he had deplored the way in which the Puritans had led Charles I. into London in triumph as a prisoner, he remarked:-

“In my opinion there was sufficient cause for triumph. The thirtieth day of January was (to use a phrase of Admiral Keppel's) 'a proud day for England,' as well as the fourteenth day of July for France."

This public association of the anniversary of the execution of an English king with the anniversary of the capture of the Bastille was destined to recoil with disastrous consequences on Priestley's head.

These indiscretions might perhaps have passed comparatively unnoticed, had it not been for two events which occurred during the next few months-one in England and one in France-and which tended to make the English people peculiarly sensitive to any hint of attack upon the throne.

The English incident was the issue of another answer to Edmund Burke written by a man who was associated in the public mind with Priestley but who was a declared advocate of revolution. In March, 1791, Thomas Paine published, in reply to Burke's "Thoughts on the French Revolution," his famous book "The Rights of Man," in which he not only upheld enthusiastically the principles of the French Revolution, but went further than the French had themselves then gone and advocated the abolition of monarchy. He spoke of "monarchical sovereignty" as the "enemy of mankind." He had himself assisted the Americans in the New World to throw off the yoke of George III. and he upheld the American Revolution as a model to be followed. "If I ask a man in America if he wants a king" he wrote, "he retorts and asks if I take him for an idiot."

This book aroused furious hostility in England and served to rally all loyal people round King George III.; and this pro-monarchical movement was enhanced by another event which took place three months later in France. On June 20th, the French King, Louis XVI., fled from Paris to join his supporters across the frontier and had almost succeeded in effecting his escape when his coach was stopped, he was surrounded by armed citizens and was led back a captive amid the execrations of the crowd into Paris. This tragic close to the French King's effort to escape aroused intense sympathy for him among the English people.

"I will venture to say," wrote a correspondent of an important London paper on July 1st, "that since the illness of our own beloved sovereign there has not been exhibited such a sense of universal consternation as was produced by the arrival of the news that Louis XVI. (betrayed by the perfidy of one of his subjects) was arrested in the flight from thraldom."

It was in the midst of this political excitement that the second anniversary of the capture of the Bastille came round and the supporters of the French Revolution in England began to make their plans for holding dinners in various parts of the country to commemorate the great event of July 14th. In London, it was arranged to ask Thomas Paine to come over specially from France and bring with him a distinguished Frenchman to attend a national commemorative dinner at the Crown and Anchor in the Strand. In Birmingham, Priestley and his friends set to work to organise a local dinner at the new Hotel in Temple Row.

It has been stated in the reminiscences of John Ryland, which Mr, Ronald Dixon published in the TRANSACTIONS OF THE UNITARIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, IN 1930, that Priestley rather discouraged the holding of the dinner. This, however, can hardly have been the case; for we learn from the diary of Catherine Hutton that on Wednesday, July 6th, Priestley, while having tea with her father, William Hutton, one of the leading citizens of Birmingham, asked him to come to a commemorative dinner oil the 14th. Hutton declined to do so, as did a Roman Catholic priest who was also having tea with Hutton, and whom Priestley also asked to attend. Some of Priestley's friends clearly regarded his proposals for celebrating the 14th July as indiscreet. Among others, however, there was much enthusiasm for the project, and the next day (July 7th), a notice was issued from the hotel inviting all friends of freedom to attend a dinner on the 14th of July, to commemorate the "Emancipation of twenty-six millions of people from the Yoke of Despotism."

The issue of this notice brought to a head the indignation which had long been seething in Birmingham against the Dissenters and especially their leading figure, Dr. Priestley; and there is evidence that, during the week that succeeded the issue of the invitation, steps were taken to work up a popular outbreak.

For example, on the morning of Monday, July 11th, an ominous notice appeared in the Birmingham Gazette, saying that the names of all those who attended the Commemoration Dinner would be noted and published. Then again, on the next day, Tuesday the 12th, an unknown person left at a public house a mysterious parcel which, on being opened, was found to contain copies of a printed handbill of an inflammatory character, which referred to "the crown of a certain great personage becoming every day too weighty for the head that wears it." The handbills were secretly circulated throughout the town, and on that very evening young Hutton heard that there was going to be a riot in the town on the Thursday. On the following day, Wednesday, the 13th, Priestley's friends issued a leaflet, repudiating all knowledge of the mysterious handbill and declaring their loyalty to the King and Constitution. They even decided to go further and cancel the arrangements for celebrating the anniversary of the 14th. But the hotel proprietor implored them to go on with the arrangements as he had made all his preparations for the dinner and would lose heavily if it were not held. It was accordingly decided not to issue the notice of cancellation.

The morning of the 14th arrived. There were unmistakable signs that some trouble was brewing. One of the Town Beadles, for instance, was heard to remark that they were going to have "such a day as Birmingham had never known," and there were other indications that the Church party were determined to strike a blow at the Dissenters and particularly at Priestley, their leading figure. In view of these disconcerting symptoms, William Russell, a well-known Birmingham man, who was one of Priestley's most staunch supporters, sent a note to him during the morning urging him not to be present at the festivity. Priestley, anxious to avoid any hostile outbreak, reluctantly acquiesced and decided to spend the day peacefully in his home at Fair Hill, about a mile from the centre of the town.

The Commemoration Dinner was fixed for three o'clock. As the guests passed into the hotel alongside St. Philip's churchyard, there was a little hissing but no disorder, and 81 guests took their seats in the banqueting room. Care had been taken to mark the loyalty of the participators by placing a fine medallion of the King's head in the centre of the table, while the assembly was presided over, not by a Dissenter, but by a distinguished churchman, Mr. James Keir, F.R.S. The same spirit of loyalty was emphasized in the toasts. The first was that of the "King and Constitution" while the Prince of Wales had one all to himself! Nor could any fault be found with the inevitable Ode which, as on all such occasions, was sung by the assembled company. It described how, at a council of the gods, France, envying the liberty which England enjoyed, asked that she too might receive the gift of freedom.

“Our neighbours in France, of our freedom aware,
And wishing such blessings might fall to their share,
For Freedom petition-The gods they agree
And issue their mandate-that France shall be free.

“The fourteenth of July was fixed as the day,
When millions their homage to freedom should pay;
In the annals of France then enrolled may it be,
Which witness'd a nation made happy and free!

"With loud acclamation let each raise his voice,
And give round the word, "Sons of Freedom, rejoice
Let each loyal Briton then cheerfully sing
The blessings of Freedom and 'Long live the King'.”

The poetry may not have been of the highest order, but the loyalty shown in the concluding words was beyond reproach. The only sign of misgiving on the part of the organisers of the programme appears to have been that the proceedings were made shorter than usual and that the number of toasts was restricted to about twenty instead of the customary number of forty! But, apart from this precaution, there seems to have been little uneasiness and all appear to have agreed that the gathering was a complete success.

One of those who was present, Mr. Joseph Jukes, my great-great-grandfather, has left in my family a manuscript account of the Riots and he briefly summarises in the following words his impression of the commemorative feast:

"Before six o'clock in the evening all the company retired from this moderate festivity in peace and perfect goodwill to all mankind."

The Chairman and some of the principal guests walked quietly across the churchyard and called on Mr. Thomas Russell in New Hall Street, where they took tea and congratulated themselves on the peaceful way in which everything had passed off. Joseph Jukes himself went back to his home at Bordesley in the Green Lanes, situated about a mile to the north-east of the town not far from Dr. Priestley's house; and before long he had retired for the night. A little before ten, when he had just gone to sleep, his son, who had a house in the town, arrived with alarming news.

"He informed me," writes Joseph Jukes in his journal, "that the windows of the hotel were broken, the New Meeting House set on fire, that the Old Meeting was shortly to share the same fate, as likewise Dr. Priestley's house, and the Doctor to be consumed in the ruins."

The elder Jukes, however, was of a sceptical turn of mind.

"Not giving credit," he writes, "to the report, nor conceiving it possible that so vile a plot was contrived or even that men could be found to execute so wicked an undertaking, I turned myself in bed and went to sleep again."

But on this occasion the sceptic was wrong and the alarming tales were true. A riot, unprecedented in the history of Birmingham, was in progress.

About eight o'clock a crowd had begun to gather outside the hotel to hoot the feasters as they came out. While they were waiting, stories were passed round as to what had happened at the dinner. Some said that Priestley had proposed the, toast of " Damnation to the King " while others said that the first toast of the evening was the "King's head on a charger." This absurd rumour may perhaps have arisen from someone associating the medallion of the King's head upon the dinner table with Priestley's unwise remarks in his letter to Edmund Burke about the execution of Charles I. In any case these stories served to add fuel to the flames, and the crowd, believing that the guests (including Priestley), were still in the hotel, began to vent their indignation by throwing stones at the windows. Shortly after, the two magistrates, Joseph Carlos, a draper, and the Rev. B. Spencer, Vicar of Aston, accompanied by a lawyer, John Brooke, came up from the Swan Inn lower down the hill, where they had been dining, and took up a position on the hotel steps. They were greeted with shouts of "Church and King for Ever" and "Damn the Presbyterians." The magistrates, instead of trying to stem the excitement, joined in the shouting and waved their hats to the crowd. Several of those who were present at the scene and made sworn depositions at the Assizes afterwards, which I have examined at the Public Record Office, declared that one of the magistrates, Mr. Carlos, was the worse for liquor. In any case he was evidently in a very excited state and under the encouragement of him and his companions the mob became still more turbulent and poured out a fresh volley of stones at the windows till every pane was smashed. Thereupon Mr. Carlos, who had meanwhile satisfied himself that all the guests had left the hotel, pointed out to the crowd that they were really only injuring the property of the landlord, a good Churchman, and he suggested that, if they wanted to be avenged on the Dissenters, they had better go down to their Meeting-house. At once the cry arose "To the New Meeting! Justice Carlos will protect us" and off they rushed down the hill to Priestley's chapel, the New Meeting House, less than half a mile away. There they set to work to destroy all the furniture and fittings and finally, as the building stood almost at the corner and had no houses adjoining it, they fetched live coals and set it on fire. With this work of destruction the rage of the mob increased and as the evening sky was lit up with the flames of Priestley's chapel, they yelled out for vengeance on Priestley himself. They threatened to kill him if they could get hold of him and a cry arose that they should march off to his house and catch him there. A liberal Churchman, Mr. Vale, who was passing at the time, was alarmed at the menacing cries of the crowd, and, happening a little later to come across Samuel Ryland, a leading member of Priestley's congregation, he told him about the mob's threats and urged him to take a carriage and drive as fast as he could to Fair Hill to warn Priestley of the approaching danger.

Samuel Ryland at once hurried off to get ready his horse and trap and, while the crowd was still shouting round the New Meeting House, he drove down the High Street over the bridge at the end of the town and out along the Stratford Road. He was well ahead of the rioters, who would take some time to cover on foot the mile of road which stretched away between the bridge and Priestley's house.

Meanwhile Priestley had been spending the day quietly at home enjoying long discussions with his friend Adam Walker, a lecturer in philosophy. After his friend had left, Priestley and his wife sat down to supper and then proceeded to play their usual game of backgammon. The first indication they received as to there being any trouble was a violent knocking on the door somewhere about nine o'clock. When the door was opened, some young men of Priestley's congregation, including T. W. Hill, who has told us the story, rushed in, and told him that his Meeting House was being demolished and that threats were being uttered against his house and his life. They begged him to let them defend the house against the mob, but Priestley sternly forbade the use of any force. It was inconsistent, he said, with the position of a Christian minister to resort to violence even in self-defence. If persecution came, it was his duty to submit to it, as his Master and His Apostles had done before him. He could not bring himself to believe that his house was really in danger from an attack from his fellow-townsmen; but as a precaution he consented to put away in a safe a few of his most valued possessions and then to withdraw to a neighbour's house.

Scarcely had he come to this decision when Samuel Ryland drove up in his chaise and assured him that his life was in real danger and that he must drive off at once before the mob arrived. Priestley accordingly stepped into the chaise with his wife and leaving his twenty-year old son, William, to continue the work of packing up his most valued possessions, was driven off to Mr. William Russell's house at Showell Green, about a mile further along the Stratford Road.

Wm. Russell was a man who, by reason both of his position as a magistrate and his strong character, exercised considerable authority in the district, although, as he resided just across the Worcestershire border, the town of Birmingham was not actually within his jurisdiction. He was an ardent supporter of Priestley, and was generally regarded as his right-hand man. When the chaise with its three occupants drove up to his house soon after half past nine that evening, Russell had already received news of the disturbances in the town. A messenger had come up in hot haste and had reported to him that the mob had divided into two parties, that one party had turned up New Street and had gone to destroy the Old Meeting-House which was situated near by; while the other party was engaged in completing the destruction of the New Meeting-House and had expressed the intention of marching along the Stratford Road and attacking first Priestley's house and then his own. Being a man of rapid decision, Russell at once decided to ride into town, find the two Birmingham magistrates and make them stop the riot. It was clearly the duty of these magistrates to read the Riot Act. If they had not already read it, he would call on them to do so. He was just engaged in loading his pistols before mounting his horse, when Samuel Ryland drove up with the Priestleys. They joined with his family in begging him not to go into Birmingham and risk his life, but he refused to listen to their entreaties, saying "he would be his own master that night."

After a ride of two miles he reached the bridge at the entrance of the town and found a crowd of people, pressing forward in a dense mass advancing along the road on the way to Priestley's house. Unable to force his way through and urged by some who knew him to give up the attempt, Russell reluctantly turned his horse back and rode ahead of the crowd to give warning of their advance. Arriving at Priestley's house, he found it occupied by young William Priestley and some of the young men of the congregation. Leaving them to continue their work of packing up the Doctor's possessions, he went out and took his stand at the garden gate and await the arrival of the mob. As the first contingent came up, he reasoned with them and urged them to withdraw, offering them money if they would depart peaceably. Some seemed inclined to obey, but as more of the crowd came up, they called out to their friends not to take any money unless they wanted to be hanged as some of the Gordon rioters had been for taking a bribe of sixpence. Some even took up stones and began to throw them. Russell saw that it was useless to stand up alone against two or three thousand men; so, telling young Priestley to lock up and bolt all doors, he rode on to his own house, where his family and the Priestleys were anxiously waiting for him. He felt sure, from what he had seen and heard, that the rioters would soon follow on after him; so he insisted that both the Priestleys and his own family should leave at once. So accordingly they drove on to the residence of a neighbour, Thomas Hawker, who lived on Moseley Wake Green, about half a mile further on to the south, while he himself went back to see what was happening at Priestley's home.

It was now past twelve o'clock. The moon was shining brightly and there was no wind blowing to ruffle the quiet of that summer night. But as Priestley paced up and down the road beside Mr. Hawker's house, sounds fell upon his ears, sounds borne across the mile or more of country that now separated him from his own house. Dimly across that distance he could hear the roar of wild voices and the rude shattering blows that a fierce mob were showering upon the walls and the crash of falling masonry. He knew that, in those moments, the treasures that he had gathered around him in all those years, including those unique scientific instruments that had made his name a household word throughout the world-were all at the mercy of a gang of ruffians and were being destroyed beyond possibility of recovery. And-what he valued much more than his scientific instruments-his manuscript writings on religion and in particular a series of notes on the whole of the New Testament, which in five days' time would have been completed and ready for the press, were left to the tender mercies of these fanatical rioters.

And yet in this fierce ordeal no sign of anger escaped him. He remained calm and unmoved and young Martha Russell, who was at his side, tells us that in this hour of anguish displayed a sublimity of demeanour that she had never seen in him before.

After a while the noise died down and it seemed as though the work of destruction was over. Then, between three and four in the morning, Russell, accompanied by young Priestley, came back and reported that, after their destruction of Priestley's house, the mob had dispersed and that those who were still in the neighbourhood were mostly lying about in the fields drunk with the wine that they had found when they broke into the cellars. Believing that the storm of violence was now practically over, Russell invited the whole party to return to his own house half a mile away and settle down to rest. They gladly accepted and soon found themselves installed in Russell's spacious apartments. There Dr. and Mrs. Priestley were just settling in for the night when news was brought that the mob had been reinforced by several hundreds of men who swarmed up from the town, and that they were clamouring for Priestley's life. All was at once in commotion again, and all realised that no time must be lost in getting the Priestleys away from the neighbourhood. So Samuel Ryland once more got ready his chaise and was off again by daybreak to convey the two fugitives to a more distant place of shelter. Skirting along through the fields and villages that lay to the south of Birmingham, they worked up well to the west of the town-the opposite side from that on which the mob had collected, and after driving for some fifteen miles, entered the town of Dudley in Staffordshire. Then after a brief halt, during which Priestley dashed off a letter to his old friend Lindsey, they drove on for a further five miles through unfrequented roads and presented themselves before breakfast at the house of William Finch, Priestley's son-in-law, who lived in a retired spot called Heath.

It was now Friday morning, the 15th, and Priestley thought that at last he would be left in peace. He knew that his meeting-house had been burnt and his house plundered. But he believed that the people would by now be sorry for what they had done. He hoped that, though his house had been almost demolished, many of his belongings might still have been saved; for he knew that, as his son William had put out all the fires in the house before the mob arrived, they would be unable to obtain fire. He did not know that, after he himself had left the neighbourhood, the reinforced mob had obtained live coals from a public house across the fields and that the whole of his possessions had been consigned to the flames.

Not being aware how far things had gone, he thought that he might go back among the people and he planned to go down on the following Sunday to the ruins of his chapel, hold a service there in the open air and preach from the text "Father forgive them for they know not what they do."

Little did he know as he sat in that quiet cottage, thinking of peace and forgiveness that on that morning the mob, which had begun by making a demonstration against Dissenters, had been swelled by the wildest and most ferocious of the population of the big town and was embarking on a wholesale course of pillage and destruction. Following the example of the Gordon rioters in London, who, eleven years before had broken open Newgate and Clerkenwell prisons, the crowd early on Friday morning marched down to the town prison, just off New Street, and the Debtors' prison in High Street, broke open the doors of both buildings and let all the prisoners and criminals loose upon the town. The cry on the lips of the mob was still the same as it had been the night before, "Church and King "-and it was still the Presbyterians and Dissenters who were the objects of attack. But it was no mere crowd of citizens and churchmen who took up the cry; it was a rabble reinforced by the vilest dregs of the population. Lists were drawn up of all the principal houses occupied by Dissenters and, under cover of zeal for the Church and loyalty to the Crown, the mob set forth, armed with bludgeons and sticks, to plunder and to burn.

The magistrates were in an awkward position. On the previous night they had encouraged the demonstration against Priestley and the Dissenters and had actually suggested the demolition of the two Meeting Houses. But the destruction of citizens' houses, especially if accompanied by acts of incendiarism, was not an offence that magistrates could possibly countenance. In fact the Riot Act contained a provision that persons who had deliberately burnt or demolished a building, were guilty of felony, even if the Riot Act had not been read beforehand. The magistrates accordingly summoned a meeting at the Swan Inn to consider what should be done. Requests were now coming in from citizens that active steps should be taken to put down the mob. News was brought to the inn that not only had William Hutton's house and shop just opposite in the High Street been attacked, but that the rioters had set off for John Ryland's magnificent house at Easy Hill, half a mile away, where they had smashed the furniture, broken into the cellars, and were now regaling themselves plentifully with liquor. At the same time William Russell, round whose country house some parties of unruly men had already begun to appear, sent in an urgent letter requesting that severe measures should at once be taken.

The magistrates, seeing that matters were serious, decided to enrol some special constables. Recruits were at once sworn in and, although they were provided with no weapons but mopsticks, they marched down from St. Phillip's churchyard, where they had been enrolled, and succeeded in driving off the gang who were attacking Hutton's house. They then proceeded up New Street to confront a huge mob of rioters who had gathered round the mansion at Easy Hill. Here they at first drove the mob before them, but before long they were overpowered by weight of numbers, and were obliged to retire, one of their members receiving injuries from which he subsequently died.

Encouraged by their success against the special constables, the mob now renewed their attack upon Hutton's town house and then set out to attack a number of the large houses in the environs of the town that had been marked down for destruction. One of these was a splendid mansion near Joseph John's house called Bordesley Hall, belonging to John Taylor. Here the first attack was beaten off by a party of special constables who had marched up to save it. But later on the rioters were reinforced by those who came on from the sacking of John Ryland's house at Easy Hill; the special constables were, like the previous patty, obliged to withdraw, and by nine o'clock in the evening the mansion was in flames. Another house that had been singled out for attack was Russell's at Showell Green, from which Priestley had escaped in the early morning. Russell knew, that as Priestley's right hand man, he was sure to be marked out for the attention of the rioters and so during the course of Friday morning, he had sent off his two daughters and his young son to a friend's house some distance away. He himself remained behind to do what he could for the protection of his property and the defence of the townspeople, and then, finding that nothing was being done to prevent the advance of parties of rioters, he went down into the town, in order to insist that the magistrates should take some more drastic action.

It was probably at this stage that the magistrates decided to send to the Secretary of State in London and apply for soldiers to be sent to keep order. There has been a considerable amount of uncertainty as to this appeal for help. The magistrates do not appear to have issued any statement that they had asked for troops to be sent. Perhaps they were unwilling publicly to confess that they were impotent themselves to deal with the situation. Whatever may have been their motive for concealment, the townspeople were all along kept ignorant of the fact that soldiers had been sent for to protect them, and Joseph Jukes, who seems to have made careful inquiries into the circumstances, goes so far as to state that in his opinion the magistrates never did apply for troops, but that the despatch of soldiers to Birmingham was due to a message which a wealthy citizen, named Samuel Garbett, sent to London at his own expense.

I have, however, been able to make sure, by searching the State Papers at the Record Office, that the magistrates actually did send off an appeal to the Secretary of State for the despatch of troops and that the appeal was sent off some time on Friday (several hours before Garbett sent off his private appeal). It was probably despatched a short time after noon; for a paragraph in one of the London papers says that a courier arrived at the Secretary of State's office early on the Saturday morning and, as the message had to be taken on horseback, it must have taken at least twelve hours, and probably more, to cover the 120 miles from Birmingham to London.

As soon as the message reached Mr. Henry Dundas, Secretary of State, at Whitehall, a Council was held to consider what should be done, and as a result, a reply was sent to the magistrates expressing the confidence of the Ministers that they were taking all possible steps to suppress the dangerous proceedings and informing them that a message was being sent by express to Nottingham, directing the commander in that town to send oft troops instantly to Birmingham to support the civil power.

Meantime, while this reply was on its way, and while the express messenger was riding from London to Nottingham with the order for troops to be sent, Birmingham was at the mercy of the mob. The special constables had proved powerless and all that the magistrates could now do was to issue pathetic appeals to the rioters to rest content with what they had done and to refrain from further violence towards the Dissenters. This is how one of the appeals issued at 5 o'clock on the Friday afternoon ran:-

"HASTY HINTS FROM A CHURCHMAN

“My Boys,

“I hereby entreat you to desist from any further Depredations and be content with the Punishment you have already inflicted on the Presbyterians."

(Then followed a statement of a legal decision which laid it down in such cases the community would be held responsible for making good all damage to property.)

In all probability this appeal was the work of the lawyer John Brooke, who had stood on the steps of the hotel with the magistrates the night before and had joined with them in cheering for "Church and King" and inciting the mob to attack the Meeting-houses. It was not likely that one who had given the lead to law-breaking would have any influence when he appealed for the law to be respected.

The magistrates themselves issued similar appeals addressed to their "Friends and Fellow-Churchmen"; but the only effect of these seems to have been to give an official Episcopalian sanction to the mob's misdeeds. This is, at any rate, the impression left on the mind of our friend Joseph Jukes, who thus describes the attack made by the rioters upon his own house at Bordesley:-

“At this period the Church and King's Friends (so denominated by the Justices) had completely finished their laudable work at Dr. Priestley's and were preparing to attack Bordesley Hall, the seat of John Taylor, Esq. Having now received further information that my person and property were destined for destruction, we lost no time in conveying the most portable furniture to the houses of my friends in the town. By eleven o'clock we had sent the last load to Mr. Horton's at Little Bromwich. The wine etc was buried in the garden and cabbages planted over it-my ale and other provisions were left to regale the zealots, Church fanatics. Before one o'clock some thousands of these pious gentry arrived and surrounded my house and appeared fully determined to demolish it. Previous to their arrival I had given six guineas in silver to Mr. Owen to distribute in such portions as he should judge most proper. I also gave five guineas in gold to Mr Benjamin Line to be applied for the same purpose. All my friends now agreed that it would not be safe for me to remain on the premises, therefore upon the arrival of these devoted members of the church, I reluctantly yielded to their entreaties and went up the fields towards the Green Lanes leaving my house to the care and management of my worthy friends, who exerted themselves with much skill and fidelity and even succeeded so far as to prevail on the goodly churchmen to retire without doing any injury to the building. However their departure was not effected until they had exhausted my ale and provisions nor did their tender consciences seem hurt by Mr Owen administrating certain fees to the leaders of this band of Episcopalians.

“I remained more than an hour in the fields expecting every moment to behold my house in flames, there being a large quantity of straw and faggots in the rickyards. Not perceiving any appearance of fire, it somewhat relieved my mind. I therefore went to Mr Ben Line's house in the Green Lanes where I was kindly received and refreshed with a dinner. During this afternoon great numbers of fiery zealots passed by laden with bottles of wine &c which had been taken from Mr. Taylor's house (Bordesley Hall) and others who had drunk so immoderately of the good creature, lay in a deplorable condition in the fields and ditches unable to proceed in their Episcopal labours."

Jukes appears to have owed the preservation of his house, partly to his shrewdness in removing his furniture and leaving plenty of ale in a conspicuous position for the rioters to consume and partly also, as he suggests elsewhere, to the fact that, as a Guardian of the Poor, he had shown himself, on several occasions, anxious to secure a fair administration of the funds provided for the relief of the needy.

There are indeed signs that the mob was able occasionally to exercise some discretion in carrying out its depredations. We read, for instance, of a Swedenborgian Minister, whose church, in the centre of the town, was in danger of being attacked, when he himself came out from his house next door, shouted to the crowd that he was not a Unitarian but a minister of the New Jerusalem Church, and then distributed among them the collection that he had taken in his church on the previous Sunday, whereupon the crowd went off crying " New Jerusalem for Ever."

But it is notoriously unsafe to rely on the whims of a mob. So most citizens felt it prudent to close their shops, put in their hats the blue cockade, which the "Church and King" party had adopted as their emblem, and to write the words "Church and King" conspicuously on the houses. While Birmingham was thus in the hands of the mob on that disastrous Friday, Priestley had been spending the Friday at his son-in law's at Heath, twenty miles away. At mid-day the household was alarmed by a message which was received from the neighbouring town of Stourbridge, saying that he had been observed as he passed through Dudley in the early morning and that the mob would follow him out to Mr. Finch's. A similar message was brought in from Dudley during the evening: but Priestley ignored this, as he had done the former one, and retired to bed at ten o'clock. An hour later he was waked up with the news that a third messenger had arrived from Dudley, asserting positively that some men were in pursuit of him and would be at Mr. Finch's house that night. The family, now thoroughly alarmed, entreated Priestley to escape while there was still time. So he dressed and, ordering the horses to be got ready, he rode off with a servant and arrived, after a ten mile ride in the moonlight, at Bridgnorth in Shropshire at two o'clock on Saturday morning. Here he snatched a couple of hours sleep and then decided to start south to London. Taking a carriage at the inn, he drove south over the Shropshire border and followed the road through Worcestershire to Kidderminster. Here he found friends, who gave him a hearty welcome and at their house he was able to enjoy a few hours of rest and peace.

As the Saturday passed without any signs of disturbance appearing, Priestley thought that he might safely now return nearer the scene of the disturbances, and accordingly, in the evening, he ordered a horse and rode back from Kidderminster direct to the house of his daughter, Mrs Finch, at Heath Forge. No sooner had he arrived there, however, than Mr. Finch came in from Dudley with the alarming information that there was momentary expectation of a riot breaking out in that town and that a crowd had assembled in the streets threatening to destroy the houses of the local Dissenting minister and his friends. It was evident to Priestley that the Finch's house would be in danger if he stayed on there. Accordingly, bidding farewell to his wife and daughter, he once more mounted his horse and rode oft with his servant along the road that led to Kidderminster. His intention was to dismount at an inn about six miles off and from there take a chaise into the town. But when he reached the inn, no chaise could be procured; so the two were obliged to continue on horseback. But a solitary night ride along unfamiliar roads was an awkward business and Priestley took the wrong turning. After riding for twelve miles or so, he and his companion found themselves at three o'clock on the Sunday morning not at Kidderminster, but once more at Bridgnorth. They had been riding away from Kidderminster instead of towards it. For a man of 58, who had not been to bed for two nights, this long night ride must have been a trying experience. By the time he got to Bridgnorth, he could hardly sit on his horse, so he put up at a little inn and got a few hours sleep. After this much needed rest, and fortified by breakfast, he again mounted his horse and, with his companion at his side, soon covered the twelve miles into Kidderminster. Here he was fortunate enough to meet a young member of his congregation, Thomas Ryland, the elder brother of the writer of those reminiscences to which I have previously referred. Young Ryland took him to the house of the friends with whom he was staking, the Browns, who, finding that Priestley. was now bent on travelling to London, urged him to change into non-clerical clothes and drop his ministerial garb. Priestley however refused to disguise himself and said he would take the risk of being recognised.

The best and safest way of reaching London was to take one of those mail coaches which Pitt had introduced seven years before in the teeth of the combined opposition of the postal authorities and the private coachmasters. One of these mails would be due in a few hours to leave Worcester, which was only 15 miles from Kidderminster. So, hiring a chaise, he drove with his friend young Ryland into Worcester and found there was just one place in the coach vacant. This his friend secured in the name of Ryland and under that assumed name Priestley at length set off for London. That the incognito was desirable is shown by the following incident. The man who had driven the two into Worcester heard afterwards that his clerical fare was none other than the notorious Dr. Priestley. "Had I known it," he remarked, "I would have overturned the chaise and broken both their necks."

So on the Sunday morning, July 17th, Priestley was being carried along by mail coach to the safe haven of London, where he arrived at the house of his friend Lindsey in Essex Street, early on Monday morning.

While he was hurrying away from Birmingham, sixty men of the 15th Dragoons were hurrying thither from Nottingham as fast as their steeds could carry them. By dint of hard riding, they covered the distance of fifty-seven miles in about eleven hours and by half past nine, on the Sunday night, they had reached Birmingham. "The Light Horse," "The Light Horse," cried out the inhabitants as they saw them advancing along the Aston Road. At those words, the rioters, who were already planning another day of burning and looting, melted away like snow, and Birmingham's three days of terror were over.

But the town had had a narrow escape. Priestley has given it as his opinion that, if the Government in London and the Commander of the troops at Nottingham had not acted with such admirable promptitude, and if the rioters had been left in control for another day, Birmingham would have been destroyed.

After it was all over, Priestley longed to return to the town where he had spent so many happy years. But the feeling against him was too bitter, and so he was never able to deliver personally that sermon of forgiveness which he planned while on his escape from the rioters and which we can now read in his collected works. As time went on and the French Revolution, which he had once hailed as the harbinger of a glorious reign of peace, plunged deeper and deeper into the horrors of massacre and bloodshed, the hostility of Englishmen towards him became still more marked, so that he eventually made up his mind to leave England and to make a fresh home in America, where in 1804, he passed peacefully away.

BERNARD M. ALLEN

June, 1932.

The Birmingham Riots of 1791

Birmingham: Corns and Bartleet, Union Street. Sold by Hamilton, Adams, and Co., Paternoster Row, London. 1867.

Many houses in the town and neighbourhood (besides those already enumerated) partially suffered, but were saved from destruction, either by persuasion, or by the gift of money ot liquor; among these are the houses of Mr. T. Russell, near Moseley; of Mr. Harry Hunt, at Ladywood; of the Rev. Mr. Coates, at the Fiveways; and Mr. Smith's house (Hay Hall). Mr Jukes having intimation that his house in the Green Lanes was to be attacked, removed all his furniture, liquors, etc, took out his sashes and window frames, and conveyed what ever the rioters were likely to pull down, to a place of security. Owing to this judicious conduct, and the remonstrances and singular exertions of the Rev. Mr. Darwell, the house was saved from destruction.

The Morning Chronicle (London) Wednesday, February 26, 1806; Issue 11480

Partnerships dissolved

Thomas Waterhouse and Joseph Jukes, jun. of Birmingham, silver platers - Jan. 1, 1806.

Will of Joseph Jukes

This is the last Will and Testament of me Joseph Jukes of Bordesley in the parish of Aston near Birmingham in the County of Warwick Gentleman Imprimis I give and devise unto my son John Jukes All my freehold Messuage farm Lands Hereditaments and Appurtenances whatsoever situate at Little Bromwich in the parish of Aston aforesaid To hold to him his Heirs and Assigns for ever And I give and devise unto my friends Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins both of Birmingham aforesaid Merchants and their Heirs All those my two freehold messuages with the Outbuildings Courts Yards and Gardens thereunto belonging situate and being in Bordesley aforesaid and in the several Occupations of myself and of Sarah Cope widow And also those two Closes pieces or parcels of Land or Ground to the said Messuages or Tenements belonging (that is to say) The Home Close and the Mount Close in my own occupation and containing together twelve Acres or thereabouts (be the same more or less) And also all other my Lands Tenements Hereditaments and Premises with the Appurtenances situate in Bordesley aforesaid consisting of Six Closes or upwards now in the several tenures or occupations of the widow Rollins Charles Hall Samuel Spencer and John Fitter or their undertenants containing the whole twenty four acres or thereabouts (be the same more or less) To have and to hold the said Messuages Lands Hereditaments and Premises with the Appurtenances unto the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs To the several uses and upon the several Trusts and subject the Provisions and Declarations hereinafter mentioned expressed and declared of and concerning the same (that is to say) To the Use and Behoof of my son John Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the life of my said son John Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent Remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make Entries and bring Actions as occasion shall be and require Yet Nevertheless to permit and suffer the same John Jukes to receive and take the Rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said son John Jukes To the use an Behoof of John Towers Lawrence of Birmingham aforesaid Furrier and Thomas Smale of the same place Button maker their Executors Administrators and Assigns for and during and unto the full end and term of Five hundred years from thence next ensuing and fully to be complete and ended Upon the Trusts and to and for the intents and purposes following (that is to say) Upon Trust that they the said John Towers Lawrence and Thomas Smale and the survivor of them and the Executors or Administrators of such survivor as soon as conveniently may be and within the space of twelve months next after the decease of my said son John Jukes or in his life time if he shall think fit and so direct by writing under his hand and seal shall and do by mortgage of the said Messuages Lands Hereditaments and Premises or of and in a competent part thereof for the said term of Five hundred years and by with and out of the Rents Issues and Profits thereof in the mean time levy and raise such sum of money as will be sufficient to pay unto each and every of the Younger children of my said son John Jukes the sum of Three hundred and fifty Pounds to be paid to them on their severally attaining the age of twenty one years and the share or shares of either or any of such younger children who shall happen to die in the mean time shall go and be payable and distributable among his her or their respective lawful Issue Provided nevertheless that in every such mortgage there be reserved a power notwithstanding such Mortgage for the person or persons who for the time being shall be intitled (sic) to the said Messuages Tenements Hereditaments and Premises either for life or in fee tail to grant building leases of the said Land or any part or parts thereof pursuant to the power hereinafter given for that purpose And in the mean time and subject to the said term of Five hundred Years so limited to the said John Towers Lawrence and Thomas Smale their Executors Administrators and Assigns and to the Trusts thereof To the use of my grandson Joseph Jukes eldest son of my said son John Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Joseph Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Joseph Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Joseph Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Joseph Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson John Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson John Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson John Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson John Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson John Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson William Mansfield Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson William Mansfield Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson William Mansfield Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson John Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson John Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Henry Walter Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Alfred Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Alfred Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Alfred Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Alfred Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Alfred Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Edward Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Edward Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Edward Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Edward Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Edward Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of my grandson Frederick Jukes for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the natural life of my said grandson Frederick Jukes In trust to preserve the contingent remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make entries and bring actions as occasion shall be and require Yet nevertheless to permit and suffer my said grandson Frederick Jukes to receive and take the rents issues and profits thereof for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of my said grandson Frederick Jukes To the use and behoof of the heirs male of the body of my said grandson Frederick Jukes for ever And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of every the daughter and daughters of my son the said John Jukes equally to be divided amongst them share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and of the several and respective heirs male of the body and bodies of all and every such Daughter and Daughters lawfully issuing and in case there shall be a failure of Issue of any one or more of such Daughters then as well as to the original share or shares of as the share or shares surviving or accruing to such last mentioned Daughter or Daughters or her or their issue To the use of all and every other the Daughter and Daughters of my said son John Jukes to be divided between them if more than one share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and of the several and respective heirs male of their bodies issuing and in case all such Daughters but one shall happen to die without Issue or if there shall be but one such Daughter then to the use of such surviving or only Daughter and of the heirs male of her body lawfully Issuing And in default of such issue To the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters of my said grandson Joseph Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson John Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson William Mansfield Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Henry Walter Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Alfred Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Edward Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of all and every the Daughters (if more than one) of my said grandson Frederick Jukes their Heirs and Assigns for ever To hold as Tenants in common and not as joint Tenants And if but one Daughter Then to the use and behoof of such only Daughter her heirs and assigns for ever and in default of such Daughter or Daughters or there being such all of them die before they shall attain the age of twenty one without lawful issue Then to the use and behoof of William Gosling Esquire of the Victualling Office London for and during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the determination of that Estate by forfeiture or otherwise To the use of the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs during the life of In trust to preserve the contingent Remainders next hereinafter limited from being defeated or destroyed and for that purpose to make Entries and bring Actions as occasion shall be and require Yet Nevertheless to permit and suffer the same William Gosling to receive and take the Rents issues and profits thereof during the term of his natural life And from and immediately after the decease of the said William Gosling To the use and behoof of the heirs of the body of the said William Gosling for ever And in default of such Issue Then to the use and behoof of John Gosling Esquire of the Victualling Office aforesaid and the Heirs of his body And in default of such Issue To the use and behoof of the right Heirs of my said son John Jukes for ever and to and for no other use trust intent or purpose whatsoever And my mind and will is and I do hereby expressly direct that in case either or any of the person or persons who by virtue of this my will and of the limitations hereinbefore contained or any of them shall become intitled (sic) for life or otherwise to the premises aforesaid shall at the time of their so becoming intitled (sic) be under the age of twenty one years the said Timothy Smith and Henry Perkins and their Heirs shall receive the rents issues and profits of the said premises during such minority and shall pay apply and dispose of the same towards the maintenance education or other benefit of such person or persons so intitled (sic) as aforesaid during his her or their respective minority or minorities And I do hereby will and declare that it shall and may be lawful for my said son John Jukes and my said grandson Joseph Jukes as they shall severally come into possession of the said Messuages Lands Hereditaments and Premises by virtue of the uses and limitations thereof hereinbefore expressed and declared by Indenture or Indentures under his or their hand and seal or hands and seals to demise and lease all and any or such part or parts of the Closes of Land situate in Bordesley aforesaid as they shall think advantageous and beneficial unto any person or persons whomsoever for any term or number of years not exceeding ninety nine years to take effect in possession and not in reversion So as upon every such Lease so to be made there be reserved and continue payable to the person or persons who shall become intitled (sic) to the same by virtue of this my will the best and most improved rent and rents that at the time of granting such Leases respectively can or may be had or obtained for the same And so that no fine or fines premium or consideration money be received or taken for the granting of any such Lease or Leases And so as the respective Leases of all and every such Lease or Leases do execute Counterparts of such Leases respectively And so as in such Leases there be contained conditions for reentry on nonpayment of the rent thereby reserved And so as no Clause be contained in any of the said Leases to give power to any Lessee to commit waste or to exempt him her or them from punishment for the committing the same And I do hereby declare that my said Trustees and their Heirs shall not be chargeable with or accountable for any Loss or Damage which shall or may happen to the said Trust Estate or any part thereof so as the same shall or may happen without their or either of their wilful neglect or default nor the one of them for the other of them nor for the Acts Deeds Receipts Payments Defaults or Neglects of the other or others of them but each of them for his own Acts Deeds Receipts Payments Defaults and neglects only And also that it shall and may be lawful to and for my said Trustees and their Heirs Executors and administrators to retain and reimburse himself and themselves out of the rents and profits of the said Trust Estate all Costs charges damages and expenses which they or either of them shall or may sustain expend or be put unto in or about the execution of the trusts hereby in them exposed Also I give devise and bequeath unto my said son John Jukes his Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns All and singular the rest residue and remainder of my real and personal Estate Chattels and Effects of what nature or kind soever and wheresoever not hereinbefore disposed of And Lastly I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said son John Jukes sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former and other Wills by me at any time heretobefore made and Do declare this only to be my last Will and Testament In Witness whereof I the said Testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained on nine sheets of Paper to the first eight sheets thereof set my hand and to this ninth and last sheet my hand and seal this Tenth----------day of December--------In the year of our lord One thousand eight hundred and seven-------

Signed Sealed Published and Declared by the said Testator as an for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses.


General Notes for Child Elizabeth Jukes

It has assumed that Elizabeth Jukes is the mother of John and William Pitt, mentioned in the Will of Richard Jukes as his grandchildren, but there is no documentary evidence for this.
picture

Samuel Meredith and Sarah




Husband Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1780 - about - Lingen, Hereford
   Christened: 31 Oct 1779 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: James Meredith
       Mother: Esther Bird


     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah

         Born: 1786 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Herefordshire
Presteigne
Willey
Samuel Meredith - 60 - Agricultural Labourer
Sarah Meredith - 55
Jane Meredith - 20

1861 Census:

Herefordshire
Presteigne
Broad St, Dukes Arms
Samuel Meredith - Boarder - Widower - retired labourer - Herefordshire - Lingen

1871 Census:

Radnorshire
Presteign
149 Broad St - Dukes Arms
Samuel Meredith - Boarder - Widower - 91 - Ag. Lab.

picture

Edward Meredith and Sarah




Husband Edward Meredith

         Born: 1790 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1823 - about
   Christened: 9 Feb 1823
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Robert Oakes and Sarah




Husband Robert Oakes

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah Oakes

         Born: 22 Dec 1823 - Milton, nr. Gravesend, Kent, England
   Christened: 16 Jun 1824 - Saint Peter And Saint Paul, Milton By Gravesend, Kent, England
         Died: 3 Jan 1906 - Romford, Essex
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Clement Mansfield Ingleby
         Marr: 3 Oct 1850 - St. Mary's, Ilford




General Notes (Husband)

Robert was of Gravesend


General Notes for Child Sarah Oakes

In 1838 Charles Holcombe purchased Valentines and moved there with his wife Margaret and his niece, Sarah Oakes, who had been under his care since infancy. He was an industrialist who ran a brass foundry, and a tar and asphalt works at Greenwich. He is also described as a "refiner of coal tar, spirit, pitch and varnish". He built a wharf with a road and some houses, and a pub called The Sea Witch, at the side of the Thames (destroyed in 1940).

In 1850 Sarah Oakes married Clement M.Ingleby and went to live in his home town of Edgbaston where they had four children. In April 1860 Mrs. Margaret Holcombe died and around this time the Inglebys moved back to Valentines. There is a table tomb to Margaret and Charles Holcombe (1792-1870) in the churchyard of St.Mary's church in Ilford High Road.

Mrs Ingleby became a typical upper class Victorian lady.

Her life spanned 1823 - 1906; Queen Victoria lived from 1819 to 1901. Victoria was crowned in 1838, the year Sarah moved to Valentines. Sarah married in 1850; Queen Victoria had married ten years earlier.

The Great Exhibition was held in 1851 and Charles Holcombe may have been an exhibitor.

Mrs Beeton published her book on household management in 1859-60, just as Mrs Ingleby moved back to Valentines with her young family.

When Mrs Ingleby died on 3rd January 1906 her obituary noted her many acts of generosity, particularly in the Beehive neighbourhood where many of the estate workers lived.

picture

John Wylde (Wild) and Sarah




Husband John Wylde (Wild)

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Phoebe Wylde

         Born: 29 Aug 1813 - Lingen, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 1865 - December Q - Presteigne, Hefeordshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James Meredith
         Marr: 4 Nov 1841 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



2 F Susannah Wylde (Wild)

         Born: 
   Christened: 25 May 1817 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Mary Wylde (Wild)

         Born: 
   Christened: 31 May 1801 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Martha Wylde (Wild)

         Born: 
   Christened: 19 Jan 1812 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Elizabeth Wylde (Wild)

         Born: 
   Christened: 25 May 1817 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Phoebe Wylde

1861 Census: England- Herefordshire - Beresford and Pedwardine - District 8
Household: Phoebe Meredith [widow of James] with daughters Frances, Phoebe and Decima, and a son [sic] Mary. Phoebe is a pauper living in Oakhill Cottage.

1871 Census:

Household: Phoebe Meredith [widow of Thomas], with son Henry James and daughter Decima.


picture

Samuel Bult and Sarah




Husband Samuel Bult

         Born: 1806 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Bult
       Mother: Hannah Inglesby


     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah Inglesby Bult

         Born: I August 1827
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Samuel Inglesby Bult

         Born: 28 Mar 1829
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Hannah Inglesby Bult

         Born: 9 Feb 1832
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Hannah Inglesby Bult

         Born: 31 Jan 1834
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Middlesex
St. Mary Islington East
Hornsey Lane
Samuel Bult - 35 - Independent
Samuel Bult - son - 12
Sarah Bult - 40 - wife
Hannah Bult - daughter - 7

1851 Census:

Islington East
Samuel Bult - Head - 49
Sarah Bult - wife - 53
Samuel I. - son - 22

picture

Thomas Hicks and Unknown




Husband Thomas Hicks

         Born: 1752 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Oct 1817 - Cope Hall, Enborne, Berkshire
       Buried: 1817 - Newbury Parish Church, Berkshire


       Father: John Hicks
       Mother: Mary King


     Marriage: 

 Other Spouse: Mary Payne - 25 Mar 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire




Wife Unknown

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sarah Westall Hicks

         Born: 1779 - circa - Berkshire
   Christened: 19 Dec 1779 - Clewer, Berkshire
         Died: Feb 1820
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George H. Meredith
         Marr: 16 Sep 1805 - Abingdon, Berkshire




General Notes (Husband)

Thomas's Will of 5 Feb 1814 describes him as Thomas Hicks of Skinners Green in the parish of Enborne Berkshire Gentleman. It is not known whether he continued the stonemason's business of his father John. The identity of the mother of his daughter Sarah Westall Meredith nee Hicks is not known.

The History of the Ancient Town and Borough of Newbury in the County of Berks.

By Walter Money

"Hicks, Thomas, of Cope Hall, d. 6 Oct. 1817, a. 65."

Jackson's Oxford Journal, Saturday, May 28, 1825; Issue 3761

"Mary, relict of Thomas Hicks, Esq, of Cope Hall, near Newbury"

Certified copy of a conveyance D/EX 1041/1 1809

1 bdl

Contents:

1. Thomas Hicks and Mary his wife late of Newbury now of Enborne, gent. and others to:

2. John Meredith of Brumagham co. Warwick, gent, (a trustee of George Meredith, late a Lieutenant in His Majesty's Corps of Marines, now of Speen, esq.)

Messuage, barn, outhouses, orchards, stables near the Wash in Newbury, and about 100acres (with abuttals) dispersed in the common fields (known as Northcroft, Eastfield and Westfield), in Newbury
Included in the property is a messuage outhouses and barns and just over 10 acres of land (specified) in Enborne near the Newbury property above. The deed contains topographical detail in the abuttals of the Enborne property, such as 'King's Ditch' and 'Nightingale Lane' etc.. The Enborne property includes several coppices. Consideration: £4765


General Notes for Child Sarah Westall Hicks

Sarah was an heiress.

Sarah Westall Hicks was the daughter of Thomas Hicks. The Australian Dictionary of Biography mistakenly refers to her as the daughter of H. W. Hicks but a Henry Wilkins Hicks was in fact the brother of Thomas Hicks, as is clear from his Will.

Sarah was living at Enborne, Berkshire at the time of her marriage.
picture

Bernard Meredith Allen and Rosa Eliza Cooke




Husband Bernard Meredith Allen

         Born: 1864 - September Quarter - Stoke Newington, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Harris Allen
       Mother: Sarah Elizabeth Jukes


     Marriage: 1 Aug 1895 - Edmonton




Wife Rosa Eliza Cooke

         Born: 1870 - March Quarter - Portsea
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

Residence: 1881 1 Hermitage Villas, London, Middlesex, England.

Residence: 1901 21 Well Walk, Hampstead, London, England.
Census: 1901 Aged 36 (31/3/1901)
Bernard was described as an assistant secretary to the Technical Education Board of the London County Council.

Books by Bernard Meredith Allen and books that mention Bernard Meredith Allen:

Gordon in China by Bernard Meredith Allen - China - 1933 - 222
pages.
Augustus Caesar by Bernard Meredith Allen - Rome - 1937 - 261 pages.
Prayer by Mario Puglisi Pico, Bernard Meredith Allen - Prayer -
1929 - 294 pages.
Gordon and the Sudan by Bernard Meredith Allen - Sudan - 1931 -
485 pages.
Sir Robert Morant: A Great Public Servant by Bernard Meredith
Allen - Education - 1934 - 318 pages.
William Garnett by Bernard Meredith Allen - 1933.
The Story Behind the Gospels by Bernard Meredith Allen - Bible -
1926 - 122 pages.
Down the Stream of Life by Bernard Meredith Allen - 1948 - 206
pages.
Has Christ Failed? by Bernard Meredith Allen - 1928 - 130 pages.
The Rt. Hon. Sir Ernest Satow, G.C.M.G.: A Memoir by Bernard
Meredith Allen, Ernest Mason Satow - Diplomats - 1933 - 152 pages.
picture

Charles Allen and Elizabeth Harris




Husband Charles Allen

         Born: 1792
   Christened: 
         Died: 1839 - Samer, bear Boulogne, France
       Buried: 1839 - Ratcliff FBG, Wapping, London


       Father: John Allen
       Mother: Elizabeth Marsh


     Marriage: 1816




Wife Elizabeth Harris

         Born: 1788
   Christened: 
         Died: 1862
       Buried: 1862 - Stoke Newington, London



Children
1 F Charlotte Allen

         Born: 1817 - Maidenhead, Berkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M John Allen

         Born: 27 Nov 1818 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Samuel Allen

         Born: 1820 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Sarah Angell Allen

         Born: 15 Mar 1822 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Charles Harris Allen

         Born: 13 Apr 1824 - Great Coggeshell, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Dec 1904 - aged 80 - Hampstead, London
       Buried: 1904 - Highgate Cemetery, Hampstead
       Spouse: Sarah Elizabeth Jukes
         Marr: 1859
       Spouse: Mary Harrison
         Marr: 1852



6 M Joseph Allen

         Born: 5 Oct 1825 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Frederick Allen

         Born: 26 Feb 1827 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 F Emma Elizabeth Allen

         Born: 14 Jan 1829 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 M Arthur John Allen

         Born: 14 Jan 1829 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



10 M William Allen

         Born: 3 Jul 1831 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



11 M Lewis Philip Allen

         Born: 4 Feb 1834 - Great Coggeshall, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Occupation: Farmer
Residence: Coggleshall, Essex, England


General Notes for Child Charles Harris Allen

Residence: 1881 1 Hermitage Villas, London, Middlesex, England.
Occupation: 1881 Secretary Anti Slavery Society.

Residence: 1901 17 Well Walk, Hampstead, London, England
Occupation: 1901 Retired secretary.
Census: 1901 Aged 76 (31/3/1901)

Charles Harris Allen F.R.C.S.

CHARLES HARRIS ALLEN PAPERS, 1893-1902.
7 items.
London, England.
Six letters, 1893-1902, from Lord Cromer review the work of the Home for Freed Women Slaves in Cairo, Egypt, the progress of the campaign against slavery in the Sudan, and Allen's career as secretary of the British and Foreigh Anti-Slavery Society. One letter from Lord Curzon, 1897, criticizes statements by Allen and Joseph A. Pease concerning the government's policy about slavery on Zanzibar.
http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/guide/inv/

Wrote and published a book:

Charles Harris Allen (Allan) (fl. 1862- 69)
C.H. Allen, A Visit to Queensland and Her Goldfields, London 1870 DAA
Searle & McKay

Mary Louisa was a daughter from a previous marriage - she was born about 1854

Charles H. Allen. Obituary The Geographical Journal, Vol. 25. No. 2 (Feb. 1905), p. 225

The veteran worker for the abolition of slavery, Mr. Charles H. Allen, died at Hampstead on December 19, 1904, at the advanced age of eighty years. Mr. Allen belonged to a Quaker family, well known for philanthropic sympathies, and in his early years travelled considerably in various parts of the world. In 1879 he became secretary of the British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society, a post-which he held for nineteen years, throwing himself into the cause with immense energy
and determination, and to his efforts was largely due the organization of the International Anti-slavery Conferencew, hich met at Brussels in 1889. He had been a Fellow of our Society (Royal Geographical Society) since 1864.
picture

Charles Harris Allen and Sarah Elizabeth Jukes




Husband Charles Harris Allen

         Born: 13 Apr 1824 - Great Coggeshell, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Dec 1904 - aged 80 - Hampstead, London
       Buried: 1904 - Highgate Cemetery, Hampstead


       Father: Charles Allen
       Mother: Elizabeth Harris


     Marriage: 1859

 Other Spouse: Mary Harrison - 1852




Wife Sarah Elizabeth Jukes

         Born: 1826 Circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1926 - March Q - Hampstead
       Buried: 


       Father: Alfred Jukes
       Mother: Sarah Meredith





Children
1 F Beatrice Allen

         Born: 1860 - March Quarter - Stoke Newington, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Charles Mansfield Allen

         Born: 1861 - December Quarter - Stoke Newington, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 1872 - September Quarter - Stoke Newington, London
       Buried: 1872 - Highgate Cemetery, Hampstead



3 M Alfred Jukes Allen

         Born: 1862 - December Quarter - Stoke Newington, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 1916 - June Quarter - Newton Abbot
       Buried: 



4 M Bernard Meredith Allen

         Born: 1864 - September Quarter - Stoke Newington, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Rosa Eliza Cooke
         Marr: 1 Aug 1895 - Edmonton




General Notes (Husband)

Residence: 1881 1 Hermitage Villas, London, Middlesex, England.
Occupation: 1881 Secretary Anti Slavery Society.

Residence: 1901 17 Well Walk, Hampstead, London, England
Occupation: 1901 Retired secretary.
Census: 1901 Aged 76 (31/3/1901)

Charles Harris Allen F.R.C.S.

CHARLES HARRIS ALLEN PAPERS, 1893-1902.
7 items.
London, England.
Six letters, 1893-1902, from Lord Cromer review the work of the Home for Freed Women Slaves in Cairo, Egypt, the progress of the campaign against slavery in the Sudan, and Allen's career as secretary of the British and Foreigh Anti-Slavery Society. One letter from Lord Curzon, 1897, criticizes statements by Allen and Joseph A. Pease concerning the government's policy about slavery on Zanzibar.
http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/guide/inv/

Wrote and published a book:

Charles Harris Allen (Allan) (fl. 1862- 69)
C.H. Allen, A Visit to Queensland and Her Goldfields, London 1870 DAA
Searle & McKay

Mary Louisa was a daughter from a previous marriage - she was born about 1854

Charles H. Allen. Obituary The Geographical Journal, Vol. 25. No. 2 (Feb. 1905), p. 225

The veteran worker for the abolition of slavery, Mr. Charles H. Allen, died at Hampstead on December 19, 1904, at the advanced age of eighty years. Mr. Allen belonged to a Quaker family, well known for philanthropic sympathies, and in his early years travelled considerably in various parts of the world. In 1879 he became secretary of the British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society, a post-which he held for nineteen years, throwing himself into the cause with immense energy
and determination, and to his efforts was largely due the organization of the International Anti-slavery Conferencew, hich met at Brussels in 1889. He had been a Fellow of our Society (Royal Geographical Society) since 1864.


General Notes (Wife)

Letter written by Sarah Elizabeth Allen (nee Jukes)

"From a letter of condolence after our sad loss in the spring, from our Australian friend Mrs. Norvill who visited us whilst in England with her grandmother Mrs. Charles Meredith of Hobart Tasmania in 1890 & 1891.

'The picture of Alfred has laways stayed in my memory. I went to church with Mr. Allen on Sunday & it was a dull day. Alfred was in the choir in his chorister's gown, & all of a sudden a ray of light lit up his hair, & I remember thinking it looks like a halo.'

17 Well Walk
Hampstead
1916

Alfred was her son Alfred Jukes Allen who died in 1916. Mrs Norvill is Louisa Anne Norvill (nee Meredith) who was born in 1872/73 and her grandmother was Mrs. Charles Meredith who was Louisa Anne Meredith (nee Twamley).
______________________________________________________________________

National Archive

KGA/RAMSAY/1/13 1849

Contents:

Letts's diary no. 1, 1849. Boards (lock removed.) 25 x 20 cms, 231ff. Daily diary, in parts in very great detail, dealing principally with ACR's love affair with Miss Sarah (Sally) Jukes, cousin of J B Jukes and apparently also related to Mrs Playfair. Monthly accounts at end. ff.84, 86: letters from J B Jukes on the love affair; f93, on his own marriage. ff.103, 106, 110, 122, 157, 161, and 172: letters on the same subject from Lyon Playfair who acted as a go between. ff.119, 131, 151, 165, 176, 184, 190: letters from his wife, Margaret Playfair, also on the same subject. f.230 is a despairing poem, with a profile sketch of a woman's head on the back of the sheet. The tone of the diary may be represented by the entry on f.145, September 17: 'A day of horror and unutterable depression. Life seems a blank to me'.
[no title] KGA/RAMSAY/1/14 1850

Contents:

Letts's diary no.1, 1850. Boards, with damaged lock, 25 x 20 cms, 202ff. A continued detailed account of ACR's love affairs: decline of feeling for Miss Jukes (who from being an angel becomes an icicle) and first meetings with Miss Louisa Williams. f43, 19 April: account of R I discourse. 'Playfair's fortune is made now I believe' f.74: letter from Mrs Playfair. Monthly accounts at end.
[no title] KGA/RAMSAY/8/552/1-4 n.d

Contents:

JUKES, Sarah. Mrs Alfred Jukes and her daughter Sarah.
Four letters

ACR would have been Andrew Crombie Ramsay, who became President of the Geological Society.

According to records in the UK National Archives, Sarah Elizabeth had a love affair with Andrew Crombie Ramsay ca. 1849, who later became President of the Geological Society.


General Notes for Child Beatrice Allen

Residence: 1901 17 Well Walk, Hampstead, London, England
Residence: 1881 1 Hermitage Villas, London, Middlesex, England
Census: 1901 Aged 41 (31/3/1901)

Beatrice is probably the author of the following letter:

I will answer your questions about the Meredith family to the best of my ability. Charles Meredith and his father before him had settled in Tasmania and must have been another and perhaps somewhat distant branch. Charles M. came over to England and married Miss Twamley, a friend of Aunt Jane, and also a cousin of his own. After an absence of 50 years Mrs. C. M. came to stay with us in the early 90's. She was a very clever and accomplished woman more so than any other woman in Tasmania, so the government House set made much of her and she was much féted (?) by successive governors and their wives. I should have said that Charles M. and his father were no doubt amongst the landed gentry though not wealthy. Charles M. I believe devoted himself a good deal to politics. He and his wife had 3 sons but I never heard they did anything much. The eldest was the father of Louisa who came over with her grandmother. She was then only 17 and has never been in England since. She is fond of letter writing and still corresponds with me. Her son came over in (?) in the war - Flying Corps - was shot down over the German lines and taken prisoner - lost the use of his right arm. Died eight years after his return home. Louisa has many sisters but only one brother and he has only a daughter so name is not going on there. That is all about them that needs to be said. Now for mother's branch. You are perhaps not aware that 'Grandma Jukes' was the eldest of the whole twelve. Uncle Joseph must I think have been one of the younger ones. Samuel and James were old bachelors and there were some who died as young men. I have often heard another ???? of her cousin John - a very handsome young man - I seem to remember tat he enlisted for a time in the Austrian army where I suppose he met his wife. He afterwards went to Australia but neither he nor his son were very satisfactory and were soon lost news of. Of his brothers you will probably remember George Meredith, a most charming man who at one time lived next door to the Garnetts at Kensington. He had a very bigoted R. C. wife and one daughter who married but of course could not carry on the name. With the exceptions of George and his brother John (aforesaid) who went to Australia I believe all the other sons of John Meredith's son were unmarried. His eldest daughter who was mother's contemporary married Professor Beete Jukes. 'Grandma' used to say it was funny her niece should marry her husband's nephew. They were of course not related to each other. They had no children. I hope I have made all this clear. Mother talked most about the Joseph Merediths as they were the ones she had most to do with though so much younger than herself. L. Norvill doesn't live in Tasmania now but in Victoria.

The letter refers to the visit of the two Louisa Anns to England in the 1890s, and to a son of Louisa Ann Norvill who came over in the war (WWI) and died 8 years after returning [to Australia] . Her only brother and his only daughter that are mentioned are on my chart (David Owen and Alice Meredith). "Grandma Jukes" must be Sarah Jukes nee Meredith and Uncle Joseph is Joseph Hordern Jukes. I suspect the writer has the generations mixed up when he/she says that Grandma was one of twelve - also I have her as the 2nd oldest. The John who is the cousin of the writer's mother must be the John b. 1828 to John and Jane Walker Meredith. The details in the letter probably explain why he was not mentioned in his mother's will - not sure how we track down him and his Austrian wife. George must be George Frederick and Eliza Scholefield his bigoted R.C. wife. John is described as very handsome and George as charming so the odds are on the writer being female!


General Notes for Child Alfred Jukes Allen

Residence: 1901 17 Well Walk, Hampstead, London, England
Census: 1901 Aged 38 (31/3/1901)
Occupation: 1901 Commercial clerk

There is a book "A History of Verona" by Miss A. M. Allen with an introduction acknowledging help from her cousin, Alfred Jukes Allen.


General Notes for Child Bernard Meredith Allen

Residence: 1881 1 Hermitage Villas, London, Middlesex, England.

Residence: 1901 21 Well Walk, Hampstead, London, England.
Census: 1901 Aged 36 (31/3/1901)
Bernard was described as an assistant secretary to the Technical Education Board of the London County Council.

Books by Bernard Meredith Allen and books that mention Bernard Meredith Allen:

Gordon in China by Bernard Meredith Allen - China - 1933 - 222
pages.
Augustus Caesar by Bernard Meredith Allen - Rome - 1937 - 261 pages.
Prayer by Mario Puglisi Pico, Bernard Meredith Allen - Prayer -
1929 - 294 pages.
Gordon and the Sudan by Bernard Meredith Allen - Sudan - 1931 -
485 pages.
Sir Robert Morant: A Great Public Servant by Bernard Meredith
Allen - Education - 1934 - 318 pages.
William Garnett by Bernard Meredith Allen - 1933.
The Story Behind the Gospels by Bernard Meredith Allen - Bible -
1926 - 122 pages.
Down the Stream of Life by Bernard Meredith Allen - 1948 - 206
pages.
Has Christ Failed? by Bernard Meredith Allen - 1928 - 130 pages.
The Rt. Hon. Sir Ernest Satow, G.C.M.G.: A Memoir by Bernard
Meredith Allen, Ernest Mason Satow - Diplomats - 1933 - 152 pages.
picture

Charles Harris Allen and Mary Harrison




Husband Charles Harris Allen

         Born: 13 Apr 1824 - Great Coggeshell, Essex
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Dec 1904 - aged 80 - Hampstead, London
       Buried: 1904 - Highgate Cemetery, Hampstead


       Father: Charles Allen
       Mother: Elizabeth Harris


     Marriage: 1852

 Other Spouse: Sarah Elizabeth Jukes - 1859




Wife Mary Harrison

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1853
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Louisa Allen

         Born: 1854 - circa - Stoke Newington, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Residence: 1881 1 Hermitage Villas, London, Middlesex, England.
Occupation: 1881 Secretary Anti Slavery Society.

Residence: 1901 17 Well Walk, Hampstead, London, England
Occupation: 1901 Retired secretary.
Census: 1901 Aged 76 (31/3/1901)

Charles Harris Allen F.R.C.S.

CHARLES HARRIS ALLEN PAPERS, 1893-1902.
7 items.
London, England.
Six letters, 1893-1902, from Lord Cromer review the work of the Home for Freed Women Slaves in Cairo, Egypt, the progress of the campaign against slavery in the Sudan, and Allen's career as secretary of the British and Foreigh Anti-Slavery Society. One letter from Lord Curzon, 1897, criticizes statements by Allen and Joseph A. Pease concerning the government's policy about slavery on Zanzibar.
http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rbmscl/guide/inv/

Wrote and published a book:

Charles Harris Allen (Allan) (fl. 1862- 69)
C.H. Allen, A Visit to Queensland and Her Goldfields, London 1870 DAA
Searle & McKay

Mary Louisa was a daughter from a previous marriage - she was born about 1854

Charles H. Allen. Obituary The Geographical Journal, Vol. 25. No. 2 (Feb. 1905), p. 225

The veteran worker for the abolition of slavery, Mr. Charles H. Allen, died at Hampstead on December 19, 1904, at the advanced age of eighty years. Mr. Allen belonged to a Quaker family, well known for philanthropic sympathies, and in his early years travelled considerably in various parts of the world. In 1879 he became secretary of the British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society, a post-which he held for nineteen years, throwing himself into the cause with immense energy
and determination, and to his efforts was largely due the organization of the International Anti-slavery Conferencew, hich met at Brussels in 1889. He had been a Fellow of our Society (Royal Geographical Society) since 1864.
picture

John Allen and Elizabeth Marsh




Husband John Allen

         Born: 1757 - Wapping, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Marsh

         Born: 1754
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Charles Allen

         Born: 1792
   Christened: 
         Died: 1839 - Samer, bear Boulogne, France
       Buried: 1839 - Ratcliff FBG, Wapping, London
       Spouse: Elizabeth Harris
         Marr: 1816




General Notes for Child Charles Allen

Occupation: Farmer
Residence: Coggleshall, Essex, England

picture

Rev. Jeremiah Smith and Felicia Anderton




Husband Rev. Jeremiah Smith

         Born: 22 Jul 1771 - Brewood, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 Dec 1855 - Aged 84 - Brewood, Staffordshire
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Felicia Anderton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1861
       Buried: 


       Father: William Anderton
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Rebecca Smith

         Born: 1812 - circa
   Christened: 3 Oct 1812 - Manchester Cathedral
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Felicia Smith

         Born: 18 May 1814
   Christened: 6 Oct 1814 - St. Peter's Manchester
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Jeremiah Finch Smith

         Born: 1 Jul 1815 - Manchester
   Christened: 29 Sep 1815 - St. Peter's, Manchester
         Died: 15 Sep 1895 - Litchfield
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Elizabeth Anne Ingleby
         Marr: 6 May 1847 - Kings Norton, Worcestershire



4 M Rev. William Anderton Smith

         Born: 5 Sep 1816
   Christened: 11 Nov 1816 - St. Peter's Manchester
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Felicia Smith

         Born: 18 Jun 1818
   Christened: 23 Dec 1818 - St. Peter's Manchester
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Elizabeth Smith

         Born: 1819 - circa
   Christened: 4 Feb 1819 - St. Peter's Manchester
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M James Hicks Smith

         Born: 11 Jun 1822 - Manchester
   Christened: 4 Oct 1822 - St. Peter's, Manchester
         Died: 28 Dec 1881 - Brewood, Staffordshire
       Buried: 



8 M Rev. Isaac Gregory Smith

         Born: 21 Nov 1826 - Manchester
   Christened: 3 Jul 1827 - Mosely, St. Mary's
         Died: 17 Jan 1920 - Woking, Surrey
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Augusta Marray
         Marr: 1859



9 M John George Smith

         Born: 1829 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

REV. JEREMIAH SMITH, D.D. - Obituary.

Dec. 21. At Brewood, in his 84th year, the Rev. Jeremiah Smith, D.D. formerly High Master of the Free Grammar School, and Rector of St. Anne's, in Manchester.

He was born on the 22d of July 1771 at Brewood in Staffordshire where his progenitors had been for many generations small proprietors under the ancient family of Giffard. He was educated by the Rev. Dr. Croft at Brewood Grammar School, which at that time enjoyed much local celebrity, and at which several of the younger sons of families well-known in Staffordshire derived their education. He matriculated at Hertford College (now merged in Magdalen Hall) in the year 1790, whence he removed on gaining one of the exhibitions to Corpus Christi College, then under the Presidency of the Rev. Dr. Cooke. He duly proceeded B.A. 1794, M.A. 1797, B.D. 1810, D.D. 1811, Whilst at Oxford he was on terms of intimate acquaintance with Dr. Phillpotts now Bishop of Exeter, with Dr. Copleston late Bishop of Llandaff, and with Dr. Mant the late Bishop of Down and Connor; and his friendship, especially with the two former, was continued in after-life. His first curacy was Edgbaston, near Birmingham, and his first scholastic appointment was that of assistant to the second master of King Edward's School. Neither of these were long retained. His first curacy he exchanged for that of St. Mary's chapel, Moseley, (of which Dr. Hook, the Vicar of Leeds, was subsequently incumbent); and on the elevation of the second master, the Rev. John Cooke, to the head mastership of King Edward's School, Mr. Smith became his successor. Thin office he filled until his nomination to Manchester in 1807, when, upon the death of Mr. Charles Lawson, M.A. who had been for more than forty years High Master of the Grammar School, the then President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, presented his elève Mr. Smith to the post, who soon after took his Doctor's degree. For thirty years he filled the High Master's chair, during which he held successively the curacies of St. Mark's, Chetham Hill, St. George's, Carrington. and Holy Trinity, Salford; and subsequently the incumbency of St. Peter's and the rectory of St. Anne's. To the last he was collated in 1823 by Dr. Law, Bishop of Chester; and by Dr. Blomfield, when Bishop of Chester, he was nominated a King's Preacher for the diocese. In 1837 he resigned the high mastership of the school and the rectory of St. Anne's, and, except the vicarage of Great Wilbraham, in Cambridge (of which his relatives were patrons), which he held until 1847, lived to the time of his death in retirement.

Dr. Smith's character as a clergyman stood very high in Manchester. His discharge of his duties was conscientious and exemplary, and he gained the affections of the congregations where he ministered. He ever inculcated upon his pupils and preached to his congregations the distinctive tenets of the English Church, as having retained its catholicity inviolate amidst crowds of surrounding sects. He was a thorough Churchman, and in his later years often expressed his regret that in his earliest days so little attention should have been paid to the rules and discipline of the Church in the ministratration of her public offices. He sympathised with the revival consequent upon the Oxford movement of 1833, although his sound judgment, extensive learning, and warm attachment to the Anglican Church made him deprecate anything which went beyond her order of teaching, as plainly set forth in her authorised formularies. Many of Dr. Smith's pupils have followed in his steps, having derived their early convictions on theological subjects from his paternal teaching and counsels. Conscientious in his convictions both upon theological and political subjects-convictions which were the result of patient study-and acting according to these convictions, Dr. Smith ever entertained most charitable feelings towards those who differed from him, and was always ready to give others credit for conscientiousness and zeal, Many of his pupils distinguished themselves by the honours and prizes which they obtained at Oxford and Cambridge. In the church, in the law, in the medical profession, and in the honourable occupation of the British merchant, the pupils of Dr. Smith will be found occupying places of distinction. As an instructor the Doctor presented an unusual combination of sound scholarship, refined taste, and amenity of manner. Prompt and decisive in all cases where promptness and decision were requisite, he was so gentle and courteous withal, that the most timid boy felt that he was sure to have a friend in “the Doctor" if he took pains to deserve it.

On leaving Manchester, in 1837, Dr Smith received testimonials of plate from his former scholars, as well as from his parishioners of St. Anne's.

The closing years of his life were spent partly at Leamington and partly at Brewood. During the last four years the once clear and vigorous intellect, which go distinguished him, was in some degree overclouded, and the bodily infirmities of old age crept upon him. One of the latest objects in which he took much interest was the building of an additional church for an outlying district of his native parish, towards which he gave £500. This church was consecrated in 1851, but he was too feeble to be present at the service.

Dr. Smith married Felicia, daughter of William Anderton, esq.,. of Moseley Wake Green, near Birmingham (who survives him), and has left five sons and two daughters. His sons are-1. The Rev. Jeremiah Finch Smith, M.A. Rector of Aldridge, near Walsall, married to the daughter of Clement Ingleby, esq. of King's Heath House, Moseley, near Birmingham; 2. the Rev. William Anderton Smith, M.A. of Bath, married to the youngest daughter of the late Vice-Adm. Sir Thomas B. Thompson, G.C.B. Bart. of Hartsbourne Manor, Herts; 3. James Hicks Smith, of Lincoln's Inn, Barrister-at-law ; 4. the Rev. Isaac Gregory Smith. M.A. late Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford, and formerly Hertford Scholar and Ireland Scholar, now Rector of Tedstone Delamere, Herefordshire ; 5. John George Smith, M.A. Student of Lincoln's Inn. Dr. Smith's younger daughter married the Rev. George B. Sandford, M.A. Incumbent of Church Minshull, in Cheshire, who died in Dec. 1852, leaving his widow with five young children.

There is a fine engraving of Dr. Smith, by Woolnoth, from a miniature by Hargreaves, in the second volume of Dr. Hibbert Ware's History of the Foundations of Manchester. 4to. 1830.


General Notes for Child Jeremiah Finch Smith

Jeremiah Finch was the Rector of Aldridge from 1849 and prebendary of Lichfield Cathedral form 1884. In 1891 Jeremiah and Elizabeth Anne were living at The Close, Lichfield. He edited the Admission Register of the Manchester School.

Jeremiah Finch Smith was Rector of Aldridge in the 1851,61,71,81 England censuses

The first Rector of Aldridge after it was made a separate Parish from Barr in 1849 was the Rev. Jeremiah Finch Smith. He made great steps in restoring and improving the church.A new Aisle and Vestry were added, the Galleries, which had been put in to seat the local school children, were demolished and the Nave was opened into the lower part of the Tower. He also had the old pews which had doors on them removed and more modern pews without doors, ( The first in Staffordshire) were installed. These have themselves since been removed. Rev. Smith also added extra seats for the poor of the Parish.

He published an alumni book - The Admission Register of the Manchester School with Some Notices of the More Distinguished Scholars. The book was published in Manchester by the Chetham Society in 1874. The book included an account of Jeremiah's wife's uncle, Alfred Jukes the surgeon.

The Times, Thursday, May 13, 1847; Page 9; Issue 19548; Col A

Married

On Thursday, the 6th inst, at King's Norton, Worcestershire, by the Rev. W. Anderton Smith, the Rev. J. Finch Smith, M.A., of St. Mary Church, near Torquay, Devonshire, eldest son of the Rev. Jeremiah Smith, D.D., vicar of Great Wilbraham, Cambridgeshire, and late High Master of Manchester School, to Elizabeth Anne, only daughter of Clement Ingleby, Esq., of Cannon-hill, Moseley, Worcestershire.


General Notes for Child James Hicks Smith

James was a barrister and antiquary. He died unmarried.


General Notes for Child Rev. Isaac Gregory Smith

Isaac Gregory was a Church of England clergyman and scholar. He married Augusta Marray in 1859. He was rector of Tedstone Delamere (1854-1872), vicar of Great Malvern (1872-1896) and rector of Great Shefford (1896-1904).


General Notes for Child John George Smith

John George was a barrister and clerk in the registry of the Admiralty Court.
picture

William Anderton




Husband William Anderton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Felicia Anderton

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1861
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Rev. Jeremiah Smith




picture
Sir John Henry Wiggin 4th Bart. and Cecilia Evelyn Anson




Husband Sir John Henry Wiggin 4th Bart.

         Born: 3 Mar 1921
   Christened: 
         Died: 1 January 1992 - Aged 70
       Buried: 


       Father: Sir - Captain Charles Richard Henry Wiggin 3rd Bart
       Mother: Mabel Violet Mary Jaffray


     Marriage: 30 Sep 1947




Wife Cecilia Evelyn Anson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Sir Charles Rupert John Wiggin 5th Bart.

         Born: 2 Jul 1949
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Chambers



2 M Benjamin Henry Edward Wiggin

         Born: 23 August 19511951
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John Henry and Cecilia Evelyn divorced in 1961. He succeeded as 4th Baronet in 1972 upon the death of his father.


General Notes (Wife)

Cecilia Evelyn was the daughter of Thomas Edward Anson, 4th Earl of Lichfield and Evelyn Maud Keppel.


General Notes for Child Sir Charles Rupert John Wiggin 5th Bart.

Charles Rupert John succeeded to the baronetcy in 1992 on the death of his father.
picture

Charles Richard Seymour Coxe and Louisa A. T. Appleyard




Husband Charles Richard Seymour Coxe

         Born: 26 Jan 1875 - Brompton, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 23 Feb 1942 - aged 67
       Buried: 


       Father: Canon Seymour Richard Coxe
       Mother: Fanny Coxe


     Marriage: 1920-1941

 Other Spouse: Beatrice Brown or Gladys Harriet Singleton - 1907 - March Quarter - Leeds, Yorkshire




Wife Louisa A. T. Appleyard

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 

 Other Spouse: Henry A.G. Denyer - 1920 - March Quarter - Reigate, Surrey


General Notes (Husband)

In the Marlborough College Register Charles' address was given as the Bank of England, Leeds.

Charles Richard Seymour Coxe married either Beatrice Brown or Gladys Harriet Singleton in 1907.

His second wife, Louisa Appleyard was first married in 1920.

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 25, 1942; pg. 1; Issue 49169; col A

Coxe.- On Feb. 23, 1942, Charles Richard Seymour Coxe, Hurst Road, Horsham, beloved husband of Louisa (nee Appleyard), and only son of the late Canon and Mrs. Seymour Coxe, aged 67.

The Times, Monday, Nov 29, 1909; pg. 1; Issue 39129; col A

Coxe. - on the 25th Nov., at 26, Alexandra-crescent, Ilkley, the wife of Chrales R. Seymour Coxe, of twins (boy and girl).
picture

Henry A.G. Denyer and Louisa A. T. Appleyard




Husband Henry A.G. Denyer

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1920 - March Quarter - Reigate, Surrey




Wife Louisa A. T. Appleyard

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 

 Other Spouse: Charles Richard Seymour Coxe - 1920-1941



Children
1 M Robert Gordon Denyer

         Born: 1921 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: Jul 1941
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Robert Gordon Denyer

The Times, Friday, Jul 11, 1941; pg. 1; Issue 48975; col A

Denyer.- In July, 1941, Sgt. Pilot Robert Gordon Denyer, during night operations, only and much loved son of Mrs. Seymour Coxe and the late Capt. H.A.G. Denyer, 34 Hurst Road, Horsham, Sussex, aged 19.
picture

Evelyn Stanley Archer and Ada Matilda (Meta) Meredith




Husband Evelyn Stanley Archer

         Born: 20 May 1888 - East Tamar, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Jun 1955 - Launceston, Tasmania
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 28 Oct 1913




Wife Ada Matilda (Meta) Meredith

         Born: 23 Aug 1886 - New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Aug 1956 - Launceston, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: Edwin Meredith
       Mother: Ada Steuart Johnstone





Children
1 F Laird Archer

         Born: 10 May 1917 - Launceston, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Allan Wilfred Taylor
         Marr: 13 May 1948 - St. John's, Launceston, Tasmania



2 F Meta Margery Archer

         Born: 30 Oct 1914 - East Tamar, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Dec 1977 - Launceston, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Hely Cyprian Anthony Pitt
         Marr: 3 Sep 1941 - St. John's, Launceston, Tasmania



3 F Pamela Meredith Archer

         Born: 1 Feb 1919 - Launceston, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: M. Edward Goodman
         Marr: 26 May 1945 - St. Helena St. Catherine's, Victoria




picture
Allan Wilfred Taylor and Laird Archer




Husband Allan Wilfred Taylor

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 13 May 1948 - St. John's, Launceston, Tasmania




Wife Laird Archer

         Born: 10 May 1917 - Launceston, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Evelyn Stanley Archer
       Mother: Ada Matilda (Meta) Meredith




picture
Hely Cyprian Anthony Pitt and Meta Margery Archer




Husband Hely Cyprian Anthony Pitt

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 3 Sep 1941 - St. John's, Launceston, Tasmania




Wife Meta Margery Archer

         Born: 30 Oct 1914 - East Tamar, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Dec 1977 - Launceston, Tasmania
       Buried: 


       Father: Evelyn Stanley Archer
       Mother: Ada Matilda (Meta) Meredith




picture
M. Edward Goodman and Pamela Meredith Archer




Husband M. Edward Goodman

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 26 May 1945 - St. Helena St. Catherine's, Victoria




Wife Pamela Meredith Archer

         Born: 1 Feb 1919 - Launceston, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Evelyn Stanley Archer
       Mother: Ada Matilda (Meta) Meredith




picture
David B. Armstrong




Husband David B. Armstrong

         Born:  - Manchester
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Helen Maud Armstrong

         Born: 1863 - circa - Manchester, Lancashire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edward Parker Reynolds
         Marr: 16 Nov 1889 - St. Mark's, Sheffield, Yorkshire




General Notes for Child Helen Maud Armstrong

Helen Maud was the only daughter of David B. Armstrong of Manchester.
picture

Edward Parker Reynolds and Helen Maud Armstrong




Husband Edward Parker Reynolds

         Born: 1862 - June Quarter - St. George, Hanover Square, London, Middlesex
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edward Reynolds
       Mother: Maria Louisa Parker


     Marriage: 16 Nov 1889 - St. Mark's, Sheffield, Yorkshire




Wife Helen Maud Armstrong

         Born: 1863 - circa - Manchester, Lancashire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: David B. Armstrong
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Evelyn Maud Reynolds

         Born: 1890 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Violet May Reynolds

         Born: 1893 - circa - Sheffield, Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Times, Thursday, Nov 21, 1889; pg. 1; Issue 32862; col A

On the 16th, at St. Mark's, Sheffield, by the Rev. A.H. Favell, assisted by the Rev. T.C. Davies, Edward Parker, eldest son of Edward Reynolds, Sheffield, to Helen Maud, only daughter of the late David B. Armstrong, formerly of Manchester.

1901 Census:

Yorkshire
Ecclesall
60 Ashdell Grove, Westbourne Road

Edward P. Reynolds - head - 38 - Living on Own Means
Helen M. - wife - 38
Evelyn M. - daughter - 10
Violet M. - daughter - 7


General Notes (Wife)

Helen Maud was the only daughter of David B. Armstrong of Manchester.
picture

George Paulson Wragge and Elizabeth Arnold




Husband George Paulson Wragge

         Born: 1811 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Wragge
       Mother: Emma Ingleby


     Marriage: 4 Sep 1851 - Kenilworth




Wife Elizabeth Arnold

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Arnold
       Mother: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Morning Chronicle (London), Monday, September 8, 1851; Issue 26437

On the 4th inst., at Kenilworth, George paulson Wragge, Esq., of Priory Grove, Edgbaston, Birmingham, to Elizabeth, second daughter of the late John Arnold, Esq., of Moor Green, Moseley.

1841 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Frederick St
George Wragg - 30 - solicitor
Clement Wragge - 25 - solicitor

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Priory Road
George Paulson Wragge - head - 40 - solicitor
Emma Mary Wragge - sister - 34

1861 Census:

Staffordshire
Cheadle
Oakamoor
Emma Wragge - Head - 76
George P. Wragge - son - 50 - solicitor
Elizabeth - daughter-in-law - 39
Elizabeth - grand-daughter - 1
Emma G - grand-daughter - 6 months
Clement L. - grandson - 8
Ellen ?? - grand-daughter -

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Priory Road
George Paulson Wragge - head - 60 - solicitor
Elizabeth - wife - 48
Elixabeth ???? - daughter - 11
Emma Gertrude - daughter - 10
Kathleen ?????? - daughter - 7

picture

John Arnold




Husband John Arnold

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Elizabeth Arnold

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: George Paulson Wragge
         Marr: 4 Sep 1851 - Kenilworth



2 F Louisa Arnold

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Leslie Stuart Arter and Barbara Joyce Meredith




Husband Leslie Stuart Arter

         Born: 11 Apr 1926 - Dymchurch, Romney Marsh, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 28 Mar 1983
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 21 Jan 1951 - Folkstone, Kent




Wife Barbara Joyce Meredith

         Born: 27 Apr 1923
   Christened: 
         Died: Sep 1997 - Kent, England
       Buried: 


       Father: Harry Rouse Meredith
       Mother: Margaret Edith Underhill




General Notes (Husband)

They have three issue - all living

picture

Vincent Cotterill Scholefield and Annie Sabina Aston




Husband Vincent Cotterill Scholefield

         Born: 9 Oct 1840 - Birmingham
   Christened: 2 Mar 1841 - Smethwick, Staffordshire
         Died: 4 Jan 1911
       Buried: 


       Father: Joshua Scholefield
       Mother: Susan Corbett


     Marriage: 1866




Wife Annie Sabina Aston

         Born: 1842 - circa - Birmingham
   Christened: 29 Sep 1842 - Birmingham, St. George's
         Died: 9 Jul 1921
       Buried: 


       Father: John Aston
       Mother: Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith





Children
1 M Ernest N. M. Scholefield

         Born: 1873 - circa - Monmouthshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Florence M. Scholefield

         Born: 1877 - circa - Monmouthshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Vincent Cotterill was a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy.

1881 Census:

Monmouthshire
Cwmcarvan
Vincent C. Scholefield - Head - 40 - No Occupation
Annie S. - wife - 38
Ernest N.M. - son - 8 - born in Monmouthshire
Florence M. - Daughter - 4 - Monmouthshire
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George Lyttleton Aston and Sarah Chippindale




Husband George Lyttleton Aston

         Born: 1839
   Christened: 4 Mar 1839 - Birmingham, St. George's
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Aston
       Mother: Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith


     Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Chippindale

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

George was a button manufacturer employing 300.
picture

John Meredith and Jane Aston




Husband John Meredith

         Born: 1770 - Circa
   Christened: 26 May 1770 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 30 May 1850 - Leamington
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Sally Turner


     Marriage: 3 Oct 1814 - Rowington, Warwickshire

 Other Spouse: Lucy Lawrence - 13 Mar 1800 - Saint Anne Soho, Westminster, London




Wife Jane Aston




         Born: 1781- Circa - Warwickshire
   Christened: 13 Dec 1781-1782 - Saint Martin, Birmingham
         Died: 1869 - March Quarter - aged 88 - Warwickshire
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Aston of Wroxall
       Mother: Jane




General Notes (Husband)

John was President of the Birmingham Law Society 1825-32, Chairman of the Leamington Board of Commissioners, and one of the Executors of Sir Thomas Lawrence - Gentleman's Magazine 1850 p.106

1841 Census:

John (aged 65) living with Jane (aged 50) at Eastnor Villa, Radford Road, Kenilworth, Leamington, Warwickshire with four servants.

The Gentleman's Magazine - 1850

May 30. At Leamington, aged 80, John Meredith esq. The deceased was for several years Chairman of the Leamington Board of Commissioners. He was one of the executors of Sir Thomas Lawrence, his first wife being a daughter of that celebrated man. He was subsequently united to Miss Aston, of Rowington Hall, who survives him.


General Notes (Wife)

Of Rowington Hall - She was possibly the d/o Samuel and Jane of Rowington Hall, bapt. 1781/2 - Vivienne Rae-Ellis Louis Anne Meredith - A Tigress in Exile (Blubber Head Press, Tasmania: 1979)

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Leamington Priors
Jane Meredith - 66 - annuitant
John B, Hebbert - 39 - solicitor
Lucy Julia Hebbert - 23 - wife
Emily T. Aston - 16 - niece.

picture

John Aston and Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith




Husband John Aston

         Born: 1800 - Circa - Sutton Coldfield
   Christened: 
         Died: 1871-1881
       Buried: 


       Father: Samuel Aston of Wroxall
       Mother: Jane


     Marriage: 8 Jun 1824 - Saint Phillips, Birmingham, Warwick, England




Wife Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith




         Born: 1804 - Circa - Birmingham
   Christened: 11 Jan 1804
         Died: 1890 - September Quarter
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Lucy Lawrence





Children
1 M John Meredith Lawrence Aston

         Born: 25 Sep 1825
   Christened: 10 May 1832 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Julia Lucy Aston

         Born: 7 Jul 1827
   Christened: 10 May 1832 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 1882
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Benbow Hebbert
         Marr: 31 Oct 1849 - St. Philip's Church, Birmingham



3 M Thomas Lawrence Aston

         Born: 15 Jun 1829
   Christened: 10 May 1832 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Charles Reginald Aston

         Born: 7 Apr 1832
   Christened: 10 May 1832 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Emily Isabel Aston

         Born: 13 Nov 1834
   Christened: 10 Dec 1834 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 1921
       Buried: 



6 F Harriette Lilias Aston

         Born: 3 Mar 1837
   Christened: 22 May 1837 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M George Lyttleton Aston

         Born: 1839
   Christened: 4 Mar 1839 - Birmingham, St. George's
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Chippindale



8 F Jane Florence Aston

         Born: 7 Feb 1840
   Christened: 12 Nov 1840 - St. George's Birmingham
         Died: 1874
       Buried: 



9 F Annie Sabina Aston

         Born: 1842 - circa - Birmingham
   Christened: 29 Sep 1842 - Birmingham, St. George's
         Died: 9 Jul 1921
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Vincent Cotterill Scholefield
         Marr: 1866



10 M Edward Albert Henry Aston

         Born: 1845 - circa
   Christened: 18 Dec 1845 - St. George's Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
Augustus Road
John Aston - Head - 60 - Button Manufacturer employing 212 persons and 6 clerks
Lucy - wife - 58
Thomas L. - son - unmarried - 31 - Button Manufacturer
Emily - daughter - Unmarried - 26
Lilias - daughter - unmarried - 24
Jane - daughter - unmarried - 20
George L. - son - unamrried - 21
Edward A. - son - unmarried - 15
Jane Meredith - visitor - 74

In the 1861 England Census John Aston was described as a button manufacturer employing 212 persons and 6 clerks, living with Lucy and their children at Augustus Road, Edgbaston. Lucy's step-mother, Jane Meredith is recorded as a visitor.

John Aston of Rowington Hall, Warwick

J. A & Sons, Ltd., John Aston & Co. Eagle Button Works Summer Hill Road, Birmingham.
Newton’s London Journal of Arts & Sciences
New Patents
Sealed in England
1846
John Aston, of Birmingham, button manufacturer, for improvements in buttons and in ornaments for dress. Sealed 28th May – 6 months for inrolment (sic).


General Notes (Wife)

The sitter has traditionally been identified as Miss Lucy Meredith, Lawrence's niece, daughter of his sister Lucy and her husband John Meredith, attorney of Temple Row, Birmingham. Born in 1803, she married in 1824 John Aston of Rowington Hall, Warwick. Lawrence made a drawing of the younger Lucy in 1813, in the year of her mother's death, which was engraved by F.C. Lewis. Garlick highlights, however, the likeness of the sitter to the drawing that Lawrence made of his sister, Mrs Lucy Meredith on her death bed. In addition, he points out that, not born until 1803, Miss Lucy Meredith would have been younger than the subject appears on Lawrences' death in 1830 (op.cit).


General Notes for Child John Meredith Lawrence Aston

John was the vicar of King's Norton, Worcestershire.


General Notes for Child Thomas Lawrence Aston

Thomas was a button manufacturer.


General Notes for Child Charles Reginald Aston

Charles was a landscape artist in Devon.

He was bequeathed ninteen guineas in the Will of Charles Meredith, his godfather and great-uncle.


General Notes for Child Emily Isabel Aston

1901 Census: Spinster

Death - 1 January 1921

ASTON 26u Eastnor Villa, Leamington, Emily Isabel do late John Aston
Esq., MP of Westfield Edgbaston & Rowington Hall Warks.


General Notes for Child Harriette Lilias Aston

1901 Census: Spinster


General Notes for Child George Lyttleton Aston

George was a button manufacturer employing 300.


General Notes for Child Jane Florence Aston

Jane died unmarried in 1874.


General Notes for Child Edward Albert Henry Aston

Edward was the vicar of Fyfield.
picture

John Benbow Hebbert and Julia Lucy Aston




Husband John Benbow Hebbert

         Born: 12 Nov 1809
   Christened: 9 Oct 1810 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
         Died: 27 Dec 1887 - Edgbaston
       Buried: 


       Father: John Hebbert
       Mother: Jenney Benbow


     Marriage: 31 Oct 1849 - St. Philip's Church, Birmingham




Wife Julia Lucy Aston

         Born: 7 Jul 1827
   Christened: 10 May 1832 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 1882
       Buried: 


       Father: John Aston
       Mother: Lucy Louisa Anne Meredith





Children
1 F Lucy Constance Hebbert

         Born: 1852 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Frank Dudley Docker
         Marr: 17 Aug 1895 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire



2 M Charles Alfred Hebbert

         Born: 24 Jun 1856
   Christened: 26 Aug 1856 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Frances Helen Dilke
         Marr: 27 Jan 1883 - St. John Baptist, Coventry



3 M John Benbow Hebbert

         Born: 28 Apr 1853
   Christened: 17 Jun 1853 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Myrrha Devon Pemberton
         Marr: 1877



4 M Arthur H. Hebbert

         Born: 10April 1860 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
   Christened: 4 Oct 1860 - St. Philip's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M R.M. Hebbert

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M George Frederiick Hebbert

         Born: 23 Nov 1857
   Christened: 28 Apr 1858 - St. Philip's Birmingham
         Died: 28 Sep 1908 - Wellington, New Zealand
       Buried: 



7 M Henry C. Hebbert

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 F Dinah Hebbert

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John Benbow was an attorney at law, and with Julia Lucy they had 6 sons and 2 daughters. They lived at Augustus Road, Edgbaston. He was the son of John Hebbert and Jenney Benbow. Note that the IGI record for the birth of John Benbow Hebbert gives his mother’s name as Jane.

The Jurist - 1853 - page 374

The Right Hon. Sir John Jervis, Knt, Lord Chief Justice of her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas has appointed John Benbow Hebbert, gent, of Birmingham, in the county of Warwick, to be one of the Perpetual Commissioners for taking the acknowledgements of deeds to be executed by married women, in and for the county of Warwick, also in and for the counties of Stafford and Worcester.

Correspondence between Wm. Scholefield, Esq., M.P., and Mr. J. B. Hebbert, respecting the Birmingham-Radical-Freehold Land Society, and the late election for North Warwick (Unknown Binding)
by William Scholefield (Author), John Benbow Hebbert (Author)

1831 - Hebbert had enrolled as a solicitor in 1831, and as he remained active until his death, his professional longevity surpassed that of Ralph Docker by two or three years.She was the daughter of one of Ralph Docker's most distinguished contemporaries in the Birmingham legal fraternity, John Benbow Hebbert (1809-87), by his wife, Lucy Julia, daughter of John Aston of Edgbaston and Rowington, and sister of a prosperous Birmingham manufacturer, George Lyttelton Aston. Hebbert had enrolled as a solicitor in 1831, and as he remained active until his death, his professional longevity surpassed that of Ralph Docker by two or three years.

Bulletins and Other State Intelligence

The Commission of Captain John Benbow Hebbert to bear date the 9th, instead of the 12th April 1860

John Benbow Hebbert, Gent, to be Captain

Marriages:

Charles Alfred Hebbert - 27 January 1883 - surgeon - 17 Great College St, Westminster - groom's father, John Benbow Hebbert, solicitor - married to Dilke, Frances Helen - spinster - bride's address Holyhead Rd, Coventry - bride's age - 28 - Bride's father, William Andrew Dilke, gentleman (Deceased) - Witnesses - C. Wentworth Dilke, Arthur H. Hebbert, Henry C. Hebbert, Dinah Hebbert, George Laston

The Times, Thursday, Dec 29, 1887; pg. 8; Issue 32268; col E

Mr. J. B. Hebbert, clerk to the Birmingham magistrates, died on Tuesday night at his residence, Edgbaston, at the age of 78. Mr. Hebbert had held the position of magistrates clerk since 1853, and had preciously practised with success as a solicitor. He was a stanch conservative, and in his early days had token an active part in the foundation of the Birmingham Loyal and Constitutional Association of 1834,of which he was the first hon. secretary. He was one of the first members of the local Volunteer battalion, and rose in 20 years' service to the rank of major. Mr. Hebbert in addition to his position in Birmingham, held the appointment of clerk to the justices at West Bromwich, to which he was appointed in 1839, and was up to a year ago borough clerk of Wednesbury. He acted also as solicitor to several local institutions and public bodies.

Birmingham Daily Post, Saturday, December 31, 1887; Issue 9208

Funeral of Mr. J.B. Hebbert

The funeral of Mr John Benbow Hebbert, one of the clerks to the borough justices, who died on Tuesday night, at his residence, 3, Augustus Road, Edgbaston, after a short illness, took place yesterday afternoon, in St. Philip's Churchyard, in the presence of a large number of spectators and friends, The funeral party left the deceased's residence about half-past two o'clock, and arrrived at the church at a few minutes to three. The principal mourners were the four sons of the deceased, Messrs, Benbow Hebbert, C.A. Hebbert, A.H. Hebbert, and R.M. Hebbert, following whom were Mr. T.C.S. Kynnerslet (stipendiary), Mr. H. Wiggin, M.P., Rev. E. Aston, Dr. Robert Jordan, Messrs, G.L. Aston, O. Pemberton, L. Aston, A Hill, E. Docker, C. Docker, G. Pemberton and J. Farndale (chief superintendent of police). The coffin was of polished oak, with brass mountings, and bore upon the breast-plate the inscription. "John Benbow Hebbert. Died December 27, 1887; aged 78 years". It was covered with several magnificent wreaths and other floral tokens contributed by the members of the family, Mrs. Aston, Misses Wheeler, Mr. and Mrs. H. Wiggin, Miss Decker, Messrs, J.F. Brame, D. Docker, H. Weiss, W. Hillman (assistant to the deceased as clerk to the West Bromwich justices), and the officers and men of the West Bromwich police, the last named wreath bearing the inscription, "In affectionate remembrance of their late friend and faithful advisor". The procession on arriving at the churchyard was met by the Rev. Canon Bowlby and the Rev. T.G. Clarke, the rector and curate of St. Philip's. In the church were assembled a large number of magistrates, members of the legal profession, and various public bodies, who had attended to pay a last tribute of respect to the memory of an old and valued public servant. Among them were Messrs, J.D. Goodman, J.S, Hopkins, J. Lowe, J.C. Lord, T.H. Bartleet, C.T. Parsons and J.F. Brame, borough magistrates; Messrs, A Keen, H.A. Wiggin, and W. Septimus Harding, representing the West Bromwich justices; Messrs, J. Loxdale Warren, Hugo Young, and H. Stubbins, the local bar; Messrs, C.T. Saunders, Joseph Rowlands, A Walter, G. Buller, E. Bickley, A Peet, T.H. Smith, G.F. James, and J, Harris, the legal profession; W. Barrdale (the deceased's colleague), J.S. King, H. Young, and A Daniels from the Magistrates' Clerks' office; Superintendent Black, Inspector Helden, Inspector Cooper, Detectived Monk, Baker and Gibson, representing the detective department; Inspector Hall, the Police Court officials; Superintendent Tozer, the fire brigade; Major W. Cox and Quartermaster Griffiths, representing the First Volunteer Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, with which Mr. J.B. Hebbert was for many years connected; Major Roe and Mr. S.H. Kuyvett, inspectors of factories; Messrs, W.N. Fisher, L.J. Sharp, G. King Patten, R. Coleman, C.H. Reeves, J.C. Onions, J. Hillman, W. Hillman, T Javett, G. Beech, F. Cooper, etc. The funeral service in the church and at the grave was read by Canon Bowlby and the Rev, T.G. Clarke, the deceased being interred in the family vault, which is situated immediately in front of the western entrace of the church, the opening to it being made from the pathway. A large number of people gathered in the churchyard, and were kept in order by a small number of police, under Inspector Moore. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs, Holliday and Co., Warwick House.

The Derby Mercury, Wednesday, November 7, 1849; Issue 7021

On Wednesday last, at St. Philip's Church, by the Rev. J. Garbett, M.A., Rural Dean, John Benbow Hebbert, Esq., solicitor, of New-street, Birmingham, to Lucy Julia, eldest daughter of John Aston, Esq., of Warstone.

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Leamington Priors
Jane Meredith - 66 - annuitant
John B, Hebbert - 39 - solicitor
Lucy Julia Hebbert - 23 - wife
Emily T. Aston - 16 - niece.

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
John Benbow Hebbert - 50 - Attorney at Law
Lucy Julia - 34 - wife
John B. - 7
Charles Alfred - 4
George Francis? - 3
Arthur H. - 11 months

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
John Hebbert - 60 - clerk to the magistrate
Lucy Julia - 43
John Benbow - 17
Charles A. - 14
George H. - 13
Arthur H. - 10
??? A. - 9 - son
Lucy C. - ?
Violet C. - 6
???? M. - 4 - son

Birmingham Daily Post, Thursday, April 19, 1860; Issue 614

The following appointments have been gazetted:-1st Warwickshire Rifle Volunteer Corps..............John Benbow Hebbert, Gent, to be Captain..........

Birmingham Daily Post, Thursday, December 29, 1887; Issue 9206

The Late Mr. J.B. Hebbert.

We announced yesterday the death of Mr. John Benbow Hebbert, one of the clerks to the Birmingham justices. The event was somewhat sudden, for though Mr. Hebbert had for years been in a bad state of health, he seemed in the course of last week to have improved a little, a visit to Bath having relieved some of the more urgent symptoms. As lately as Friday last he was able to attend the Court in Moor Street; On Sunday he became seriously ill, but again on Monday an improvement in his condition took place. It was, however, only apparent, for on Tuesday the case became hopeless, and in the evening of that day Mr. Hebbert quietly expired.

The record of Mr. Hebbert's life takes us back a long way in our local history-to a period when the town had no representative in parliament, before it enjoyed the benefit of any system of representative local government, and when its population was not more than a fifth of its present numbers. My Hebbert was born in 1809, in Broad Street, then a pleasant and almost suburban road, with well-kept gardens in front of the houses. He was educated at King Edward's School, and on leaving that institution was articled to a solicitor, and was himself, in 1831, admitted on the rolls of attorneys and solicitors, thus being, at the time of his death, the oldest legal practitioner in Birmingham. Almost immediately on commencing practice Mr. Hebbert engaged in the political work which for many years afterwards engaged a great part of his attention and energy. He was then a Tory of the strongest type, and to his creed, alike by conviction as well as by association, he consistently adhered throughout his life, though on receiving an appointment as justices' clerk he ceased to take an active part in political conflict, the keen sense of propriety which marked his conduct leading him to the just conclusion that those who are servants of the public, especially in relation to judicial affairs, should keep aloof from party manifestations. In his earlier life, of course, there was nothing to prevent him engaging to the fullest extent in politics, and he entered into them with all the sense of enthusiasm and all the force of conviction. His first employment in this respect dates as far back as 1832, when he acted as the agent of Mr. W.S. Dugdale, who was then elected as one of the Conservative members for North Warwickshire, and who, in conjunction with Sir J. Eardley Wilmot, defeated Mr. Dempster Heming in a contest which was long held to be memorable in the annals of the county elections. Mr Hebbert's services on that occasion led to his recognition as the leading agent of the Tory party in the Northern Division of the county and in the borough. In 1834 he largely assisted in the formation of a now forgotten, but once powerful, political organisation-the Loyal and Constitutional Association. Of this he became one of the honorary secretaries (his colleague being Mr. George Whateley); acting in that capacity until 1839, when, on his retirement, he was presented with a piece of plate and a testimonial in money. Such a tribute from his party was well deserved, for then, and for many years after the Loyal and Constitutional Association had faded into impotence, Mr. Hebbert was the life and soul of Toryism in Birmingham. He organised for it, he spoke for it, he wrote for it-at one time he was practically manager of its newspaper, the Advertiser-and when party energies were flagging, he was sure to be first in the effort to revive them. In the county this was a comparatively easy task, for the Tories had the representation practically in their own hands. They were called upon, no doubt, every now and then to fight for their supremacy, but they always succeeded in maintaining it; this being largely due to Mr. Hebbert's attention and skill in the conduct of the county registration. In Birmingham the case was widely different. While in the county toryism was a triumphant cause, in the borough it was almost a despairing one. Here, however, Mr Hebbert did his part as manfully as if he expected to win each forlorn hope in which he engaged. In 1835 he was earnest for Mr. Richard Spooner, in 1837 he worked hard for Mr. Stapleton, in 1840 he was the strenuous advocate of Sir Charles Wetherell, and in 1841 he once more supported the efforts of Mr. Richard Spooner to carry a seat. Though four times defeated in the course of ten years, the Tories made a fifth and successful effort in 1844, on the death of Mr. Joshua Scholefield, when Mr. Richard Spooner defeated Mr. William Scholefield, the son of the late member. This victory, the only one they achieved until the recent election of Mr. H. Matthews-over forty years later-was largely due to Mr Hebbert's labours. Indeed, he used to say that Mr. Spooner introduced him Mr. Welchman Whateley as “the man who made me a Member.” In 1847 Mr Spooner was, in his turn, beaten by Mr. William Scholefield, and Mr Hebbert was then one of those who induced him to come out for the county, in conjunction with Mr. Newdegate, the former member, Mr Dugdale, not seeking re-election, in consequence of having offended his party by supporting the policy of Free Trade. This contest practically closed Mr. Hebbert's political fighting career, though for some years afterwards he continued to render party services in organisation, registration and in other ways, being associated in these with many of the local Tory leaders whose names, once familiar in the town as household words, are now hardly remembered excepting by some of the older residents: such, for example, as Mr. Welchman and Mr. George Whateley, Mr. George Barker, Mr. J.W. Unett, Mr. William James, and of course Mr. Richard Spooner, the two last-named especially being his intimate and attached friend, a category in which the late Mr. Newdegate should also be included.

In affairs of local as well as of Parliamentary politics, Mr. Hebbert took his full share, in common with the leading representatives of his party. We think sometimes that there is bitterness enough in politics now; but our strife, in its intensity and in the roughness of its display, is but as water unto wine, or as moonlight unto sunlight, in comparison with the passions of half a century ago. The Church-rate contest in 1837, when St. Martin's was turned into a bear garden, and when a riot occurred, for which Mr. G.F. Muntz and others were prosecuted, may be cited as an illustration of the contrast. In this conflict Mr Hebbert, who was then absent from Birmingham, took no direct part; but on his return he was engaged to conduct the prosecution of Mr. Muntz, at the Warwick assizes-a rather awkward business, as he was, at the same assizes, entrusted with the task of defending the Tory paper, the Advertiser, in an action for libel brought against it by Mr. Muntz. Another example of the ten bitterness of local party strife was furnished by the successful effort to obtain a charter of incorporation for the borough in 1838, and by the desperate attempts subsequently made by the Tories to upset the charter. The first meeting to consider the subject was called by circular by Mr. P.H. Muntz in 1837, and, curiously enough, the only conservative who attended was Mr. Hebbert, then secretary of the Loyal and Constitutional Association. On learning the purpose of the meeting, he instantly retired; and then began a conflict which, in one form or other-in public meetings, deputations to the Privy Council and to Ministers, in Parliament, and in the law courts-lasted till 1842. How bitter it was, how strenuous, how intense in the resistance to representative institutions on the one side, and in the support of them in the other, only those who have waded through the newspapers of the time can form an idea, and even those only a faint one. In this contest Mr. Hebbert was a leading partisan, and as he did not spare his opponents, either by speech or pen, he was not spared by them in return. That his party ultimately lost every point for which they contended was no fault of his; he did his best for them, and in his vigorous days he was no mean opponent. One thing should be said before we dismiss these now old-world battles in Birmingham history. Mr. Hebbert's share in them was prompted by strong conviction as to principles, and by keen enjoyment of conflict. It brought him little or no pecuniary advantage. For some of his work as a legal agent he was, of course, remunerated; but for much of it-most of it, probably-he received nothing but thanks. If he had thought of money reward, it would have paid him infinitely better to have quietly pursued his practice as a solicitor, and to have let politics alone.

To this generation Mr. Hebbert is best known by his office of clerk to the justices. In 1840 he was appointed clerk to the West Bromwich Bench of Staffordshire magistrates, an appointment he held until his death-a period of forty-seven years. In 1856 he was appointed one of the clerks to the Birmingham borough justices, and this appointment, as already noted, he held until his death, a period of thirty-one years. His first colleagues were the late Mr. Wm. Barlow and Mr. W.H. Gem, and later, on Mr. Barlow's death, Mr. T.H. Gem was joined with him, being succeeded on his decease by Mr. Barradale, who for the last five years has acted with Mr. Hebbert as joint clerk. In this capacity Mr. Hebbert's services were deserving of high praise. Not a word too much was said of them yesterday by the justices at the Police Court. He was a thoroughly trained and sound lawyer, with a most extensive and exact knowledge of criminal law; so exact, indeed, that scarcely a decision founded upon the advice he gave to the bench was ever reversed on appeal. The justices, especially those who had known him for many years, will feel that by Mr. Hebbert's death they have lost an excellent advisor, and a personal friend, whose courtesy was unfailing towards them, and whose culture, as well as his legal knowledge, rendered intercourse with him profitable as well as agreeable. It was not only, however, as a politician and as a valuable public servant that Mr. Hebbert should be remembered. He had an intimate association with the educational and literary life of the town. In the remote period when the artists, separating from the Society of Arts, migrated to the Athenæum Rooms, in Temple Row, Mr. Hebbert was actively engaged on behalf of the artists. At a later period, when the Midland Institute was founded, he was one of its most active and earnest promoters, he took part in all the arrangements with the Town Council for the provision of a site, and the erection of a building; he was a member of the first Council of the Institute, was vice-president in 1857, and again in 1860, and retained his seat upon the Council until 1866. In connection with the volunteer movement in Birmingham, Mr. Hebbert also took a prominent and most useful part. In March, 1857, he was one of those who addressed the then Lord-Lieutenant, the Earl of Warwick, to urge the formation of a volunteer corps in the town. The War Office, however, refused at that time to look favourably upon volunteering, and so the project fell through. It was revived at the end of 1859, the volunteer force was instituted throughout the country, and a Birmingham battalion of the Warwickshire Regiment was formed. In this Mr. Hebbert enrolled himself as a private member. In that capacity he served for some months, until, in 1860, he received a commission as captain of the No. 10, or Gunmakers' Company, then called the “Tower Company.” On the retirement of Lieut.-Colonel Mason in 1867, and the promotion of Major Ratcliff to the lieutenant-colonelcy, Captain Hebbert became one of the two majors of the battalion, and this commission he held until 1872, when, to the great regret of his colleagues, both officers and private members, ill-health obliged him to resign it. Many readers will be interested to know that Mr. Hebbert was at one period an active an eminent member of the Masonic body. He was initiated in 1861 as a member of the “Faithful” lodge. In due time, zealous in Masonry, he became a Past Master of the Mark Master degree, an eminent member of the Royal Arch, and a member of the Knights Templars, being in 1870, in this last names connection, appointed first Grand Captain of England. He also took an active share in the foundation of the Masonic Hall, in Birmingham. Mr Hebbert married Miss Aston, daughter of the late Mr. John Aston, of Birmingham and Rowington, By this lady (who died some years ago), he leaves several children, sons and daughters.

To these notes we have but a few words to add; a brief but emphatic testimony to the worth of Mr. Hebbert's private character. He was honourable as a professional man, sincere and earnest in maintaining his political and religious convictions, courteous as an acquaintance and colleague, and constant as a friend. He will be missed as one whose judgment remained sound to the last, whose efforts to discharge his duty were unfailing in spite of much physical suffering, and who, although he had outlived the associates and fellow-workers of his earlier days, will be remembered with kindness and regret by many younger men whom he had made his friends.

At the Birmingham Police Court, yesterday, the magistrates on the bench in the First Court were Mr. Hill (Deputy-Stipendiary), Mr. John Lowe, and Mr. Felix Hadley. Mr. Kynnersley, who had been relieved from attendance on Wednesdays, was not present. The detectives, with Superintendent Black, were present in a body to mark their respect for the deceased gentleman by listening to the remarks which were expected to be made. Mr. Hill had not, apparently, heard of Mr. Hebbert's decease until he came into court. When the application for summonses had been disposed of, Mr. Hill said: I am sorry to have to announce a very serious loss which this Court has sustained. Mr. John Benbow Hebbert, who for thirty years ahs been a clerk to this Court, died last night. Mr. Hebbert has for many years been in weak health, notwithstanding which he was indefatigable in the performance of his duties in this Court. He was an able lawyer, and had a thorough knowledge of the duties of a magisterial court, and he had also a very sound judgment. His loss will be very great to the magistrates of this Court, to the officers, and to the public in general. His end was not expected to be so near. As I have mentioned, Mr. Hebbert has been for many years in a weak state of health. Latterly his health had become still worse, but he had continued to attend to his duties until Friday. We shall all regret his loss very much.

Mr. Lowe said he endorsed every syllable Mr. Hill had uttered. He had the honour of an acquaintance with Mr Hebbert for something like forty years, and had ever found him most kind and most agreeable in every position of life. What he had seen of Mr. Hebbert had made him proud that they had a gentleman of his experience and knowledge connected with the Court. He deeply sympathised with Mr. Hebbert's family in their affliction, and looked upon the removal of their old friend with the most profound regret.

Mr. Girter, on behalf of himself and brother practitioners in the court, desired to add their expression of regret at the loss the Court and the town had sustained. They had all been indebted to Mr. Hebbert for the expression of their opinion in the conduct of their work; and though they might often not have liked his opinion, they generally found he was correct. He took a shrewd and correct view of the cases before him, and assisted in the conduct of the business in that court in a way that would be missed for a long time to come.

Mr. Barradale (magistrates' clerk) said he deeply deplored the loss of a colleague with whom he had the pleasure of working for the last five years without the slightest unpleasantness. The news of his death came upon him with such a shock that he failed to find language to adequately express his grief at the loss of a colleague who had been at all times able to give him valuable advice and assistance. He endorsed all that had been said as to his character as an officer of that court.

A letter was shortly after received from Mr. Kynnersley by Mr. Barradale. The writer said that he had been terribly shocked by the death of a dear and most valued friend. “I could not,” he continued, “trust myself to speak of it, and therefore sent this by messenger, asking you to say for me how deeply I feel his loss, He was an old client of mine at its Stafford Sessions, and was, with the exception of George and Welchman Whateley, the only person in Birmingham to whom I was not an entire stranger. I have always considered that it was in consequence of his too favourable report of me that I was so kindly received by the magistrates. I had a sincere regard and affection for him, and I know he had the same for me. He is gone, and it cannot be long before I follow him.”

In the Second Court, Mr. Heaton made reference to the death of Mr. Hebbert. He said that before proceeding with the business of the Court it was his painful duty to refer to the death of Mr. Hebbert, who had long been one of the clerks to the borough magistrates. He (Mr. Heaton) had sat for sixteen years or more with Mr. Hebbert, and had watched narrowly the want of good health from which the poor gentleman had suffered. He had been ailing, as they all knew, for many years, but never would he give up his work, and was always at his post and always ready. His demeanour was such as to command the respect of all who had anything to do with him, and he (Mr. Heaton) was sure Mr. Hebbert's death would be a great loss to the borough. He was a valuable public servant, and a good and faithful friend. Mr. Stone who also sat on the bench, said that by the decease of Mr. Hebbert the justices had lost a good advisor and a courteous friend. In all his transactions he was fair and honourable, and never failed to act in the fairest possible manner to all defendants who appeared before the magistrates. He very much regretted Mr. Hebbert's loss. Feeling reference to Mr. Hebbert was also made by Mr. J.C. Lord in the Third Court. He said that as a solicitor, magistrates' clerk, and confidential advisor, it would be most difficult to find a successor to Mr. Hebbert, but it would be impossible to fill the void caused to his friends by the death of this kindly-hearted and courageous old English gentleman.

Hebbert.- On the 28th September, 1908, at Wellington, New Zealand, George Frederick, son of the late Major Hebbert, of Firsgate, Edgbaston, England; deeply regrestted.

The Times, Friday, Apr, 03, 1863; pg. 1; Issue 24523; col A

On the 31st March. at Firsgate, Edgbaston, Birmingham, the wife of Mr. John B. Hebbert, of a daughter.



General Notes for Child Lucy Constance Hebbert

Dudley Docker by R.P.T. Davenport-Hines - 2004

On 17 August 1895, a fortnight before his 33rd birthday, Dudley Docker married, at St. Augustines in Edgbaston, Lucy Constance Hebbert. She was the daughter of one of Ralph Docker's most distinguished contemporaries in the Birmingham legal fraternity, John Benbow Hebbert (1809-87), by his wife Lucy Julia, daughter of John Aston of Edgbaston and Rowington and sister of a prosperous Birmingham manufacturer, George Lyttelton Aston. Hebbert had enrolled as a solicitor in 1831, and as he remained active until his death, his professional longevity surpassed that of Ralph Docker by two or three years........


General Notes for Child Charles Alfred Hebbert

27.01.1883 - Hebbert, Charles Alfred 26, bac., surgeon 17 Great College Street, Westminster son of John Benbow Hebbert, solicitor, to Dilke, Frances Helen 28, spin. Holyhead Road, Coventry daughter of William Andrew Dilke, gentleman [deceased] C. Wentworth Dilke, Arthur H. Hebbert, Henry C. Hebbert, Dinah Hebbert, George Laston.

The Times, Friday 23 January 1880

Royal College of Surgeons - Charles Alfred Hebbert of Birmingham, of the Westminster Hospital, admitted with diploma as a member of the College on 21 January 1880.


General Notes for Child John Benbow Hebbert

John Benbow Hebbert was a solicitor. He was known as Benbow Hebbert.


General Notes for Child Arthur H. Hebbert

1901 Census:

Staffordshire
Smethwick
Little Moor Hill
Arthur H. Hebbert - Head - 40 - Solicitor - married


General Notes for Child George Frederiick Hebbert

Taranaki Herald 16 July 1889 Mortgage Hinemura

This is to notify that a sitting of the Trust Commissioner will be held at the Courthouse, New Plymouth, on Monday, the 22nd day of July, 1889, at 10 30 o'clock, for the purpose of making the enquiry required by law in respect of the following alienation.

Mortgage, Harirota Hinemura to George Frederick Hebbert, of Section 58, Block 7, Waitara Survey District, containing 50 acres.

Dated this 16th day of July, 1889.
C.E. Rawson, Trust Commissioner, C.W. Govett, Solicitor, New Plymouth

Taranaki Herald. Volume 38, Issue 8529, 20 Juky 1889, Page 2

A sitting of the Trust Commissioner (C.E. Rawson, Esq.) was held this (Saturday) morning at the Courthouse, when the question of a mortgage, Harirota Hinemura to George Frederick Hebbert, of sec 58, block 7, Waitara Survey District. A certificate will be issued on the 29th instant providing no objections are lodged.

Evening Post, Volume 76, Issue 79, 30 September 1908, Page 1

Hebbert.- On the 28th September, 1908, at Wellington, New Zealand, George Frederick, son of the late Major Hebbert, of Firsgate, Edgbaston, England; deeply regrestted.

picture

Colonel Walter William Wiggin and Edith Atkins




Husband Colonel Walter William Wiggin

         Born: 1856 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Nov 1936 - King's Norton, Birmingham
       Buried: 9 Nov 1936 - aged 81 - Alvechurch


       Father: Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin 1st Bart.
       Mother: Mary Elizabeth Malins


     Marriage: 




Wife Edith Atkins

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: George Caleb Atkins
       Mother: Anne





Children
1 M Charles Wiggin

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: Died as an Infant
       Buried: 



2 M G. Robert (Bob) Wiggin

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The chief houses are Bordesley Hall with Bordesley Park belonging to Lieut.-Colonel H. C. Geast Dugdale, but now the residence of Mr. Alfred Harold Wiggin, J.P., and the Forhill House, the residence of Mr. Walter William Wiggin, J.P.

The Times, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1936; pg. 19; Issue 47528; col E

Colonel W.W. Wiggin

The funeral took place at Alvechurch yesterday of Colonel Walter William Wiggin. The Rev. G.J. Hodgins officiated, assisted by the Rev. W.E. Catlow. Among those present were:

Brigadier-General E.A. Wiggin (brother), Colonel Sir Charles Wiggin (nephew) and Lady Wiggin. Colonel W.H. Wiggin (nephew) and Mrs. Wiggin. Mr. R.A. Wiggin (nephew), Captain Peter Wiggin (nephew) and Mrs. Wiggin, Major and Mrs. Noel Wilson, Colonel and Mrs. A Lawrence, Captain and Mrs. G.P. Lawrence, Mr. John Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Nettlefold (niece), Lady Salt (niece), Mrs. D.W. Turner (niece).

Earl Fortescue, Sir William Jaffray, Major H. Cartland, Lieutenant-Colonel C.F. Milward (Chairman, Worcestershire County Council), representitives of the Bromsgrove and Redditch Benches, the Devon and Somerset Staghounds, the North Warwickshire Hunt, the Worcestershire Hunt, and the Birmingham Agricultural Exhibition Society.

The Times, Thursday, Feb 04, 1937; pg. 10; Issue 47600; col F

Wills and Bequests

Gifts to Charity

Lieutenant-Colonel Walter William Wiggin, late Queen's Own Worcestershire Yeomanry, of King's Norton, Birmingham, who died on November 4, aged 81, left £180,568, with net personalty £151,031. He left:-

£500 to the Wiggin Cottage Homes at Harborne; and £100 to Clifton College, Bristol.
picture

John Monington and Laura Ellen Barnes




Husband John Monington

         Born: 1847 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1917 - Ashford Carmonel, Shropshire
       Buried: 


       Father: William Monington
       Mother: Sarah Langford


     Marriage: 




Wife Laura Ellen Barnes

         Born: 6 Dec 1856 - Gloucester, Gloucestshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 12 Mar 1918 - Ashford Carmonel, Shropshire
       Buried: 


picture
Josiah Inglesby Meredith and Mary Jane Barry




Husband Josiah Inglesby Meredith

         Born: 6 Nov 1829 - Woolwich, Kent, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 1909 - Barnstaple, Devon
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Hannah Bult


     Marriage: 1859 - Scarborough, North Yorkshire




Wife Mary Jane Barry

         Born: 1840 - circa - Scarborough, North Yorkshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Harold Inglesby Meredith

         Born: 1865 - circa - Wandsworth
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Grace
         Marr: 1891 - Bideford, Devon



2 M Ernest Barry Meredith

         Born: Dec 1866 - Wandsworth, Greater London
   Christened: 
         Died: Jun 1886 - Greenwich, Greater London
       Buried: 



3 M William J.? Meredith

         Born: 1869 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Bertram A. Meredith

         Born: 1872 - circa - Blackheath, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Percy W. Meredith

         Born: 1874 - circa - Lewisham, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Ethel M. Meredith

         Born: 1876 - circa - Lewisham, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Mabel B. Meredith

         Born: 1881 - circa - Brockley, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1871 Census:

London
Charlton
Josiah Meredith - 41 - Saw Mill Proprietor
Mary J. - wife - 30
Harold J. - son - 6
Ernest B. - son - 4
William J. - son - 2

1881 census - 38A Robertson St, Hastings Holy Trinity, Sussex, England
Home of Henry Mills and family, a Cabinet Maker employing 50 men & boys.
Josiah J. MEREDITH, Visitor, M, 51, Woolwich, Kent, England, Timber Merchant
Mary J. MEREDITH, Wife, M, 40, Scarboro, York, England
Harold J. MEREDITH, Son, 16, Wandsworth, Surrey, England, Clerk To Above
Ernest B. MEREDITH, Son, 14, Wandsworth, Surrey, England, Scholar
Ethel M. MEREDITH, Daur, 5, Lewisham, Kent, England
(Reference: RG11, Piece / Folio 1026 / 50, Page 17)

1891 census North Down Rd, Carisbrooke, Bideford, Devon
Josiah J. MEREDITH, Head, M, 61, b.Woolwich, Kent, Living On Own Means
Mary J. MEREDITH, Wife, M, 50, b. Scarborough, North Riding of Yorkshire
Harold J. MEREDITH, Son, S, 26, b. Wandsworth Surrey, Ironmonger(Em'er)
Bertram A. MEREDITH, Son, S, 19, b.Blackheath Kent, Ironmonger Assistant(Em'ee)
Percy W. MEREDITH, Son, S, 17, b.Lewisham, Kent, Architects Pupil(Em'ee)
Mabel B. MEREDITH, Dau, 10, b.Brockley, Kent, Scholar, Disability
2 servants

1901 Census:

Devon
Bideford
Josiah - 71 - retired timber merchant
Mary J. - wife - 60
Bertram - son - 29
Ethel - daughter - 25
Mabel - daughter - 20

Josiah died at age 79.


General Notes for Child Harold Inglesby Meredith

1901 Census:

Devon
Bideford
Claremont Abbesham??
Harold I. Meredith - head - 36 - Ironmonger
Grace - wife - 37
Ernest C. - son - 4
Elsie M. - daughter - 8
Dorothy M. - daughter - 7
Edith G. - daughter - 6
Mary C. - daughter - 5


General Notes for Child Mabel B. Meredith

Mabel had a disability.
picture

Joseph Stephens and Susannah Beaumont




Husband Joseph Stephens

         Born: 1778 - circa
   Christened: 27 Apr 1778 - Lyonshall, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Lawrence Stephens
       Mother: Hannah Meredith


     Marriage: 




Wife Susannah Beaumont

         Born:  - Brinsop, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Hannah Stephens

         Born: 1807 - circa
   Christened: 11 Oct 1807 - Knill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mr Gough



2 F Susan Stephens

         Born: 1810 - circa
   Christened: 16 Dec 1810 - Knill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Sarah Stephens

         Born: 1813 - circa
   Christened: 28 Mar 1813 - Knill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Holdsworth



4 F Anne Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Dowding



5 F Louisa Stephens

         Born: 1818 - circa - Dinedor, Herefordshire
   Christened: 20 Jan 1818 - Dinedor, Herefordshire
         Died: Sep 1885 - Kensington, London
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Walter Rankin Johnson
         Marr: 2 Dec 1840 - Weobley, Herefordshire
       Spouse: Philip Smith Coxe
         Marr: 1849 - June Quarter - Marylebone, London



6 F Mary Jane Stephens

         Born: 1822 - circa
   Christened: 18 Jul 1822 - Dinedor, Herefordshire
         Died: 1891 - December Quarter - Marylebone, London
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edward Mooyart
         Marr: 1860 - December Q - Notting Hill, London



7 F Joanna Stephens

         Born: 1820 - circa
   Christened: 23 Apr 1820 - Dinedor, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 F Octavia Stephens

         Born: 1824 - circa
   Christened: 8 Oct 1824 - Dinedor, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 F Harriet Susan Stephens

         Born: 1826 - circa
   Christened: 9 Sep 1826 - Credenhill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



10 M Lawrence Johnstone Stephens

         Born: 1828 - circa
   Christened: 10 August 1828 - circa - Creden Hill, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Eliza Jane Pooley
         Marr: 1859 - March Quarter - Marylebone, Middlesex




General Notes (Husband)

Joseph of Dinedor, then Dilwyn, farmer - they had ten children, nine daughters and one son.


General Notes (Wife)

Miss Beaumont of Prinsop near Hereford.


General Notes for Child Mary Jane Stephens

Living with her sister Louisa Coxe in London in 1851.

1891 Census:

St. Marylebone
Christchurch
2 Harewood Square
Mary J. Mooyaart - Head - Widow - Living on Own Means


General Notes for Child Lawrence Johnstone Stephens

Address in 1860 - Howick, Alnwick, Northumberland. — Caius Coll Camb. B.A. 1851, M A. 1855 ; Deacon 1852, Priest. 1853, both by Bp of Wore; Curate of Howick, 1859; late Curate of Lesbury, Northumberland; formerly Curate of Shawbury, Shropshire.

He married a widow.

1871 Census:

Hampshire
Owslebury

Lawrence J. Stephens - head - 42 - Vicar of Owslebury
Eliza Jane - wife - 41 - clergyman's wife.


picture

Charles Joseph Meteyard and Anne Maria Beddoes




Husband Charles Joseph Meteyard

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Anne Maria Beddoes

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Lucy Anne Meteyard

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Henry Frederick Meredith
         Marr: 1877 - March Q - Clun




picture
Ronald Beeching and Peggy Margaret Meredith




Husband Ronald Beeching

         Born: 17 Nov 1920
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Jan 2004 - Chcihester, Sussex
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1949 - circa




Wife Peggy Margaret Meredith

         Born: 26 Dec 1920
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Harry Rouse Meredith
       Mother: Margaret Edith Underhill




General Notes (Husband)

There were two issue - both living.
picture

Joseph Beete




Husband Joseph Beete

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Sophia (Jane) Beete

         Born: 1787 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 October 1849 - aged 62
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Jukes
         Marr: 8 Jan 1811
       Spouse: Captain W.D. Dalzelle
         Marr: 4 Jul 1829 - Clifton




General Notes (Husband)

He was in trade in Demerara and he owned the sugar estate 'Best' with its coffee growing annexe 'Phoenix' and was involved in the establishment of the first Anglican Church in the land.

Case heard in the Court of the King's Bench in 1827 between Joseph Beete and "Bidgood" who had been previously known as H.F. Sloane. The case centred on a debt owed to Joseph Beete of £3,968.00.

By 1810, Joseph was a Judge Surrogate of the Court of Vice Admiralty, for the Colonies of Demerary and Essequebo (British Guiana - Guyana)


General Notes for Child Sophia (Jane) Beete

Sophia was only 32 years old when her husband John died, leaving her with a son aged 8, and 3 daughters aged 4, 2 and 3 months. Her daughter Caroline Amelia recounts that she:

Joseph Beete Jukes was christened after his maternal grandfather, Joseph Beete of Demerara. He had the irreparable misfortune of losing his father before he had completed his eighth year; and his mother, Jane, having three daughters to support on very slender means, and having been herself highly educated, commenced a school for young ladies in the neighbouring town of Wolverhampton. In a few years she left it for the pleasant village of Penn in that vicinity, where she lived for ten years, greatly respected and beloved by all her pupils. The house being then required for other purposes, she removed to the village of Pattingham, six miles on the Shropshire side of Wolverhampton. Her sons maintenance and education were provided for, he being an heir to the property at Bordesley abovementioned.

Sophia (Jane) Beete married again at Clifton, Captain W.D. Dalzelle. The details were published in the Gentleman's Magazine - July 1829, Page 74.

Jane Beete, eldest daughter of Joseph Beete, Esq., of Demerara married to Captain W.D. Dalzelle, late of the Madras Army on 4 July 1829 at Clifton.



picture

John Jukes and Sophia (Jane) Beete




Husband John Jukes

         Born: 1786 - circa
   Christened: 20 Nov 1786 - New Meeting House Moor Street-Unitarian, Birmingham, Warwick, England
         Died: 24 April 1819 - Aged 32
       Buried: 


       Father: John Jukes
       Mother: Elizabeth Mansfield


     Marriage: 8 Jan 1811




Wife Sophia (Jane) Beete

         Born: 1787 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 October 1849 - aged 62
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Beete
       Mother: 



 Other Spouse: Captain W.D. Dalzelle - 4 Jul 1829 - Clifton



Children
1 M Joseph Beete Jukes




         Born: 10 Oct 1811 - Summer Hill, Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Jul 1869 - Dublin, Ireland
       Buried: 3 Aug 1869 - St Mary's churchyard at Selly Oak, Birmingham
       Spouse: Georgina Augusta Meredith
         Marr: 22 Sep 1849



2 F Sophia Ann Jukes

         Born: 3 Jun 1814
   Christened: 1 Jul 1814
         Died: 20 Nov 1828
       Buried: 



3 F Caroline Amelia Jukes

         Born: 29 Jan 1819 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
   Christened: 1 Mar 1819 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
         Died: 9 January 1900 (The Times Obit) - Torquay, Devon
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Alfred Hall Browne
         Marr: 18 May 1843 - Wolverhampton, Warwickshire



4 F Louisa Mansfield Jukes

         Born: 4 Oct 1816
   Christened: 
         Died: Sep 1830 or 1831
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John was a button manufacturer, as was his father John and his grandfather, Joseph.

John had three daughters, who were referred to as the siblings of Joseph Beete Jukes in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

John died intestate. As a result, Administration had to be sought in the Bishop's Court of Lichfield. Sophia, his wife appeared personally as the party applying for Letters of Administration of her deceased husband's estate and effects, together with her late husband's two brothers, Joseph Jukes a plater and Alfred Jukes, a surgeon. The declaration was signed by all three of them. His estate, before deducting debts, was less than £2000. The Application was sworn on 14 July, 1819. It is stated on the document that he died on the 14 June, 1819. Administration was granted on 6 October, 1819.


General Notes (Wife)

Sophia was only 32 years old when her husband John died, leaving her with a son aged 8, and 3 daughters aged 4, 2 and 3 months. Her daughter Caroline Amelia recounts that she:

Joseph Beete Jukes was christened after his maternal grandfather, Joseph Beete of Demerara. He had the irreparable misfortune of losing his father before he had completed his eighth year; and his mother, Jane, having three daughters to support on very slender means, and having been herself highly educated, commenced a school for young ladies in the neighbouring town of Wolverhampton. In a few years she left it for the pleasant village of Penn in that vicinity, where she lived for ten years, greatly respected and beloved by all her pupils. The house being then required for other purposes, she removed to the village of Pattingham, six miles on the Shropshire side of Wolverhampton. Her sons maintenance and education were provided for, he being an heir to the property at Bordesley abovementioned.

Sophia (Jane) Beete married again at Clifton, Captain W.D. Dalzelle. The details were published in the Gentleman's Magazine - July 1829, Page 74.

Jane Beete, eldest daughter of Joseph Beete, Esq., of Demerara married to Captain W.D. Dalzelle, late of the Madras Army on 4 July 1829 at Clifton.



General Notes for Child Joseph Beete Jukes

Georgina Augusta was the daughter of John Meredith and granddaughter of James Meredith. James Meredith was his uncle Alfred's wife's father.

Jukes, (Joseph) Beete (1811-1869), geologist, was born at Summer Hill, near Birmingham, on 10 October 1811, the eldest child and only son of John Jukes and his wife, Sophia. Members of a dissenting family, his father and paternal grandfather were involved in button manufacturing, and his maternal grandfather-Joseph Beete-had been in trade in Demerara. His father died when Jukes was seven and his mother was left to support him and his three sisters on somewhat slender means. He became Director of the Geological Survey of Ireland

He took his degree in Cambridge in 1836.

Joseph Beete Jukes, Fellow of the Royal Society, was born in Birmingham on the 18th of October, 1811, and was educated partly at the Merchant Taylors' School in Wolverhampton, and partly at King Edward's School in Birmingham. At the latter school he gained an exhibition, which took him to Cambridge, where he entered St. John's College in 1830, and took his B.A. degree in 1836, proceeding to his M.A. in 1841.


General Notes for Child Caroline Amelia Jukes

Caroline Amelia was a friend of Louisa Anne Meredith and was one of the witnesses to her marriage to Charles Meredith.

I believe that Caroline Amelia Jukes, sister of Joseph Beete Jukes married Alfred Hall Browne, June 1843 in Wolverhampton. It seems too much of a coincidence that one of the collections at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford was donated by Alfred John Jukes-Browne in 1928. Is there some connection to the Jukes-Pitt button manufacturing? Is Alfred John Jukes-Browne, Caroline's son??

Collector: Alfred John Jukes-Browne
Collected or donated by: 1928
PRM Relationship: Field Collector Other Owner
Continents: Africa
Career: Natural Historian
Oxford University Educated? No
Oxfordshire Based? No
Clubs: Royal Society Geological Society
Biography: Yes
Institution:
Collection Size: Small

Alfred John Jukes-Browne (16 April 1851 - 14 August 1914 was a British invertebrate palaeontologist and stratigrapher. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1909.

The Travels of Joseph Beete Jukes, F.R.S.

By Robert A. Bayliss

Senior Lecturer, Robert Gordon's Institute of Technology, Aberdeen

“An interesting but comparatively little-known scientific traveller of the nineteenth century, was J.B. Jukes, the geologist.

He was born at Summerhill, Birmingham, on 10 October 1811, and attended school in Wolverhampton and Birmingham. The invaluable book of letters and biographical information written by his sister, Amelia Browne, ………”

Later in the same article is the following:

“A nephew of Jukes, Alfred J. Jukes-Browne, also worked with the Survey, despite substantial handicap, and was elected F.R.S. in 1909.”

The Times Obituary, Friday 12 June 1900:

The death of Mrs. A Hall-Browne, which took place on Tuesday at her residence, Torquay, will recall to some of out older geologists the memory of their distinguished colleague, the late Professor J. Beete Jukes, who was for many years director of H.M. Geological Survey in Ireland, and a firm friend of the late Adam Sedgewick, Edward Forbes, Murchison, Huxley, Tyndall, and other men of science, now passed away. Mrs. Browne was the late professor's only sister, and possessed much of that clearness of intellect and sound common sense which made her brother's lectures so delightful to his pupils in Dublin. She would have attained her 81st birthday in a few days. Her son, Mr. Jukes-Browne, has for many years been engaged on H. M. Geological Survey in England.
picture

Captain W.D. Dalzelle and Sophia (Jane) Beete




Husband Captain W.D. Dalzelle

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 4 Jul 1829 - Clifton




Wife Sophia (Jane) Beete

         Born: 1787 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 October 1849 - aged 62
       Buried: 


       Father: Joseph Beete
       Mother: 



 Other Spouse: John Jukes - 8 Jan 1811


General Notes (Wife)

Sophia was only 32 years old when her husband John died, leaving her with a son aged 8, and 3 daughters aged 4, 2 and 3 months. Her daughter Caroline Amelia recounts that she:

Joseph Beete Jukes was christened after his maternal grandfather, Joseph Beete of Demerara. He had the irreparable misfortune of losing his father before he had completed his eighth year; and his mother, Jane, having three daughters to support on very slender means, and having been herself highly educated, commenced a school for young ladies in the neighbouring town of Wolverhampton. In a few years she left it for the pleasant village of Penn in that vicinity, where she lived for ten years, greatly respected and beloved by all her pupils. The house being then required for other purposes, she removed to the village of Pattingham, six miles on the Shropshire side of Wolverhampton. Her sons maintenance and education were provided for, he being an heir to the property at Bordesley abovementioned.

Sophia (Jane) Beete married again at Clifton, Captain W.D. Dalzelle. The details were published in the Gentleman's Magazine - July 1829, Page 74.

Jane Beete, eldest daughter of Joseph Beete, Esq., of Demerara married to Captain W.D. Dalzelle, late of the Madras Army on 4 July 1829 at Clifton.



picture

Captain John Bell and Louisa Meredith




Husband Captain John Bell

         Born: 30 Nov 1790 - Middlebie, Dumfriesshire, Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 12 Dec 1841 - Hobart, Tasmania
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 16 Jun 1832 - Hobart, Tasmania

 Other Spouse: Mary Rogers




Wife Louisa Meredith

         Born: 1808 - Oxford, Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 1890
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Westall Hicks





Children
1 F Sabina Letitia Bell

         Born: 20 May 1833 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Louisa Sarah Bell

         Born: 21 Dec 1834 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Patrick Maxwell
         Marr: 14 Oct 1853 - Tasmania, Australia



3 M George Meredith Bell

         Born: 23 Jul 1836 - Bellvue, Hewtown, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Jun 1898 - Wantwood, Southland, New Zealand
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Margaret Robertson
         Marr: 21 Jun 1865 - Hobart, Tasmania



4 F Emily Mary Bell

         Born: 11 Dec 1837 - Bellview, Newtown
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John and Louisa had one son, George, and three daughters.

Captain John Bell of Belevue, New Town was a merchant and ship owner.


General Notes for Child Sabina Letitia Bell

By 1891 Sabina was living in England.


General Notes for Child Louisa Sarah Bell

By 1891 Louisa was living in England.


General Notes for Child George Meredith Bell

By 1891 Geoge was living in New Zealand.


General Notes for Child Emily Mary Bell

By 1891 Emily was living in England.
picture

Captain John Bell and Mary Rogers




Husband Captain John Bell

         Born: 30 Nov 1790 - Middlebie, Dumfriesshire, Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 12 Dec 1841 - Hobart, Tasmania
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 

 Other Spouse: Louisa Meredith - 16 Jun 1832 - Hobart, Tasmania




Wife Mary Rogers

         Born: 1791 - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: Mar 1831
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

John and Louisa had one son, George, and three daughters.

Captain John Bell of Belevue, New Town was a merchant and ship owner.

picture

George Meredith Bell and Margaret Robertson




Husband George Meredith Bell

         Born: 23 Jul 1836 - Bellvue, Hewtown, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 10 Jun 1898 - Wantwood, Southland, New Zealand
       Buried: 


       Father: Captain John Bell
       Mother: Louisa Meredith


     Marriage: 21 Jun 1865 - Hobart, Tasmania




Wife Margaret Robertson

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 Oct 1921 - Wantwood, Southland, New Zealand
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

By 1891 Geoge was living in New Zealand.
picture

Patrick Maxwell and Louisa Sarah Bell




Husband Patrick Maxwell

         Born: 1826
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 14 Oct 1853 - Tasmania, Australia




Wife Louisa Sarah Bell

         Born: 21 Dec 1834 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Captain John Bell
       Mother: Louisa Meredith




General Notes (Husband)

Patrick Maxwell was a Lieutenant in the 37th Bengal Volunteers40 at the time of his marriage in 1853.


General Notes (Wife)

By 1891 Louisa was living in England.
picture

John Bemand and Ann Monington




Husband John Bemand

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Ann Monington

         Born: 1845 - Wigmore, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1911
       Buried: 


       Father: William Monington
       Mother: Sarah Langford




picture
John Hebbert and Jenney Benbow




Husband John Hebbert

         Born: 1788 - circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1865 - circa
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 20 Oct 1808 - St. Michael's, Coventry




Wife Jenney Benbow

         Born: 1781 - circa - Sturchall, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Jan 1858
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Benbow Hebbert

         Born: 12 Nov 1809
   Christened: 9 Oct 1810 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
         Died: 27 Dec 1887 - Edgbaston
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Julia Lucy Aston
         Marr: 31 Oct 1849 - St. Philip's Church, Birmingham



2 F Maria Hebbert

         Born: 1812 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Mary Anne Hebbert

         Born: 1813 - circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 4 Jan 1813 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
         Died: 13 Nov 1890
       Buried: 



4 F Jane Hebbert

         Born: 1813 - circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Charlotte Martha Hebbert

         Born: 9 Mar 1818
   Christened: 25 Apr 1820 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Dinah Hebbert

         Born: 2 Nov 1815 - St. Martin's Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 3 Feb 1894 - 23 Stirling Road, Edgbaston
       Buried: 



7 M Charles Hebbert

         Born: 14 Sep 1820
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 M George Peter Hebbert

         Born: 16 Apr 1822
   Christened: 12 Jul 1824 - St. Martin's Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 M Frederick Henry Hebbert

         Born: 30 Apr 1825
   Christened: 30 Nov 1826 - St. Martin's Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



10 F Sarah Hebbert

         Born: 1833 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1851 Census:

Birmingham
St. Paul
46 Newhall Street
John Hebbert - Head - 63 - House Proprietor
Jenny - wife - 70
Mary Anne - daughter - 38
Jane - daughter 34
Dinah - daughter - 26


1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Birmingham
Newhall Street
John Hebbert - Head - 74
Maria - daughter - 49
Jane - daughter - 36
Sarah - daughter - 28


General Notes (Wife)

The Morning Chronicle (London), Friday, January 8, 1858; Issue 28408

On the 4th inst., Jenny, wife of John Hibbert, esq., of Hewhall Street, Birmingham.


General Notes for Child John Benbow Hebbert

John Benbow was an attorney at law, and with Julia Lucy they had 6 sons and 2 daughters. They lived at Augustus Road, Edgbaston. He was the son of John Hebbert and Jenney Benbow. Note that the IGI record for the birth of John Benbow Hebbert gives his mother’s name as Jane.

The Jurist - 1853 - page 374

The Right Hon. Sir John Jervis, Knt, Lord Chief Justice of her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas has appointed John Benbow Hebbert, gent, of Birmingham, in the county of Warwick, to be one of the Perpetual Commissioners for taking the acknowledgements of deeds to be executed by married women, in and for the county of Warwick, also in and for the counties of Stafford and Worcester.

Correspondence between Wm. Scholefield, Esq., M.P., and Mr. J. B. Hebbert, respecting the Birmingham-Radical-Freehold Land Society, and the late election for North Warwick (Unknown Binding)
by William Scholefield (Author), John Benbow Hebbert (Author)

1831 - Hebbert had enrolled as a solicitor in 1831, and as he remained active until his death, his professional longevity surpassed that of Ralph Docker by two or three years.She was the daughter of one of Ralph Docker's most distinguished contemporaries in the Birmingham legal fraternity, John Benbow Hebbert (1809-87), by his wife, Lucy Julia, daughter of John Aston of Edgbaston and Rowington, and sister of a prosperous Birmingham manufacturer, George Lyttelton Aston. Hebbert had enrolled as a solicitor in 1831, and as he remained active until his death, his professional longevity surpassed that of Ralph Docker by two or three years.

Bulletins and Other State Intelligence

The Commission of Captain John Benbow Hebbert to bear date the 9th, instead of the 12th April 1860

John Benbow Hebbert, Gent, to be Captain

Marriages:

Charles Alfred Hebbert - 27 January 1883 - surgeon - 17 Great College St, Westminster - groom's father, John Benbow Hebbert, solicitor - married to Dilke, Frances Helen - spinster - bride's address Holyhead Rd, Coventry - bride's age - 28 - Bride's father, William Andrew Dilke, gentleman (Deceased) - Witnesses - C. Wentworth Dilke, Arthur H. Hebbert, Henry C. Hebbert, Dinah Hebbert, George Laston

The Times, Thursday, Dec 29, 1887; pg. 8; Issue 32268; col E

Mr. J. B. Hebbert, clerk to the Birmingham magistrates, died on Tuesday night at his residence, Edgbaston, at the age of 78. Mr. Hebbert had held the position of magistrates clerk since 1853, and had preciously practised with success as a solicitor. He was a stanch conservative, and in his early days had token an active part in the foundation of the Birmingham Loyal and Constitutional Association of 1834,of which he was the first hon. secretary. He was one of the first members of the local Volunteer battalion, and rose in 20 years' service to the rank of major. Mr. Hebbert in addition to his position in Birmingham, held the appointment of clerk to the justices at West Bromwich, to which he was appointed in 1839, and was up to a year ago borough clerk of Wednesbury. He acted also as solicitor to several local institutions and public bodies.

Birmingham Daily Post, Saturday, December 31, 1887; Issue 9208

Funeral of Mr. J.B. Hebbert

The funeral of Mr John Benbow Hebbert, one of the clerks to the borough justices, who died on Tuesday night, at his residence, 3, Augustus Road, Edgbaston, after a short illness, took place yesterday afternoon, in St. Philip's Churchyard, in the presence of a large number of spectators and friends, The funeral party left the deceased's residence about half-past two o'clock, and arrrived at the church at a few minutes to three. The principal mourners were the four sons of the deceased, Messrs, Benbow Hebbert, C.A. Hebbert, A.H. Hebbert, and R.M. Hebbert, following whom were Mr. T.C.S. Kynnerslet (stipendiary), Mr. H. Wiggin, M.P., Rev. E. Aston, Dr. Robert Jordan, Messrs, G.L. Aston, O. Pemberton, L. Aston, A Hill, E. Docker, C. Docker, G. Pemberton and J. Farndale (chief superintendent of police). The coffin was of polished oak, with brass mountings, and bore upon the breast-plate the inscription. "John Benbow Hebbert. Died December 27, 1887; aged 78 years". It was covered with several magnificent wreaths and other floral tokens contributed by the members of the family, Mrs. Aston, Misses Wheeler, Mr. and Mrs. H. Wiggin, Miss Decker, Messrs, J.F. Brame, D. Docker, H. Weiss, W. Hillman (assistant to the deceased as clerk to the West Bromwich justices), and the officers and men of the West Bromwich police, the last named wreath bearing the inscription, "In affectionate remembrance of their late friend and faithful advisor". The procession on arriving at the churchyard was met by the Rev. Canon Bowlby and the Rev. T.G. Clarke, the rector and curate of St. Philip's. In the church were assembled a large number of magistrates, members of the legal profession, and various public bodies, who had attended to pay a last tribute of respect to the memory of an old and valued public servant. Among them were Messrs, J.D. Goodman, J.S, Hopkins, J. Lowe, J.C. Lord, T.H. Bartleet, C.T. Parsons and J.F. Brame, borough magistrates; Messrs, A Keen, H.A. Wiggin, and W. Septimus Harding, representing the West Bromwich justices; Messrs, J. Loxdale Warren, Hugo Young, and H. Stubbins, the local bar; Messrs, C.T. Saunders, Joseph Rowlands, A Walter, G. Buller, E. Bickley, A Peet, T.H. Smith, G.F. James, and J, Harris, the legal profession; W. Barrdale (the deceased's colleague), J.S. King, H. Young, and A Daniels from the Magistrates' Clerks' office; Superintendent Black, Inspector Helden, Inspector Cooper, Detectived Monk, Baker and Gibson, representing the detective department; Inspector Hall, the Police Court officials; Superintendent Tozer, the fire brigade; Major W. Cox and Quartermaster Griffiths, representing the First Volunteer Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, with which Mr. J.B. Hebbert was for many years connected; Major Roe and Mr. S.H. Kuyvett, inspectors of factories; Messrs, W.N. Fisher, L.J. Sharp, G. King Patten, R. Coleman, C.H. Reeves, J.C. Onions, J. Hillman, W. Hillman, T Javett, G. Beech, F. Cooper, etc. The funeral service in the church and at the grave was read by Canon Bowlby and the Rev, T.G. Clarke, the deceased being interred in the family vault, which is situated immediately in front of the western entrace of the church, the opening to it being made from the pathway. A large number of people gathered in the churchyard, and were kept in order by a small number of police, under Inspector Moore. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs, Holliday and Co., Warwick House.

The Derby Mercury, Wednesday, November 7, 1849; Issue 7021

On Wednesday last, at St. Philip's Church, by the Rev. J. Garbett, M.A., Rural Dean, John Benbow Hebbert, Esq., solicitor, of New-street, Birmingham, to Lucy Julia, eldest daughter of John Aston, Esq., of Warstone.

1851 Census:

Warwickshire
Leamington Priors
Jane Meredith - 66 - annuitant
John B, Hebbert - 39 - solicitor
Lucy Julia Hebbert - 23 - wife
Emily T. Aston - 16 - niece.

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
John Benbow Hebbert - 50 - Attorney at Law
Lucy Julia - 34 - wife
John B. - 7
Charles Alfred - 4
George Francis? - 3
Arthur H. - 11 months

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Edgbaston
John Hebbert - 60 - clerk to the magistrate
Lucy Julia - 43
John Benbow - 17
Charles A. - 14
George H. - 13
Arthur H. - 10
??? A. - 9 - son
Lucy C. - ?
Violet C. - 6
???? M. - 4 - son

Birmingham Daily Post, Thursday, April 19, 1860; Issue 614

The following appointments have been gazetted:-1st Warwickshire Rifle Volunteer Corps..............John Benbow Hebbert, Gent, to be Captain..........

Birmingham Daily Post, Thursday, December 29, 1887; Issue 9206

The Late Mr. J.B. Hebbert.

We announced yesterday the death of Mr. John Benbow Hebbert, one of the clerks to the Birmingham justices. The event was somewhat sudden, for though Mr. Hebbert had for years been in a bad state of health, he seemed in the course of last week to have improved a little, a visit to Bath having relieved some of the more urgent symptoms. As lately as Friday last he was able to attend the Court in Moor Street; On Sunday he became seriously ill, but again on Monday an improvement in his condition took place. It was, however, only apparent, for on Tuesday the case became hopeless, and in the evening of that day Mr. Hebbert quietly expired.

The record of Mr. Hebbert's life takes us back a long way in our local history-to a period when the town had no representative in parliament, before it enjoyed the benefit of any system of representative local government, and when its population was not more than a fifth of its present numbers. My Hebbert was born in 1809, in Broad Street, then a pleasant and almost suburban road, with well-kept gardens in front of the houses. He was educated at King Edward's School, and on leaving that institution was articled to a solicitor, and was himself, in 1831, admitted on the rolls of attorneys and solicitors, thus being, at the time of his death, the oldest legal practitioner in Birmingham. Almost immediately on commencing practice Mr. Hebbert engaged in the political work which for many years afterwards engaged a great part of his attention and energy. He was then a Tory of the strongest type, and to his creed, alike by conviction as well as by association, he consistently adhered throughout his life, though on receiving an appointment as justices' clerk he ceased to take an active part in political conflict, the keen sense of propriety which marked his conduct leading him to the just conclusion that those who are servants of the public, especially in relation to judicial affairs, should keep aloof from party manifestations. In his earlier life, of course, there was nothing to prevent him engaging to the fullest extent in politics, and he entered into them with all the sense of enthusiasm and all the force of conviction. His first employment in this respect dates as far back as 1832, when he acted as the agent of Mr. W.S. Dugdale, who was then elected as one of the Conservative members for North Warwickshire, and who, in conjunction with Sir J. Eardley Wilmot, defeated Mr. Dempster Heming in a contest which was long held to be memorable in the annals of the county elections. Mr Hebbert's services on that occasion led to his recognition as the leading agent of the Tory party in the Northern Division of the county and in the borough. In 1834 he largely assisted in the formation of a now forgotten, but once powerful, political organisation-the Loyal and Constitutional Association. Of this he became one of the honorary secretaries (his colleague being Mr. George Whateley); acting in that capacity until 1839, when, on his retirement, he was presented with a piece of plate and a testimonial in money. Such a tribute from his party was well deserved, for then, and for many years after the Loyal and Constitutional Association had faded into impotence, Mr. Hebbert was the life and soul of Toryism in Birmingham. He organised for it, he spoke for it, he wrote for it-at one time he was practically manager of its newspaper, the Advertiser-and when party energies were flagging, he was sure to be first in the effort to revive them. In the county this was a comparatively easy task, for the Tories had the representation practically in their own hands. They were called upon, no doubt, every now and then to fight for their supremacy, but they always succeeded in maintaining it; this being largely due to Mr. Hebbert's attention and skill in the conduct of the county registration. In Birmingham the case was widely different. While in the county toryism was a triumphant cause, in the borough it was almost a despairing one. Here, however, Mr Hebbert did his part as manfully as if he expected to win each forlorn hope in which he engaged. In 1835 he was earnest for Mr. Richard Spooner, in 1837 he worked hard for Mr. Stapleton, in 1840 he was the strenuous advocate of Sir Charles Wetherell, and in 1841 he once more supported the efforts of Mr. Richard Spooner to carry a seat. Though four times defeated in the course of ten years, the Tories made a fifth and successful effort in 1844, on the death of Mr. Joshua Scholefield, when Mr. Richard Spooner defeated Mr. William Scholefield, the son of the late member. This victory, the only one they achieved until the recent election of Mr. H. Matthews-over forty years later-was largely due to Mr Hebbert's labours. Indeed, he used to say that Mr. Spooner introduced him Mr. Welchman Whateley as “the man who made me a Member.” In 1847 Mr Spooner was, in his turn, beaten by Mr. William Scholefield, and Mr Hebbert was then one of those who induced him to come out for the county, in conjunction with Mr. Newdegate, the former member, Mr Dugdale, not seeking re-election, in consequence of having offended his party by supporting the policy of Free Trade. This contest practically closed Mr. Hebbert's political fighting career, though for some years afterwards he continued to render party services in organisation, registration and in other ways, being associated in these with many of the local Tory leaders whose names, once familiar in the town as household words, are now hardly remembered excepting by some of the older residents: such, for example, as Mr. Welchman and Mr. George Whateley, Mr. George Barker, Mr. J.W. Unett, Mr. William James, and of course Mr. Richard Spooner, the two last-named especially being his intimate and attached friend, a category in which the late Mr. Newdegate should also be included.

In affairs of local as well as of Parliamentary politics, Mr. Hebbert took his full share, in common with the leading representatives of his party. We think sometimes that there is bitterness enough in politics now; but our strife, in its intensity and in the roughness of its display, is but as water unto wine, or as moonlight unto sunlight, in comparison with the passions of half a century ago. The Church-rate contest in 1837, when St. Martin's was turned into a bear garden, and when a riot occurred, for which Mr. G.F. Muntz and others were prosecuted, may be cited as an illustration of the contrast. In this conflict Mr Hebbert, who was then absent from Birmingham, took no direct part; but on his return he was engaged to conduct the prosecution of Mr. Muntz, at the Warwick assizes-a rather awkward business, as he was, at the same assizes, entrusted with the task of defending the Tory paper, the Advertiser, in an action for libel brought against it by Mr. Muntz. Another example of the ten bitterness of local party strife was furnished by the successful effort to obtain a charter of incorporation for the borough in 1838, and by the desperate attempts subsequently made by the Tories to upset the charter. The first meeting to consider the subject was called by circular by Mr. P.H. Muntz in 1837, and, curiously enough, the only conservative who attended was Mr. Hebbert, then secretary of the Loyal and Constitutional Association. On learning the purpose of the meeting, he instantly retired; and then began a conflict which, in one form or other-in public meetings, deputations to the Privy Council and to Ministers, in Parliament, and in the law courts-lasted till 1842. How bitter it was, how strenuous, how intense in the resistance to representative institutions on the one side, and in the support of them in the other, only those who have waded through the newspapers of the time can form an idea, and even those only a faint one. In this contest Mr. Hebbert was a leading partisan, and as he did not spare his opponents, either by speech or pen, he was not spared by them in return. That his party ultimately lost every point for which they contended was no fault of his; he did his best for them, and in his vigorous days he was no mean opponent. One thing should be said before we dismiss these now old-world battles in Birmingham history. Mr. Hebbert's share in them was prompted by strong conviction as to principles, and by keen enjoyment of conflict. It brought him little or no pecuniary advantage. For some of his work as a legal agent he was, of course, remunerated; but for much of it-most of it, probably-he received nothing but thanks. If he had thought of money reward, it would have paid him infinitely better to have quietly pursued his practice as a solicitor, and to have let politics alone.

To this generation Mr. Hebbert is best known by his office of clerk to the justices. In 1840 he was appointed clerk to the West Bromwich Bench of Staffordshire magistrates, an appointment he held until his death-a period of forty-seven years. In 1856 he was appointed one of the clerks to the Birmingham borough justices, and this appointment, as already noted, he held until his death, a period of thirty-one years. His first colleagues were the late Mr. Wm. Barlow and Mr. W.H. Gem, and later, on Mr. Barlow's death, Mr. T.H. Gem was joined with him, being succeeded on his decease by Mr. Barradale, who for the last five years has acted with Mr. Hebbert as joint clerk. In this capacity Mr. Hebbert's services were deserving of high praise. Not a word too much was said of them yesterday by the justices at the Police Court. He was a thoroughly trained and sound lawyer, with a most extensive and exact knowledge of criminal law; so exact, indeed, that scarcely a decision founded upon the advice he gave to the bench was ever reversed on appeal. The justices, especially those who had known him for many years, will feel that by Mr. Hebbert's death they have lost an excellent advisor, and a personal friend, whose courtesy was unfailing towards them, and whose culture, as well as his legal knowledge, rendered intercourse with him profitable as well as agreeable. It was not only, however, as a politician and as a valuable public servant that Mr. Hebbert should be remembered. He had an intimate association with the educational and literary life of the town. In the remote period when the artists, separating from the Society of Arts, migrated to the Athenæum Rooms, in Temple Row, Mr. Hebbert was actively engaged on behalf of the artists. At a later period, when the Midland Institute was founded, he was one of its most active and earnest promoters, he took part in all the arrangements with the Town Council for the provision of a site, and the erection of a building; he was a member of the first Council of the Institute, was vice-president in 1857, and again in 1860, and retained his seat upon the Council until 1866. In connection with the volunteer movement in Birmingham, Mr. Hebbert also took a prominent and most useful part. In March, 1857, he was one of those who addressed the then Lord-Lieutenant, the Earl of Warwick, to urge the formation of a volunteer corps in the town. The War Office, however, refused at that time to look favourably upon volunteering, and so the project fell through. It was revived at the end of 1859, the volunteer force was instituted throughout the country, and a Birmingham battalion of the Warwickshire Regiment was formed. In this Mr. Hebbert enrolled himself as a private member. In that capacity he served for some months, until, in 1860, he received a commission as captain of the No. 10, or Gunmakers' Company, then called the “Tower Company.” On the retirement of Lieut.-Colonel Mason in 1867, and the promotion of Major Ratcliff to the lieutenant-colonelcy, Captain Hebbert became one of the two majors of the battalion, and this commission he held until 1872, when, to the great regret of his colleagues, both officers and private members, ill-health obliged him to resign it. Many readers will be interested to know that Mr. Hebbert was at one period an active an eminent member of the Masonic body. He was initiated in 1861 as a member of the “Faithful” lodge. In due time, zealous in Masonry, he became a Past Master of the Mark Master degree, an eminent member of the Royal Arch, and a member of the Knights Templars, being in 1870, in this last names connection, appointed first Grand Captain of England. He also took an active share in the foundation of the Masonic Hall, in Birmingham. Mr Hebbert married Miss Aston, daughter of the late Mr. John Aston, of Birmingham and Rowington, By this lady (who died some years ago), he leaves several children, sons and daughters.

To these notes we have but a few words to add; a brief but emphatic testimony to the worth of Mr. Hebbert's private character. He was honourable as a professional man, sincere and earnest in maintaining his political and religious convictions, courteous as an acquaintance and colleague, and constant as a friend. He will be missed as one whose judgment remained sound to the last, whose efforts to discharge his duty were unfailing in spite of much physical suffering, and who, although he had outlived the associates and fellow-workers of his earlier days, will be remembered with kindness and regret by many younger men whom he had made his friends.

At the Birmingham Police Court, yesterday, the magistrates on the bench in the First Court were Mr. Hill (Deputy-Stipendiary), Mr. John Lowe, and Mr. Felix Hadley. Mr. Kynnersley, who had been relieved from attendance on Wednesdays, was not present. The detectives, with Superintendent Black, were present in a body to mark their respect for the deceased gentleman by listening to the remarks which were expected to be made. Mr. Hill had not, apparently, heard of Mr. Hebbert's decease until he came into court. When the application for summonses had been disposed of, Mr. Hill said: I am sorry to have to announce a very serious loss which this Court has sustained. Mr. John Benbow Hebbert, who for thirty years ahs been a clerk to this Court, died last night. Mr. Hebbert has for many years been in weak health, notwithstanding which he was indefatigable in the performance of his duties in this Court. He was an able lawyer, and had a thorough knowledge of the duties of a magisterial court, and he had also a very sound judgment. His loss will be very great to the magistrates of this Court, to the officers, and to the public in general. His end was not expected to be so near. As I have mentioned, Mr. Hebbert has been for many years in a weak state of health. Latterly his health had become still worse, but he had continued to attend to his duties until Friday. We shall all regret his loss very much.

Mr. Lowe said he endorsed every syllable Mr. Hill had uttered. He had the honour of an acquaintance with Mr Hebbert for something like forty years, and had ever found him most kind and most agreeable in every position of life. What he had seen of Mr. Hebbert had made him proud that they had a gentleman of his experience and knowledge connected with the Court. He deeply sympathised with Mr. Hebbert's family in their affliction, and looked upon the removal of their old friend with the most profound regret.

Mr. Girter, on behalf of himself and brother practitioners in the court, desired to add their expression of regret at the loss the Court and the town had sustained. They had all been indebted to Mr. Hebbert for the expression of their opinion in the conduct of their work; and though they might often not have liked his opinion, they generally found he was correct. He took a shrewd and correct view of the cases before him, and assisted in the conduct of the business in that court in a way that would be missed for a long time to come.

Mr. Barradale (magistrates' clerk) said he deeply deplored the loss of a colleague with whom he had the pleasure of working for the last five years without the slightest unpleasantness. The news of his death came upon him with such a shock that he failed to find language to adequately express his grief at the loss of a colleague who had been at all times able to give him valuable advice and assistance. He endorsed all that had been said as to his character as an officer of that court.

A letter was shortly after received from Mr. Kynnersley by Mr. Barradale. The writer said that he had been terribly shocked by the death of a dear and most valued friend. “I could not,” he continued, “trust myself to speak of it, and therefore sent this by messenger, asking you to say for me how deeply I feel his loss, He was an old client of mine at its Stafford Sessions, and was, with the exception of George and Welchman Whateley, the only person in Birmingham to whom I was not an entire stranger. I have always considered that it was in consequence of his too favourable report of me that I was so kindly received by the magistrates. I had a sincere regard and affection for him, and I know he had the same for me. He is gone, and it cannot be long before I follow him.”

In the Second Court, Mr. Heaton made reference to the death of Mr. Hebbert. He said that before proceeding with the business of the Court it was his painful duty to refer to the death of Mr. Hebbert, who had long been one of the clerks to the borough magistrates. He (Mr. Heaton) had sat for sixteen years or more with Mr. Hebbert, and had watched narrowly the want of good health from which the poor gentleman had suffered. He had been ailing, as they all knew, for many years, but never would he give up his work, and was always at his post and always ready. His demeanour was such as to command the respect of all who had anything to do with him, and he (Mr. Heaton) was sure Mr. Hebbert's death would be a great loss to the borough. He was a valuable public servant, and a good and faithful friend. Mr. Stone who also sat on the bench, said that by the decease of Mr. Hebbert the justices had lost a good advisor and a courteous friend. In all his transactions he was fair and honourable, and never failed to act in the fairest possible manner to all defendants who appeared before the magistrates. He very much regretted Mr. Hebbert's loss. Feeling reference to Mr. Hebbert was also made by Mr. J.C. Lord in the Third Court. He said that as a solicitor, magistrates' clerk, and confidential advisor, it would be most difficult to find a successor to Mr. Hebbert, but it would be impossible to fill the void caused to his friends by the death of this kindly-hearted and courageous old English gentleman.

Hebbert.- On the 28th September, 1908, at Wellington, New Zealand, George Frederick, son of the late Major Hebbert, of Firsgate, Edgbaston, England; deeply regrestted.

The Times, Friday, Apr, 03, 1863; pg. 1; Issue 24523; col A

On the 31st March. at Firsgate, Edgbaston, Birmingham, the wife of Mr. John B. Hebbert, of a daughter.



General Notes for Child Mary Anne Hebbert

Mary Ann Hebbert was unmarried.

Birmingham Daily Post, Saturday, November 15, 1890; Issue 10108

Hebbert. - On the 13th inst., at her residence, aged 79, Many Anne Hebbert, eldest daughter of the late John Hebbert, of Newhall Street, Birmingham.

1871 Census:

Birmingham
St. Paul
Newhall Street
Mary A. Hebbert - Head - 58
Jane Hebbert - Sister - 46
Dinah Hebbert - Sister - 44



General Notes for Child Jane Hebbert

1871 Census:

Birmingham
St. Paul
Newhall Street
Mary A. Hebbert - Head - 58
Jane Hebbert - Sisiter - 46
Dinah Hebbert - Sister - 44


General Notes for Child Dinah Hebbert

Dinah Hebbert was unmarried.

Birmingham Daily Post, Monday, February 5, 1894; Isssue 11117

Hebbert. - On the 3rd inst., at her residence, 23, Stirling Road, Edgbaston, aged 78, Dinah, youngest daughter of the late John Hebbert, formerly of Newhall Street.

1871 Census:

Birmingham
St. Paul
Newhall Street
Mary A. Hebbert - Head - 58
Jane Hebbert - Sisiter - 46
Dinah Hebbert - Sister - 44

picture

George Meredith Elkington and Fanny Bigg




Husband George Meredith Elkington

         Born: 1863 Reg. March 1864 - Dell Cottage - Reg. Kings Norton
   Christened: 
         Died: 1913, March Quarter - Thanet, Kent
       Buried: 


       Father: James Balleney Elkington
       Mother: Margaret Meredith


     Marriage: 1886, September Quarter - Thanet, Kent




Wife Fanny Bigg

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


picture
James Meredith and Esther Bird




Husband James Meredith

         Born: 1745 - circa - Lingen, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 30 Dec 1778 - Lingen, Hereford




Wife Esther Bird

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1780 - about - Lingen, Hereford
   Christened: 31 Oct 1779 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah



2 M Joseph Meredith

         Born: 1782 - about
   Christened: 14 Jul 1782 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1788 - about
   Christened: 8 Mar 1788 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes for Child Samuel Meredith

1841 Census:

Herefordshire
Presteigne
Willey
Samuel Meredith - 60 - Agricultural Labourer
Sarah Meredith - 55
Jane Meredith - 20

1861 Census:

Herefordshire
Presteigne
Broad St, Dukes Arms
Samuel Meredith - Boarder - Widower - retired labourer - Herefordshire - Lingen

1871 Census:

Radnorshire
Presteign
149 Broad St - Dukes Arms
Samuel Meredith - Boarder - Widower - 91 - Ag. Lab.

picture

Jonathon Hicks (Hix) and Unknown Boddington




Husband Jonathon Hicks (Hix)

         Born: 1675 - circa
   Christened: 8 Apr 1676 - Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire
         Died: 1 Feb 1742
       Buried: 


       Father: Gideon Hicks (Hix)
       Mother: Hanna


     Marriage: 




Wife Unknown Boddington

         Born: 1671 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 26 February 1713 - aged 42
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Hicks

         Born: 1726 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 September 1768 - aged 43
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary King
       Spouse: Mary Payne
         Marr: 25 Mar 1805 - Enborne, Berkshire



2 M Thomas Hicks

         Born: 1721 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Oct 1817 - Cope Hall nr Newbury
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Jonathan Hicks was the stonemason of Speenhamland. He built a house opposite the stone-yard known as “Albion House”. His monument in Speen Church also refers to his wife, a daughter of John Boddington of Leicestershire, who died 26 Feb 1713 aged 42. In fact, his Will indicates that he had three wives. It states his wish to be buried as near as possible to his two late wives Jane and Rebecca, as well as making bequests to his wife Dorothy. He leaves much of his property and estate to his son John Hicks “otherwise Dunbricke” who is still a minor. It is assumed that this is the same person as the John Hicks b. ca. 1726 of Speenhamland, who was also a mason. The meaning of the style “otherwise Dunbricke” is unclear.

The Will appoints as a trustee his brother (presumably brother in law) a Simon Rawlins. There is no indication which of the 3 wives was a Rawlins. Two generations later, his granddaughter Mary married a John Rawlins.


General Notes for Child John Hicks

John Hicks was described in his Will of 21 June 1768 as a Mason of Speenhamland in the Parish of Speen, Berkshire. His Will was probated on 29 Oct 1768.

by P S Spokes, Berkshire Archaeological Society, Berkshire Archaeological Society - Berkshire (England) - 1934
Money, Hist, of Speen (1892), 32, states, " This Mr. Hicks was a stone-mason at
... John Hicks, d. 1768, aged 42. Mary, his wife ; d. 1806, aged 86.


General Notes for Child Thomas Hicks

The Gentleman's Magazine - 1817 - Page 474

Oct. 6. At Cope Hall, near Newbury, in his 96th year, Thomas Hicks esq.
picture

John Boyes and Sabina Meredith




Husband John Boyes

         Born: 1800 - circa - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: Bef 1871
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 9 Mar 1833 - Hobart, Tasmania




Wife Sabina Meredith

         Born: 1810 - Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1877
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Westall Hicks





Children
1 F Louisa Mary Boyes

         Born: 1834 - circa - Tasmania
   Christened: 8 Jan 1834
         Died: 1925
       Buried: 



2 F Elizabeth Isabella Boyes

         Born: 1835 - circa - Tasmania
   Christened: 20 Apr 1835
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Sabina Meredith Boyes

         Born: 1837 - circa - Tasmania
   Christened: 23 Jan 1837
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Charles Crofton Boyes

         Born: 8 Oct 1838 - Hobart, Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Isabella Boyes

         Born: 1841 - circa - Tasmania
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Sir George Thomas Henry Boyes

         Born: 1842 - Leamington, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Mar 1910 - Down End, Winchester, Hampshire
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Louisa Elizabeth Ridley
         Marr: 1874



7 M Major-General John Edward Boyes

         Born: 3 Jun 1843 - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 11 Jan 1915
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Catherine Holloway
         Marr: 23 Oct 1866 - Marchwood Church, Southampton



8 M Francis (Frank) Campbell Boyes

         Born: 1845 - circa - Brighton, Sussex
   Christened: 23 May 1845 - Chapel Royal, Brighton, Sussex
         Died: 1922
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Isabella



9 M Duncan Gordon Boyes

         Born: 1846 - December Quarter - Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
   Christened: 
         Died: 26 Jan 1869 - Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
       Buried: 



10 F Helen Campbell Boyes

         Born: 1852 - Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John and Sabina had five sons and four daughters.

John Boyes merchant Hobart & London.

Sabina was enumerated in the England census of 1851 at 3 Paragon Buildings, Cheltenham, with sons George, Edward, Frank and Duncan, daughters Louisa and Isabella, and four servants.

1861 Census:

Middlesex
Paddington
St. John
8 Kensington Gardens Terrace
John Boyes - Head - 61 - Fund Holder
Sabina - wife - 51
Charles - son - 22
Elizabeth - daughter - 25
Sabina M. - daughter - 24
Helen C. - daughter - 8


General Notes (Wife)

1851 Census:

Sabina was enumerated in the England census of 1851 at 3 Paragon Buildings, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire with sons George (aged 9), Edward (aged 7), Frank (aged 6) and Duncan (aged 4), daughters Louisa (aged 17) and Isabella (aged 10), and four servants.

1861 Census:

Middlesex
Paddington
St. John
8 Kensington Gardens Terrace
John Boyes - Head - 61 - Fund Holder
Sabina - wife - 51
Charles - son - 22
Elizabeth - daughter - 25
Sabina M. - daughter - 24
Helen C. - daughter - 8


General Notes for Child Sabina Meredith Boyes

BMD - Sabina Meredith Boyes - Marriage Sept. 1904 - Downham, Cambridgeshire.

BMD - Sabina Meredith Boyes - Marriage Dec, 1908 - St. Asaph - Denbighshire.


General Notes for Child Sir George Thomas Henry Boyes

George Thomas Henry had a distinguished naval carreer, as described in his obituary in The Times, Frady, March 18, 1910; pg. 13; Issue 39223; col. C

“Vice-Admiral Sir George Thomas Henry Boyes, who died on Wednesday at Down End, Winchester, was a son of the late Mr. John Boyes, of Kensington-gardens-terrace, W., and a brother of Major General John Edward Boyes, C.B. ?Born in 1842 he entered the Navy in 1854, and, as a cadet in the Royal Albert and the Agamemnon, served in the Black Sea during the war with Russia. He took part in the expedition to Kertch and Yenikalé, was present at the attack and capture of Kinburn as well as the siege of Sevastopol. He received the Crimean and Turkish medals with the clasp for Sevastopol. He was promoted to lieutenant in 1862 and to commander in 1877. In the last-named rank he served in the Achilles during the Egyptian war of 1882 and received the Egyptian medal, Khedive's bronze star, and the Medjidieh of the Third Class. In 1884 he was promoted to captain, and in 1884 received from the Sultan of Turkey the Medjidieh of the Second Class, a promotion in the order. He was also a commander of the Second CIass of the Saxe-Ernestine Order.?As flag captain to Sir Edward Seymour, he assisted at the salvage of the Howe in Ferrol, in 1892, and wrote a monograph on the subject which is a standard work. He was commodore at Hong-kong from June, 1893, to July, 1896, and having retired in that year he attained flag rank on the retired list of rear-admirals in June, 1899. From June to August, 1900, he was Assistant Director of Transports, and under Sir Bouverie Clark he assisted during the war in South Africa to carry out with complete success the sea transport of the greatest military expedition which has ever left these shores. When Sir Bouverie Clark retired, in November, 1901, Sir George Boyes succeeded him as Director of Transports, and upon his shoulders fell the task of providing for the supply of reinforcements and for the return home of the troops. He was made a K.C.B. In 1908, and relinquished the office of Director of Transports in the following year. He had already, in 1904, become a vice-admiral on the retired list. ?Sir George Boyes married in 1874 Louisa Elizabeth, the elder daughter of the late Colonel John Henry Ellis Ridley, and has issue. ?The funeral will take place at the Crematorium, Golder's Green, at 12 o'clock to-morrow.”

1901 Census:

Hampshire
Fareham
Nuthry Manor??
George T.H. Boyes - Head - 59 - Rear Admiral
Louisa E. - wife - 52
Marjory G. - daughter - 18


General Notes for Child Major-General John Edward Boyes

John Edward Boyes entered the army in 1861 and served in the Egyptian War of 1882, Soudan 1884, and Nile Expedition 1884-85. He commanded the 17th Brigade, South Africa Field Force 1900-01. He was promoted to Major-General in 1898 and created CB in 1900.

The Gentleman' Magazine - 1866 - Page 824

At Marchwood Church, near Southampton, by the Rev. Thomas Blackburn, rector of Clothall, Herts, assisted by the Rev. John D. Durell, incumbant of Marchwood, John Edward Boyes, esq., of Kensington-garden-terrace, to Mary Catherine, eldest dau. of H.F.K. Holloway, esq., of Marchwood Park, Hants.

1901 Census:

Devon
Abbotsham
Cornborough
John E. Boyes - Head - 57 - Major-General
Mary C. - wife - 54
Mary S. - daughter - 27


General Notes for Child Francis (Frank) Campbell Boyes

Frank Boyes was described in the 1881 England and subsequent England censuses as a retired farmer. His wife Isabella was enumerated separately in the 1881 Scotland census as a sheep farmer's wife:

1881 Scotland Census:

Isabella Boyes
Age 24
Head
Reg District - Kelvin
Parish - Glasgow Barony
County: Lanarkshire
Address: 74 Cromwell st.
Occupation - Sheep Farmers wife
Duncan Boyes - 17 days
Francis Boyes - 4
Helen Boyes - 1

1881 Census:

Dorset
Fordington
Mary Catherine Boyes - Head - 34
Mary Boyes - daughter - 13
George Boyes - son - 6
Francis Boyes - brother-in-law - 36 - retired
Helen Boyes - sister-in-law - 27

1891 Census:

Norfolk
Tottenhill
Oakwood House
Frank Boyes - Head - 46 - Retired Farmer
Isabelle - wife - 34
Frank - son - 13
Helen - daughter - 11
Duncan - son - 10
Sabina - daughter - 8
Charlotte - daughter - 7
Thomas - son - 2

1901 Census:

Norfolk
Tottenhill
The Oakwood
Frank C. Boyes - Head - 56 - Retired Farmer - Widower
Helen - daughter - 21
Thomas - son - 12
Edward - son - 9
George - son - 7



General Notes for Child Duncan Gordon Boyes

The Times - Saturday 5 June, 1869 Page 1

On the 25th Jan. at Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand, after three days illness, Duncan Gordon Boyes, Esq, youngest son of the late John Boyes, Esq, of 8, Kensington-garden-terrace, London, aged 22.


General Notes for Child Helen Campbell Boyes

1881 Census:

Dorset
Fordington
Fordington House
Mary Catherine Boyes - Head - 34
Mary Boyes - daughter - 13
George Boyes - son - 6
Francis Boyes - brother-in-law - 36 - annuitant
Helen Boyes - sister-in-law - 27

picture

Major-General John Edward Boyes and Mary Catherine Holloway




Husband Major-General John Edward Boyes

         Born: 3 Jun 1843 - Middlesex, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 11 Jan 1915
       Buried: 


       Father: John Boyes
       Mother: Sabina Meredith


     Marriage: 23 Oct 1866 - Marchwood Church, Southampton




Wife Mary Catherine Holloway

         Born: 1846 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 4 Feb 1936 - Marchwood, Northam, Devon
       Buried: 7 Feb 1936 - Abbotsham Church


       Father: H.F.K. Holloway
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Mary S. Boyes

         Born: 1868 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M George Boyes

         Born: 1875 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John Edward Boyes entered the army in 1861 and served in the Egyptian War of 1882, Soudan 1884, and Nile Expedition 1884-85. He commanded the 17th Brigade, South Africa Field Force 1900-01. He was promoted to Major-General in 1898 and created CB in 1900.

The Gentleman' Magazine - 1866 - Page 824

At Marchwood Church, near Southampton, by the Rev. Thomas Blackburn, rector of Clothall, Herts, assisted by the Rev. John D. Durell, incumbant of Marchwood, John Edward Boyes, esq., of Kensington-garden-terrace, to Mary Catherine, eldest dau. of H.F.K. Holloway, esq., of Marchwood Park, Hants.

1901 Census:

Devon
Abbotsham
Cornborough
John E. Boyes - Head - 57 - Major-General
Mary C. - wife - 54
Mary S. - daughter - 27


General Notes (Wife)

The Times, Thursday, February 6, 1936; Page 1:

BOYES--On Feb. 4, 1936, at Marchwood, Northam, Devon, Mary Catherine Boyes, widow of Major-General John Edward Boyes, C.B., aged 90. Funeral in Abbotsham Church tomorrow (Friday) at 2.30.

1881 Census:

Dorset
Fordington
Fordington House
Mary Catherine Boyes - Head - 34
Mary Boyes - daughter - 13
George Boyes - son - 6
Francis Boyes - brother-in-law - 36
Helen Boyes - sister-in-law - 27

picture

Sabina Meredith Boyes




Husband

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Sabina Meredith Boyes

         Born: 1837 - circa - Tasmania
   Christened: 23 Jan 1837
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Boyes
       Mother: Sabina Meredith




General Notes (Wife)

BMD - Sabina Meredith Boyes - Marriage Sept. 1904 - Downham, Cambridgeshire.

BMD - Sabina Meredith Boyes - Marriage Dec, 1908 - St. Asaph - Denbighshire.
picture

Sir George Thomas Henry Boyes and Louisa Elizabeth Ridley




Husband Sir George Thomas Henry Boyes

         Born: 1842 - Leamington, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Mar 1910 - Down End, Winchester, Hampshire
       Buried: 


       Father: John Boyes
       Mother: Sabina Meredith


     Marriage: 1874




Wife Louisa Elizabeth Ridley

         Born: 1850 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1923
       Buried: 


       Father: Colonel John Henry Ellis Ridley
       Mother: 





Children
1 M John Ridley Boyes

         Born: 1875 - Stoke Damerel, Devon
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Constance J. Boyes

         Born: 1877 - circa - Dinan, France
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Hector Boyes

         Born: 1881 - Stoke Damerel, Devon
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Marjory Grace Boyes

         Born: 1882 - Devonport, Devon
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

George Thomas Henry had a distinguished naval carreer, as described in his obituary in The Times, Frady, March 18, 1910; pg. 13; Issue 39223; col. C

“Vice-Admiral Sir George Thomas Henry Boyes, who died on Wednesday at Down End, Winchester, was a son of the late Mr. John Boyes, of Kensington-gardens-terrace, W., and a brother of Major General John Edward Boyes, C.B. ?Born in 1842 he entered the Navy in 1854, and, as a cadet in the Royal Albert and the Agamemnon, served in the Black Sea during the war with Russia. He took part in the expedition to Kertch and Yenikalé, was present at the attack and capture of Kinburn as well as the siege of Sevastopol. He received the Crimean and Turkish medals with the clasp for Sevastopol. He was promoted to lieutenant in 1862 and to commander in 1877. In the last-named rank he served in the Achilles during the Egyptian war of 1882 and received the Egyptian medal, Khedive's bronze star, and the Medjidieh of the Third Class. In 1884 he was promoted to captain, and in 1884 received from the Sultan of Turkey the Medjidieh of the Second Class, a promotion in the order. He was also a commander of the Second CIass of the Saxe-Ernestine Order.?As flag captain to Sir Edward Seymour, he assisted at the salvage of the Howe in Ferrol, in 1892, and wrote a monograph on the subject which is a standard work. He was commodore at Hong-kong from June, 1893, to July, 1896, and having retired in that year he attained flag rank on the retired list of rear-admirals in June, 1899. From June to August, 1900, he was Assistant Director of Transports, and under Sir Bouverie Clark he assisted during the war in South Africa to carry out with complete success the sea transport of the greatest military expedition which has ever left these shores. When Sir Bouverie Clark retired, in November, 1901, Sir George Boyes succeeded him as Director of Transports, and upon his shoulders fell the task of providing for the supply of reinforcements and for the return home of the troops. He was made a K.C.B. In 1908, and relinquished the office of Director of Transports in the following year. He had already, in 1904, become a vice-admiral on the retired list. ?Sir George Boyes married in 1874 Louisa Elizabeth, the elder daughter of the late Colonel John Henry Ellis Ridley, and has issue. ?The funeral will take place at the Crematorium, Golder's Green, at 12 o'clock to-morrow.”

1901 Census:

Hampshire
Fareham
Nuthry Manor??
George T.H. Boyes - Head - 59 - Rear Admiral
Louisa E. - wife - 52
Marjory G. - daughter - 18


General Notes (Wife)

1881 Census:

Devon
Stoke Dameral
Stoke
LOuisa E. Boyes - wife - 32 - Wife of Captain Boyes
John R. - son - 6
Constance J. - daughter - 4
Hector - son - 1 month


General Notes for Child Constance J. Boyes

1891 Census:

Devon
Tormoham
St Clare
John H.E. Ridley - Head - 74 - Retired Colonel of the Militia
Anna M. - wife - 67
Holt W. - son - 40 - coffee & Tea planter
Augusta C. - daughter - 31
Constance J. Boyes - grand-daughter - 14
picture

Frederick Jukes and Florence Gladys Boyle




Husband Frederick Jukes

         Born: 1886
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Arthur Jukes
       Mother: Margaret Jellie


     Marriage: 4 Aug 1915 - "Renfrew" Camperdown




Wife Florence Gladys Boyle

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Pamela Jukes

         Born: 1922 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: Living at 2008
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Clark



2 F Felicity Jukes

         Born: 1932
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 F Shirley Jukes

         Born: 1916
   Christened: 
         Died: 2008
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

The Argus - Monday 30 August 1915

Jukes-Boyle

On the 4th August at "Renfrew" Camperdown, by the Rev. Andrew Dunn, Frederick only son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jukes of Brighton, to Florence Gladys, eldest daughter of Mr. and <rs. W. Boyle, "Renfrew", Camperdown

They had three daughters.


General Notes (Wife)

Florence was of Irish stock.


General Notes for Child Pamela Jukes

Born in Swan Hill, in Victoria.


General Notes for Child Felicity Jukes

Born in Swan Hill, in Victoria.


General Notes for Child Shirley Jukes

Born in Swan Hill, in Victoria.
picture

Charles William Rees and Catherine Bradley




Husband Charles William Rees

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Catherine Bradley

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Blanche Louise Rees

         Born: 23 Jan 1892
   Christened: 
         Died: 21 June 1969 - Ages 77
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Clarence Leslie Meredith-Kaye




General Notes for Child Blanche Louise Rees

Blanche Louise was the daughter of Charles William Rees and Catherine Bradley.
picture

Bridgewater and Mary Stephens




Husband Bridgewater

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Mary Stephens

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: James Stephens
       Mother: 




General Notes (Wife)

Mary married a Mr.Bridgewater - a farmer.


picture

Thomas Moodie and Helen Inglis Brown




Husband Thomas Moodie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Helen Inglis Brown

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M James Brown Moodie

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 Jun 1958
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Janie Chalmers Meredith
         Marr: 21 Sep 1909 - New Zealand




General Notes for Child James Brown Moodie

James Brown was the son of Thomas Moodie and Helen Inglis Brown. He was Masterton manager for Dalgety & Co.

New Zealand Free Lance, Volume 10, Issue 482, 25 September 1909, Page 14

Mr James B. Moodie, Masterton manager for Dalgety and Co., was married on Tuesday last to Miss Janie Chambers Meredith of Masterton. The bride was given away by her brother (Mr. J.M. Meredith), and was attended by two bridesmaids, Miss Eileen Moodie and Miss Doris Gawith. Mr. H.W. Rishworth was best man, and Mr. A.R. Schlanders was groomsman. Mr. and Mrs. Moodie motored away on their honeymoon, not feeling the least bit moody. The presents included a solid silver tea service from the Masterton staff of Dalgety and Co.

picture

Alfred Hall Browne and Caroline Amelia Jukes




Husband Alfred Hall Browne

         Born: 1810 - Circa (1891 Census) - Great Yarmouth, Norfolk
   Christened: 
         Died: Jan 1893
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 18 May 1843 - Wolverhampton, Warwickshire




Wife Caroline Amelia Jukes

         Born: 29 Jan 1819 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
   Christened: 1 Mar 1819 - St. Martin's, Birmingham
         Died: 9 January 1900 (The Times Obit) - Torquay, Devon
       Buried: 


       Father: John Jukes
       Mother: Sophia (Jane) Beete





Children
1 M Alfred John Jukes-Browne

         Born: 16 Apr 1851 - Penn Fields, Nr. Wolverhampton
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Aug 1914
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Emma Jessie Smith
         Marr: 30 Sep 1881



2 M Frederick Mansfield Browne

         Born: 22 Feb 1853 - Wolverhampton, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 January 1858 (The Times)
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1891 Census:

Alfred Hall Browne was reported living at Elinbank, Newton Abbot, Devon with his wife Caroline (aged 72 - nee Jukes) and their son Alfred J Jukes-Browne who was described as an assistant geologist & two servants. Alfred Hall Browne was described as a retired solicitor.


General Notes (Wife)

Caroline Amelia was a friend of Louisa Anne Meredith and was one of the witnesses to her marriage to Charles Meredith.

I believe that Caroline Amelia Jukes, sister of Joseph Beete Jukes married Alfred Hall Browne, June 1843 in Wolverhampton. It seems too much of a coincidence that one of the collections at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford was donated by Alfred John Jukes-Browne in 1928. Is there some connection to the Jukes-Pitt button manufacturing? Is Alfred John Jukes-Browne, Caroline's son??

Collector: Alfred John Jukes-Browne
Collected or donated by: 1928
PRM Relationship: Field Collector Other Owner
Continents: Africa
Career: Natural Historian
Oxford University Educated? No
Oxfordshire Based? No
Clubs: Royal Society Geological Society
Biography: Yes
Institution:
Collection Size: Small

Alfred John Jukes-Browne (16 April 1851 - 14 August 1914 was a British invertebrate palaeontologist and stratigrapher. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1909.

The Travels of Joseph Beete Jukes, F.R.S.

By Robert A. Bayliss

Senior Lecturer, Robert Gordon's Institute of Technology, Aberdeen

“An interesting but comparatively little-known scientific traveller of the nineteenth century, was J.B. Jukes, the geologist.

He was born at Summerhill, Birmingham, on 10 October 1811, and attended school in Wolverhampton and Birmingham. The invaluable book of letters and biographical information written by his sister, Amelia Browne, ………”

Later in the same article is the following:

“A nephew of Jukes, Alfred J. Jukes-Browne, also worked with the Survey, despite substantial handicap, and was elected F.R.S. in 1909.”

The Times Obituary, Friday 12 June 1900:

The death of Mrs. A Hall-Browne, which took place on Tuesday at her residence, Torquay, will recall to some of out older geologists the memory of their distinguished colleague, the late Professor J. Beete Jukes, who was for many years director of H.M. Geological Survey in Ireland, and a firm friend of the late Adam Sedgewick, Edward Forbes, Murchison, Huxley, Tyndall, and other men of science, now passed away. Mrs. Browne was the late professor's only sister, and possessed much of that clearness of intellect and sound common sense which made her brother's lectures so delightful to his pupils in Dublin. She would have attained her 81st birthday in a few days. Her son, Mr. Jukes-Browne, has for many years been engaged on H. M. Geological Survey in England.


General Notes for Child Alfred John Jukes-Browne

Alfred adopted the surname of Jukes Browne on 2 November 1872.

1891 Census:

Alfred J Jukes-Browne was living with his parents at Elinbank, Newton Abbot, Devon - he was described as an assistant geologist (aged 39) "geological survey SC--Department

In 1911, Alfred lived at Bridge Road, Torquay

JUKES-BROWNE, Alfred John, BA; FRS, FGS

Born Penn Fields, near Wolverhampton, April 1851; s of A. H. Browne and C. A. Jukes; took name of Jukes-Browne on attaining age of 21; m 1881, Emma Jessie Smith; one d ; died 16 Aug. 1914.

Education: Cholmondeley School, Highgate; St John’s College, Cambridge.

Career: Appointed to staff of Geological Survey, 1874; was chiefly occupied in mapping parts of Suffolk, Cambridge, Rutland, and Lincoln up to 1883; was then entrusted with the preparation of a monograph on the British Upper Cretaceous rocks, and for this purpose examined and partly resurveyed the Cretaceous districts in Herts, Bedford, Bucks, Oxford, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Dorset, and Devon; spent the winter of 1888–89 in Barbados, afterwards collaborating with Prof. J. B. Harrison in papers on the geology of that island; awarded Murchison medal, 1901; retired from the Geological Survey in 1902 on account of ill-health.

Publications: Student’s Handbook of Physical Geology (2 editions), of Historical Geology (1886), of Stratigraphical Geology (2nd edn 1912); The Building of the British Isles (3rd edn 1911); The Cretaceous Rocks of Britain, in 3 vols (Memoirs Geol Survey); and many other smaller memoirs for same Survey; many papers contributed to the Geological Society, Geologists’ Association, Geological Magazine, and the Malacological Society.

Recreations: Conchology, garden.

Address: Westleigh, Torquay


General Notes for Child Frederick Mansfield Browne

The Times, Tuesday, Feb 02, 1858; pg. 1; Issue 22906; col A

On Jan. 29, aged 4 years and 11 months, Frederick Mansfield, younger son of Alfred Hall Browne, colicitor, Clifton Villas, Camden Square.
picture

William Rouse and Elizabeth Bardwell Browne




Husband William Rouse

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth Bardwell Browne

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Eliza Rouse

         Born: 13 Jul 1827 - Marylebone, Middlesex
   Christened: 21 Nov 1827 - Westminster, Craven Chapel, Marshall Street, London
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: John Bult Meredith
         Marr: 4 May 1852 - Kensington, London




General Notes for Child Eliza Rouse

Eliza was the elder daughter of William Rouse and Elizabeth Bardwell Browne, who lived at 16 Canterbury Villas, Maida Vale, at the time of Eliza’s marriage. They were old friends of the Merediths.
picture

John Meredith and Hannah Bult




Husband John Meredith




         Born: 1784 - Circa
   Christened: 29 May 1784-1 Oct 1811 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford & Woolwich
         Died: 22 Jan 1859 - 6pm - Lambeth
       Buried: 28 Jan 1859 - Norwood Cemetery


       Father: Samuel Meredith
       Mother: Martha Carter


     Marriage: 1816 - St. Mary's Woolwich




Wife Hannah Bult

         Born: 5 Sep 1790 - Dr. Williams Library, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Aug 1863 - Lambeth
       Buried: 1863 - Norwood Cemetery, London


       Father: John Bult
       Mother: Hannah Inglesby





Children
1 F Hannah Bult Meredith

         Born: 3 May 1817 - St. Mary's, Kent
   Christened: 4 Sep 1827 - London, England
         Died: 1907 - December Q - Wandsworth
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Henry Rogers
         Marr: 1866 - June Quarter - Wandsworth



2 M John Bult Meredith




         Born: 5 Feb 1821 - St. Swithins, Middlesex
   Christened: 
         Died: 1915 - December Quarter - Croydon
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Eliza Rouse
         Marr: 4 May 1852 - Kensington, London



3 M Samuel Bult Meredith

         Born: 22 Aug 1822 - Woolwich, Kent, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Aug 1901 - Windsor, Surrey
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Penelope



4 F Sarah Saunders Meredith

         Born: 8 Jan 1824 - St. Mary's, Kent
   Christened: 4 Sep 1827 - London, England
         Died: 1914
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Frederic Doulton
         Marr: 5 May 1846 - Resent St. Baptist Chapel, Lambeth, Surrey



5 M William Saunders Meredith

         Born: 24 May 1826
   Christened:  - St. Mary's, Woolwich, Kent
         Died: 23 April 1848 - Registered 1848 - June Quarter - Lambeth, Surrey
       Buried: 



6 F Martha Bult Meredith

         Born: 14 Feb 1828 - Woolwich, Kent, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 December 1847 -  aged 20 - Lambeth
       Buried: 



7 M Josiah Inglesby Meredith

         Born: 6 Nov 1829 - Woolwich, Kent, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 1909 - Barnstaple, Devon
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mary Jane Barry
         Marr: 1859 - Scarborough, North Yorkshire



8 F Maria Carter Meredith




         Born: 21 Dec 1834
   Christened: 
         Died: 30 Sep 1909 - Maradana Warwick Gardens, Worthing, Sussex
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Frederick David Waldock
         Marr: 9 Aug 1862 - Esher St. Congregational Chapel, Lambeth




General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census Collection:

Location: 3 Durham Place, Lambeth, Surrey

John (aged 55) with his wife Hannah (aged 50), and their children, Hannah (aged 20), John (aged 20) apprentice engineer, Samuel (aged 15) also an apprentice engineer, Sarah (aged 15), William (aged 15), Martha (aged 13), Josiah (aged 12) and Maria (aged 6)

1851 Census Collection:

Location: 3 Durham Place, Lambeth, Surrey

John (aged 67) described as a proprietor of houses, with his wife Hannah (aged 60), and two children, Hannah (aged 33) and John (aged 30) an engineer.

No. 100 Lambeth Rd, (formerly No. 3 Durham Place) was built about 1794, (ref. 45) the first occupant being William Bligh, vice-admiral, 1794–1814 (Bligh of the Bounty). Bligh accompanied Captain Cook on his second voyage round the world in 1772–4 when bread-fruit was discovered at Otaheite. This lead to Bligh's appointment to the Bounty in 1787. The famous mutiny occurred on the voyage from Tahiti where bread-fruit plants had been collected with a view to acclimatizing them in the British West Indies. In 1805 Bligh was appointed governor of New South Wales but he had a troubled term of office and he was deposed and imprisoned by a Major Johnston, who was subsequently cashiered. (ref. 96) Bligh died in 1817 and was buried in Lambeth Churchyard (see p. 116).

1861 Census Collection:

Hannah, described as a widow, proprietor of houses, was living at the same address with her daughters Hannah and Maria.

By the time of the 1871 Census, John and Hannah's son John Bult was living at No. 3 Durham Place - it is assumed his mother Hannah had passed away

A FATHER'S ADVICE to his son on his going to reside in China.
By William S. Meredith, Dec.28th, 1842. Finally left London, Jan. 25th, 1843. J.M.
“Gratitude preserves old friendships, and procures new.”


Index
Person & Health 1
Religion 2
Teetotallism 8
Business 13
Study 19
Conversation 22
Discussion 26
Letter-Writing 28
Recreation 32
Acquaintance 33
Friendship 36
At Sea 41
Sea Sickness 53
Journal 56
Storm 57
Danger 60

Page 1
PERSON
Be cleanly. In dress be neat, not fine, nor expensive, nor in the extreme of fashion.
Luke 12th. 22nd. 28th.

HEALTH
Retire to rest at an early hour; rise early: wash the entire person-drink half a pint of water, if pure-walk out in the fresh air, but not to produce fatigue.

Clothe yourself according to the climate, taking care always to produce a genial heat-avoid drafts and wet feet-change clothes when wet. Attend to the first intimation of a cold: do not say “It is only a cold.” For head-ache put the soles of the feet in cold water for 10 minutes; previously bathing the back of your hands, temples, behind the ears, and the forehead.
III John 2nd

Page 2
RELIGION
Commit to memory the first three verses of the fifth psalm; also the nineteenth, twenty-third, and the first eight verses of the 37th.
Read once a week at least one of the eight penitential Psalms-the sixth, twenty-fifth, thirty-second, thirty-eighth, fifty-first, hundred & second, hundred & thirtieth, hundred & forty-third, with a portion of the gospels or epistles. Be much in meditation and ejaculatory prayer. Let prayer precede and accompany all your little concerns. “Pray without ceasing.” Go into the fields with Isaac. Gen. 24th & 63rd. Always rise, so as to allow half an hour for reading, self examination and prayer. And when you cannot pray for yourself which will sometimes be the case, pray for others; your relations, your connections, the city where you dwell, the Church, or the spread of the gospel in the world, particularly amongst the millions of China. Carry the text of the day with you; it will be a comfort and an encouragement to recollect that we have the same text for our daily portion at home. Read occasionally other good books besides your Bible particularly Finney; accustom yourself to the “breaking down” he speaks of.

Avoid idle, but cultivate pious conversation, Malachi III 16th, taking care to improve yourself in this divine art. Be watchful over your own heart, your spirit, manner, and conduct. Be regular and punctual on the means of grace. Be careful to keep the Lord`s day profitably: as you will have no Sabbath around you amongst the heathen, you will need to be doubly upon your guard in this respect. Let your's be a cheerful not a gloomy piety. Select the pious for your closest companions.

Encourage and keep up the desire of influencing others to be good, and to do good. This will be a never failing stimulus to excel in knowledge, morals and religion. Endeavor to do good in the family & where God may place you, and to do good as you have opportunity to the ignorant elsewhere; setting your heart upon, and giving God no rest till you have saved one soul. That will be an abundant recompense for your going all the way to China. Watch and pray against a spirit of pride and self-righteousness. Flee these as you would flee the serpent. Cultivate a feeling of gratitude both towards God and man; and you will never want.

On no account fail in keeping a journal of your religious experience-a volume might be written on its advantages. It will in one word act as a barometer to the soul. Come to this determination; always to be ready to perform those duties which others dislike, or may decline. Be much in heaven; let heaven have your first thoughts every morning and when any little cross arises, set heaven against it-hold the balances just and equal, and I will answer for the consequences. Read a page daily in Philip`s Eternity Realized.
James 8th v. 13th Prov 3rd-17th

“The glories of the heavenly state
Should now with joy our souls elate
While in our thoughts we trace
The wondrous heights and depths of love
Which make us meet for realms above
To see our saviour's face.”
Gatherings of forty years by the Rev. ?Hune? Shepherd

Page 8
TEETOTALLISM
Next to your religion, we consider your being a Tee-Totaller as one of your greatest privileges. Indeed we could not have consented to your going had you not professed both. In propagating this, as in religion, you will need wisdom. You see that I take it for granted that you will be diffusing your light. I am sure it is not necessary to urge the keeping of the pledge to one who has nearly served an apprenticeship; the recollection that you have four dear sisters and three brothers with you, as well as two dear parents all pledged members will tend to strengthen, comfort, and encourage you. In introducing the system into China, (for I expect that this honor is left for you,) as I before intimated, you will need great wisdom and prudence; still it must be done. Your father, you know glories where he is permitted to be a pioneer in a good cause, so will my son-You have been blessed with this excellent system, and you will be anxious to be a blessing to others-I said with prudence, to not drag it in-as much as possible avoid argument-to a good man tell of the good you have seen and heard that it has effected-and to the missionary say that it will remove one of the greatest stumbling blocks in the way of the spread of the gospels, to the poor man say that it will make him rich, and to the rich that it will enable him to enjoy his riches. A word here, and a tract there, will be your best plan at first; but your living example will be the most powerful means you can employ. We purpose giving you some Temperance and religious tracts, which lend as far as possible, it ensures the reading, and promotes economy.-Bacchus and Anti-Bacchus with some other works, we purpose sending also. I scarcely need add that you will consider your pledge as extending to the horrid opium and everything else that intoxicates.
Rom. 14th 21st

Page 13
BUSINESS
“Not slothful in business, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord.” Rom. XII 11th
“Quarter of an hour Before the time.” I owe all I have in the world to these quarters of hours.” Lord Nelson.

The union of punctuality with diligence is the grand secret of all success, whether in business, science, morals, or religion. Be active, what others decline you promptly do-be courteous, cultivating a pleasing, but manly address-never flatly contradict, never impute motives. Be a thorough master of your business or profession. Aim high. Never let any see you suspect them of falsehood or dishonesty. Abhor the sentiment that says you are to suspect every man a rogue till you have proved him an honest man. Yet as the Chinese have a character for deceitfulness and petty theft, it will be your duty to watch them. Be upright in all your dealings and transactions. Keep correct accounts, beginning with your own. Have a regular debtor and creditor account of all your expenditure. The knowing how your money goes will teach you economy, and prepare you for business on the largest scale. Pay ready money whenever it is possible especially in domestic concerns. When debts are contracted be punctual in payment. Let all your remittances be at the appointed time, not keeping that which is not your own for the sake of interest, or any pecuniary advantage. Be respectful and obliging to your master and superiors, never resting till you obtain their confidence, then be careful to retain it. When your duty to them, or a higher duty requires you to express an opinion differing from their's, let it be with deference preceded by an apology, or some just compliment.

Be attentive to the wants whether real or imaginary of all. Study to please and you are sure of success. Avoid finding fault about trifles. Let all your orders or commands be given with distinctness of expression but with softness of manner; this will ensure obedience. It will be seldom necessary to give a reason for such commands. Let me again beseech you as if it were the last words I were to write or speak, that in all your appointments, whether in business, benevolence or religion, that you be always, “A quarter of an hour before the time.”
Eccl. 9th-10th

Page 19
STUDY
Let not your studies smell of the lamp;-by this I mean never to sit up beyond the usual time of retiring to sleep. A regular habit of early rising will generally supersede the necessity of midnight study. But if circumstances ever should arise that would make it necessary for you to rob yourself of your rest, let it be in the morning and not at night. Some recommend a change from severe to lighter study, as a means of relaxation; this is well, but I would suggest that it be total abstinence, and this before the mind becomes jaded. Never study in the open air; particularly in a warm climate like that of China. In reading make notes; and when the book is your own, Dr. Watts recommends the practice of marking the margin, when you meet with any thing remarkable. Keep a list of the books you read, and when you read them.
Prov.4th 5th

Page 20
CONVERSATION
I have often been at a loss to determine which has the most charms-elegant writing or elegant conversation. I would advise that you resolve to excel in both.

There are rules you can read; but it is practice which will make you perfect. Penetrate at once into the character, profession or business of the parties present; our friend the Rev. J Millar is an excellent pattern for you in this particular.

This can be done very much with the eye and ear; but chiefly, and easily, by just touching upon the subjects you may suppose the company to be most conversant with. You will then find that with a little occasional drawing out, each will be ready to cast in their individual proportion into the conversational treasury; and when you retire be careful to set down in a book kept for that purpose what you have thus so pleasantly gathered.

Speak but seldom yourself. Your chief business is to elicit truth from others. Be at ease in all company. I am supposing my son not capable of choosing improper company; and if by accident he is thrown into such, he will soon make his escape.

Feeling at ease will always ensure your leaving a favorable impression behind you; and in addition if you drop some word or sentiment calculated to make all better, you will be saved those regrets which too frequently have fallen to the lot of others.
Phil.1st 27th

Page 26
DISCUSSION
In a discussion, argument, or where there are any differences of opinion, whether in business, the parlor, or in committees, as a young man especially, attend to and act out, the conduct of either Job 32nd 4th and when once having delivered your sentiments do not be solicitous about consequences; to reiterate the same thing only tends to irritate but does not convince. Take our Lord for your model. Do not use expressions stronger than the case may require; here also follow our blessed Lord, who, I believe, except in the case of the Pharisee lawyer, never used strong language, but after delivering the most weighty and solemn truths with simplicity and plainness of speech left their force to bear upon the hearer's mind.
II Tim.2nd 23rd

Page 28
LETTER-WRITING
This is a divine art, and if we consider that the Scriptures were originally all written, the term is neither extravagant nor improper. The Epistles especially were letters addressed to individuals “to the Church”-“To the believers scattered abroad.” You have heard me say, that had I been earlier disciplined, such is the delight I take in letter-writing, I think I could move a world.

Write naturally; do not attempt to write fine. Suppose yourself sitting in the company of the party you are going to address, telling them your thoughts. Use brevity but fulness and clearness of expression-this will apply particularly to business letters. Feeling, sympathy, courteousness, and kindness should pervade your letters; letters of business by no means excepted-a courteous letter will obtain an answer or a connection when the cold phlegmatic one would fail. Throw your whole soul into every subject you touch-Let no letter pass from under hand without dropping some word to profit. There is this great, inexpressibly great, advantage in letter-writing over speaking, you can be more full and free. Keep a journal; this will always furnish you with matter. Read some of the best letter writers [such] as Cowper, Newton etc.
Gal. 6th 11th

Page 32
RECREATION
This includes-exercise-sights (lawful of course) scenery, sketching company-retirement-according to inclination and circumstances.
Gen. 24th 63rd

Page 33
ACQUAINTANCE
As a man of large benevolence, which I trust you will be, and should you be extensively engaged in business, the circle of your acquaintance will necessary be large. It will therefore be your wisdom so to conduct yourself as to gain the esteem of all; but should you not be so fortunate, take care never to make any one your enemy.

Discover the different capabilities of your acquaintance that everyone may have his proper place in the circle. By so doing you will make the very utmost use of the talent which God may have given them. This will also have a beneficial reaction upon yourself, and teach you your proper place in society, and gradually fit you for the most important offices.
1Cor 15-33

Page 36
FRIENDSHIP
From amongst your acquaintance it will be desirable to select a few friends and only a few, lest they should take up too much of your time. It is not indispensable, as some suppose, that in order to friendship the individual should be an exact epitome of ourselves; nevertheless there are some prerequisites necessary. If possible, let the balance of attainments be with your intended friend. He should possess not slender but deep, sterling, enlightened piety, general knowledge - good temper - communicativeness - and be a Tee Totaller if you can find one. Do not be anxious for what is termed bosom friends, in other words, one who will tell you all he thinks and feels; such a one will expect you to do the same, and this may not be either convenient or proper; coolness will follow. You will perhaps remember the case of the two American students related by Todd, who to exemplify this ideal character of a bosom friend, resolved to tell each other of of their faults-they had not practiced this long, before they became shy of one another`s company & a total alienation ensued. Do not be inquisitive about each other's private affairs. Dwell less on the defects than on the excellencies of every friend; and do the same when speaking of others; you will find this will have a most happy influence on the spirit of both you and your friend, and tend more to perpetuate friendship than any thing else. Caleb & Joshua made a good report of the land, and they entered into it, while the rest perished in the wilderness.
Prov 18th 24t

Page 41
AT SEA
On board a ship, particularly in a long voyage, character is exhibited more than in any other place on this side eternity. The exhortation “to watch and pray” will needs be in constant exercise. Be courteous to equals and superiors, and kind to every one who is below you. Pay great deference to a captain; he reigns as absolute as the Emperor of China. While friendly with all, be intimate with none. Your fellow passengers, like the Chinese, will be inquiring who you are, and what you intend to be. To some you may answer good-humouredly what are your pursuits; generally it is best to give a direct answer (mercantile) and then quickly turn the subject by asking, “Do you see that sail?” Or any other apt question; then a few words on something profitable, leaving the parties with a favorable impression.

When occasion offers modestly but firmly show your religious and Tee-total principles; this will save you much that is painful afterwards. To hesitate is to invite temptation; to boast is to invite opposition. If reflections be made and persecutions follow, bear them patiently. These are but for a moment. You can afford to suffer-you have been reaping the fruits of religion simultaneously for more than six years, and hope to enjoy them throughout eternity. In all such cases be sure to attend to the scriptural maxim, “overcome evil with good.” Punish your opponents by doing them some act of kindness. Your heavenly Father will take care of the rest. “If a man's ways please the Lord, his enemies shall be at peace with him.” Embrace the earliest opportunity when out at sea to commence lending religious and temperance tracts (one of each), always taking care that the parties are at leisure, and if possible alone. Wait a day or so to see how these work-then effect a change, lending those you receive back to others. By doing this daily and at a given time it will not interfere with your studies and other duties. Before lending to the seamen ask permission of the captain. Preparatory to circulation read one or two yourself so as to be seen of men, not with a pharisaical motive, but to invite attention, and perhaps solicitation will follow. If there is no chaplain on board, and no one else promotes it, consult with the captain on the Saturday respecting service on the Lord's day, and whether you shall read a chapter, pray, & sing with a short sermon, weather permitting. But if this is not allowed, be sure you keep the day holy unto the Lord. In reference to your own person do just as if you were on terra firma as far as aqua infirma will permit. Rise with the morning watch, wash yourself, using the water economically, this being a most valuable article at sea. I need not add shave, as Neptune will do all you require in that way. Take your meals regularly, but eat sparingly. Keep in with the cook and steward as these are important personages and can either add or diminish your comfort much. Drink plenty of water between meals, but none at meals. No suppers are eaten at sea. Learn the way of the ship; by this I mean not only the vessel but its occupiers. Learn to help yourself. Ascertain the names of all on board, particularly of the sailors, and observe their characters; you will know then how to treat them, and to pray for them. In their little troubles show that you sympathize with them. Learn the nautical phrases as soon as you can. If there is a book on board explaining these terms, borrow it. Your friend Mr. Prince will be glad to assist you. Learn also the longitudes and latitudes of places and distances.
Psalm 107th 23-31st

Page 53
SEA SICKNESS
To prevent or rather to modify sea-sickness, the lot of all new sailors, walk the deck regularly at certain times of the day; and if below you feel the least symptoms, run up on deck forthwith, taking care to fall in with the motions of the ship, and not against it. Should these circumstances occur, no doubt from the habits of some, and the kindness of others, you will be pressed to take a little alcohol-a spoonful - half a spoonful - ever so little- not a drop - remember your pledge - lift up your heart to God to enable you to endure all that is painful and remember moreover, that you are fortified by the opinion of two medical friends, Dr. Lovell and Mr. Mitchell, who told you in the most decided manner, that it tended to create instead of allaying the sickness. They advised you to lie in a horizontal position, and to keep yourself quiet.

Page 56
JOURNAL
Keep a journal, but do not talk about it; neither captain nor passengers like journalling. Accustom yourself to this practice during your stay abroad, & indeed for the rest of your life.

Pge 57
STORM
If on deck in a storm, watch against those mighty waves, which sometimes ride so high as to go over the ship. If you have not time to escape them, throw yourself flat on deck, taking hold of the first thing you can seize that is firm. You will remember my telling you of the narrow escape I had when going out to America when the old cook, caboose, fire, kettle, and all were overturned, and yet mercifully preserved. I had scarcely left him a second when it occurred. Guard against the lurches-these arise when a heavy sea strikes the ship; by one of these your father was thrown out of his berth at night.
Dr. Morrison (see memoirs) was also thrown down in his cabin and severely hurt.

Page 60
DANGER
In danger be cool, think a moment, before you move! Deliberately put on your life preserver, not forgetting to fill it. Then commit yourself to the care of your heavenly Father. If the danger continues, read Paul's shipwreck,
"Acts" and, like him, pray for the whole ship's company, and God will give them to you, and you shall all arrive safe at the desired haven. Farewell my son, - and again farewell; farewell. If we meet not again here, we shall meet in heaven. Let us comfort one another with these words.
Psalm 50th 15th

[Transcriber's Note: This is a computer transcription by Humphrey Edward Waldock, Jan. 2nd, 2000 of 61 pages of a much worn and battered leather-bound note book, 5 and a half inches by 3 inches, hand written in ink. The handwriting is good. Occasionally the speech recognition programme uses Americanisms instead of the very accurate British spelling of the author. There may be a few transcriber's errors also. The author's punctuation has been retained, except for correction of a very few accidental omissions by the author.

The transcriber's father was Sir Claud Humphrey Meredith Waldock, 1904-1981, Son of Frederic William Waldock, 1866-1924, who was son of Frederick David Waldock, 1831-1908 who married in 1860 Maria Carter Meredith, daughter of ?Jms. (James?) Meredith? and grand daughter of ?William S. Meredith? She persuaded her husband, an architect, to become a missionary in Colombo, Ceylon. They had 8 Children.

We have a Book of Common Prayer printed in 1773, marked “Henry Rogers, of Stone House, Petworth, February 23rd, 1776,” (the year of the U.S. Rebellion) and subscribed “?Jms? Meredith, His Book.” It contains inter alia,
* The Act of Uniformity, I Elizabeth (1559);
*A form of prayer with thanksgiving for the 5th of November, Guy Fawkes' day (1605);
*A form of prayer with fasting for the 30th of January, the day of the martyrdom of the blessed King Charles Ist (1640);
*A form of prayer with thanksgiving on 29th of May for the end of the Great Rebellion and the restoration of King Charles II, (1660) to be kept for ever holy;
*A form of prayer and thanksgiving for the reign of King George III. (1761]

MEMOIR OF JOHN MEREDITH, ESQ.

John Meredith, Esq., was born in the county of Hereford, in the year 1784. He was baptized at Woolwich, by the Rev. Mr. Freeman, on Oct. 1, 1811, in the 27th year of his age. Preparatory to his appearing before the church he was examined privately by the minister and deacons. We find the following entry in his diary respecting this interview : - " I proceeded trembling for fear that I should say anything that the blessed Spirit did not warrant me. The Lord was very good ; he enabled me to say much more than I thought I could. God grant it might be according to truth. Oh that I might not deceive myself; Thee I cannot deceive." After relating his experience to the church as a candidate for baptism, he makes the following brief entry : - " Gave in my experience before the church. A great trial, but a great mercy." After partaking of the Lord's Supper for the first time, he thus writes : - " l am joined unto God's church and people. Oh, for Christ's sake, that I may be of the Lord's planting ; and I would humbly pray for his Divine presence whilst here with his church militant ; and that afterwards I may be received to his church triumphant. Amen and amen."

The subject of our memoir first became a member of the church meeting in Lambeth about twenty-five years ago, being dismissed to fellowship here by letter from the Baptist church at Bessel's Green, Kent, August 3, 1834. It is about twenty-three years since our departed friend was first called to fill the office of deacon. He had a clear view of its duties, and a deep sense of the solemn obligations under which he was laid to fulfil them. Hence on retiring to his home that day, he penned in secret the following paragraph : - " To-day, after the ordinance, I was chosen, by ballot, one of three deacons to our little church. If I stand, let me not be content with merely serving tables, which too generally is understood to be all that is required, and means keeping a good table for the minister and the poor ; but seeking to be full of faith and the Holy Ghost, may it be my concern to assist the minister, as Stephen and Philip did the Apostles, viz., in teaching sinners the way to heaven, and the inquirer the way of God more perfectly. There being a large debt (about £600 or £700 on the chapel), and a debt on the expenditure, and the income not meeting the present expenditure, makes it doubtful whether it is my duty to stand, as the time this will occupy will necessarily be a great deduction from the more important work of teaching. Lord, teach me (I am but a child) what thou wouldst have me to do."

He was a devoted labourer in the cause of Christ, and his labours were not in vain in the Lord. Whilst in connection with the church at Woolwich, he became the Superintendent of the Sabbath School there, and must have laboured indefatigably, as he occasionally visited as many as seventy families a day, in inquiring after absentee scholars and in canvassing for new ones. At Bessel's Green, in Kent, he filled the office of superintendent for several years. A boy named Allen was by him invited to the Sabbath School, who became impressed with the need of salvation, and has now for many years been labouring as a useful servant of God in the ministry. In George Street School he also filled the office of superintendent for a time, and acted in the capacity of visitor for the school. During his superintendency a youth received divine impressions, who left the school and entered the army, but the impressions never left him, and though a soldier, he became united to a Christian church. He also superintended the Palace Yard School, Lambeth, for several years.

A large portion of his time was spent in visiting the members at their homes, praying with them and trying to encourage them in the good way. Until within six months of his death he regarded himself as having neglected his duty if he did not call upon at least two or three sick or poor members every day. If a person were seriously ill, he would endeavour to see them at least once every twenty-four hours until a change took place. He was likewise very active and useful by epistolary correspondence.

According to a memorandum in his diary, he divided his correspondents into three general classes under the following heads, viz., 1. Careless ; 2. Inquirers ; 3. Decided; and used to address a letter to each of them on the return of their birthdays, giving counsel and advice as he thought each particular case required. He also enclosed a small book or tract to each of his correspondents.

He regarded a room as incompletely furnished without a copy of the Word of God. Hence, at least, one copy of the Bible was placed in every room in the house ; and should it by any mistake have been removed, he would have lost no time in taking it back to its place, or putting another in its stead. He sometimes called it " the Guard " or "Watchman" of the room.

Mr. Meredith was a man eminent for prayer. His diary contains one of the most remarkable and interesting memorials that, perhaps, was ever left by man ; it is the names of 460 persons for whom he was in the constant habit of making intercessory prayer. It comprehends the names not only of many of the leading ministers of the metropolis, but also the names of eminent ministers, laymen, and missionaries, in Australia, America, India, China, and other portions of the globe. For his own family he made daily special intercession, and his prayers were answered, as many years ago he was permitted to see each one of his sons and daughters united to Christian churches. Surely this is an encouragement for other Christian parents to pray for the conversion of their offspring.

His bodily health had been failing for six years, but more especially had it given way within the last six months. From the nature of the complaint under which he laboured, his sufferings must often have been intense and excruciating, but all was borne with much patience and resignation. On Friday evening, 21st inst., I saw him about nine o'clock. He knew that his departure was at hand. His mind was calm and serene. He rested, with unshaken confidence, for acceptance with God, on the finished work of Jesus. To him death had lost its sting. His last words were, " Come, Lord Jesus." At three the following morning he became unconscious ; and at six o'clock, on the evening of the same day, January 22nd, 1859, his disembodied and triumphant spirit entered, without a struggle or a groan, into its heavenly and eternal rest !

On Friday morning last, his mortal remains were interred in the Norwood Cemetery, amidst a large circle of mourning friends ; and whilst bending over his opened grave, in imagination " I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, Write, blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth. Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours ; and their works do follow them."

Lambeth. L.

The Baptist Magazine 1859 vol. 51 (series 5.- vol. 5) p302-3 (London: Pewtress & Co and J. Heaton & Son)








General Notes (Wife)

Dr Williams's Library is the pre-eminent research library of English Protestant nonconformity. Established under the will of Dr Daniel Williams, the Library is one of the oldest open to the public still conducted on its original benefaction. It has never received any government funding.

The Library serves a very wide readership, not only ministers and lay people of all denominations and faiths, but academics, independent scholars, family historians and research students.

Dr Williams's Trust which owns the Library, is one of the most important independent charitable trusts serving religious nonconformity.

Transcription of unsigned office copy of legal receipt in solicitor's clerk's copperplate handwriting for Frederick David Waldock and his wife, Maria Carter Waldock. There are several other similar items with connection to Hannah's parents' estate.

Newera Allia 1869
To John Bult Meredith Esq.
College Wharf, Belvedere Road
Lambeth, Surrey, England.

Dear Brother,

We have received (your letter) Messr.s Parson & Wollacott's of the 19th July last in which they inform us that you have paid to our brother Josiah, for us the following sums, namely-
The sum of £180/4/9 being the one equal sixth part to which the undersigned Frederick David Waldock (in right of the undersigned Maria Carter Waldock) is entitled under the will of our grandmother Mrs. Hannah Bult deceased of the net rents and proceeds of sale of certain leasehold houses in Harrison Street, St. Pancras, Middlesex- which sum was received by you as our attorney under and by virtue of a Power of Attorney from us dated 9th February, 1864
And the sum of £299/13/7 being the one seventh part to which the undersigned Frederick David Waldock (in right of the undersigned Maria Carter Waldock) is entitled under the will of our Grandfather Mr. John Bult, deceased, of the net rents and proceeds of sale of certain leasehold houses in St. Giles in the Fields and St. Marylebone, Middlesex which sum was received by you as our attorney under and by virtue of a Power of Attorney from us dated the 12th of March, 1864-And we now write to say that we severally fully approve of such payments.

Yours affectionately,

In Pencil F. D. W. and M. C. W.

61 Gracechurch Street, London, E.C.
1st January, 1864.

Dear Sir,

By this mail you will receive a letter from Miss Meredith informing you that we have been instructed, on behalf of the late Mrs. Meredith's family, to act as their solicitors in the sale of the leasehold houses in Harrison Street, Gray's Inn Road, which they are about to effect pursuant to the directions in the will of the late Mrs. Hannah Bult.
As that will contains no clause to the effect that the receipt of any particular person shall be a good discharge for the purchase money [to?etc?], it is not improbable that the purchaser's solicitor will require the concurrence in the assignment of all the persons who are beneficially interested in the proceeds, among whom are yourself and Mrs Waldock.

The Revd F. D. Waldock
27 Lake Side Road, Candy, Ceylon.

Page 2

In order therefore to avoid the delay which must be occasioned by sending the Assignment for your & Mrs Waldock's execution, & presuming that you & she are desirous to concur in the proposed sale, we have prepared, and now enclose for your execution, a power of attorney authorising Mrs Waldock's {?half?) brothers Mr. J.B. Meredith & Mr. S. B. Meredith jointly and severally to act for you in the matter. If, after careful perusal, you & Mrs. Waldock approve of this document, you & she will be so good as to attend with it before a Notary Public in Kandy, in whose presence, and that of two other witnesses, you & she will execute the document by signing your names where the respective initials are pencilled, & the notary will see that it is duly attested, attaching his usual certificate verifying same.
Should there not be a Notary Public in or near Kandy, then the document can be executed in like manner before some other person authorized to administer oaths, who will attach his certificate as above.
When this document has been thus completed we will thank you to return it, with the certificate, immediately to us.

The blanks at the end for date should be supplied in words, not figures, as of the day when executed.

We are

Dear sir,

Yours truly
Parson & Woollacott
61 Gracechurch street,
London, E.C. 19th April, 1864

Dear Sir,

We have received your letter of the 15th ulto, returning the second Power of Attorney duly executed. We also received in due course your letter of the 9th of February last returning the former power, which was also duly executed. We did not at the time acknowledge the receipt of this as we were under the impression that Mr. J.B. Meredith, who knew of its arrival, wants to do so.

We are obliged to you for your prompt attention to the matters, & are,

Yours faithfully, Parson & Woollacott

The Revd Fred. D. Waldock
27 Lake Side Road, Kandy, Ceylon

Kandy Newera Ellia 1864 (in Pencil) Date

To: Messers John Bult Meredith, Samuel Bult Meredith & Josiah Inglesby Meredith and Miss Hannah Bult Meredith, Tustees under the will of Mrs. Hannah Meredith, deceased.

Dear Brothers and Sister,

I Have received Messers Parson & Woollacott's letter of the 19 July last in which they inform me that you have paid to our brother Josiah for me the sum of £47/1/2, being the share to which I am entitled under our late mother's will of the general Income, to the 18th July last, from the residuary estate - and I now write to say that I fully approve of such payment.

Yours affectionately (in Pencil) M C. W

61 Gracechurch Street, London, E.C.
10th February, 1864

Dear Sir,

Since we sent you the power of attorney, as to the Harrison Street property, on the 1st ulto, it has occurred to the trustees under the will of the late Mr. John Bult that it will facilitate the winding up of Mr. Bult's estate if you & Mrs. Waldock would execute a power authorizing the payment of your share (in right of Mrs. Waldock) of that estate to Messrs. J.B. & S.B. Meredith. We have, therefore, on their instructions, prepared the enclosed power which, if approved, we will thank you & Mrs. Waldock to execute in like manner as the power which we sent you in January last to provide for the event of that letter having miscarried, or been mislaid, we will repeat the directions there given.

The Revd F.D. Waldock
2727 Lake Side Road, Kandy, Ceylon
Via Marseilles
[there follow similar instructions for due execution]

With this power in their hands, Messrs. J.B. & S.B. Meredith will be able to approve of the accounts, receive your share of the estate, & give a proper discharge for same, on your mirror, & then the time which would be consumed in sending the accounts & release to you will be saved.

Of course Messrs. Meredith will act of your instructions as to the remittance of the money to you, or otherwise dealing with it.
Etc.

(Courtesy of H.E. Waldock)


General Notes for Child Hannah Bult Meredith

1881 census - Back St (Private House), Petworth, Sussex, England
Henry Rogers, Head, M, 76, Tewksbury, Gloucester, England, Retired Congregational Minister
Hannah B. Rogers, Wife, M, 63, Westwick, Kent, England
Alice Austin, Serv, U, 22, Petworth, Sussex, England, Domestic Servant
(Reference: RG11, Piece / Folio 1112 / 48, Page 31)

Hannah died aged 90.


General Notes for Child John Bult Meredith

John Bult Meredith was brought up in Woolwich until 1829, then Bessels Green, Kent, until 1833, and finally in Lambeth where he was sent to a grammar school in Pimlico. He was baptised at Regent Baptist Chapel, Ethelred Street, Lambeth in 1835, and signed the total abstinence pledge the following year. He was an Engineer by profession, having been articled by indenture to John Hague in 1936 for 5 years. He worked on various engineering projects in different parts of the country after his indenture expired. Then in 1851 he bought a sawmill at Bankside, Southwark and settled down to live in Lambeth. In 1854 he moved to 6 Durham Place, Lambeth to be near his parents, and in 1864, after their death, he moved with his young family to Durham Villa, Wandsworth Common.

1871 Census Collection

John, a saw mill proprietor employing 90 men, (aged 50) was living at the family house, Durham Villa with his wife Eliza (aged 43) and their children Eliza Marian (aged 18), Alfred John Rouse (aged 16), Edward William (aged 14), and Howard Walter (aged 12)

1881 Census Collection:

John, a saw mill proprietor employing 90 men (aged 60) was living in Upper Richmond Rd, Wandsworth with his wife Eliza (aged 53), his daughter Eliza Marian (aged 28) and his three sons, Alfred (aged 26), Edward (aged 24) and Howard (aged 22) the latter described as a builder's ironmonger

1891 Census Collection:

John (aged 70) described as a timber merchant, was living at the Wandworth house with his wife Eliza (aged 65) and their daughter Eliza Marian.

1901 Census Collection:

John (aged 80) was living at 9 Sydenham Rd., Croydon with his wife Eliza (aged 73) and his daughter Eliza Marian (aged 48)

See Fragmentary Records of a Long Life including narratives of Seven Voyages by John B. Meredith:

"According to a certificate of birth in my possession I was born in Cannon Street, London, on February 5, 1821. This registration was effected at Dr. Williams' Library, Redcross Street, near Cripplegate, in the City of London. The new Registration Act was not passed till August 17, 1836.

I was one of a family of eight - four sons and four daughters - being the eldest son; one sister was older than myself.

Our parents afterwards lived at Woolwich during some eight or nine years. The land on the opposite shore of the Thames, that is, on the Essex side of the river, was then fields and marshes. At times we were ferried over the river, and wandered about there for an afternoon ramble, to our great delight......."


General Notes for Child Samuel Bult Meredith

1881 Census Collection:

Samuel was living with his married sister Sarah Doulton at 147 Peckham Rye, Camberwell, Surrey. Sarah was the head - assumed that her husband was deceased - living with her 5 children - he was described as a retired farmer.

The Times, Thursday, Oct 24, 1901; pg. 2; Issue 36594; col A

Re Samuel Bult Meredith deceased Pursuant to the Statute 22nd and 23rd Victoria Chap. 35, Notice is hereby given that all creditors and other persons having any claims or demands against the estate of Samuel Bult Meredith formerly of No. 16, Campbell Road Croydon in the County of Surrey but late of Springfield Villa Englefield Green in the same County retired Naval Engineer deceased (who died on the 20th day of August 1901, and whose will was proved in the Principal Registry of the Probate Division of the High Court of Justice on the 18th October 1901 by Arthur Meredith and George James Evered the Executors therein names) are hereby required to send the particulars of their claims and demands to me the undersigned on or before the 25th day of November 1901 after which date the said Executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the said deceased among the parties entitled thereto having regard only to the claims and demands of which they shall then have had notice and that they will not be liable for the assets of the said deceased or any part thereof so distributed to any person or persons of whose claims and demands they shall not then have had notice.

Dated this 23rd day of October 1901.

William B. Fairbrother 147, Leadenhall Street E.C. Solicitor for the said Executors.


General Notes for Child Sarah Saunders Meredith

1881 census - 147 Peckham Rye, Camberwell, Surrey, England.

Sarah S. Doulton, Head, W, 57, Woolwich, Kent, England, Dividends.
Amy Sarah Doulton, Daur, U, 33, Lambeth, Surrey, England, Dividends.
Alice Dunea. Doulton, Daur, U, 27, Brixton, Surrey, England, Dividends.
Alfred Percy Doulton, Son, U, 26, Brixton, Surrey, England, Solicitors Managing Clerk.
Isabel H. Doulton, Daur, U, 22, Dulwich, Surrey, England, Dividends.
Herbert V. Doulton, Son, U, 17, Dulwich, Surrey, England, Scholar.
Hannah F. Sleigh, Serv, U, 21, Stepney, Middlesex, England, Cook Domestic.
Mary Kate Blake, Serv, U, 21, Preston Condover, Hampshire, England, Housemaid Domestic.
Samuel B. Meredith, Brother, M, 58, Woolwich, Kent, England, Retired Farmer.

1891 Census:

Camberwell
257 Barry Road
Sarah S. Doulton - Head - 67 - Living on Own Means
Alice D. - daughter - 37 - Living on Own Means
Hubert V. - son - 27 - schoolmaster
Rosie - granddaughter - 10 - Scholar

1901 Census:

Camberwell
257 Barry Road
Sarah S. Doulton - 77 - Living on Own Means
Alice D. - daughter - 47
Hubert V. - son - Schoolmaster
Rosie - granddaughter - 20


General Notes for Child William Saunders Meredith

Name: William Saunders Meredith
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 24 May 1826
Christening Place: t Marys, Woolwich, Kent, Eng
Father's Name: John Meredith
Mother's Name: Hannah
Maternal Grandfather's Name: John Bult

Source Citation: Place: St Marys, Woolwich, Kent, Eng; Collection: Dr. William's Library; Nonconformist Registers; Date Range: 1825 - 1828; Film Number: 838729.

The Chinese Repository
Vol. XIV

From January to December 1845
Establishment of H. B. M. Plenipotentiary and Superintendant of Trade in China
H. B. Majesty's Consulate at Fuchau
Mr W. Saunders Meredith - Junior Assistant

The Primative Church Magazine - 1847

The Era (London England), Sunday, July 31, 1842; Issue 201

City of London School......Dr. Conquest's Gold Medal, value 10 guineas, for general proficiency, adjudged to William Saunders Meredith..........Greek iambic verses on the same subject (orations in praise of the founder) were also recited by W. S. Meredith, gold medalist.........

The Times, Tuesday, Oct 10, 1843; pg. 5; Issue 18423; col E

China and India - Extraordinary Express

G. Tradescant Lay Esq., had been temporarily appointed to act as her Britannic Majesty's Consul at Canton; Robert Thom, Esq., as Interpreter; and Messrs. T. W. Meadows and A Meredith, as clerks in the Consular-office.

Page 161

....aged twenty-one years, William Saunders Meredith, third son of John Meredith, Esq. Lambeth Road, late of the diplomatic Department, Hong Kong, China

The Times Tuesday April 25th 1848:

On the 23rd, of dysentery, aged 21, William Saunders Meredith, Esq, third
son of John Meredith Esq, Lambeth Road and late of the Diplomatic Department, Hong Kong , China.

Baptist Reporter and Missionary Intelligencer - Page 248
1848

....April 23, aged 21, Mr. W.S. Meredith, third son of John Meredith, Esq., Lambeth Road, London. He was connected with the Deplomatic Department, Hong Kong, China, and had returned home only eleven days, on leave of absence, for the recovery of his health, when death removed him to a better world. His hope of heaven was founded on the atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ.

The China Consuls
British Consular Officers - 1843-1943 by P. D. Coates.

Page 13:

"..........Why Connor and Meredith were in Hong Kong and available for selection by Pottinger is not clear..........Meredith, of whom Davis also thought highly, was one of at least eight children in a middle-class Lambeth family and had just reached Hong Kong, barely 17 years old." (1843).

Page 17:

Due to poor accomodation in Foochow......."The improvement" (in accomodation) "such as it was, came too late for Meredith, the junior assistant. He went home with chronic dysentery (about 1845) , returned to China for eighteen months and then went home again to die of the dysentery at the age of 21."

Page 43:

"......Morrison and Meredith were pelted with stones while walking in the city's streets....." (Foochow).


General Notes for Child Martha Bult Meredith

The Times, Thursday, Dec, 23, 1847; pg. 7; Issue 19740; Col B

".....on Wednesday the 22nd inst., Martha Bult Meredith, aged 20, third daughter of John Meredith, Esq, Lambeth Road. She fell asleep in Jesus."


General Notes for Child Josiah Inglesby Meredith

1871 Census:

London
Charlton
Josiah Meredith - 41 - Saw Mill Proprietor
Mary J. - wife - 30
Harold J. - son - 6
Ernest B. - son - 4
William J. - son - 2

1881 census - 38A Robertson St, Hastings Holy Trinity, Sussex, England
Home of Henry Mills and family, a Cabinet Maker employing 50 men & boys.
Josiah J. MEREDITH, Visitor, M, 51, Woolwich, Kent, England, Timber Merchant
Mary J. MEREDITH, Wife, M, 40, Scarboro, York, England
Harold J. MEREDITH, Son, 16, Wandsworth, Surrey, England, Clerk To Above
Ernest B. MEREDITH, Son, 14, Wandsworth, Surrey, England, Scholar
Ethel M. MEREDITH, Daur, 5, Lewisham, Kent, England
(Reference: RG11, Piece / Folio 1026 / 50, Page 17)

1891 census North Down Rd, Carisbrooke, Bideford, Devon
Josiah J. MEREDITH, Head, M, 61, b.Woolwich, Kent, Living On Own Means
Mary J. MEREDITH, Wife, M, 50, b. Scarborough, North Riding of Yorkshire
Harold J. MEREDITH, Son, S, 26, b. Wandsworth Surrey, Ironmonger(Em'er)
Bertram A. MEREDITH, Son, S, 19, b.Blackheath Kent, Ironmonger Assistant(Em'ee)
Percy W. MEREDITH, Son, S, 17, b.Lewisham, Kent, Architects Pupil(Em'ee)
Mabel B. MEREDITH, Dau, 10, b.Brockley, Kent, Scholar, Disability
2 servants

1901 Census:

Devon
Bideford
Josiah - 71 - retired timber merchant
Mary J. - wife - 60
Bertram - son - 29
Ethel - daughter - 25
Mabel - daughter - 20

Josiah died at age 79.


General Notes for Child Maria Carter Meredith

Maria Carter taught at and administered the Colombo Native Christian Girls' Boaring School.

Frederick David Waldock- Born 22 Sept 1831, Braughing, Hertford, England. Christened 7 Mar 1832, Independent Church, Buntingford, Hertford. School, where ? Married Maria Carter Meredith 9 Aug 1862, at Esher St. Congregational Chapel, District of Lambeth, London, England. Frederick Waldock was a young architect whose bride purportedly persuaded him to "don the cloth" as a Baptist missionary. Became a Baptist minister 23 Jul 1862. "11 Aug 1862, a farewell party was held for F.D. Waldock who was bound for Kandy, Ceylon." He then took his wife from England to Colombo, Ceylon by sailing ship (the "Percy Douglas") around the Cape of Good Hope in 1862. Designed and had house built in Colombo. All eight children born here. It is now (1984) the headquarters building for the Baptist Church ("Mission House", 46 Kynesy Road, Colombo) in Sri Lanka. He designed and built many buildings in Ceylon for the Baptist Church- churches and schools. "Waldock House", one of four houses of Carey Baptist College, Kynsey Road, Colombo: 8, Sri Lanka, was named after him. Retired 1898. Died 6 Oct 1908, Worthing, England.

Maria Carter (Meredith) Waldock- Born where ? when ? Parents: ?

Meredith, Hannah Bult. Strong minded. Brought up children in a strict Baptist way. They were not allowed to go to theatres or concerts and all they did on Sundays was to read the Bible. Maria taught and administered the Colombo Native Christian Girls' Boarding School. Died 30 Sep 1909, Mardana Warwick-Gardens, Worthing, England.

Transcription of a letter to Maria Carter Waldock, Née Meredith, wife of Frederick David Waldock from her brother John Meredith. Eliza must be John's wife; who Hannah was is not clear. (Courtesy of H.E. Waldock)

Durham Villa,
Wandsworth Common,
London, S.W.
June 9, 1866

My Dear Maria,

We were very sorry to hear of Mr. Allen's death, it did seem sudden. Indeed, I would have written next to Frederick in reply to his letter but am not sure where he is, and mine is a letter of business.

You are aware that by mother's will, on sister's marriage the surplus she had over the rest was to be redivided; it has been done, and Mr. Wollacott will explain in his letter what he wishes you and Frederick to sign, and you both must be particular, as by not doing so on a former occasion, it caused some little extra charge, you will see that the firm is now Woollacott & Leonard, Mr. Larson having retired on account of his health, so we live in a world of change.

Little did we suppose sister was going so suddenly to make such a change as she has done, but I hope it will be for her happiness. I have seen her new home, having been there at the welcome the people gave them on their marriage, it is a pleasant country place, where one would be free from the wear and tear of London life, it is a daily race here, and the world seems going on at a rapid pace.

Eliza has been engaged for some weeks last in getting your order, for things without end, ready for shipment and she has at last succeeded in getting off the case to the dock. The vessel “Jane Maria” sails on Tuesday next June 12. What a case it is, more than 3 or 4 men can lift. Your order came when we were full of business every way and especially in preparing for Hannah's marriage & the business connected with it. By the way there are some few pounds legal expenses connected with the alteration of the property which you have to bear in conjunction with the rest, however, has you will see by Mr. Woollacott's statement that you will get a small additional sum to receive interest upon.

Eliza will write to you by the next mail with bill of lading which we have not yet received from the ship broker.
We have received at college wharf two curious sort of trays or half boxes, but no particulars, what they are for. Will you send word when you write next. We are all well and all send their love to you, Frederick, & yours.

Believe me, your affectionate brother,

John B. Meredith


picture

John Bult and Hannah Inglesby




Husband John Bult

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1823
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Hannah Inglesby

         Born: 1764
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 May 1848 - Lambeth, London
       Buried: 


       Father: John Inglesby
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Hannah Bult

         Born: 5 Sep 1790 - Dr. Williams Library, London
   Christened: 
         Died: 18 Aug 1863 - Lambeth
       Buried: 1863 - Norwood Cemetery, London
       Spouse: John Meredith
         Marr: 1816 - St. Mary's Woolwich



2 M Samuel Bult

         Born: 1806 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah



3 M John Bult

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1832
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John's will was dated 15 June 1819, and was contested in the courts later by a representitive of his son John.


General Notes (Wife)

Hannah's father was John Inglesby. Her death announcement describes her as Hannah, widow of John Bult Esq. late of Wigmore Street, Cavendish Square and of Brook Green, Hammersmith.

1841 Census:

Middlesex
St. Pancras
Kentish Town
Bartholomew Place
Hannah Bult - 75


General Notes for Child Hannah Bult

Dr Williams's Library is the pre-eminent research library of English Protestant nonconformity. Established under the will of Dr Daniel Williams, the Library is one of the oldest open to the public still conducted on its original benefaction. It has never received any government funding.

The Library serves a very wide readership, not only ministers and lay people of all denominations and faiths, but academics, independent scholars, family historians and research students.

Dr Williams's Trust which owns the Library, is one of the most important independent charitable trusts serving religious nonconformity.

Transcription of unsigned office copy of legal receipt in solicitor's clerk's copperplate handwriting for Frederick David Waldock and his wife, Maria Carter Waldock. There are several other similar items with connection to Hannah's parents' estate.

Newera Allia 1869
To John Bult Meredith Esq.
College Wharf, Belvedere Road
Lambeth, Surrey, England.

Dear Brother,

We have received (your letter) Messr.s Parson & Wollacott's of the 19th July last in which they inform us that you have paid to our brother Josiah, for us the following sums, namely-
The sum of £180/4/9 being the one equal sixth part to which the undersigned Frederick David Waldock (in right of the undersigned Maria Carter Waldock) is entitled under the will of our grandmother Mrs. Hannah Bult deceased of the net rents and proceeds of sale of certain leasehold houses in Harrison Street, St. Pancras, Middlesex- which sum was received by you as our attorney under and by virtue of a Power of Attorney from us dated 9th February, 1864
And the sum of £299/13/7 being the one seventh part to which the undersigned Frederick David Waldock (in right of the undersigned Maria Carter Waldock) is entitled under the will of our Grandfather Mr. John Bult, deceased, of the net rents and proceeds of sale of certain leasehold houses in St. Giles in the Fields and St. Marylebone, Middlesex which sum was received by you as our attorney under and by virtue of a Power of Attorney from us dated the 12th of March, 1864-And we now write to say that we severally fully approve of such payments.

Yours affectionately,

In Pencil F. D. W. and M. C. W.

61 Gracechurch Street, London, E.C.
1st January, 1864.

Dear Sir,

By this mail you will receive a letter from Miss Meredith informing you that we have been instructed, on behalf of the late Mrs. Meredith's family, to act as their solicitors in the sale of the leasehold houses in Harrison Street, Gray's Inn Road, which they are about to effect pursuant to the directions in the will of the late Mrs. Hannah Bult.
As that will contains no clause to the effect that the receipt of any particular person shall be a good discharge for the purchase money [to?etc?], it is not improbable that the purchaser's solicitor will require the concurrence in the assignment of all the persons who are beneficially interested in the proceeds, among whom are yourself and Mrs Waldock.

The Revd F. D. Waldock
27 Lake Side Road, Candy, Ceylon.

Page 2

In order therefore to avoid the delay which must be occasioned by sending the Assignment for your & Mrs Waldock's execution, & presuming that you & she are desirous to concur in the proposed sale, we have prepared, and now enclose for your execution, a power of attorney authorising Mrs Waldock's {?half?) brothers Mr. J.B. Meredith & Mr. S. B. Meredith jointly and severally to act for you in the matter. If, after careful perusal, you & Mrs. Waldock approve of this document, you & she will be so good as to attend with it before a Notary Public in Kandy, in whose presence, and that of two other witnesses, you & she will execute the document by signing your names where the respective initials are pencilled, & the notary will see that it is duly attested, attaching his usual certificate verifying same.
Should there not be a Notary Public in or near Kandy, then the document can be executed in like manner before some other person authorized to administer oaths, who will attach his certificate as above.
When this document has been thus completed we will thank you to return it, with the certificate, immediately to us.

The blanks at the end for date should be supplied in words, not figures, as of the day when executed.

We are

Dear sir,

Yours truly
Parson & Woollacott
61 Gracechurch street,
London, E.C. 19th April, 1864

Dear Sir,

We have received your letter of the 15th ulto, returning the second Power of Attorney duly executed. We also received in due course your letter of the 9th of February last returning the former power, which was also duly executed. We did not at the time acknowledge the receipt of this as we were under the impression that Mr. J.B. Meredith, who knew of its arrival, wants to do so.

We are obliged to you for your prompt attention to the matters, & are,

Yours faithfully, Parson & Woollacott

The Revd Fred. D. Waldock
27 Lake Side Road, Kandy, Ceylon

Kandy Newera Ellia 1864 (in Pencil) Date

To: Messers John Bult Meredith, Samuel Bult Meredith & Josiah Inglesby Meredith and Miss Hannah Bult Meredith, Tustees under the will of Mrs. Hannah Meredith, deceased.

Dear Brothers and Sister,

I Have received Messers Parson & Woollacott's letter of the 19 July last in which they inform me that you have paid to our brother Josiah for me the sum of £47/1/2, being the share to which I am entitled under our late mother's will of the general Income, to the 18th July last, from the residuary estate - and I now write to say that I fully approve of such payment.

Yours affectionately (in Pencil) M C. W

61 Gracechurch Street, London, E.C.
10th February, 1864

Dear Sir,

Since we sent you the power of attorney, as to the Harrison Street property, on the 1st ulto, it has occurred to the trustees under the will of the late Mr. John Bult that it will facilitate the winding up of Mr. Bult's estate if you & Mrs. Waldock would execute a power authorizing the payment of your share (in right of Mrs. Waldock) of that estate to Messrs. J.B. & S.B. Meredith. We have, therefore, on their instructions, prepared the enclosed power which, if approved, we will thank you & Mrs. Waldock to execute in like manner as the power which we sent you in January last to provide for the event of that letter having miscarried, or been mislaid, we will repeat the directions there given.

The Revd F.D. Waldock
2727 Lake Side Road, Kandy, Ceylon
Via Marseilles
[there follow similar instructions for due execution]

With this power in their hands, Messrs. J.B. & S.B. Meredith will be able to approve of the accounts, receive your share of the estate, & give a proper discharge for same, on your mirror, & then the time which would be consumed in sending the accounts & release to you will be saved.

Of course Messrs. Meredith will act of your instructions as to the remittance of the money to you, or otherwise dealing with it.
Etc.

(Courtesy of H.E. Waldock)


General Notes for Child Samuel Bult

1841 Census:

Middlesex
St. Mary Islington East
Hornsey Lane
Samuel Bult - 35 - Independent
Samuel Bult - son - 12
Sarah Bult - 40 - wife
Hannah Bult - daughter - 7

1851 Census:

Islington East
Samuel Bult - Head - 49
Sarah Bult - wife - 53
Samuel I. - son - 22


General Notes for Child John Bult

John had no children.
picture

George Bush and Sarah Hicks




Husband George Bush

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 16 Sep 1869 - South Lyncombe, nr Bristol




Wife Sarah Hicks

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


General Notes (Husband)

The Bristol Mercury, Saturday, September 25, 1869; Issue 4147

September 16, at South Lyncombe, by the Rev. Henry Gale, George Bush, of the National Provincial Bank, to Sarah, daughter of Eugene Hicks, of Devonshire-buildings, Bath.
picture

John Charles Cameron and Julia Mooyart




Husband John Charles Cameron

         Born: 14 Sep 1810 - Scotland
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 11 Jun 1840 - Kandy, Sri Lanka




Wife Julia Mooyart

         Born: 4 Sep 1819
   Christened: 14 Nov 1819
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Jacobus Nicolaas Mooyart
       Mother: Johanna Catherine Jahn




General Notes (Husband)

Assistant Staff Surgeon.
picture

Harper Campbell and Clara Elizabeth Poynter




Husband Harper Campbell

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 21 Jan 1891 - Geelong, Victoria




Wife Clara Elizabeth Poynter

         Born: 17 Jun 1866 - Talbot, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Meredith Poynter
       Mother: Emily Nodder Shaw




picture
Joseph Carter and Margaret Meredith




Husband Joseph Carter

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 18 Apr 1760 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Margaret Meredith

         Born: 1733 - Circa
   Christened: 9 Mar 1733 - Lingen, Herefordshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens





Children
1 F Unknown Carter

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




picture
Samuel Meredith and Martha Carter




Husband Samuel Meredith

         Born: 1735 - Circa
   Christened: 6 Mar 1735 - Lingen, Hereford
         Died: 29 October 1807 - Aged 71
       Buried: 


       Father: David Meredith
       Mother: Sarah Owens


     Marriage: 15 Feb 1763




Wife Martha Carter

         Born: 1745 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 2 March 1827 - aged 82
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Samuel Meredith - of Wigmore

         Born: 1764 - Circa
   Christened: 2 Jan 1764 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 13 January 1819 (aged 56)
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Esther (Hester) Radnor
         Marr: 12 Feb 1804 - Byton, Herefordshire



2 F Martha Meredith

         Born: 1766 - Circa
   Christened: 9 May 1766 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1768 - Circa
   Christened: 17 Jul 1768 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Timothy Meredith

         Born: 1770 - Circa
   Christened: 21 Nov 1770 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 4 October 1820 - aged 49
       Spouse: Ann



5 F Phebe Meredith

         Born: 1773 - Circa
   Christened: 4 Jun 1773 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M James Meredith

         Born: 1775 - Circa
   Christened: 1 Mar 1775 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1777 - Circa
   Christened: 4 May 1777 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 M Scipio Meredith

         Born: 1779 - Circa
   Christened: 22 Jun 1779 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 F Hannah Meredith

         Born: 1782 - Circa
   Christened: 9 Jun 1782 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: William Edwards
         Marr: 21 Mar 1815 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford



10 M John Meredith




         Born: 1784 - Circa
   Christened: 29 May 1784-1 Oct 1811 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford & Woolwich
         Died: 22 Jan 1859 - 6pm - Lambeth
       Buried: 28 Jan 1859 - Norwood Cemetery
       Spouse: Hannah Bult
         Marr: 1816 - St. Mary's Woolwich



11 M William Meredith

         Born: 1787 - Circa
   Christened: 27 Jan 1787 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ann Rollings
         Marr: 10 Feb 1817 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




General Notes (Husband)

Described as Samuel Meredith of Wigmore.


General Notes for Child John Meredith

1841 Census Collection:

Location: 3 Durham Place, Lambeth, Surrey

John (aged 55) with his wife Hannah (aged 50), and their children, Hannah (aged 20), John (aged 20) apprentice engineer, Samuel (aged 15) also an apprentice engineer, Sarah (aged 15), William (aged 15), Martha (aged 13), Josiah (aged 12) and Maria (aged 6)

1851 Census Collection:

Location: 3 Durham Place, Lambeth, Surrey

John (aged 67) described as a proprietor of houses, with his wife Hannah (aged 60), and two children, Hannah (aged 33) and John (aged 30) an engineer.

No. 100 Lambeth Rd, (formerly No. 3 Durham Place) was built about 1794, (ref. 45) the first occupant being William Bligh, vice-admiral, 1794–1814 (Bligh of the Bounty). Bligh accompanied Captain Cook on his second voyage round the world in 1772–4 when bread-fruit was discovered at Otaheite. This lead to Bligh's appointment to the Bounty in 1787. The famous mutiny occurred on the voyage from Tahiti where bread-fruit plants had been collected with a view to acclimatizing them in the British West Indies. In 1805 Bligh was appointed governor of New South Wales but he had a troubled term of office and he was deposed and imprisoned by a Major Johnston, who was subsequently cashiered. (ref. 96) Bligh died in 1817 and was buried in Lambeth Churchyard (see p. 116).

1861 Census Collection:

Hannah, described as a widow, proprietor of houses, was living at the same address with her daughters Hannah and Maria.

By the time of the 1871 Census, John and Hannah's son John Bult was living at No. 3 Durham Place - it is assumed his mother Hannah had passed away

A FATHER'S ADVICE to his son on his going to reside in China.
By William S. Meredith, Dec.28th, 1842. Finally left London, Jan. 25th, 1843. J.M.
“Gratitude preserves old friendships, and procures new.”


Index
Person & Health 1
Religion 2
Teetotallism 8
Business 13
Study 19
Conversation 22
Discussion 26
Letter-Writing 28
Recreation 32
Acquaintance 33
Friendship 36
At Sea 41
Sea Sickness 53
Journal 56
Storm 57
Danger 60

Page 1
PERSON
Be cleanly. In dress be neat, not fine, nor expensive, nor in the extreme of fashion.
Luke 12th. 22nd. 28th.

HEALTH
Retire to rest at an early hour; rise early: wash the entire person-drink half a pint of water, if pure-walk out in the fresh air, but not to produce fatigue.

Clothe yourself according to the climate, taking care always to produce a genial heat-avoid drafts and wet feet-change clothes when wet. Attend to the first intimation of a cold: do not say “It is only a cold.” For head-ache put the soles of the feet in cold water for 10 minutes; previously bathing the back of your hands, temples, behind the ears, and the forehead.
III John 2nd

Page 2
RELIGION
Commit to memory the first three verses of the fifth psalm; also the nineteenth, twenty-third, and the first eight verses of the 37th.
Read once a week at least one of the eight penitential Psalms-the sixth, twenty-fifth, thirty-second, thirty-eighth, fifty-first, hundred & second, hundred & thirtieth, hundred & forty-third, with a portion of the gospels or epistles. Be much in meditation and ejaculatory prayer. Let prayer precede and accompany all your little concerns. “Pray without ceasing.” Go into the fields with Isaac. Gen. 24th & 63rd. Always rise, so as to allow half an hour for reading, self examination and prayer. And when you cannot pray for yourself which will sometimes be the case, pray for others; your relations, your connections, the city where you dwell, the Church, or the spread of the gospel in the world, particularly amongst the millions of China. Carry the text of the day with you; it will be a comfort and an encouragement to recollect that we have the same text for our daily portion at home. Read occasionally other good books besides your Bible particularly Finney; accustom yourself to the “breaking down” he speaks of.

Avoid idle, but cultivate pious conversation, Malachi III 16th, taking care to improve yourself in this divine art. Be watchful over your own heart, your spirit, manner, and conduct. Be regular and punctual on the means of grace. Be careful to keep the Lord`s day profitably: as you will have no Sabbath around you amongst the heathen, you will need to be doubly upon your guard in this respect. Let your's be a cheerful not a gloomy piety. Select the pious for your closest companions.

Encourage and keep up the desire of influencing others to be good, and to do good. This will be a never failing stimulus to excel in knowledge, morals and religion. Endeavor to do good in the family & where God may place you, and to do good as you have opportunity to the ignorant elsewhere; setting your heart upon, and giving God no rest till you have saved one soul. That will be an abundant recompense for your going all the way to China. Watch and pray against a spirit of pride and self-righteousness. Flee these as you would flee the serpent. Cultivate a feeling of gratitude both towards God and man; and you will never want.

On no account fail in keeping a journal of your religious experience-a volume might be written on its advantages. It will in one word act as a barometer to the soul. Come to this determination; always to be ready to perform those duties which others dislike, or may decline. Be much in heaven; let heaven have your first thoughts every morning and when any little cross arises, set heaven against it-hold the balances just and equal, and I will answer for the consequences. Read a page daily in Philip`s Eternity Realized.
James 8th v. 13th Prov 3rd-17th

“The glories of the heavenly state
Should now with joy our souls elate
While in our thoughts we trace
The wondrous heights and depths of love
Which make us meet for realms above
To see our saviour's face.”
Gatherings of forty years by the Rev. ?Hune? Shepherd

Page 8
TEETOTALLISM
Next to your religion, we consider your being a Tee-Totaller as one of your greatest privileges. Indeed we could not have consented to your going had you not professed both. In propagating this, as in religion, you will need wisdom. You see that I take it for granted that you will be diffusing your light. I am sure it is not necessary to urge the keeping of the pledge to one who has nearly served an apprenticeship; the recollection that you have four dear sisters and three brothers with you, as well as two dear parents all pledged members will tend to strengthen, comfort, and encourage you. In introducing the system into China, (for I expect that this honor is left for you,) as I before intimated, you will need great wisdom and prudence; still it must be done. Your father, you know glories where he is permitted to be a pioneer in a good cause, so will my son-You have been blessed with this excellent system, and you will be anxious to be a blessing to others-I said with prudence, to not drag it in-as much as possible avoid argument-to a good man tell of the good you have seen and heard that it has effected-and to the missionary say that it will remove one of the greatest stumbling blocks in the way of the spread of the gospels, to the poor man say that it will make him rich, and to the rich that it will enable him to enjoy his riches. A word here, and a tract there, will be your best plan at first; but your living example will be the most powerful means you can employ. We purpose giving you some Temperance and religious tracts, which lend as far as possible, it ensures the reading, and promotes economy.-Bacchus and Anti-Bacchus with some other works, we purpose sending also. I scarcely need add that you will consider your pledge as extending to the horrid opium and everything else that intoxicates.
Rom. 14th 21st

Page 13
BUSINESS
“Not slothful in business, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord.” Rom. XII 11th
“Quarter of an hour Before the time.” I owe all I have in the world to these quarters of hours.” Lord Nelson.

The union of punctuality with diligence is the grand secret of all success, whether in business, science, morals, or religion. Be active, what others decline you promptly do-be courteous, cultivating a pleasing, but manly address-never flatly contradict, never impute motives. Be a thorough master of your business or profession. Aim high. Never let any see you suspect them of falsehood or dishonesty. Abhor the sentiment that says you are to suspect every man a rogue till you have proved him an honest man. Yet as the Chinese have a character for deceitfulness and petty theft, it will be your duty to watch them. Be upright in all your dealings and transactions. Keep correct accounts, beginning with your own. Have a regular debtor and creditor account of all your expenditure. The knowing how your money goes will teach you economy, and prepare you for business on the largest scale. Pay ready money whenever it is possible especially in domestic concerns. When debts are contracted be punctual in payment. Let all your remittances be at the appointed time, not keeping that which is not your own for the sake of interest, or any pecuniary advantage. Be respectful and obliging to your master and superiors, never resting till you obtain their confidence, then be careful to retain it. When your duty to them, or a higher duty requires you to express an opinion differing from their's, let it be with deference preceded by an apology, or some just compliment.

Be attentive to the wants whether real or imaginary of all. Study to please and you are sure of success. Avoid finding fault about trifles. Let all your orders or commands be given with distinctness of expression but with softness of manner; this will ensure obedience. It will be seldom necessary to give a reason for such commands. Let me again beseech you as if it were the last words I were to write or speak, that in all your appointments, whether in business, benevolence or religion, that you be always, “A quarter of an hour before the time.”
Eccl. 9th-10th

Page 19
STUDY
Let not your studies smell of the lamp;-by this I mean never to sit up beyond the usual time of retiring to sleep. A regular habit of early rising will generally supersede the necessity of midnight study. But if circumstances ever should arise that would make it necessary for you to rob yourself of your rest, let it be in the morning and not at night. Some recommend a change from severe to lighter study, as a means of relaxation; this is well, but I would suggest that it be total abstinence, and this before the mind becomes jaded. Never study in the open air; particularly in a warm climate like that of China. In reading make notes; and when the book is your own, Dr. Watts recommends the practice of marking the margin, when you meet with any thing remarkable. Keep a list of the books you read, and when you read them.
Prov.4th 5th

Page 20
CONVERSATION
I have often been at a loss to determine which has the most charms-elegant writing or elegant conversation. I would advise that you resolve to excel in both.

There are rules you can read; but it is practice which will make you perfect. Penetrate at once into the character, profession or business of the parties present; our friend the Rev. J Millar is an excellent pattern for you in this particular.

This can be done very much with the eye and ear; but chiefly, and easily, by just touching upon the subjects you may suppose the company to be most conversant with. You will then find that with a little occasional drawing out, each will be ready to cast in their individual proportion into the conversational treasury; and when you retire be careful to set down in a book kept for that purpose what you have thus so pleasantly gathered.

Speak but seldom yourself. Your chief business is to elicit truth from others. Be at ease in all company. I am supposing my son not capable of choosing improper company; and if by accident he is thrown into such, he will soon make his escape.

Feeling at ease will always ensure your leaving a favorable impression behind you; and in addition if you drop some word or sentiment calculated to make all better, you will be saved those regrets which too frequently have fallen to the lot of others.
Phil.1st 27th

Page 26
DISCUSSION
In a discussion, argument, or where there are any differences of opinion, whether in business, the parlor, or in committees, as a young man especially, attend to and act out, the conduct of either Job 32nd 4th and when once having delivered your sentiments do not be solicitous about consequences; to reiterate the same thing only tends to irritate but does not convince. Take our Lord for your model. Do not use expressions stronger than the case may require; here also follow our blessed Lord, who, I believe, except in the case of the Pharisee lawyer, never used strong language, but after delivering the most weighty and solemn truths with simplicity and plainness of speech left their force to bear upon the hearer's mind.
II Tim.2nd 23rd

Page 28
LETTER-WRITING
This is a divine art, and if we consider that the Scriptures were originally all written, the term is neither extravagant nor improper. The Epistles especially were letters addressed to individuals “to the Church”-“To the believers scattered abroad.” You have heard me say, that had I been earlier disciplined, such is the delight I take in letter-writing, I think I could move a world.

Write naturally; do not attempt to write fine. Suppose yourself sitting in the company of the party you are going to address, telling them your thoughts. Use brevity but fulness and clearness of expression-this will apply particularly to business letters. Feeling, sympathy, courteousness, and kindness should pervade your letters; letters of business by no means excepted-a courteous letter will obtain an answer or a connection when the cold phlegmatic one would fail. Throw your whole soul into every subject you touch-Let no letter pass from under hand without dropping some word to profit. There is this great, inexpressibly great, advantage in letter-writing over speaking, you can be more full and free. Keep a journal; this will always furnish you with matter. Read some of the best letter writers [such] as Cowper, Newton etc.
Gal. 6th 11th

Page 32
RECREATION
This includes-exercise-sights (lawful of course) scenery, sketching company-retirement-according to inclination and circumstances.
Gen. 24th 63rd

Page 33
ACQUAINTANCE
As a man of large benevolence, which I trust you will be, and should you be extensively engaged in business, the circle of your acquaintance will necessary be large. It will therefore be your wisdom so to conduct yourself as to gain the esteem of all; but should you not be so fortunate, take care never to make any one your enemy.

Discover the different capabilities of your acquaintance that everyone may have his proper place in the circle. By so doing you will make the very utmost use of the talent which God may have given them. This will also have a beneficial reaction upon yourself, and teach you your proper place in society, and gradually fit you for the most important offices.
1Cor 15-33

Page 36
FRIENDSHIP
From amongst your acquaintance it will be desirable to select a few friends and only a few, lest they should take up too much of your time. It is not indispensable, as some suppose, that in order to friendship the individual should be an exact epitome of ourselves; nevertheless there are some prerequisites necessary. If possible, let the balance of attainments be with your intended friend. He should possess not slender but deep, sterling, enlightened piety, general knowledge - good temper - communicativeness - and be a Tee Totaller if you can find one. Do not be anxious for what is termed bosom friends, in other words, one who will tell you all he thinks and feels; such a one will expect you to do the same, and this may not be either convenient or proper; coolness will follow. You will perhaps remember the case of the two American students related by Todd, who to exemplify this ideal character of a bosom friend, resolved to tell each other of of their faults-they had not practiced this long, before they became shy of one another`s company & a total alienation ensued. Do not be inquisitive about each other's private affairs. Dwell less on the defects than on the excellencies of every friend; and do the same when speaking of others; you will find this will have a most happy influence on the spirit of both you and your friend, and tend more to perpetuate friendship than any thing else. Caleb & Joshua made a good report of the land, and they entered into it, while the rest perished in the wilderness.
Prov 18th 24t

Page 41
AT SEA
On board a ship, particularly in a long voyage, character is exhibited more than in any other place on this side eternity. The exhortation “to watch and pray” will needs be in constant exercise. Be courteous to equals and superiors, and kind to every one who is below you. Pay great deference to a captain; he reigns as absolute as the Emperor of China. While friendly with all, be intimate with none. Your fellow passengers, like the Chinese, will be inquiring who you are, and what you intend to be. To some you may answer good-humouredly what are your pursuits; generally it is best to give a direct answer (mercantile) and then quickly turn the subject by asking, “Do you see that sail?” Or any other apt question; then a few words on something profitable, leaving the parties with a favorable impression.

When occasion offers modestly but firmly show your religious and Tee-total principles; this will save you much that is painful afterwards. To hesitate is to invite temptation; to boast is to invite opposition. If reflections be made and persecutions follow, bear them patiently. These are but for a moment. You can afford to suffer-you have been reaping the fruits of religion simultaneously for more than six years, and hope to enjoy them throughout eternity. In all such cases be sure to attend to the scriptural maxim, “overcome evil with good.” Punish your opponents by doing them some act of kindness. Your heavenly Father will take care of the rest. “If a man's ways please the Lord, his enemies shall be at peace with him.” Embrace the earliest opportunity when out at sea to commence lending religious and temperance tracts (one of each), always taking care that the parties are at leisure, and if possible alone. Wait a day or so to see how these work-then effect a change, lending those you receive back to others. By doing this daily and at a given time it will not interfere with your studies and other duties. Before lending to the seamen ask permission of the captain. Preparatory to circulation read one or two yourself so as to be seen of men, not with a pharisaical motive, but to invite attention, and perhaps solicitation will follow. If there is no chaplain on board, and no one else promotes it, consult with the captain on the Saturday respecting service on the Lord's day, and whether you shall read a chapter, pray, & sing with a short sermon, weather permitting. But if this is not allowed, be sure you keep the day holy unto the Lord. In reference to your own person do just as if you were on terra firma as far as aqua infirma will permit. Rise with the morning watch, wash yourself, using the water economically, this being a most valuable article at sea. I need not add shave, as Neptune will do all you require in that way. Take your meals regularly, but eat sparingly. Keep in with the cook and steward as these are important personages and can either add or diminish your comfort much. Drink plenty of water between meals, but none at meals. No suppers are eaten at sea. Learn the way of the ship; by this I mean not only the vessel but its occupiers. Learn to help yourself. Ascertain the names of all on board, particularly of the sailors, and observe their characters; you will know then how to treat them, and to pray for them. In their little troubles show that you sympathize with them. Learn the nautical phrases as soon as you can. If there is a book on board explaining these terms, borrow it. Your friend Mr. Prince will be glad to assist you. Learn also the longitudes and latitudes of places and distances.
Psalm 107th 23-31st

Page 53
SEA SICKNESS
To prevent or rather to modify sea-sickness, the lot of all new sailors, walk the deck regularly at certain times of the day; and if below you feel the least symptoms, run up on deck forthwith, taking care to fall in with the motions of the ship, and not against it. Should these circumstances occur, no doubt from the habits of some, and the kindness of others, you will be pressed to take a little alcohol-a spoonful - half a spoonful - ever so little- not a drop - remember your pledge - lift up your heart to God to enable you to endure all that is painful and remember moreover, that you are fortified by the opinion of two medical friends, Dr. Lovell and Mr. Mitchell, who told you in the most decided manner, that it tended to create instead of allaying the sickness. They advised you to lie in a horizontal position, and to keep yourself quiet.

Page 56
JOURNAL
Keep a journal, but do not talk about it; neither captain nor passengers like journalling. Accustom yourself to this practice during your stay abroad, & indeed for the rest of your life.

Pge 57
STORM
If on deck in a storm, watch against those mighty waves, which sometimes ride so high as to go over the ship. If you have not time to escape them, throw yourself flat on deck, taking hold of the first thing you can seize that is firm. You will remember my telling you of the narrow escape I had when going out to America when the old cook, caboose, fire, kettle, and all were overturned, and yet mercifully preserved. I had scarcely left him a second when it occurred. Guard against the lurches-these arise when a heavy sea strikes the ship; by one of these your father was thrown out of his berth at night.
Dr. Morrison (see memoirs) was also thrown down in his cabin and severely hurt.

Page 60
DANGER
In danger be cool, think a moment, before you move! Deliberately put on your life preserver, not forgetting to fill it. Then commit yourself to the care of your heavenly Father. If the danger continues, read Paul's shipwreck,
"Acts" and, like him, pray for the whole ship's company, and God will give them to you, and you shall all arrive safe at the desired haven. Farewell my son, - and again farewell; farewell. If we meet not again here, we shall meet in heaven. Let us comfort one another with these words.
Psalm 50th 15th

[Transcriber's Note: This is a computer transcription by Humphrey Edward Waldock, Jan. 2nd, 2000 of 61 pages of a much worn and battered leather-bound note book, 5 and a half inches by 3 inches, hand written in ink. The handwriting is good. Occasionally the speech recognition programme uses Americanisms instead of the very accurate British spelling of the author. There may be a few transcriber's errors also. The author's punctuation has been retained, except for correction of a very few accidental omissions by the author.

The transcriber's father was Sir Claud Humphrey Meredith Waldock, 1904-1981, Son of Frederic William Waldock, 1866-1924, who was son of Frederick David Waldock, 1831-1908 who married in 1860 Maria Carter Meredith, daughter of ?Jms. (James?) Meredith? and grand daughter of ?William S. Meredith? She persuaded her husband, an architect, to become a missionary in Colombo, Ceylon. They had 8 Children.

We have a Book of Common Prayer printed in 1773, marked “Henry Rogers, of Stone House, Petworth, February 23rd, 1776,” (the year of the U.S. Rebellion) and subscribed “?Jms? Meredith, His Book.” It contains inter alia,
* The Act of Uniformity, I Elizabeth (1559);
*A form of prayer with thanksgiving for the 5th of November, Guy Fawkes' day (1605);
*A form of prayer with fasting for the 30th of January, the day of the martyrdom of the blessed King Charles Ist (1640);
*A form of prayer with thanksgiving on 29th of May for the end of the Great Rebellion and the restoration of King Charles II, (1660) to be kept for ever holy;
*A form of prayer and thanksgiving for the reign of King George III. (1761]

MEMOIR OF JOHN MEREDITH, ESQ.

John Meredith, Esq., was born in the county of Hereford, in the year 1784. He was baptized at Woolwich, by the Rev. Mr. Freeman, on Oct. 1, 1811, in the 27th year of his age. Preparatory to his appearing before the church he was examined privately by the minister and deacons. We find the following entry in his diary respecting this interview : - " I proceeded trembling for fear that I should say anything that the blessed Spirit did not warrant me. The Lord was very good ; he enabled me to say much more than I thought I could. God grant it might be according to truth. Oh that I might not deceive myself; Thee I cannot deceive." After relating his experience to the church as a candidate for baptism, he makes the following brief entry : - " Gave in my experience before the church. A great trial, but a great mercy." After partaking of the Lord's Supper for the first time, he thus writes : - " l am joined unto God's church and people. Oh, for Christ's sake, that I may be of the Lord's planting ; and I would humbly pray for his Divine presence whilst here with his church militant ; and that afterwards I may be received to his church triumphant. Amen and amen."

The subject of our memoir first became a member of the church meeting in Lambeth about twenty-five years ago, being dismissed to fellowship here by letter from the Baptist church at Bessel's Green, Kent, August 3, 1834. It is about twenty-three years since our departed friend was first called to fill the office of deacon. He had a clear view of its duties, and a deep sense of the solemn obligations under which he was laid to fulfil them. Hence on retiring to his home that day, he penned in secret the following paragraph : - " To-day, after the ordinance, I was chosen, by ballot, one of three deacons to our little church. If I stand, let me not be content with merely serving tables, which too generally is understood to be all that is required, and means keeping a good table for the minister and the poor ; but seeking to be full of faith and the Holy Ghost, may it be my concern to assist the minister, as Stephen and Philip did the Apostles, viz., in teaching sinners the way to heaven, and the inquirer the way of God more perfectly. There being a large debt (about £600 or £700 on the chapel), and a debt on the expenditure, and the income not meeting the present expenditure, makes it doubtful whether it is my duty to stand, as the time this will occupy will necessarily be a great deduction from the more important work of teaching. Lord, teach me (I am but a child) what thou wouldst have me to do."

He was a devoted labourer in the cause of Christ, and his labours were not in vain in the Lord. Whilst in connection with the church at Woolwich, he became the Superintendent of the Sabbath School there, and must have laboured indefatigably, as he occasionally visited as many as seventy families a day, in inquiring after absentee scholars and in canvassing for new ones. At Bessel's Green, in Kent, he filled the office of superintendent for several years. A boy named Allen was by him invited to the Sabbath School, who became impressed with the need of salvation, and has now for many years been labouring as a useful servant of God in the ministry. In George Street School he also filled the office of superintendent for a time, and acted in the capacity of visitor for the school. During his superintendency a youth received divine impressions, who left the school and entered the army, but the impressions never left him, and though a soldier, he became united to a Christian church. He also superintended the Palace Yard School, Lambeth, for several years.

A large portion of his time was spent in visiting the members at their homes, praying with them and trying to encourage them in the good way. Until within six months of his death he regarded himself as having neglected his duty if he did not call upon at least two or three sick or poor members every day. If a person were seriously ill, he would endeavour to see them at least once every twenty-four hours until a change took place. He was likewise very active and useful by epistolary correspondence.

According to a memorandum in his diary, he divided his correspondents into three general classes under the following heads, viz., 1. Careless ; 2. Inquirers ; 3. Decided; and used to address a letter to each of them on the return of their birthdays, giving counsel and advice as he thought each particular case required. He also enclosed a small book or tract to each of his correspondents.

He regarded a room as incompletely furnished without a copy of the Word of God. Hence, at least, one copy of the Bible was placed in every room in the house ; and should it by any mistake have been removed, he would have lost no time in taking it back to its place, or putting another in its stead. He sometimes called it " the Guard " or "Watchman" of the room.

Mr. Meredith was a man eminent for prayer. His diary contains one of the most remarkable and interesting memorials that, perhaps, was ever left by man ; it is the names of 460 persons for whom he was in the constant habit of making intercessory prayer. It comprehends the names not only of many of the leading ministers of the metropolis, but also the names of eminent ministers, laymen, and missionaries, in Australia, America, India, China, and other portions of the globe. For his own family he made daily special intercession, and his prayers were answered, as many years ago he was permitted to see each one of his sons and daughters united to Christian churches. Surely this is an encouragement for other Christian parents to pray for the conversion of their offspring.

His bodily health had been failing for six years, but more especially had it given way within the last six months. From the nature of the complaint under which he laboured, his sufferings must often have been intense and excruciating, but all was borne with much patience and resignation. On Friday evening, 21st inst., I saw him about nine o'clock. He knew that his departure was at hand. His mind was calm and serene. He rested, with unshaken confidence, for acceptance with God, on the finished work of Jesus. To him death had lost its sting. His last words were, " Come, Lord Jesus." At three the following morning he became unconscious ; and at six o'clock, on the evening of the same day, January 22nd, 1859, his disembodied and triumphant spirit entered, without a struggle or a groan, into its heavenly and eternal rest !

On Friday morning last, his mortal remains were interred in the Norwood Cemetery, amidst a large circle of mourning friends ; and whilst bending over his opened grave, in imagination " I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, Write, blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth. Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours ; and their works do follow them."

Lambeth. L.

The Baptist Magazine 1859 vol. 51 (series 5.- vol. 5) p302-3 (London: Pewtress & Co and J. Heaton & Son)








picture

William Jellie and Johanna Cassidy




Husband William Jellie

         Born: 1823 - circa - Co. Down, Ireland
   Christened: 
         Died: 1877 - circa - Woodford, Victoria
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 1853 - Victoria




Wife Johanna Cassidy

         Born: 1826 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1904 - circa - Warrnambool, Victoria
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Margaret Jellie

         Born: 1856 - Circa - Belfast, Victoria
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Arthur Jukes
         Marr: 1884




picture
Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers




Husband Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Jane Caroline Chalmers

         Born: 1832 - About - Australia
   Christened: 
         Died: 24 May 1917 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Edwin Meredith
         Marr: 16 Dec 1852 - St. George's Church, Hobart, Tasmania




General Notes for Child Jane Caroline Chalmers

Notes: Jane Caroline was the eldest daughter of Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers of Bagdad.

The Mercury, Monday 2 July 1917, Page 1

MEREDITH On May 24, 1917, at her late residence, Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand, Jane Caroline, widow of the late Edwin Meredith, and eldest daughter of the late Captain Chalmers of Sayes Court, Baghdad.
picture

Edwin Meredith and Jane Caroline Chalmers




Husband Edwin Meredith

         Born: 22 Aug 1827 - Swan Port, Tasmania
   Christened: 31 Dec 1829
         Died: 5 Mar 1907 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
       Buried: 


       Father: George H. Meredith
       Mother: Mary Anne Evans


     Marriage: 16 Dec 1852 - St. George's Church, Hobart, Tasmania




Wife Jane Caroline Chalmers

         Born: 1832 - About - Australia
   Christened: 
         Died: 24 May 1917 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
       Buried: 


       Father: Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Edwin Meredith

         Born: 30 Oct 1853 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 19 Jan 1885 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Ada Steuart Johnstone
         Marr: 1877 - Launceston, Tasmania



2 F Mary Meredith

         Born: 1855 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Richard Reibey Meredith

         Born: 4 Feb 1857
   Christened: 
         Died: 1896 - Zeehan, Tasmania
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Theodora Alice Lane
         Marr: 27 Mar 1879 - St. Philip & St. James, Cheltenham, Essex



4 M Clarence Kay Meredith-Kaye

         Born: 28 Nov 1858 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Rosina Maria Kay
         Marr: 26 Feb 1884 - New Zealand



5 F Rosina Meredith

         Born: 1860 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M John Montague Meredith

         Born: 5 Dec 1862 - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Clara Meredith

         Born: 1864 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Robert Heaton Rhodes
         Marr: 21 Dec 1887



8 F Elsie Emmeline Meredith

         Born: 1866 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 F Edith Dry Meredith

         Born: 1868 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James John Mackersey
         Marr: 29 Apr 1890 - Masterton, St. Matthews, New Zealand



10 F Janie Chalmers Meredith

         Born: 1870 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: James Brown Moodie
         Marr: 21 Sep 1909 - New Zealand



11 F Gwendoline Meredyth Meredith

         Born: 1872 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Dr. Henry F. Dawson
         Marr: 12 Dec 1900 - St. Matthews, Masterton, New Zealand



12 F Melita Meredyth Meredith

         Born: 1874 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Hubert Sladden
         Marr: Apr 1906 - Wairarapa, New Zealand



13 F Kathleen Meredyth Meredith

         Born: 1876 - circa - Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Edwin migrated from Tasmania and became a pioneer settler in New Zealand on an estate near Otago, which he named Riversdale.

His obituary in the Wanganui Herald of 5 March 1907, Page 7 reads:

“DEATH OF AN OLD PIONEER. MASTERTON, March 5. An old and respected pioneer resident of Masterton passed away at an early hour this morning at his residence, Upper Plain, in the person of Edwin Meredith, aetat (aged) eighty. He was born in Tasmania, and was a son of an old Peninsula officer. He came to New Zealand 57 years ago, taking up a Crown run of 80,000 acres in Otago. He held land in 1853 in Hawke's Bay, and subsequently settled in Whareama, remaining there for 25 years. He removed in 1879 to Llandaff, on the Upper Plain, Masterton, where he has resided since. At different times he was a member of the Masterton Road Board, Wairarapa North County Council, and the Masterton A. and P. Association. He leaves many descendants.”

A Genealogical and Heraldic
History
of the
Colonial Gentry

By
Sir Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D.
1891

Meredith of Landaff.

MEREDITH, EDWIN, Esq. of Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand, member of the County Council, North Wairarapa, and chairman of the Whareama Road Board, b. 22nd August, 1827, m. 14th December, 1852, Jane Caroline, eldest daughter of Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers, and has issue,

I. Edwin, of Te Nui, New Zealand, b. 30th October, 1853, m. Ada Steuart Johnstone, and has issue,

1. Guy Owen.
2. William Laird.
3. George Steuart.
4. Ada :Matilda.

II. Richard Reibey, b. 4th February, 1857, m. Theodora Alice Lane, and has issue,

1. Owen Glendower.
2. Gwylfa Glendower.

III. Clarence Kay, b. 28th November, 1858; assumed the surname of Kaye in addition to and after that of Meredith; m., 26th February, 1884, his cousin, Rosina Maria, only child of Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S. (who d. at South Yarra, Victoria), by Maria, his wife, eldest daughter of George Meredith, Esq. of Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania, by Mary Evans, his second wife, and has issue,

1. Gladys Maria.

IV. John Montague, b. 5th December, 1862, unm.

I. Mary.
II. Rosina.
III. Clara, m., 21st December, 1887, Robert Heaton Rhodes, Esq.
IV. Elsie Emmeline.
V. Edith Dry.
VI. Janie Chalmers.
VII Gwendoline Meredyth.
VIII. Melita Meredyth.
IX. Kathleen Meredyth.

Lineage

The family of Meredith can trace a descent, through a long line of the princes of South Wales, from Owen Glendower.

John Meredith, Esq. of Temple-street, Birmingham, co. Warwick, England, and afterwards of Castle Bromwich Hall, near Birmingham, solicitor and barrister, m., about 1768, Miss Sally Turner, of Birmingham, and by her (who d. 1819) had issue,

I. John, an eminent solicitor of Birmingham, m. Lucy, sister of Sir Thomas Lawrence, the artist, and had one daughter, Lucy Louisa Ann, m., about 1824, John Aslan, of Birmingham, and has numerous issue.

II. Charles, of Leicester, England, solicitor, coroner, &c., had issue, one daughter, Fanny, deceased.

III. Henry, of Birmingham, gunmaker, had two sons, only one of whom, Henry, attained manhood.

IV. George, of whom presently.

I. Louisa Ann, b. about 1772, m. Thomas Twamley, of Hampstead, near Birmingham, and had one daughter, Louisa Anne, b. in Birmingham, 20th July, 1812 ; m. at Edgbaston, near Birmingham, 18th April, 1839, her cousin, the Hon. Charles Meredith.

II. Anne, d, unm.

One of Mr. Meredith's sisters married a Mr. Linwood, whose daughter Mary was the Miss Linwood whose wonderfully clever and artistic pictures in worsted crewel-work were the admiration of the world in the first quarter of the present century. He d. in 1788. His fourth and youngest son,

George Meredith, Esq. of Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania, b. in 1778, entered the Navy in 1794, and, as lieutenant in the Marines, served in America, the West Indies, and Egypt ; was invalided on full pay in 1805. He formerly resided at Castle Bromwich, and subsequently, on retiring from the Marines, at Newbury, and at Rhyndaston, Pembrokeshire, Wales, from which place he emigrated to Tasmania, arriving at Hobart, 18th March, 1821, in the "Emerald." During his residence in Tasmania, Mr. Meredith experienced many difficulties and dangers, and on one occasion his house was broken into by the noted bushranger Brady. Mr. Meredith m., first, 1805, Sarah Westall Hicks, an heiress, and by her (who d. in 1820 at Rhyndaston) had issue,

I. George, believed to have been murdered by aborigines in Kangaroo Land, about 1832.

II. Charles (Hon.),of Malunnah, Orford; and Hobart, Tasmania. He was for 24 years a member of the House of Assembly, an executive councillor for 23 years, a minister of the Crown in four administrations, a magistrate of the territory 36 years, &c., &c., b. 29th May, 1811, at Poyston, co. Pembroke, Wales; in 1821 emigrated, with his father and family, to Tasmania, which he left for New South Wales in 1833, and took up runs on the Murrumbidgee, Manaroo, and Limestone Plains; visited England in 1838, returned to Sydney the following year, and resided for some little time at the old house, Homebush; subsequently returned to Tasmania, landing in Hobart, October, 1840, and purchased from his father the estate of Spring Vale, was some time resident magistrate for the district of Port Sorell, which office he vacated in 1848, and during the succeeding ten years rented his father's estates and resided in the district of Glamorgan; subsequently, in 1858, removing to his own estates at Prossor's Plains. He was returned a member of the then nominee-elective Council, and took his seat, 17th July, 1855, and 2nd December, 1856, took his seat as the first member for Glamorgan, in the first representative Parliament of Tasmania; shortly afterwards was called upon to accept office as colonial treasurer in the cabinet formed by Mr. Gregson: was next returned for the City of Hobart; again took office as colonial treasurer, which he held until November, 1866; in the new Parliament represented Kingborough until 1871, in which year he was returned for West Devon, for which constituency he sat until his final retirement from Parliament in1879. In 1872-3 he held office as minister of lands and works; in the Reibey ministry of 1876-7 again occupied his former position as colonial treasurer, and immediately after his resignation was appointed police magistrate of Launceston, whither, in June, 1879, he removed from Malunnah, Orford. He m., at Old Edgbaston Church, near Birmingham, 18th April, 1839, his cousin, Louisa Anne, daughter of Thomas Twamley, Esq. of Hampstead, near Birmingham. She was b. in Birmingham, 20th July, 1812, and is the authoress of Notes and Sketches of New South Wales, My Home in Tasmania, Over the Straits, &c., &c., nearly all of which works were illustrated by herself. She has been awarded prize medals in London, Sydney, Melbourne, and Calcutta, for paintings illustrating Australian natural history, and is the only woman holding one of the fifty "Special" silver medals of the Melbourne Exhibition of 1866-7 for ''art and literature combined." This lady was elected honorary member of the Tasmanian Royal Society, "in recognition of services rendered to art and science in Tasmania," and on like grounds enjoys a pension from the Tasmanian Government. Mr. Meredith d. at Launceston, Tasmania, 2nd March, 1880, having had issue,

1. George Campbell, b. 1st July, 1840.

2. Charles, b. 5th .April, 1844, d. 15th September, 1888.

3. Owen, mining engineer, b. 6th April, 1847 ; m. 1st November, 1871, Eliza Jane Winasor, (sic) and has issue, 1, David Owen; 1, Louisa Anne, b. 10th September, 1873; 2, Winifred Eliza; 3. Sabina Ida; 4. Violet; 5. Corinna Ruby.

I. Sarah, m., at Hobart, James B. Poynter, Esq., banker and merchant, and had issue, three sons and one daughter, who reside in the colonics.

II. Louisa, m., at Hobart. Captain John Bell, merchant and shipowner, and has issue, one son, George Meredith, living in Southland, New Zealand, and three daughters, residing in England.

III. Sabina, m., at Hobart, .John Boyes, Esq., merchant, and had issue, five sons (one in the army, one a captain R.N., and another, now deceased, who received the Victoria Cross for gallant conduct at Nagasaki) and four daughters.

Mr. George Meredith m., secondly, 30th October, 1820, Mary Evans, and by her (who d. 21st November, 1842) had issue,

III. Henry, d. unm.

IV. John, m. Maria Hammond, and has five sons and five daughters.

V. Edwin, of whom we treat.

IV. Maria, m., 6th November, 1845, Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S., who entered the Navy, 18th December, 1827; obtained his commission, 6th April, 1839: from the 15th of the following May until his return to England in 1843 was engaged in an exploring expedition to the Antarctic regions in the "Terror," and subsequently became director of H.M. Magnetic Observatory at Hobart Town ; and by him (who d. at South Yarra, Victoria) has issue, a daughter, Rosina Maria, who m., 26th February, 1884, her cousin, Clarence Kaye Meredith- Kaye, Esq., before mentioned, third son of Edwin Meredith, Esq. of Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand, and has issue.

V. Clara, m. Sir Richard Dry, who was a member of the old Legislative Council of Tasmania, afterwards represented Launceston in the House of Assembly, chosen first speaker, and was colonial secretary and premier of Tasmania, from 24th November, 1866, to 1st August, 1869 ; but by him (who d. October, 1869) has no issue.

VI. Fanny, m. Captain F. S. Gaynor, of the 99th Regiment, and has one son and one daughter.

VII. Rosina, m. Captain F. Despard, of the 99th Regiment, and has one daughter.

He died in 1856.

Arms used-Arg., a lion, ramp., sa., gorged with a collar, and chain affixed thereto reflexed over the back or ; with seven quarterings. Crest-A demi lion, ramp., sa., collared and chained as in the arms. Motto-Spes est in Deo.

Residence- Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand.

New Zealand Free Lance, Volume 1, Issue 13, 29 September 1900, Page 18

The patriarch of Upper Plain, the venerable Edwin Meredith, has affected smoked goggles. The effect is stunning, reminds one somehow of an ancient billy goat, taking a sombre look at creation. What sacrilege to poke at the topsawyer of the district. Never mind, blue blood and spectacles can put up with more than that. Nous verrons.

The Courier (Hobart) Saturday 18 December 1852, Page 2

Married
On Tuesday, the 14th inst., at St. George's Church, Hobart Town, by the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Tasmania, Edwin Meredith, Esq., youngest son of G. Meredith, Esq., of Swanport, to Jane Caroline, eldest daughter of Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers, of Baghdad.


General Notes (Wife)

Notes: Jane Caroline was the eldest daughter of Captain Frederick Edmund Chalmers of Bagdad.

The Mercury, Monday 2 July 1917, Page 1

MEREDITH On May 24, 1917, at her late residence, Llandaff, Masterton, New Zealand, Jane Caroline, widow of the late Edwin Meredith, and eldest daughter of the late Captain Chalmers of Sayes Court, Baghdad.


General Notes for Child Edwin Meredith

Evening Post, Issue 15, 19 January 1885, Page 3

Mr. Edwin Meredith, jun, of Riversdale, died today, after a long illness.


General Notes for Child Richard Reibey Meredith

Evening Post, Vol 51, Issue 40, 17 February 1896, Page 2

A Cable message was received this morning from Zeehan, Tasmania, announcing the death of Mr. Richard Meredith, son of Mr. Edwin Meredith, of this district. Deceased was well known and highly respected here.


General Notes for Child Clarence Kay Meredith-Kaye

Clarence Kay Meredith adopted the surname Meredith-Kaye in 1884.

Clarence Kay, b. 28th November, 1858; assumed the surname of Kaye in addition to and after that of Meredith; m., 26th February, 1884, his cousin, Rosina Maria, only child of Captain Joseph Henry Kaye, R.N., F.R.S. (who d. at South Yarra, Victoria), by Maria, his wife, eldest daughter of George Meredith, Esq. of Cambria, Swansea, Tasmania, by Mary Evans, his second wife.


General Notes for Child John Montague Meredith

Died Unmarried.
picture

Brigadier Samuel Craven Chambers




Husband Brigadier Samuel Craven Chambers

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Mary Chambers

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sir Charles Rupert John Wiggin 5th Bart.




General Notes for Child Mary Chambers

Mary was the daughter of Brigadier Samuel Craven Chambers.
picture

Sir Charles Rupert John Wiggin 5th Bart. and Mary Chambers




Husband Sir Charles Rupert John Wiggin 5th Bart.

         Born: 2 Jul 1949
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Sir John Henry Wiggin 4th Bart.
       Mother: Cecilia Evelyn Anson


     Marriage: 




Wife Mary Chambers

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Brigadier Samuel Craven Chambers
       Mother: 





Children
1 M Richard Edward John Wiggin

         Born: 1980
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Cecilia Charlotte Wiggin

         Born: 1984
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

Charles Rupert John succeeded to the baronetcy in 1992 on the death of his father.


General Notes (Wife)

Mary was the daughter of Brigadier Samuel Craven Chambers.
picture

Charles Rogers Cope and Sarah Chance




Husband Charles Rogers Cope

         Born: 1812 - circa
   Christened: 15 Feb 1815 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 1874
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Cope
       Mother: Harriet Rogers


     Marriage: 24 May 1842 - St. Thomas's, Birmingham

 Other Spouse: Sarah Ann Rickards - 16 Jun 1847




Wife Sarah Chance

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Charles Rogers Cope

         Born: 1844 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: 1848
       Buried: 



2 F Harriet Phebe Cope

         Born: 1843 - circa - Harborne, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 1890
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1851 Census:
Birmingham, All Saints
Charles - 38 - Manufacturer - Brassfounder
Sarah Ann - 35 - wife
Harriet Phebe - 7
Florence - 1

1861 Census:
Edgbaston
Charles - 48 - Magistrate and a Brassfounder employing 56 men, 31 boys and 40 females.
Sarah Ann - 47
Florence - 11
Annie Sarah - 2

1871 Census:
Edgbaston
Charles - 58 - Brassfounder
Sarah Ann - 56
Hannah Phebe - 27
Florence - 21
Annie - 12

The Patrician - Page 87
By John Burke, Bernard Burke - Heraldry - 1847:

Cope, Charles Rogers, Esq, of Harbourne, Staffordshire, to Sarah Ann, eldest daughter of the late Edward Rickards, Esq, 16 June.


General Notes for Child Harriet Phebe Cope

Harriet died unmarried.
picture

Charles Fawcett Neville-Rolfe Neville-Rolfe and Martha Holt Chapman




Husband Charles Fawcett Neville-Rolfe Neville-Rolfe

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Martha Holt Chapman

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 F Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe

         Born: 3 Jan 1850 - Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk
   Christened: 
         Died: 11 Oct 1928 - Sedgeford Hall, Norfolk
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Holcombe Ingleby
         Marr: 27 Oct 1886 - Kings Lynn Catholic Church, Norfolk




General Notes for Child Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe

Harriet Jane was a painter and sketcher. She was fourth of the nine children of Charles Fawcett Neville-Rolfe and Martha Holt, née Chapman.

Harriet Jane Neville-Rolfe was a renowned artist and spent some time in Australia. 84 of her watercolours were donated to Queensland Art Gallery by her son Major Clement Ingleby.

picture

Clark and Pamela Jukes




Husband Clark

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 




Wife Pamela Jukes

         Born: 1922 - Circa
   Christened: 
         Died: Living at 2008
       Buried: 


       Father: Frederick Jukes
       Mother: Florence Gladys Boyle




General Notes (Wife)

Born in Swan Hill, in Victoria.
picture

John Sladden and Elizabeth Coleman




Husband John Sladden

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: Feb 1840 - St. Nicholas, Sandwich, Kent




Wife Elizabeth Coleman

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Dilnot Sladden

         Born: 23 Mar 1842 - Ash, Sandwich, Kemt
   Christened: 1 May 1842 - St. Nicholas, Ash, Kent
         Died: 1 Sep 1906 - New Zealand
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Elizabeth Letitia Coster
         Marr: 8 Mar 1866 - St. Mark's, Opawa, New Zealand




picture
Peter Stephens and Esther Cooke




Husband Peter Stephens

         Born: 1819 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: James Stephens
       Mother: 


     Marriage: 1854 - September Quarter - Knighton, Herefordshire




Wife Esther Cooke

         Born: 1827 - circa - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M Peter Cooke Stephens

         Born: 1855 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M John J. Stephens

         Born: 1857 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Samuel S. Stephens

         Born: 1859 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M William E. Stephens

         Born: 1860 - circa - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 F Anna Lavinia Stephens

         Born: 1861 - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 F Esther M. Stephens

         Born: 1864 - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 F Emma Jane Stephens

         Born: 1865 - Lower Harpton, Herefordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



8 M Frank Lawrence Stephens

         Born: 1866 - Presteign, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



9 M Harry S. Stephens

         Born: 1869 - Bucknell, Shropshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



10 M Joseph A. Stephens

         Born: 1871 - circa - Bucknell, Shropshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1841 Census:

Herefordshire
Presteign
Radnor
Lower Harpton
Peter Stephens - 20 - farmer
Ann Stephens - 25
Mary Stephens - 20
James Stephens - 18 - ironmonger's apprentice
Elizabeth Stephens - 15

1851 Census:

Herefordshire
Lower Harpton
Peter Stephens - head - 32 - farmer
Elizabeth Stephens - sister - 27 - farmer's daughter

In 1861 Peter Stephens was a Farmer of 350 acres at Lower Harpton, Herefordshire. He was living at 10 Bridge Street, Leominster in 1881, a retired farmer.

1861 Census:

Herefordshire
Lower Harpton
Peter Stephens - head - 43 - farmer
Esther - wife - 33
Peter C. - son - 5
John J. - son - 4
Sam S. - son - 2
William E. - son - 10 months
Ann - sister - 45

1871 Census:

Shropshire
Bucknell
Peter Stephens - head - 53 - Farmer
Esther - wife - 44
Peter C. - son - 15
John J. - son - 14
William E. - son - 10
Anna L. - daughter - 9
Esther M. - daughter - 7
Emma J. - daughter - 6
Frank L. - son - 4
Harry S. - son - 2
Joseph A. - son - 3 months
Anne S. - sister - 55 - housekeeper

1881 Census:

Herefordshire
Leominster
10 Bridge Street
Peter Stephens - head - 63 - retired farmer
Esther - wife - 54
Peter C. - son - 26 - Unemployed grocer
John J. - son - 25 - unemployed farmer
Anna L. - daughter - 19 - milliner's assistant
Esther M. - daughter - 17
Emma J. - daughter - 15
Frank L. - son - 14
Harry S. - son - 12
Joseph A. - son - 10


General Notes for Child Peter Cooke Stephens

In 1891 Peter Cooke Stephens (aged 34) was a grocer living at 111A Bargates, Leominster in Herefordshire with a brother Frank Lawrence (the gardener) and two of his sisters, Anna Lavinia - aged 25 - (a housekeeper) and Emma Jane - aged 21 - (assisting his other sister).


General Notes for Child John J. Stephens

In 1881 John J. Stephens was a farmer out of employment living with his parents.


General Notes for Child Frank Lawrence Stephens

In 1891 Frank Lawrence Stephens was a Gardener living at 111A Bargates, Leominster with a brother Peter Cooke and two of his sisters, Anna Lavinia and Emma Jane.
picture

Thomas Meredith and Caroline Cooper




Husband Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1802 - Circa
   Christened: 15 Aug 1802 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 1859-1861
       Buried: 


       Father: Thomas Meredith
       Mother: Esther (Hester) Marston


     Marriage: 4 Jun 1844 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford




Wife Caroline Cooper

         Born: 16 Nov 1818 - Bucknell, Shropshire (IGI)
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Edward Cooper
       Mother: Elizabeth





Children
1 M John Meredith

         Born: 1844 - circa
   Christened: 2 Aug 1844 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Thomas Meredith

         Born: 1846 - circa
   Christened: 22 Feb 1846 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



3 M Benjamin Meredith

         Born: 1847 - circa
   Christened: 1 Aug 1847 - Brampton Bryan, Hereford
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 M Richard Cooper Meredith

         Born: 1851 - March Q - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M Caleb Meredith

         Born: 1853 - June Q - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



6 M Aaron Meredith

         Born: 1858 - March Q. - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



7 M Josiah Meredith

         Born: 1859 - June Q. - Knighton, Radnorshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1851 Wales Census - Radnorshire - Boresford and Pedwardine

Thomas (aged 49), farmer of 12 acres, his wife Caroline (nee Cooper - aged 30), their son John (aged 6), Benjamin (aged 3) and Ricard (aged 2 months). They have 1 servant and a small farm of 12 acres in Boresford.

Marriage Certificate:

4 June 1844 - Parish Church at Brampton Bryan - Thomas Meredith and Caroline Cooper, both of Full Age. James - Farmer, Caroline - Servant - both resident at Keven at the time of the marriage - Thomas's father, Thomas Meredith - Caroline is clearly illegitimate and has no father named. Caroline is also illiterate and signed with an 'X'. The witnesses were John Meredith, his brother and Ann Cooper (also illiterate) presumably Caroline's sister.


General Notes (Wife)

Caroline was recorded at the 1851 census but she was reported as a widow on later census returns.

1861 Census:

Households: (1) Caroline Meredith [nee Cooper, widow of Thomas] with sons Richard, Caleb, Aaron, and Josiah. She is a laundress living in Boresford.

picture

Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin 2nd Bart. and Annie Sarah Cope




Husband Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin 2nd Bart.

         Born: 3 May 1852 - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
   Christened: 11 Jun 1852 - St. Mark's, Birmingham
         Died: 2 May 1917
       Buried: 


       Father: Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin 1st Bart.
       Mother: Mary Elizabeth Malins


     Marriage: 1878 - Kings Norton, Staffordshire




Wife Annie Sarah Cope

         Born: 1858 - circa - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Rogers Cope
       Mother: Sarah Ann Rickards





Children
1 F Margaret Annie Wiggin

         Born: 1879 - circa - Harbonne, Staffordshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 F Ellinor Mary Wiggin

         Born: 1882 - circa
   Christened: 
         Died: Jan 1974
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sir Thomas Anderton Salt
         Marr: 1905



3 M Sir - Captain Charles Richard Henry Wiggin 3rd Bart

         Born: 21 Mar 1885
   Christened: 
         Died: 16 Sep 1972
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Mabel Violet Mary Jaffray
         Marr: 24 Jul 1916




General Notes (Husband)

Henry's father had built up a nickel and cobalt refining business and became an MP and then was made a Baronet on retiring from politics. Henry Arthur succeeded to the baronetcy on his father's death. Annie Sarah and Henry's descendants then predictably married into the same circles of baronets and senior military folk. Two of the Wiggin descendants from a brother of Henry are currently Conservative MPs in the current parliament.

1881 Census:

Staffordshire
Harborne
The Park House & The Lea
Henry - 28 - Nickel Refiner & J.P.
Annie S. - 22 - Wife
Margaret - 1

1901 Census:

Staffordshire
Eccleshall
Walton Hall
Henry A. Wiggin - Head - 48
Annie S. - wife - 42
Margaret - daughter - 21
Eleanor M. - daughter - 19


Wiggin, Sir Henry Arthur

2nd Baronet - created 1892
Born 3 May 1852; son of Sir Henry Samuel Wiggin, 1st Baronet and Mary, daughter of David Malins, Edgbaston, Birmingham; married 1878, Annie Sarah, Daughter of C.R. Cope of Kinnerton Court, Radnors: one son and two daughters; died 2 May 1917 JP, DL
Succession: S father, 1905
Career: High Sheriff, Co, Stafford, 1896
Heir: Son Charles Richard Henry Wiggin, Captain Staffordshire Yeomanry (born 21 March 1885; Married 1916, Mabel Violet Mary, daughter of late Sir William Jaffray, 2nd baronet. Eton; Trinity College, Cambridge; BA 1906)
Clubs: Reform, Union
Address: Walton Hall, Eccleshall
Wiggin, Sir Henry Arthur, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920-2007 - Oxford University Press


General Notes for Child Ellinor Mary Wiggin

The Times, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1974; pg. 16; Issue 58988; col G

Obituary

Lady Salt, widow of Lieutenant Colonel Sir Thomas Anderon Salt, the second baronet, has died at the age of 91. She was Elinor Mary, younger daughter of Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin, the second baronet, and she was married in 1905. Her husband died in 1940.


General Notes for Child Sir - Captain Charles Richard Henry Wiggin 3rd Bart

Charles Richard Henry was Captain of the Staffordshire Yeomanry. He succeeded as 3rd Baronet in 1917 on the death of his father.
picture

Charles Cope and Harriet Rogers




Husband Charles Cope

         Born: 1780 - circa
   Christened: 4 Apr 1780 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Cope
       Mother: Phoebe Meredith


     Marriage: 22 Jul 1806 - Kington, Herefordshire




Wife Harriet Rogers

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children
1 M John Stephens Cope

         Born: 1811 - circa
   Christened: 3 Jan 1811 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



2 M Charles Rogers Cope

         Born: 1812 - circa
   Christened: 15 Feb 1815 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 1874
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sarah Ann Rickards
         Marr: 16 Jun 1847
       Spouse: Sarah Chance
         Marr: 24 May 1842 - St. Thomas's, Birmingham



3 F Harriet Cope

         Born: 1815 - circa
   Christened: 15 Feb 1815 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Louisa Cope

         Born: 1817 - circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 19 Aug 1830 - Bedstone, Shropshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



5 M William Rogers Cope

         Born: 1816 - circa
   Christened: 23 Apr 1818 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 1889 - London, England
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Matilda Walker
         Marr: 16 Jun 1842 - Kington, Herefordshire



6 M Edward Meredith Cope

         Born: 28 Jul 1818 - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 23 Nov 1831 - Ludlow, Shropshire
         Died: 4 Aug 1873 - Ticehurst, Sussex
       Buried: 14 Aug 1873 - Birmingham




General Notes for Child Charles Rogers Cope

1851 Census:
Birmingham, All Saints
Charles - 38 - Manufacturer - Brassfounder
Sarah Ann - 35 - wife
Harriet Phebe - 7
Florence - 1

1861 Census:
Edgbaston
Charles - 48 - Magistrate and a Brassfounder employing 56 men, 31 boys and 40 females.
Sarah Ann - 47
Florence - 11
Annie Sarah - 2

1871 Census:
Edgbaston
Charles - 58 - Brassfounder
Sarah Ann - 56
Hannah Phebe - 27
Florence - 21
Annie - 12

The Patrician - Page 87
By John Burke, Bernard Burke - Heraldry - 1847:

Cope, Charles Rogers, Esq, of Harbourne, Staffordshire, to Sarah Ann, eldest daughter of the late Edward Rickards, Esq, 16 June.


General Notes for Child William Rogers Cope

At the time of his marriage William was described as a solicitor. In 1848 the Morning Chronicle announced the dissolution of the partnership of Clement Ingleby, George Paulson Wragge and William Rogers Cope, of Birmingham, attorneys. In the 1861 and 1871 censuses he was described as the Vicar of Hartshill.

The Morning Chronicle (London) Wednesday, January 5, 1848; Issue 24400

Parnership Dissolved

Clement Ingleby, George Paulson Wragge and William Rogers Cope, of Birmingham, Attorneys.

The Bristol Mercury, Saturday, June 25, 1842; Issue 2728

Wm. Rogers Cope, Esq., solicitor, of Birminham, to Matilda, 4th daughter of Edward Walker, Esq., Surgeon, Kington

1861 Census:

Warwickshire
Mancetter
William Rogers Cope - 45 - Incumbant of Hartshill
Matilda - wife - 47

1871 Census:

Warwickshire
Hartshill
Vicarage House
William Rogers Cope - 55 - Vicar of Hartshill
Matilda - wife - 57


General Notes for Child Edward Meredith Cope

Edward was a classical scholar who entered Trinity College Cambridge in 1837 and graduated BA in 1841 and MA in 1844. He was elected a Fellow of Trinity College in 1842 and became a tutor and lecturer in Greek in 1845. He was ordained deacon in 1848 and priest in 1850.
His most important works were on Aristotle’s Rhetoric. He was unsuccessful in his candidature for the professorship of Greek at Cambridge and retired in 1869 suffering from acute mental illness. He died unmarried.

Cope, Edward Meredith (1818–1873), classical scholar, was born on 28 July 1818 in Birmingham. He first went to school in Ludlow, but then moved to Shrewsbury, where his headmasters were Samuel Butler and B. H. Kennedy. Cope entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1837. He was elected a scholar in 1839 and won the Porson prize in the same year. He graduated BA (first classic) in 1841 and MA in 1844. In 1842 he was elected a fellow of Trinity, becoming a tutor and lecturer in Greek in 1845. He was a proctor in 1859. He was ordained deacon in 1848 and priest in 1850, but although he regularly assisted various Cambridge contemporaries with their parish duties, he found the work of the educational clergy more congenial than that of the parochial.

At Trinity, Cope was a conscientious and respected lecturer. His main subjects were the Greek tragedians, historians, and orators, although in later years he lectured regularly on Plato and Aristotle. His learning and industry were notable, but, as he confessed to friends, he found it impossible to rewrite material once he had made up his mind on a topic, and this led to a certain diffuseness and lack of clarity in his
work.

In the vacations Cope was an indefatigable traveller with an excellent knowledge of European languages. He regularly spent the summer walking in the Alps, and kept extensive and detailed vacation journals which remain unpublished.

In 1854 and 1855 Cope contributed articles to the first two volumes of the Journal of Philology criticizing Grote's views on the sophists in his History of Greece. Notes and corrections by Cope were included by Grote in a later volume. In 1864 he published a literal translation of Plato's Gorgias, and a similar version of the Phaedo was edited after his death by H. Jackson.

Cope's most important works were on Aristotle's Rhetoric. He published an introduction in 1867, and an edition with an extensive commentary was completed by J. E. Sandys and published in 1877. This edition is unusual for its time in the detail of its explanatory notes, which include frequent translations. Cope carefully relates the ideas of the Rhetoric to other passages in Aristotle and to later writers on
the subject, from whom he quotes extensively. His work remains one of the chief sources of information on ancient rhetoric after more than a century.

In 1867 Cope was a candidate for the professorship of Greek at Cambridge; the votes of the electors were divided and as the vice-chancellor and the master of Trinity, on whom the election then devolved, differed, the appointment lapsed to the chancellor, who gave the chair to B. H. Kennedy. There is no doubt that his disappointment on this occasion preyed on Cope's mind, and was one of the causes of the acute mental illness which led to his retirement in 1869. His mind gave way and he died, unmarried, at Ticehurst, Sussex, on 4 August 1873, and was buried on 14 August in Birmingham.
picture

Charles Rogers Cope and Sarah Ann Rickards




Husband Charles Rogers Cope

         Born: 1812 - circa
   Christened: 15 Feb 1815 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 1874
       Buried: 


       Father: Charles Cope
       Mother: Harriet Rogers


     Marriage: 16 Jun 1847

 Other Spouse: Sarah Chance - 24 May 1842 - St. Thomas's, Birmingham




Wife Sarah Ann Rickards

         Born: 1815 - circa - Sheerness, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Jan 1893 - Holly Cottage, Somerset Road, Edgbaston
       Buried: 


       Father: Edward Rickards
       Mother: 





Children
1 F Annie Sarah Cope

         Born: 1858 - circa - Edgbaston, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Sir Henry Arthur Wiggin 2nd Bart.
         Marr: 1878 - Kings Norton, Staffordshire



2 F Florence Cope

         Born: 1850 - circa - Birmingham, Warwickshire
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

1851 Census:
Birmingham, All Saints
Charles - 38 - Manufacturer - Brassfounder
Sarah Ann - 35 - wife
Harriet Phebe - 7
Florence - 1

1861 Census:
Edgbaston
Charles - 48 - Magistrate and a Brassfounder employing 56 men, 31 boys and 40 females.
Sarah Ann - 47
Florence - 11
Annie Sarah - 2

1871 Census:
Edgbaston
Charles - 58 - Brassfounder
Sarah Ann - 56
Hannah Phebe - 27
Florence - 21
Annie - 12

The Patrician - Page 87
By John Burke, Bernard Burke - Heraldry - 1847:

Cope, Charles Rogers, Esq, of Harbourne, Staffordshire, to Sarah Ann, eldest daughter of the late Edward Rickards, Esq, 16 June.


General Notes (Wife)

Sarah was the eldest daughter of Edward Rickards.


General Notes for Child Florence Cope

Florence was unmarried in 1901 and living in Holly Cottage, Somerset Road, Edgbaston.
picture

John Cope and Phoebe Meredith




Husband John Cope

         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
     Marriage: 18 Feb 1770 - St. Philip's, Birmingham, Warwickshire




Wife Phoebe Meredith

         Born: 1740 - Circa
   Christened: 15 Oct 1740 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 


       Father: John Meredith
       Mother: Elizabeth





Children
1 M John Cope

         Born: 1772 - circa
   Christened: 1772
         Died: 1849 - circa
       Buried: 



2 M Charles Cope

         Born: 1780 - circa
   Christened: 4 Apr 1780 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 
       Spouse: Harriet Rogers
         Marr: 22 Jul 1806 - Kington, Herefordshire



3 M James Cope

         Born: 1776 - Circa
   Christened: 23 Feb 1776 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 



4 F Phebe Cope

         Born: 1774 - circa
   Christened: 24 Feb 1774 - St. Philips, Birmingham, Warwickshire
         Died: 
       Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

John Cope was the sole executor of John Meredith's Will which was proven in 1790. He was described as his brother in law.

John was described as a Timber Merchant of Birmingham in the Will of his mother-in-law Elizabeth Meredith.


General Notes for Child John Cope

Christened in 1772. Born ca 1772. John died ca 1849.

In John’s Will dated 14 Sep 1839, which describes him as John Cope of Summerhill Birmingham Gentleman, he made the following bequests:

- Thomas Pemberton of Birmingham Brassfounder, Henry Meredith of Birmingham Gunmaker, nephews Charles Rogers Cope and William Rogers Cope £1000 each, and they were appointed Executors.

- his Godchild and niece Louisa Cope (favourite of his late brother Charles Cope) and 3 other Godchildren Felicia Clarke, Henry Meredith the younger (son of the above named) and Robert Forrest £100 each.

- the Governors of the General Hospital in Birmingham £100.

- the Governors of the Blue Coat Charity School in Birmingham £100.

- the Governors of the Birmingham Dispensary £100.

- the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge £100.

- the Incorporated Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts £100.

- his female servants 19 guineas each to buy mourning and 1 years wages each.

- his nephew Charles Rogers Cope his freehold property in Summer Hill Birmingham.

- Sarah the wife of William Henry Gem of Birmingham Solicitor the interest on £1000 held in trust by the exeecutors and to her children thereafter.

- nephews Charles Rogers Cope, William Rogers Cope, Edward Meredith Cope and niece Louisa Cope the residue in equal parts (with the value of the property left to Charles Rogers Cope considered as part of his portion).

In a Codicil dated 21 Jan 1848 to the above Will he revoked the bequest of £100 to Henry Meredith the younger on the grounds that he has lost a considerable sum of money owed him by Henry. He added a bequest of an annuity of £10 to Jane Meredith mother of Henry the younger and widow of his old friend Henry Meredith and in fulfilment of a promise to her nephew John Aston. He also added a bequest of £100 to his nephew Edward Meredith Cope.

The Will and Codicil were proved on 7 Dec 1849.


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