Birth: 17 May 1768

Place or Registered Place of Birth: Plas-Newydd, Anglesey, Wales

Baptism: 12 June 1768

Place of Baptism: St. George's, Hanover Square, Middlesex

Death: 29 April 1854

Place or Registered Place of Death: Uxbridge House, Old Burlington St., London, Middlesex\

Date of Burial: 6 May 1854

Place of Burial: St. Paul's Cathedral, London

Father: Henry Bayly Paget

Mother: Jane Champagné

Spouse(s):

1. Caroline Elizabeth Villiers

2. Charlotte Cadogan

Date of Marriage:

1. 25 July 1795

2. 15 November 1810

Place or Registered Place of Marriage:

1. Grosvenor Square, Mayfair, London, Middlesex

2. Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland

Children:

Marriage to Caroline Elizabeth Villiers:

Caroline Paget (1796-1874)
Henry Paget (1797-1869)
Jane Paget (1798-1896)
Georgiana Paget (1800-1875)
Augusta Paget (1802-1872)
William Paget (1803-1873)
Agnes Paget (1804-1845)
Arthur Paget (1805-1825)

Marriage to Charlotte Cadogan:

Emily Caroline Paget (1810-1893)
Clarence Edward Paget (1811-1895)
Mary Paget (1812-1859)
Alfred Paget (1815-1815)
Alfred Henry Paget (1816-1888)
George Augustus Frederick Paget (1818-1880)
Adelaide Georgina Paget (1820-1890)
Albert Augustus William Paget (1821-1822)
Albert Arthur Paget (1823-)
Eleanor Paget (1825-1825)

Notes:

2nd Earl of Uxbridge and Marquess of Anglesey. General of the 7th Hussars and commander of cavalry in the Battle of Waterloo. His distinguished military career was slightly hindered by the fact that he had eloped with Wellington's sister-in-law. Whilst observing the battle at Waterloo with the Duke he was hit by a cannonball and fell off his horse, The following immortal dialogue was then said to have taken place: Uxbridge: 'By Jove, sir, I have lost a leg' Wellington: 'By Jove, sir, so you have!'

The Annual Register, Volume 37 - 1795
July
25. Lord Paget, to Lady C. Villiers, daughter of the Earl of Jersey.

Oxford University Alumni
Paget, Henry William, s. Henry, Earl of Uxbridge. Christ Church, matric. 14 October, 1784, aged 16; created M.A. 28 June 1786, 2nd Earl of Uxbridge, K.G. 1818, G.C.B. 1815, G.C.H. 1816, etc.. created Marquis of Anglesey 4 July, 1815, field-marshal 1846, wounded at Waterloo, M.P. Carnarvon 1790, Milbourne Port 1796-1804, 1806-10, lord-lieutenant of Ireland 1828-9, 1830-3, goldstick & colonel royal horse guards 1842, died 29 April, 1854.

The only blot upon his 'scutcheon was his conduct to his first wife. Lady Caroline Villiers, daughter of the 4th Earl of Jersey, whom he married in 1795. Though a beautiful and blameless woman, their union ultimately proved most unhappy, her husband's own family admitted that he treated her very badly, and in 1810 she was driven to obtain a divorce. Lord Paget then married Lady Charlotte Wellesley, and Lady Paget afterwards gave her hand to the Duke of Argyll, Gronow's Reminiscences recording her as still "lovely" after her second marriage.

Field Marshal Sir Henry William Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey was born on 17 May 1768 at London, England. He was the son of Sir Henry Paget, 1st Earl of Uxbridge and Jane Champagné. He was baptised on 12 June 1768 at St. George's Church, St. George Street, Hanover Square, London, England. He married, firstly, Lady Caroline Elizabeth Villiers, daughter of George Bussy Villiers, 4th Earl of the Island of Jersey and Frances Twysden, on 25 July 1795 at Grosvenor Square, Mayfair, London, England. He and Lady Caroline Elizabeth Villiers were divorced in 1810 in the Scots Courts, at her suit. He married, secondly, Lady Charlotte Cadogan, daughter of Charles Sloane Cadogan, 1st Earl Cadogan and Mary Churchill, in 1810. He died on 29 April 1854 at age 85 at Uxbridge House, Old Burlington Street, London, England. He was buried on 6 May 1854. His will was probated in July 1854.

Field Marshal Sir Henry William Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey was educated at Westminster School, Westminster, London, England. He graduated from Christ Church College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, on 28 June 1786 with a Master of Arts (M.A.). In 1790 he raised a regiment (the 80th Foot, or Staffordshire Volunteers) from his father's tenancy. He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for the Carnarvon boroughs between 1790 and 1796. He gained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in 1795 in the service of the 16th Light Dragoons. He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for Milborne Port between 1796 and 1804. He gained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in 1797 in the service of the 7th Light Dragoons. He was Colonel of the 7th Light Dragoons between 1801 and 1842. He gained the rank of Major-General in 1802. He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for Milborne Port between 1806 and 1810. He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General in 1808. He fought in the Battle of Corunna on 16 January 1809, where he commanded the cavalry under Sir John Moore. He had seduced Charlotte, then the mother of four children, and a verdict against him of £24,000, a duel between him and her brother, Captain Cadogan, and two divorces, were the results of this misconduct. He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Anglesey between 1812 and 1854. He succeeded to the title of 4th Baronet Bayly, of Placenewyd, co. Anglesey and Mount Bagenall, co. Louth [I., 1730] on 13 March 1812. He succeeded to the title of 10th Lord Paget, of Beaudesert [E., 1549] on 13 March 1812. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Uxbridge, co. Middlesex [G.B., 1784] on 13 March 1812. He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Order of the Bath (G.C.B.) on 2 January 1815. He fought in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815, where he commanded the Anglo-Belgian cavalry, contributing greatly to the Allied success, although he was wounded and lost a leg. He was created 1st Marquess of Anglesey [U.K.] on 4 July 1815. He was invested as a Knight, Order of St. George of Russia on 21 August 1815. He was invested as a Knight, Order of Maria Theresa of Austria (K.M.T.) on 21 August 1815. He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Hanoverian Order (G.C.H.) in 1816. He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 19 February 1818. He gained the rank of General in 1819. He held the office of Lord High Steward [England] in 1821, at the coronation of King George IV. He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) in 1827. He held the office of Master General of the Ordnance between 1827 and 1828. He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland between 1828 and 1829, although the Tory Government did not approve of his conduct, and recalled him. He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland between 1830 and 1833, after going over to the Whigs. He was decorated with the award of Gold Stick in 1842. He was Colonel of the Royal Horse Guards between 1842 and 1854. He gained the rank of Field Marshal in 1846. He held the office of Master General of the Ordnance between 1846 and 1852.He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Staffordshire between 1849 and 1854. According to Gibbs, he was a brilliant and gallant cavalry officer, but neither a wise nor a virtuous man. He was very popular in Ireland during his first, and very unpopular in his second vice-royalty.

The eldest son, Lord Paget, afterwards the famous Waterloo Marquess of Anglesey, was born in 1768; he was educated at Winchester and Christ Church, Oxford, and entered the army. He is considered to have been the most brilliant British cavalry officer of his time. The following incident, which is narrated in Wellington's Lieutenants, speaks for his quickness and dashing courage in an emergency. It was in Holland during the war of 1799, and he was highly praised in the despatches. Night was falling; the fighting was over, as all believed. The men were unsaddling on the sands and were preparing to bivouac. Suddenly two squadrons of chasseurs dashed down the sand upon the Horse Artillery. Lord Paget was chatting with Sir R. Wilson and other officers; they instantly sprang to horse, were joined by some non-com, officers, and together plunged furiously into the thick of the chasseurs. This gave their squadrons time to rally and remount, and the chasseurs, almost to a man, were sabred or taken.

On another occasion, in one of the fights for the possession of batteries, Paget with a single squadron made a desperate charge on a strong body of the enemy, and, riding right through them, not only recaptured several British guns, but took five pieces from the enemy .

In the long and perilous retreat of Sir John Moore to Corunna, Lord Paget was in command of the cavalry, and covered himself and his troops with glory by the masterly and courageous manner in which he covered the retreat.

Henry, first Marquis of Anglesey, left his wife and eight children to elope adulterously in 1808 with Lady Charlotte Wellesley, sister-in-law to the Duke of Wellington. The ensuing scandal was enormous. Both Henry's and Charlotte's marriages were terminated by divorce, leaving the couple free to marry each other, but Paget was first forced by a court to pay £24,000 in damages to Henry Wellesley, Charlotte's husband, and fight a duel with Charlotte's brother, Captain Cadogan. Caroline, Henry Paget's divorced wife, then married her adulterous lover the Duke of Argyll.

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1841 Census:

Old Burlington Streeet, St. James. Westminster
Henry Paget - 73 - 1768
Charlotte Paget - 59
Clarence Paget - 29
Alfred Paget - 25
Adelaide Paget - 21
Henry Paget - 19
George Paget - 23

Field Marshal Sir Henry William Paget
1st Marquess of Anglesey